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Your Source for Best Business Practices From the Trenches

NOVEMBER 2012

REVIEW Are You Guilty of Distraction? Take the test

Q&A With Dave

Score a Touchdown Every Day Hiring lessons from the NFL


Review Preview Your Source for Best Business Practices From the Trenches

Welcome to our November issue. As I write this column, we’ve just finished another incredible EntreLeadership Master Series in Orlando, Florida . Each time I go to one of these events, I ’m always surprised at how recharged I get. I literally live the concepts every day at work, but when I hear Dave or other members of the EntreLeadership team speak, I learn something new. But that ’s just the start. What really fires me up is the change I see in our attendees. EntreLeadership Master Series gives them the tools to hope and dream again. They no longer have to be overwhelmed or lost. It ’s pretty powerful stuff, and it ’s something I’ll never get tired of witnessing. EntreLeadership Master Series is not the only tool for business owners though. We have a multitude of channels for you to get plugged into, including this EntreLeadership Review. So take a few minutes, sit back, and learn how to grow yourself, your team and your profits while having a lot of fun along the way. Enjoy, and have a happy, happy Thanksgiving.

Daniel Tardy, Vice President, EntreLeadership

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EntreLeadership Review


Table of Contents 4

Celebrating One Million Downloads How the EntreLeadership team found a better way to serve

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Show, Cast and Know Building great company culture

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Q&A With Dave The ultimate EntreLeader answers your questions

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Are You Guilty of Distraction? Take this quick test to find out

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Meet Ryan Weissmueller Arizona-based CFO shares his best leadership advice

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Getting the Job Done How to delegate to your team

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Passing It On Don’t allow a spirit of fear to drive you

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How to Launch Your Dream and Avoid a Nightmare Ensure not only your independence but also success

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Hiring Lessons From the NFL How to attract more talent

For more tools to grow your people, profits and personal development, check out our website.

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Celebrating One Million Downloads How the EntreLeadership team found a better way to serve

It has been said that one small idea can change the world. And when the EntreLeadership team came up with one nearly two years ago, it was a doozie. Recently, the concept started by just a handful of Dave’s team members reached a major milestone. The EntreLeadership Podcast has officially been downloaded more than 1 million times and has been heard everywhere from Albuquerque to Zaire. Since its debut, it has remained iTunes’ number-one podcast on leadership.

A Unique Way to Serve Not bad for something that was designed as a simple communication tool that might, best case, reach a couple thousand people. After creating EntreLeadership Master Series, the team was looking for a way to better serve those who had attended. The best way to deliver it, they decided, was the podcast. “ We were traveling all over the country at EntreLeadership events,” says podcast producer

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Chris Mefford. “ Everywhere we went, people were asking us how they could get more of this stuff.”

• You r p e rs on a l va lue s ne e d to m a tc h yo u r c o m p a ny ’s core values.

From the beginning, the vision for the podcast was to offer something small-business owners couldn’t get anywhere else, starting with a business lesson taught by Dave, followed by a guest interviewed by host Chris LoCurto.

—Patrick Lencioni

“ I think this is what makes our podcast so powerful,” Mefford says. “ It continues to reinforce the success of the principles Dave teaches at EntreLeadership. You hear from Dave and think, I can’t do this—Dave’s special. He got lucky. But when you hear from another business leader basically saying the same thing , you start thinking, Maybe I could do this. Maybe it’s worthwhile. Maybe they are on to something.”

Big-Name Guests Impart Wisdom Once the idea was born, it was time to get the guests. And get them they did. The podcast guest list is a veritable who’s who of business and leadership. Tony Hseih of Zappos, NFL coach Tony Dungy, Stephen M.R. Covey, Jim Collins, Patrick Lencioni and Simon Sinek are just a few who have joined the podcast, along with Dave. For LoCurto, Mefford and assistant producer Becky Powell, each guest has brought what LoCurto describes as little nuggets of wisdom that blew them away. They have been so powerful, the team says, they’ve kept a list. A few of their favorites include:

• Be intentional with your life. Do not live improvisational. You can’t just wing it. —Clint Smith, CEO, EMMA • It’s okay to make mistakes. You just need to make new ones, not the same ones. —Tim Sanders • As a business owner or leader, there are three things you need to do: Learn more from books, get involved with your peers to help you set stretch goals for yourself, and give back to your community. —Cordia Harrington, CEO, Tennessee Bun Company • No high achiever ever woke up in the morning and said, “Let’s see what happens.” —Dan Miller • Arrogance that leads to success will always eventually lead to failure. —Jim Collins Now that they have one year under their belts, the podcast team, which also includes audio engineer Collin Fatke , looks for wa rd to bi g ger and better podcasts with even more interaction from their listeners. They truly feel like they are playing their own small part in changing the world, and they can’t wait to find out who will join them on their quest.

EntreLeadership Review


Show, Cast and Know Building great company culture expect praise, praise. When you would expect grace, give grace. When you would expect a reprimand, give it promptly and privately, because that is what you would want. Someone on Dave’s team played an important role in landing a $1. 2 million deal. It was outside of this team member’s area, so Dave didn’t have to pay him a commission. He did anyway. Why? Dave follows the Golden Rule—plus he wanted him to do it again!

Cast Your Vision I n a per fe ct world , you r tea m would be the cream of the crop: high-performing go-getters who are loyal, creative and passionate about their jobs. But life’s not perfect, right? Well actually, in this case, it is. You can attract rock-star staffers without paying Microsoft-size salaries, and it all begins by intentionally building a great company culture where people want to work . Just like Rome, though, an awesome workplace can’t be built in a day. But you can get started by following these easy-to-execute tips.

Show Them You Care The best way to begin is by implementing one of the most powerful but simplest of policies—the Golden Rule. “Do to others as you would have them do to you.” (Luke 6:31) It ’s one of the core principles of Dave’s company, and it is practiced by every person on his team. Simply put yourself in their shoes and then act the way you want to be treated. When you would

How can you fire up your team and keep them inspired? Repeatedly let them know what they are working toward. Share your vision with them early and as often as possible. In fact, Dave says it is impossible to talk about your vision too much. “ When you cast a big vision, the team sees what part they play, and you are pulling people into goals instead of pushing them,” he says.

Let Them Know They Matter Everyone yearns to be appreciated, and that includes your team members. They want to know they matter. A nd one of the easiest ways to show how much you value them is by recognizing them. Make a habit of catching people doing something right and letting them know about it.

year’s worth of goodwill . How about a $50 handshake or simply recognizing them in front of their peers? The value is immeasurable. But don’t stop there. Let others know about them too. It raises your team up and shows them they are valued.

“When you cast a big vision, the team sees what part they play, and you are pulling people into goals instead of pushing them.”

The above tips are just a few simple ideas to get you started. They are the first steps to taking your business and your team to the next level. As you build a better and better culture, people will line up to join your team, and customers will be right behind them. Everyone is happy, and leadership becomes what it is supposed to be—satisfying and fun.

It can be simple as a smile and a nod . Many leaders at Dave’s office write notes to their team members. The few minutes they take to pen the letters equal a

For more tools to grow your people, profits and personal development, check out our website.

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Q&A With Dave The ultimate EntreLeader answers your questions

For small-business owners everywhere, his story is one of hope. Flat broke with two kids to feed and a marria ge hanging on by a thread, Dave Ramsey picked himself up and started over. And what began on a card table in his living room just two decades ago has turned into a national brand that has helped millions achieve financial peace. Dave now employs more than 300 team members, and his radio show remains one of the highest rated in the country.

producer Chris Mefford, assistant producer Becky Powell and audio engineer Collin Fatke for a special show in which he answered questions sent in from listeners. Here’s a sampling of Dave’s conversation with Chris.

Dave and his team are celebrating another major accomplishment that ’s brought a ton of hope and a ton of help to small-business owners and leaders everywhere. The EntreLeadership Podcast, which was created last year, has officially hit the one-million-download mark! Since its debut, it has remained iTunes’ number- one podcast on leadership.

Dave: There are actually people

To m a rk t h i s m i le stone , D ave joined podcast host Christ LoCurto,

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Dima: How do I keep our bookkeeper, who has been here for seven years doing the same job over and over, from being restless? out there who thrive on details, and your bookkeeper is probably one of them. They get a little bit of a high when the key accounts balance. They’re just wired that way. Now me, personally, I’m not that way. But I have plenty of people on our team who are, so I never really struggle with trying to keep them interested or engaged. If your bookkeeper is continually restless, you may have someone in the wrong seat on the bus.

Nancy: What do I do with a key team member who’s extremely negative? She’s our top sales rep and she’s bringing in the most money, but she’s frequently the Debbie Downer in the building—a finger-pointing, nonteam-player personality. Should I work with her to change her attitude?

“There are actually people out there who thrive on details.”

Dave: The way we handle this kind of situation is sit down with them and have a very clear conversation. I discovered that I was

EntreLeadership Review


too nice sometimes. I wasn’t being extremely direct or clear as to what ’s going on and the conse quences of their actions. I was setting them up to fail . So you need to be very clear with Debbie Downer. You need to say something like this: “I really value you and I think you’re a great sales person, but the attitude and negativity that you’re throwing around this place far outweigh your sales. So here’s the deal: You can stay, but the attitude has to go. Today. You need to come in with a smile on your face. If you’ve got a problem, you need to cover it with me behind closed doors. Running around the office bringing everybody down does not offset the fact you’re a superstar sales person. I will still fire you.” And then, the first time they say boo, you pull them in the office and give them that last warning: “Do it again, and you’ll be cleaning out your desk.” Now I’m a little bit nicer than that, but I want you folks out there to be very clear. If I’m on the other side, I want to know I ’m hanging off the edge of a cliff. I don’t want to think I’m standing in the meadow and everything is good, and then all of a sudden the train hits me. If you tell me, then I have a chance to change my attitude.

Jeff: What’s your opinion on outside investors? Is taking investment money equal to taking on debt?

Dave: It’s probably worse, because you’re now giving up ownership. You can never pay off your stocks. I found in years past that when I’m tempted to look at angel investors, it’s time to slow down. A lot of business owners think if they’re not growing at astronomical rates, they’re not successful. When it comes to business, just staying open makes you successful. You don’t have to go from $500,000 in gross revenue to $50 million in 20 minutes. Grow slowly. Remember, the tortoise wins the race every time.

“A lot of business owners think if they’re not growing at astronomical rates, they’re not successful. When it comes to business, just staying open makes you successful.”

John: I’m starting a business. What are some steps I can take to determine the best initial fees for my services? Dave: Study other people in your

Buffalo, New York, with Nashville, Tennessee, even though they’re similar in size. But I might compare Buffalo with Cleveland, Ohio, or Nashville with Austin, Texas. Once you have your information, just experiment with your pricing by starting slightly lower. After you have some business on the books, start raising your fees.

Eric: How do you balance between hustle and burnout? Dave: If you work 80 hours a week for 10 years, no matter what you’re doing, you’re going to hit a wall . Your health is going to catch up with you , and you’re going to lose your relationships. There will be burnout. But an 80-hour week to get something off the ground is fine. I tell folks around here all of the time that we work from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. And we try to keep to that schedule. But there’s going to be a period of time when things are happening and we have to get the ox out of the ditch. We have to take advantage of the opportunity that ’s in front of us. We have to get the hay in before the rain comes. You can’t leave it on the ground; it will rot. You just don’t want to make a habit of you or your team working incredibly long hours.

market to see what they are charging. If there is no one in your area, try another one similar in size, psychographics and demographics. For example, I might not compare

For more tools to grow your people, profits and personal development, check out our website.

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Are You Guilty of Distraction? Take this quick test to find out • Physical • Intellectual • Family • Social

2 To win in business takes more than great ideas, sales ability and an awesome work ethic. You have to keep your eye on the ball at all times. And that requires intense fo cu s . But i n to d ay ’s world of instant accessibility, it ’s tougher than ever to work on your business instead of in it, which is why we invented this quick test. And yes, we know it ’s a distraction. But it ’s worth the time because we’re giving you solutions too. If you answer yes to any of the following statements, you might be too distracted.

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Your last written goal was to get a date to the junior prom.

Solution: Most people and organizations fail from a lack of clear goals and focus. Goals are that important. And not just for your business—you need to set goals for all areas of your life, including: • Financial • Spiritual

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At the end of the day, you feel like you haven’t accomplished anything.

Solution: Instead of putting out fires all day, train your team to come up with some solutions and a possible course of action for the problems that pop up. After a few weeks, they’ll be ready to graduate to the final, most-awesome step of all: They’ll simply send you an email that describes the problem, their solutions and how it was handled.

“Most people and organizations fail from a lack of clear goals and focus.”

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You always answer your phone, no matter where you are.

Solution: Unless you’re the president of the United States, a doctor or possibly Mark Zuckerberg, you don’t need to be accessible 24 hours a day. Turn off your phone, lock it up in your desk, or do whatever it takes to break the habit. Then set two time periods each day to return calls or answer emails. When you are at home, do the same.

Lose the cell, play with your kids, and kiss your spouse instead, and see what a difference it makes in your business and your life.

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You opened this email within 30 seconds of receiving it.

Solution: Email can be a total time vacuum if you don’t put it on a schedule. Leaders are readers, so you probably subscribe to a lot of great industry and leadership newsletters—not to mention all the blogs and websites that interest you. Instead, subscribe to an RSS reader service, which keeps all your content in one place and update s it daily. A n email like this one can be forwarded to your reading cue too. There are even apps out there that will summarize all your reading material. Once you’re set up, dedicate an hour a day to review the content.

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Your meetings are boring, drag on forever, and accomplish nothing.

Solution: Set a time limit, make sure there is an agenda, and stick to both. If an issue isn’t resolved, assign someone to work on it and report back by a certain date, then move on. With just a few small changes, you can transform your life from being totally stressed to accomplishing great things. So what are you waiting for? Fight those distractions and win.

EntreLeadership Review


Meet Ryan Weissmueller Arizona-based CFO shares his best leadership advice to get in the trenches with them. Both men are passionate about my success and have challenged me in many ways to find my own path in getting there.

My Best Leadership Advice Trust is key. It can sometimes take work to earn, but once it ’s lost, it is almost impossible to earn back.

My Best Hiring Advice

What I Do I am the chief financial officer for Solterra Senior Living in Scottsdale, Arizona. Solterra offers a continuum of care for seniors at five residential communities in Arizona and Colorado.

A Characteristic Every Leader Should Possess Openness. A leader must be approachable, welcome feedback— whether positive or negative—and be receptive to ideas other than his/her own.

My Mentors I can’t pin it down to just one. A good friend, Larry, is my mentor from a technical aspect. He has taught me to think critically and ask the right questions to constantly challenge myself on what I am doing and how I am doing it. My father, a successful entrepreneu r, tau g ht me t he i mportance of people. He cares deeply about people and is never afraid

You have to make a hu ge time investment when hiring to get the right people in the right seats on the right bus. Time and money on the front end will save two to four times as much down the road.

“Trust is key. It can sometimes take work to earn, but once it’s lost, it is almost impossible to earn back.” If I Knew Then …

growth—business-related, personal interest and biblical. 3. Fitness and sports. I love to challenge myself physically a nd menta l ly, but watch i n g others in sports is also a great way for me to unwind.

“Time and money on the front end will save two to four times as much down the road.” How to Beat the Competition Constantly ask, “Why not? ”

My Favorite Part of the Job Our people genuinely care about each other and our residents. No matter what happens—and we have challenges—it goes a long way. It makes it easier to enjoy the highs and allows us to grind through the lows.

I would be much more diligent in hiring, set clear expectations in all that I do, and make our culture infectious and viral from the outset.

I’m Passionate About ... 1. My family. I am blessed with an amazing wife and two fantastic kids. 2 . L ea r n i n g . I consta nt ly se ek k nowled ge and personal

For more tools to grow your people, profits and personal development, check out our website.

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Getting the Job Done How to delegate to your team without the authority or tools to get the job done. When Christy organizes a team event, for example, she is given a budget, a few parameters and permission to make certain decisions on her own. “I’m given the freedom to do my job,” Christy says. “Our leaders don’t worry about the process of how we get there. They just make sure that we meet the end goals.”

In the world of administrative assistants, it doesn’t get any better than Christy Graham. In the nearly seven years she has worked at Dave’s company, she’s earned a reputation as simply one of the best. During her career, she’s learned a lot about delegation. So when it came time to write about this subject, we wanted to share the view from the other side of the desk. Here are Christy’s tips on how to make the most of delegation.

“Everyone needs to be on the same page before you hit go.”

1. Slow Down We’ve all been there. You are in a mad rush and need something done yesterday. So you quickly delegate the job, and it falls apart. Who’s to blame? Look in the mirror. If you don’t clearly communicate your expectations, the job will

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never be completed to your satisfaction . Stop being in such a hurry. Clearly give instructions and have the person you are delegating to respond, verifying what you expect. “Everyone needs to be on the same page before you hit go,” Christy says.

2. Stop Micromanaging Dave says there is only one time that a leader should micromanage. That ’s when a team member first joins a company. As they prove their competency, it’s time to give them more responsibilities. That ca n be done really qu ick ly on basic things, but it takes longer for more complicated tasks or projects. “I would have never been trusted the first year w ith the same responsibilities I had after six years,” Christy says. “I had to prove that they could count on me for every single detail.”

“It has been said that delegation is one of the most misunderstood, abused areas of leadership. But without it, your business will never grow.”

It has been said that delegation is one of the most misunderstood, abused areas of leadership. But without it, your business will never grow. Learn to do it well, and you and your team can be successful beyond anyone’s imagination. Delegate, and you’ll soon be able to celebrate!

3. P rovide Resources and Authority What ’s one of the easiest ways to break down a great company culture? Give someone responsibility

EntreLeadership Review


Meet Steve Neuner An EntreLeader shares his delegation tips My Inspiration I am truly inspired when I see the light go on, and someone actually takes responsibility for the results that they create in their own lives. Whether it is someone realizing that their money problems are caused by the person they’re seeing in the mirror, or it is someone who realizes that their employer doesn’t “owe” them a job and begins to create a new story, there is nothing better.

My Best Leadership Advice What I Do I’m president and co-founder of A l ka l i B enef its a nd I n su ra nce Services in Plano, Texas. Alkali is an independent insurance agency that helps employers with employee benefits as well as individuals and families with their health , auto and home insurance needs.

My Biggest Decision as a Leader Giving up “rugged individualism.” I had to let go of the thought that the only way our company could go further was for me to make all of the decisions and work harder and longer.

A Characteristic Every Leader Should Possess I believe that every leader should have the ability to acknowledge their weaknesses and be human. If we can’t accept that we make m i s t a ke s , t he n we a re n’ t connected to reality and miss out on the opportunity to grow.

You must learn to get comfortable being uncomfortable. Tough decisions and tough discussions are all part of being a great leader.

“I have been blessed with a vision and purpose for a much bigger and better future for everyone around me, but I realize it begins with me.” My Biggest Obstacles Identifying the good team members from the great! I am so passionate about what we do as an organization, I sometimes have a hard time distinguishing their energy from my own.

My Favorite Movie Rudy! It’s the story of Rudy Ruettiger, an unlikely hero who overcame

a l l o d d s to do t he s e e m i n g ly i mp o s s i ble a n d pl ay fo otb a l l for Not re D a me . He had a t r ue cha mpion’s he a r t !

The Secret of My Success I have been blessed with a vision and purpose for a much bigger and better future for everyone around me, but I realize it begins with me.

The Secret of Great Delegation Clear communication of expectations is key. They include the desired outcome, the time frame and how much input I want to have along the way. There are some things I delegate that I just want to go away, while there are others I delegate that I want to be able to provide feedback on throughout the process. Delegating both tasks the same way would be a huge mistake. If I am clear on my expectations, we are both likely to feel satisfied with the results.

My Biggest Obstacle to Delegation Sometimes it’s tough to recognize early enough something should be delegated. Too often, I hold onto things thinking, I won’t bother soand-so. I’ll take care of it myself. And then, I run out of time and still end up asking them for their help at the last minute, which puts more strain on them than if I would have just delegated the task in the first place. I am acknowledging my shortcoming so that I can create a new opportunity for growth in this area.

For more tools to grow your people, profits and personal development, check out our website.

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How to Launch Your Dream (

And Avoid a Nightmare

)

Ensure not only your independence but also success you want to open a business. If it’s strictly for the dollars, then count yourself gone. To make it, you have to have a higher calling. You need a burning desire for what you are about to create. “Find something you love doing so much that on the tough days you have a reason to fight on,” Dave says.

Starting Part Time

Maybe it ’s the idea of creating a legacy. Or the chance to follow your passion , help others, and become the next Donald Trump (minus the comb-over). Whatever is driving you to become an entrepreneur, how do you know when it ’s time to turn that dream into a reality and launch your small business? Or more importantly, should you even do it at all? There are several factors you should consider before taking that final leap into becom ing a full-time business owner, including:

Asking Yourself Why Q u e s t i o n a n y s u p e r- s u c c e s s fu l busine ss ow ner about the b e g i n n i n g o f t h e i r c o m p a n y, a n d t h e y w i l l t e l l y o u c o u n tle s s wa r stor ie s . It i sn’t e a sy making green. Starting a company usua l ly i nvolve s lon g hou rs , superhuman efforts and borderl i n e d i s a s te r s o n a d a i ly b a s i s . Before you make any move, take some time for some deep soulsearching and ask yourself why

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Now t h at you’ve de cide d you can’t live without starting your company, it ’s time to jump ship from your current position, right? Not exactly. Unless you have more money in the bank than the Real Housewives of Beverly Hills, start slowly on your venture, meaning part time, and keep your day job while dipping your toes into the entrepreneurial waters to see if your product or service will sell.

“Before you make any move, take some time for some deep soulsearching, and ask yourself why you want to open a business.” Dave recommends coming up with an income goal that is a percentage of your salary, and then work like a crazy person to get there. When you reach it, you can concentrate 100% on your new venture. For example, if you make $75,000 a year, your goal could be to quit when your side business has an annual income of $50,000.

Remember to set the number high enough to be able to take care of your family and not too far away from your present salary. If you currently earn $60,000 a year and your business brings in $5,000 annually, the gap is too wide. “ It ’s hard to work your day job and spend a ton of hours on your business, but it is harder to make a mistake and lose your home in foreclosure because you jumped before the boat was close enough to dock,” Dave says. There are some exceptions to this rule, however. If all your extra income is from one client, then stay at your current position until you have a larger customer base. There is always the chance that you may lose that customer and your extra income would drop to zero in a heartbeat. On the other hand, if your business is steadily growing each month from all your extra work, from $6,000 to $7,000 to $8,000 for example, the decision to leave your current position may come sooner. Owning your own business can be one of the most thrilling, joyful things you’ll ever accomplish. But no matter how much you want to get started, be wise and wait until the time is right, ensuring that you’ll not only have inde pendence but success, happiness and a future for your family.

EntreLeadership Review


Hiring Lessons From the NFL How to attract more talent of 6-10. Manning spent the 2011 season on Indianapolis’ bench nursing his injuries. And Bradford? H is team had one of the worst records of the year.

In the world of football, they are the kings. The superstar players whose names are as familiar as the teams they represent. They are treated like royalty. Just ask Charles Johnson’s paycheck. In 2011, the defensive end for the Carolina Panthers signed a recordbreaking , six-year, $76 -million contract, making him the highestpaid professional pigskin player of all time. But Johnson is not alone. There are 30 NFL players on Forbes magazine’s list of the world’s top 100 highest-paid athletes this year. Q ua r terb ack Pey ton M a n n i n g will earn $32 .4 million with the Broncos. Rams quarterback Sam Bradford will earn $26.8 million. And the list goes on and on. T he t he o r y b e h i n d t he s e b i g dollars is that the players are so exceptionally talented , they ’ll help carry their team to the Super Bowl or at least the playoffs. But that’s not always the case. In 2011, Joh nson made just 40 tack le s , and his team had a dismal record

What ’s the business lesson to be learned from these guys? Big salaries don’t always produce big results. And that’s something you should keep in mind as you try to attract talent to your team. Business success is about much more than who spends the most money. As Dave teaches at EntreLeadership Master Series, there are several ways to find a solution.

Start With the Culture If you build a place where people love to work, they will come. In fact, they’ll be knocking down your door. And the best way to begin is to follow the most golden of all rules: “Do to others as you would have them do to you.” (Luke 6:31) If you would expect praise, don’t just give it, but do it in front of their peers, family—heck, anyone who w ill listen . I f they need a helping hand, lend it. When you would expect grace, give it. Before you know it, word of mouth will spread, and your team will turn into your best recruiters as they let everyone know that they work at the Super Bowl of companies.

Have a Generous Spirit What ’s one of the best ways to create an awesome vibe for your company? Be generous with your products, services and profits for your team, customers and community. Volunteer, give back, and let your team do the same. When

possible, begin allocating funds each month for these types of projects, and simply show you have a big heart. As Dave says, “ The dividends in terms of smiles and personal satisfaction far outweigh the few dollars committed.”

“If you build a place where people love to work, they will come.”

Champions Beget Champions It’s a fact. Winners like to hang out with winners. So when you have a building full of them , others will naturally follow. Take time in your hiring process to find the perfect person for every position, no matter how strong the need. At Dave’s company, there is a 12-step hiring process that takes several months to complete. The result is a building full of people who are as passionate about winning as any team Manning ever dreamed of. By creating a culture where people love to work, you’ll attract more talent than you’ll ever need , a n d yo u ’ l l c r e ate a S u p e r B owlwo r t hy te a m . W it h t h i s t y p e o f b u s i n e s s , e ve r y s e a s o n w i l l b e a winning one.

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JOIN DAVE AND HIS TEAM AT THE OFFICES

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