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HARVEST All the sensational flavours of the season

BISCUIT TIN TREATS

JARS OF GOODNESS

all you need to know about home preserves

Walnut & Spice

LOADS MORE INSIDE! TOP DINNERS

CAKE WITH ROSÉ PEARS

PANTRY STARS

Delicious

QUICK & EASY MEALS

TURN TO PAGE 100


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A Letter From Pamela

w

Autumn is not always a clearly defined season in terms of weather conditions in Australia, but it’s certainly defined by the appearance of certain fruits and veggies.

PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHER YIANNI ASPRADAKIS

I LOVE pomegranates! Their versatility forms a happy marriage with so many flavours, both sweet and savoury. I’m a tad obsessed with pomegranate molasses, which can be found in delis. Its flavour is unique and can be the key ingredient in magical sauces, dressings, marinades and glazes. In this issue we have a recipe for home-made pomegranate molasses and it’s simply divine. As well as our regular features, this issue reveals everything you need to know about preserving – one of my favourite things to do, I’m so glad that everything old is new again! There are baked goodies for the biscuit tin, a great feature on nuts – did you know nutritionists suggest we eat a handful of tree nuts each day? My problem is stopping at just a handful! On the vegetable front, we show you how to preserve artichokes, not only do they look wonderful and would make a great gift to a foodie, but they taste sublime, too. Kumara has now reached superfood status and deservedly so, it’s a brilliant veggie, versatile and delicious, as our recipes attest. Welcome to our world of FOOD.

EDITORIAL AND FOOD DIRECTOR

AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN

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34 ARTICHOKES

3 A LETTER FROM PAMELA

SWEET POTATOES

WAKE-UP CALL

JARS OF GOODNESS

The potato that isn’t really a potato is at its seasonal best. Red, purple and white sweet potatoes are versatile and their flavour is welcome in all manner of dishes.

A healthy breakfast is the most important meal of the day. It provides energy and nutrients that are fundamental to health, wellbeing and vitality.

Perhaps it invokes memories of Grandma, or perhaps it’s the anticipation of the deliciousness inside, but a jar of homemade preserves is always welcome.

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TEST KITCHEN Q&A

IN SEASON

IN SEASON

ARTICHOKES

BREAKFASTS

NUTS

PRESERVES

SWEET POTATOES

POMEGRANATES

ON THE COVER The coolness of autumn lends itself to wonderful comforting treats. Our Walnut & spice cake with rosé pears on page 100 simply shouts ‘yes please!’. P H OTO G R A P H ER JA M E S M O F FAT T ST YLIST S O P H I A YO U N G P H OTO C H EF AMAL WEBSTER

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POMEGRANATES

STEP-BY-STEP

GOING NUTS

While the pomegranate may have brought sorrow to the Ancient Greek Goddess Persephone, it has brought joy to the palates of mere mortals for centuries!

Shop-bought preserved artichokes are convenient, but there is satisfaction in making your own. It isn’t difficult, it’s all about preparation and we show you how.

The many varieties of nuts bring a world of flavour and texture to just about every cuisine. We celebrate nuts with gorgeous recipes.

AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN


A TASTE OF AUTUMN

BISCUIT TIN

As the leaves start to fall, autumn brings with it a cornucopia of fresh, fabulous produce. And the luscious flavours of the season are at their finest in these recipes.

It doesn’t matter if it’s for the kids racing in from school, or if it’s for you to enjoy with a cuppa, a filled biscuit tin is a treasure trove of yumminess!

TAPAS TEMPTATIONS Served hot and cold, tapas dishes are a wonderful way of sampling and sharing Spanish food.

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WHAT’S FOR DINNER

AUTUMN HARVEST

FOOD IN A FLASH

BISCUITS

MEAT FREE

TAPAS

NEW BOOK EXTRACT

144 RECIPE INDEX

147 CONVERSION CHART

WHAT’S FOR DINNER?

FOOD IN A FLASH

NO MEAT MONDAY

SUPER POWER!

It’s a much-pondered question. However, with our fabulous family meal ideas, there’s always an easy answer!

Whipping up a weeknight meal in a matter of minutes might seem like an impossible dream. Well, we show you that dreams can come true with these recipes.

Eating meat-free one night of the week is an easy − and healthy − option. These top-tasting meals could have Monday become your favourite day of the week!

What we eat impacts on how we look, feel and function. Our new book, Everyday Powerfoods, is packed with delicious recipes to help you look and feel your best.

AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN

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Test Kitchen Q&A

UESTIONS I’d like to try cane sugar alternatives. Can you tell me about coconut sugar? A

Coconut sugar is not made from coconuts, but from the sap of the blossoms of the coconut palm tree. The sap is collected and then boiled to evaporate the water content, leaving a little sugar that looks a bit like raw or light brown cane sugar with a similar caramel flavour. It also has the same amount of kilojoules as regular table (white) sugar.

&ANSWERS Why does eggplant sometimes have a bitter flavour?

A

The older the eggplant, the more bitter the taste. If eggplants are old, large and have dark seeds you can sprinkle them with salt. This releases the bitterness. There is no need to salt fresh, smaller eggplants.

Just how good are commercial curry pastes, or I’ve tried kangaroo meat a couple of times, but I’m seeing other Australian should we always endeavour to ‘game’ meat becoming more widely make our own? available. I’m not keen to try it until I find out more, so can you tell me Good quality curry pastes are available what crocodile tastes like?

A

A

Crocodile meat is pale pink with a surprisingly mild flavour. The best part is the tail, though the legs can also be cooked. High heat toughens it, though tenderness can be improved if it is first marinated in kiwifruit or pawpaw puree. Casseroling suits it, and it also works well served as carpaccio (raw and very thinly sliced) with fruits or salad leaves and a well-flavoured dressing.

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commercially, but creative cooks enjoy making their own, adjusted to their own tastes. Many recipes include directions for making a special curry paste. This usually involves collecting and

AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN

chopping quite a lot of ingredients. So make a larger quantity while you’re about it, divide into one-recipe portions and freeze in small freezer bags for next time.

I’ve read in some recipes the requirement to use a ‘microplane’ to grate ingredients. What is this utensil?

A

Its design resembles a small metal cricket bat covered in tiny razor-like holes along its length. It is easy and fast to use, and provides a fine, almost fluffy, shaved grate; it can also be used to grate chocolate, cheese, garlic, ginger and nutmeg. The ideal utensil for a keen cook!


ILVE appliance su se

l Austra ian Wom en the ’s in Kitchen Test kly ee W

d


Bite-Sized News

News to snack on CHEESY GOODNESS The Nimbin Natural Cheese Co. crafts a delicious, healthy cheese which is low in salt, contains no animal rennet, provides the goodness of dairy milk and contains vegetarian enzymes. Available in a block, grated, or in slices, The Nimbin Natural Cheese Co. cheese is suitable for vegetarians. Available from supermarkets.

FOODIE FACT

STRANGE BUT TRUE! There are many phobias that can affect people, but did you know that one is a fear of vegetables? It is called Lachanophobia.

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THE AUTUMN HARVEST... sees pumpkin at its best, as well as carrots, fennel, beetroot and eggplant. The perfect produce for oven-roasted vegies and soothing soups. Pantries full of the season’s finest produce preserved in jams and marmalades, chutneys and relishes, and tins full of baked goodies tells us that it’s autumn.

AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN


DID YOU KNOW? Apples float in water. This is because roughly one-quarter of their volume is just air.

To stop food from freezing, some Eskimo people refrigerate their food because the temperature inside the fridge is warmer than outside!

Perfect PICKLE!

YES PLEASE!

The new Sara Lee Incredibly range takes yumminess to another level, with crunchy cheesecake, gooey lava pudding and creamy dessert ice creams. FOR MORE OF OUR RECIPES GO TO

The Ball Brothers commenced manufacturing ‘Ball Mason Jars’ back in 1884, so with over a century of experience, their range is of the highest quality. Now, the range includes Ball Heritage Collection Spring Green Mason Jars. These regular-mouth 16oz (500ml) pint jars have a gorgeous retro look, with all of the company’s modern standards for quality and reliability. But these are

WE LOVE

only part of the range Ball offers. From Quilted Crystal Jelly Jars to Wide Mouth Quart Jars and from pectin to the incredible Ball Deluxe Home Preserving Starter Kit, Ball will help you fill the pantry with sumptuous, jams, relishes, chutneys and pickles – in fact any fresh seasonal produce that can be preserved! Available nationally from Big W and Woolworths stores. 9


Bite-Sized News

STAWBERRY FIELDS The Victorian strawberry growing season lasts right through to May and Victorian Strawberries has close to one hundred growers state-wide. That means lots of everyone’s favourite luscious, juicy berries are ripe for the picking! But while strawberries are a popular ingredient in cakes, puddings and desserts, they are equally delicious in savoury dishes. So why not grab a punnet of fresh and fabulous Victorian Strawberries at your local supermarket or greengrocer and try your hand at making this this Berry beet jam. It’s the perfect condiment to use with steaks, burgers, pork and lamb. It’s ideal as a relish on sandwiches and it makes a deliciously piquant addition to a cheeseboard.

BERRY BEET JAM PREP + COOK TIME 1 HOUR 30 MINUTES MAKES 1 500ML JAR

 4 large beetroot, peeled,         

quartered 2 large brown onions, peeled, halved 4 sprigs fresh rosemary 1 tbsp olive oil 2 tbsp brown sugar ½ cup malt vinegar 100ml water 1 cinnamon quill 1 tsp ground clove 1 x 250g punnet Victorian strawberries, washed, hulled, cut in eighths

1 Before you start, read jar preparation and sterilising methods instructions on page 77.

DID YOU KNOW? The town of Wépion in Belgium has a museum devoted to strawberries. The Musée de la Fraise is a tribute to the strawberry’s cultural importance.

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AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN

2 Pre-heat oven to 180°C/160°C fan. 3 Toss beetroot, onion and rosemary in oil, then place on a lined baking tray. Bake for 50 minutes, or until beetroot is tender. Remove from oven and cool slightly. 4 Discard rosemary. Roughly chop beetroot and onions and place in a saucepan with brown sugar, vinegar, the water and spices. Cook for 15 minutes or until sugar is well dissolved. Add strawberries and cook for a further 5 minutes, until strawberries are soft but not broken up. 5 Pour jam into a hot sterilised jar, allow to cool then seal. Refrigerate for up to 4 weeks.


Advertorial

EASY AND DELICIOUS

MEALS IN MINUTES SWEET, SOUR & SPICY STIR FRIED PRAWNS Prep + cook time 25 minutes, serves 4 1 ½ cups of SunRice Jasmine Rice 2 brown onions, peeled, halved, sliced 5mm 600g peeled, uncooked prawns 4 Tbs tomato sauce 1 tbsp garlic chilli sauce Pantry staples: vegetable oil, sugar, salt, pepper, light soy sauce, coriander & lime wedges to serve.

1 Cook rice as per pack instructions. Run a fork through the rice to loosen the grains, then cover to keep warm. 2 Toss the prawns in ½ tsp sugar and ½ tsp pepper. 3 Heat 2 Tbsp of vegetable oil and the onions in a medium − large non−stick frypan over high heat and stir fry until the onions are slightly translucent but still hold some crunch. Add the prawn meat and stir fry until cooked through. 4 Add the ketchup and garlic chilli sauce, then taste and season with light soy or salt.


What’s in

SEASON

APPLES BANANAS FIGS GUAVA KIWIFRUIT LEMONS MANDARINS - IMPERIAL ORANGES - VALENCIA; NAVEL PASSIONFRUIT PAWPAW PEARS PERSIMMONS PLUMS POMEGRANATES QUINCE RHUBARB

While the luscious pomegranate may have brought sorrow to the Ancient Greek Goddess Persephone, it has brought much joy to mortals for centuries.

AUTUMN

fruits

AUTUMN

vegetables AVOCADOS BEANS BROCCOLI BRUSSELS SPROUTS CABBAGE CAPSICUM CARROTS CAULIFLOWER CELERY CELERIAC CORN EGGPLANTS FENNEL GINGER KUMARA LEEK MUSHROOMS


In Season DINNER PARTY ROSEWATER & PISTACHIO CHEESECAKE CUPS

RECIPE ON PAGE

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ranates


Pomegranates The pomegranate spread eastwards from Persia to India and China, and was taken to America by Spanish sailors from the Mediterranean region, where it had long been cultivated. It was a useful fruit for long sea voyages because its hard skin kept it in better condition than other fruits; those sailors didn’t realise it, but pomegranates were also good to take to sea because they have useful amounts of Vitamin C, which prevents scurvy. The pomegranate, with its burnished red skin and calyx like a crown, looks what it is — a precious fruit of ancient Persia. Cut it across into halves (a job for a sharp serrated knife as the skin is leathery) and it is like a jewel-box, with myriad seeds, each in a sac of translucent carmine flesh set in cream-coloured pith. Sweet-sour and refreshing, the seeds can be scattered across salads, desserts, chicken, fish and rice dishes, or rubbed through a sieve to obtain the crimson juice, or the halved fruit can be juiced on a lemon-squeezer. Take care when doing this as the juice stains; it was used as a red dye for Persian rugs. A large pomegranate will give about ½ cup juice. It makes a cool, sharp-flavoured drink, good by itself or with vodka or gin, and is valued for its flavour in sauces, soups, stews and marinades, especially for duck to be grilled or roasted. It also makes a sharply fruity jelly to serve with poultry or ham or spread on croissants or brioche. AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN

PREPARATION To obtain the seeds, hold a pomegranate half over a bowl, cut-side down, and hit it with a wooden spoon to make them drop out.

CHOOSING Pomegranates should feel heavy for their size, show no signs of deterioration at the calyx end and have unmarked skin that gives slightly when gently pressed.

STORING Pomegranates will keep for a few days at room temperature, making a beautiful display. They can be refrigerated whole for a couple of weeks and the seeds can be frozen in an airtight container for a few months.

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In Season

NOTES DATE & ROSE POMEGRANATE MOLASSES Rosewater varies in strength between brands. Taste the syrup with 1 tablespoon rosewater and adjust with a further teaspoon or more if you like. Keeps 12 months. Serve as a sweet and sour syrup in salad dressings, marinades and drinks. You can also use it as a marinade for sticky lamb cutlets and sausages.

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PREP + COOK TIME 1 HOUR 30 MINUTES MAKES 2 CUPS

This sweet, piquant Middle Eastern condiment can add an extra depth of flavour into a whole array of dishes. Try it with meat dishes for basting or creating a quick sauce from the cooking pan, or drizzled over roasted root vegetables.  1 cup (240g) fresh unpitted dates  1 cup (250ml) boiling water  1.5 litres (6 cups) pomegranate juice  ¼ cup (60ml) lemon juice  1 cup (220g) caster sugar  1 tablespoon rosewater, approximately

(see Cook’s Notes)

1 Before you start, read jar preparation and sterilising methods instructions on page 77. 2 Place a couple of saucers in the freezer to chill. Place dates in a medium bowl. Pour over the boiling water; set aside for 10 minutes to soften. Blend or process dates and soaking water until smooth. 3 Combine date mixture, pomegranate juice, lemon juice and sugar in a large saucepan. Stir over high heat, without boiling, until sugar dissolves. Bring to the boil; reduce heat, simmer gently, uncovered, stirring occasionally, for 1¼ hours or until thick and syrupy. 4 To test the thickness of the syrup, drop a tablespoon of the syrup onto a chilled saucer, wait a couple of minutes until cooled. If it is not thick enough, continue cooking and repeat testing. 5 Stir in rosewater. Pour hot syrup into a hot sterilised bottle; seal immediately. Label and date bottle when cold. Refrigerate after opening.

PHOTOGRAPHER WILLIAM MEPPEM + STYLIST SOPHIA YOUNG + PHOTOCHEF KIRSTEN JENKINS

COOK’S

DATE & ROSE POMEGRANATE MOLASSES

AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN


LOVELY GIFT DATE & ROSE POMEGRANATE MOLASSES YOU WILL NEED a bottle that can be sterilised RECIPE OPPOSITE

AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN

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In Season

25 MINUTES QUINOA SALAD WITH HALOUMI & POMEGRANATE RECIPE OPPOSITE

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AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN


QUINOA SALAD WITH HALOUMI & POMEGRANATE

ROSEWATER & PISTACHIO CHEESECAKE CUPS

PREP + COOK TIME 25 MINUTES SERVES 4

ROSEWATER & PISTACHIO CHEESECAKE CUPS PREP + COOK TIME 55 MINUTES (+ COOLING) SERVES 16

 1 cup (200g) red or white quinoa  2 cups (500ml) water

 100g pistachios

 1 clove garlic, crushed

 ½ cup (110g) caster sugar

 2 tablespoons lemon juice

 ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon

 2 teaspoons ground cumin

 ½ teaspoon ground cardamom

 2 teaspoons ground coriander

 6 sheets fillo pastry, halved crossways

 ¼ cup (60ml) EXTRA virgin olive oil

 50g butter, melted

 ½ cup loosely packed fresh mint leaves

 750g cream cheese, softened

 100g baby spinach leaves

 2¼ cups (360g) icing sugar

 ½ cup (75g) sunflower seeds, toasted

 2 tablespoons rosewater

 250g haloumi, cut into 1cm slices  ¾cup (210g) greek-style yoghurt  ⅓ cup (50g) pomegranate seeds

1 Bring quinoa and the water to the boil in a medium saucepan; cook, covered, over low heat for 15 minutes or until tender. Drain; cool slightly. 2 Combine garlic, juice, spices and 1 tablespoon of the oil in a large bowl; season to taste. Add quinoa to bowl with mint, spinach leaves and seeds; toss gently to combine. 3 Heat remaining oil in a large frying pan over high heat; cook haloumi for 1 minute each side or until golden. 4 Serve quinoa salad topped with haloumi, yoghurt and pomegranate seeds.

COOK’S

NOTES ROSEWATER & PISTACHIO CHEESECAKE CUPS Cheesecake cups can be assembled several hours ahead without the fairy floss; store, covered, in the fridge.

QUINOA SALAD WITH HALOUMI & POMEGRANATE For something different, swap the quinoa for either lentils, freekeh or barley. Fresh pomegranate seeds can sometimes be found in the fridge section of supermarkets or good green grocers. If unavailable, cut a whole pomegranate in half and scrape the seeds from flesh with your fingers while holding the pomegranate upside down in a bowl of cold water; the seeds will sink and the white pith will float. Make sure you cook the haloumi just before serving, as it becomes tough and rubbery on cooling.

AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN

 1½ teaspoons lemon rind  ¼ cup (60ml) lemon juice  ¾ cup (180g) pomegranate seeds  100g rose-flavoured persian fairy floss

1 Preheat oven to 180°C/160°C fan. Line two oven trays with baking paper. 2 Place nuts on one oven tray; roast for 5 minutes or until browned lightly. Transfer to a food processor; cool. Process cooled nuts until ground finely. Place ground nuts in a small bowl with caster sugar and spices; stir to combine. Wash oven tray to cool; line with baking paper. 3 Place one pastry half on each oven tray; lightly brush with melted butter, sprinkle ¼ cup nut spice mixture between the two pastry halves. Repeat layering with pastry halves, butter and nut mixture. Top with remaining pastry halves; brush with the remaining butter and sprinkle with remaining nut mixture. Bake 15 minutes or until pastry is golden; cool. Crumble pastry into rough pieces; store in an airtight container until needed. 4 Beat cream cheese, sifted icing sugar, rosewater, rind and juice in a small bowl with electric mixer until soft peaks form. 5 Spoon ¼-cups of cream cheese mixture into ¾-cup (180ml) glasses; sprinkle with crumbled pastry and pomegranate seeds. Just before serving, top with fairy floss.

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In Season

COOK’S

NOTES CHICKEN, BURGHUL & POMEGRANATE SALAD To remove seeds from the pomegranate, cut it in half crossways; hold it, cut-side down, in the palm of your hand over a bowl, then hit the outside firmly with a wooden spoon. The seeds should fall out easily; discard any white pith that falls out with them. Pomegranate molasses is available at delis and most major supermarkets.

CHICKEN, BURGHUL & POMEGRANATE SALAD PREP + COOK TIME 45 MINUTES (+ REFRIGERATION) SERVES 6

 ¼ cup (60ml) EXTRA virgin olive oil  ¼ cup (60ml) pomegranate molasses  1 tablespoon ground cumin  2 cloves garlic, crushed  1kg chicken breast fillets  1½ cups (375ml) chicken stock  1½ cups (240g) burghul  1 large pomegranate (430g),

seeds removed  1 medium red onion (170g),    

Guess WHAT?

   

halved, sliced thinly 350g watercress, trimmed 2 cups firmly packed fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves 1 cup (110g) coarsely chopped roasted walnuts 150g fetta, crumbled

1 Combine oil, molasses, cumin and garlic in a large bowl with chicken. Cover; refrigerate 3 hours or overnight. 2 Bring stock to the boil in a medium saucepan. Remove from heat, add burghul; cover, stand 5 minutes. 3 Meanwhile, make pomegranate dressing. 4 Drain chicken, discard marinade. Cook chicken on a heated oiled chargrill plate (or barbecue or grill), for 3 minutes each side or until cooked through. Remove chicken from heat, cover loosely with foil; rest 10 minutes, then slice thickly. 5 Place chicken and burghul in a large bowl with dressing and remaining ingredients; toss gently to combine. Divide salad among serving plates. POMEGRANATE DRESSING Place ingredients in a screw-top jar; shake well.

POMEGRANATE DRESSING ¼ cup (60ml) EXTRA virgin olive oil ¼ cup (60ml) lemon juice 3 teaspoons honey 3 teaspoons pomegranate molasses

DID YOU KNOW? Pomegranate juice is the basis of grenadine syrup which is used in cocktails such as tequila sunrise.

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LOVELY LUNCH CHICKEN, BURGHUL & POMEGRANATE SALAD RECIPE OPPOSITE

AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN

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WOW FACTOR! CHOCOLATE MOUSSE CAKE WITH POMEGRANATE SYRUP RECIPE OPPOSITE

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AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN


In Season

CHOCOLATE MOUSSE CAKE WITH POMEGRANATE SYRUP PREP + COOK TIME 1 HOUR (+ COOLING & REFRIGERATION) SERVES 12

 200g dark chocolate,

chopped coarsely  60g butter, chopped  6 eggs, separated  ⅔ cup (150g) caster sugar

   

CHOCOLATE MOUSSE 400g dark chocolate, chopped ¼ teaspoon ground cardamom ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon 600ml thickened cream POMEGRANATE SYRUP

 ⅓ cup (75g) caster sugar  ¼ cup (60ml) orange juice  1 medium orange (240g),

rind peeled into wide strips  1 pomegranate (450g),

seeds removed (see Cook’s Notes)

1 Preheat oven to 170°C/150°C fan. Grease a 22cm springform pan; line base and side with baking paper. 2 Place chocolate and butter in a small saucepan over low heat; stir until smooth and melted. Cool. 3 Beat egg yolks and ½ cup of the sugar in a small bowl with an electric mixer until thick and creamy. Beat in chocolate mixture. Transfer to a large bowl. 4 Beat egg whites and remaining sugar in a clean large bowl with electric mixer until soft peaks form; fold into chocolate mixture, in two batches. Spoon mixture into pan. 5 Bake cake 35 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the centre comes out with moist crumbs attached. Cool in pan. 6 Meanwhile, make chocolate mousse, then pomegranate syrup. 7 Pour mousse over cake in pan. Cover; refrigerate 6 hours or until firm. Just before serving top with pomegranate syrup. CHOCOLATE MOUSSE Stir chocolate in a small saucepan over low heat until smooth; stir in spices. Beat cream in a large bowl with an electric mixer until soft peaks just form. Fold in chocolate mixture until just combined. POMEGRANATE SYRUP Stir sugar, juice and rind in a small saucepan over medium heat, without boiling, until sugar dissolves. Bring to the boil. Remove pan from heat; stir in pomegranate seeds, stir to coat in syrup; cool.

COOK’S

NOTES CHOCOLATE MOUSSE CAKE WITH POMEGRANATE SYRUP To remove seeds from a pomegranate, cut the fruit in half crossways; hold the half, cut-side down, in the palm of your hand over a bowl, then hit the outside firmly with a wooden spoon. The seeds should fall out easily; discard any white pith that falls out with them. Cake and syrup can be made a day ahead; store separately in airtight containers in the fridge.

DID YOU KNOW? Pomegranate molasses is made with boiled-down pomegranate juice. It is thick and brown with a sharp-sweet balance a little reminiscent of balsamic vinegar. It is a staple in Middle Eastern kitchens, used for salad dressings and sauces and for brushing on meat, seafood or poultry to be grilled or roasted. It is available at Middle Eastern food stores, but try making your own! See page 16 for our recipe.

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Sweet potatoes are not really potatoes at all – they belong to a different family of plants – but they can be cooked in the same ways: boil, mash, slice and fry, bake in their skins, roast, turn into soup or a salad. You can even take off thin strips with a vegetable peeler and deep-fry for delicious crisps.

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AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN

PHOTOGRAPHER LOUISE LISTER + STYLIST ANNETTE FORREST

Sweet POTATO


In Season LOVELY LUNCH KAFFIR LIME & RED CURRY FISH PARCELS

RECIPE ON PAGE

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LOVELY LUNCH KITCHARI RECIPE OPPOSITE

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In Season

KITCHARI PREP + COOK TIME 40 MINUTES SERVES 2

 1 tablespoon EXTRA virgin olive oil  2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger

KAFFIR LIME & RED CURRY FISH PARCELS PREP + COOK TIME 30 MINUTES (+ REFRIGERATION) SERVES 2

 2 cloves garlic, crushed

 2 teaspoons red curry paste

 3 whole cloves

 4 shredded kaffir lime leaves

 ½ teaspoon cumin seeds

 2 coriander roots with 1cm

 ½ fresh long green chilli, sliced finely

of stem, bruised

 1 fresh bay leaf

 1 fresh long red chilli, sliced finely

 ½ small kumara (125g), peeled,

 2 x 200g firm boneless white fish fillets,

      

cut into 1cm pieces ¼ cup (30g) frozen peas ½ cup (100g) basmati rice 1½ cups (375ml) water ½ teaspoon salt-reduced chicken stock powder ½ cup (85g) rinsed, drained canned brown lentils ¼ cup (70g) low-fat plain yoghurt 2 tablespoons fresh coriander leaves

1 Heat oil in a medium saucepan over low heat; cook ginger, garlic, cloves, seeds, chilli and bay leaf, stirring occasionally, for 1 minute or until fragrant. 2 Stir kumara, peas, rice, the water and stock powder into pan. Shake the pan to evenly settle the rice; bring to the boil. Reduce heat; cover, simmer, without stirring, for 15 minutes. 3 Remove from heat; stand, covered, for 10 minutes, then fold through the lentils. Serve rice mixture topped with yoghurt and coriander. TIPS Kitchari, an ancient Indian dish, is often eaten to detoxify the body, and is believed to aid digestion. It is based on the practise of Ayurveda, which focuses on the body’s overall balance and harmony. Basmati is a white, slender-grained aromatic rice. We used SunRice basmati rice in this recipe. Kitchari can be served as a breakfast dish with a poached egg and wholemeal flatbread.

AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN

KAFFIR LIME & RED CURRY FISH PARCELS

    

skin on 1 small kumara (250g), cut into 1cm thick slices 2 teaspoons lime juice 2 tablespoons red quinoa 2 teaspoons light coconut milk 2 tablespoons fresh coriander leaves

1 Combine paste, lime leaves, coriander roots and stems, and half the chilli in a small bowl. Rub fish fillets with mixture; cover, refrigerate for 1 hour or overnight. 2 Preheat oven to 220°C/200°C fan. 3 Place kumara in a small saucepan, cover with cold water; bring to the boil, simmer, uncovered, for 5 minutes or until just tender, drain. 4 Cut two pieces of foil 50cm x 30cm; place on work surface, shiny-side up (see Cook’s Notes). Lay two 48cm x 30cm pieces of baking paper over foil. 5 Divide kumara and fish mixture between paper, drizzle with juice. Fold foil over to completely enclose fish and kumara. 6 Place fish parcels on a large baking tray. Bake parcels for 15 minutes or until fish is cooked through. Discard coriander roots and stems. 7 Meanwhile, rinse and drain quinoa well. Place in a small saucepan, cover with water; bring to the boil, boil for 10 minutes or until tender, drain. 8 Serve fish with quinoa; top with coconut milk, remaining chilli and coriander leaves.

COOK’S

NOTES KAFFIR LIME & RED CURRY FISH PARCELS We used snapper for this recipe. The parcels can be made to the end of step 5 and refrigerated for up to 1 day in advance. Heat reflects off the shiny side of aluminium foil, so having the shiny side facing into the parcel ensures maximum heat penetrating the fish.

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In Season

Sweet FACTS KUMARA OR ORANGE SWEET POTATO? THIS popular variety has dry, dense, nutty-sweet flesh, which holds together well for a salad or curry. Kumara is good for boiling, baking in their skins and serving with sour cream and chives, and for frying.

PURPLE-SKINNED SWEET POTATO THIS variety has white flesh which discolours quickly when cut, so drop pieces into icy water as you go. It is good for any of the cooking methods – frying, baking, roasting, mashing, soups, salads and curries.

KUMARA & ONION PIZZA PREP + COOK TIME 30 MINUTES SERVES 2

COOK’S

NOTES KUMARA & ONION PIZZA Pitta bread makes an ideal thin-and-crispy pizza base when you’re short on time and can’t make your own.

 1 small kumara (250g), unpeeled,

sliced thinly  ½ small brown onion (40g), cut into

thin wedges  1 large wholemeal pitta bread (100g)  2 tablespoons salt-reduced tomato

pasta sauce  1½ teaspoons finely chopped fresh rosemary  ¼ cup (30g) coarsely grated low-fat vintage cheddar  20g baby rocket leaves

1 Preheat oven to 220°C/200°C fan. Line an oven tray with baking paper. 2 Cook kumara and onion on a heated oiled grill plate (or grill or barbecue) until browned both sides and tender. 3 Place bread on oven tray; spread with sauce. Layer with vegetables and sprinkle with rosemary then cheese. Bake for 8 minutes or until base is crisp and cheese has melted. Serve topped with rocket.

WHITE-SKINNED SWEET POTATO THIS variety has purple, earthy-tasting flesh which is quite sweet. It is best used for baking.

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30 MINUTES KUMARA & ONION PIZZA RECIPE OPPOSITE

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PARTY FOOD SWEET POTATO CRISPS WITH CHILLI SALT RECIPE OPPOSITE

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In Season

SWEET POTATO CRISPS WITH CHILLI SALT PREP + COOK TIME 25 MINUTES SERVES 4

 1 medium kumara (400g)

COOK’S

NOTES

 1 medium white-skinned sweet

potato (400g)  1 medium purple-skinned sweet    

potato (400g) vegetable oil, for deep-frying 2 teaspoons sea salt flakes ½ teaspoon dried chilli flakes ½ teaspoon sweet paprika

1 Using vegetable peeler, slice vegetables into long, thin strips. 2 Heat oil in wok; deep-fry kumara and sweet potato strips, in batches, until browned lightly and crisp. Drain on wire rack over paper-lined tray. 3 Combine salt, chilli and paprika in small bowl. Sprinkle hot sweet potato crisps with chilli salt mixture.

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SWEET POTATO CRISPS WITH CHILLI SALT Kumara takes longer to brown and crisp than white or purple sweet potato, so fry the kumara crisps separately before the others. The crisps will keep well if, once quite cold, they are stored in an airtight container. If they should soften, re-crisp them, on an oven tray, in a single layer, in a preheated 170°C/150°C fan oven for 3 minutes, turn the oven off and leave them there with the door closed for 10 minutes, then remove and cool completely.

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In Season

DID YOU KNOW? The sweet potato is one of the oldest vegies eaten by humans. Scientists estimate that sweet potatoes were first cultivated by Central American Indigenous people centuries ago.

Sweet FACTS

VEGETABLE RÖSTI WITH SMOKED SALMON & SOUR CREAM PREP + COOK TIME 30 MINUTES SERVES 2

 ½ small kumara (125g), peeled,

grated coarsely  2 shallots (50g), sliced finely

Christopher Columbus is thought to be the explorer who initially introduced them to Europe back in the 1400s. From then, it spread to Asia, Africa and, centuries later, it arrived in Australia.

CHOOSING

 1 medium silver beet leaf (65g),

SWEET potatoes should be undamaged, firm, evenly coloured and heavy for their size.



STORING DO not refrigerate sweet potatoes – store in a well-ventilated place, away from heat and light, and use within a week.

     

trimmed, shredded 1 small zucchini (90g), grated coarsely 1 egg, beaten lightly ⅓ cup (50g) wholemeal spelt flour 1 tablespoon EXTRA virgin olive oil 120g smoked salmon 1½ tablespoons light sour cream 1 tablespoon fresh dill sprigs

1 Combine kumara, shallot, silver beet, zucchini, egg and flour in a large bowl; mix well. Divide mixture into four equal portions. 2 Heat oil in a large non-stick frying pan over medium heat, place kumara mixture into pan; press each portion down with a spatula to flatten. Cook 4 minutes each side or until rösti are golden and cooked through. 3 Serve rösti topped with smoked salmon, sour cream and dill. TIP Cooked rösti can be stored in the refrigerator overnight and reheated in a sandwich press.

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LOVELY BRUNCH VEGETABLE RÖSTI WITH SMOKED SALMON & SOUR CREAM RECIPE OPPOSITE

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Made From Scratch

Artichokes fruit and vegetables

Preserving is a time-honoured tradition. And while shop-bought preserves are convenient, there is real satisfaction in making your own. And it isn’t difficult, it’s all in the preparation. Here, we show you how it’s done.

P H OTO G R A P H ER S B E N D E A R N E LY & W I L L I A M M E P P E M S T Y L I S T S O P H I A YO U N G

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VERSATILE

PRESERVED ARTICHOKES

RECIPE ON PAGE

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COOK’S

NOTES

Steps

PRESERVED ARTICHOKES

STEP 1

STEP 4

WORKING with one artichoke at a time, trim the stalks to 6cm; peel stalks with a vegetable peeler.

CUT off tops leaving a 4cm artichoke base; rub with halved lemon and place in a bowl of water.

STEP 2

STEP 5

SNAP off the tough outer leaves of the artichoke until you reach the pale inner leaves.

BRING the vinegar brine to the boil over medium heat; cook artichokes in the brine until tender.

STEP 3

STEP 6

USING a small paring knife, trim any remaining tough ends from the dark green leaves.

USING a small teaspoon, or melon baller, discard the centre hairy choke from each artichoke.

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Artichokes are very seasonal, appearing on greengrocers’ shelves during spring and then again in autumn. Serve preserved artichokes as part of an antipasti platter with olives, cured meats and buffalo mozzarella. Or use as a topping for pizza and bruschetta, or as a sandwich filling with rocket, prosciutto and tomato.

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Made From Scratch

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Made From Scratch

PRESERVED ARTICHOKES PREP + COOK TIME 1½ HOURS MAKES 10 CUPS

You need to start 8 days before  20 small globe artichokes (1.8kg)  1 medium lemon (140g), halved  2 litres (8 cups) water  3½ cups (875ml) white

wine vinegar  2 cups (500ml) dry white wine  3 cloves garlic  2 fresh bay leaves  2 teaspoons sea salt flakes  1 teaspoon whole black    

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peppercorns ½ cup (125ml) EXTRA virgin olive oil ¼ cup (60ml) lemon juice 4 fresh rosemary sprigs 3½ cupS (875ml) EXTRA virgin olive oil, extra

1 Before you start, read jar preparation and sterilising methods instructions on page 77. 2 Fill a large bowl with water. Squeeze juice from one lemon half into the bowl. 3 Working with one artichoke, at a time, trim artichoke stalks to 6cm; peel stalks with a vegetable peeler. Snap off the tough outer leaves of the artichoke until you reach the pale inner leaves. Using a small paring knife, trim any remaining tough ends from the dark green leaves. Cut off tops leaving a 4cm artichoke base; rub with halved lemon and place in the bowl of water. Remove in batches to cook. 4 Combine the water, 3 cups of the vinegar, wine, garlic, bay leaves, half the salt and all the peppercorns in a large saucepan over medium heat. Bring to the boil over medium heat. Cook artichokes, in three batches, for 6 minutes or until tender; drain well and place in a large bowl. Using a small teaspoon (or melon baller), remove and discard the centre hairy choke from each artichoke. 5 Whisk together olive oil, lemon juice, remaining vinegar and remaining salt in a small bowl. Pour over artichokes; season to taste with freshly ground black pepper. Stir to coat in liquid; set aside for 30 minutes to marinate. 6 Spoon artichokes and marinating liquid into a 2.5 litre (10-cup) sterilised jar; add rosemary, top with extra oil to cover artichokes. Seal; label and date jars. Leave for 1 week for flavours to develop; refrigerate after opening.

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A healthy breakfast is the most important meal of the day. It provides energy and nutrients that are fundamental to health, wellbeing and vitality. And with these delicious breakfast ideas, you’ll be ready to take on your day!

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Start The Day


Start The Day

Breaky STUFF

BAKED BEANS & TOMATO POTS WITH ROSEMARY SOURDOUGH CRUMBLE PREP + COOK TIME 2½ HOURS (+ STANDING) SERVES 2

Start this recipe the night before.

TOP TIP It’s hard to eat poorly when you’ve got a carton of eggs in the fridge, even if there’s little else around. Eggs represent very compact packets of protein and nutrients ready to be turned into a nutritious meal in minutes. Master an omelette then you can create a filling according to what you have on hand.

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 ½ cup (100g) dried cannellini beans  rice bran oil spray  1 medium brown onion (150g),

chopped finely  2 cloves garlic, crushed  1½ teaspoons chopped fresh rosemary  1 teaspoon ground cumin  pinch chilli flakes  400g canned cherry tomatoes in juice  1 cup (250ml) water  60g white sourdough bread,

torn roughly  1 tablespoon small fresh

rosemary sprigs

1 Cover beans in a large bowl with cold water; stand 8 hours or overnight. Drain. 2 Cook beans in a large saucepan of boiling water for 45 minutes or until tender. Drain. 3 Preheat oven to 200°C/180°C fan. 4 Spray a medium non-stick frying pan with oil, heat over low heat; cook onion, stirring, for 10 minutes or until softened. Add garlic, rosemary, cumin and chilli; cook, stirring, for 1 minute or until fragrant. Add tomatoes, the water and beans, bring to the boil; reduce heat, simmer, uncovered, for 10 minutes or until thickened slightly. Season with pepper. 5 Spoon mixture into 2 x 1½-cup (375ml) ovenproof dishes; place on a baking tray. Top mixture with torn bread and rosemary sprigs. Spray with oil. 6 Bake for 15 minutes or until browned and bubbling. per serve 13.1g total fat (1.9g saturated fat); 1459kJ (349 cal); 30.3g carbohydrate; 21.5g protein; 16.1g fibre; 310mg sodium

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WEEKEND

BAKED BEANS & TOMATO POTS WITH ROSEMARY SOURDOUGH CRUMBLE RECIPE OPPOSITE

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25 MINUTES MUSHROOM, TOMATO & GOAT’S CHEESE OMELETTES RECIPE OPPOSITE

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Start The Day

MUSHROOM, TOMATO & GOAT’S CHEESE OMELETTES PREP + COOK TIME 25 MINUTES SERVES 4

 1 tablespoon EXTRA virgin olive oil  400g mixed mushrooms, sliced (such as

COOK’S

NOTES

button, swiss brown, flat, enoki, shimeji)  1 clove garlic, crushed  ½ teaspoon chopped fresh thyme leaves  200g grape tomatoes, halved  8 free-range eggs  ⅓ cup (80ml) water  100g drained marinated goat’s cheese

1 Heat half the oil in a 20cm frying pan over medium-high heat; cook mushrooms, stirring occasionally, for 8 minutes or until browned. 2 Add garlic, thyme and tomatoes; cook, stirring, for 2 minutes or until tomatoes are just softened. Season to taste. Remove from pan; cover to keep warm. Wipe pan clean. 3 Lightly beat eggs and the water with a pinch of salt in a large bowl until combined. 4 Heat ½ teaspoon of the remaining oil in same pan over high heat. Add a quarter of the egg mixture, tilting the pan so it covers the base. Draw the outside edge of the egg mixture into the centre of the pan with a lifter or spatula, letting the uncooked egg run over the base. Repeat until egg is almost set. Top half the omelette with a quarter each of the mushroom mixture and cheese. Fold omelette over; slide out of pan onto a plate, folding in half again as it slides onto the plate. 5 Repeat step 4 with remaining oil, egg mixture, mushroom mixture and cheese. If you like, serve omelettes topped with extra thyme sprigs and freshly ground black pepper.

MUSHROOM, TOMATO & GOAT’S CHEESE OMELETTES Omelettes are best served immediately, but can be kept warm in a 150°C/130°C fan oven for a few minutes while cooking the remaining omelettes.

per serve 20.7g total fat (7.4g saturated fat); 1204kJ (287 cal); 3g carbohydrate; 21.5g protein; 2.4g fibre

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Start The Day

QUINOA PORRIDGE PREP + COOK TIME 20 MINUTES SERVES 2

COOK’S

NOTES QUINOA PORRIDGE Although most quinoa comes rinsed, it’s a good idea to rinse it yourself under cold water until the water runs clear. This removes any remaining outer coating, which has a bitter taste and can make it difficult to digest. Quinoa absorbs a lot of liquid, so depending on how you like your porridge, add a little boiling water at the end of step 1 to thin it out. We used a pink lady apple in this recipe.

 ½ cup (100g) white quinoa, rinsed  1½ cups (375ml) water  ½ cup (125ml) skim milk or

almond milk  1 medium red apple (150g),

grated coarsely  ⅓ cup (95g) plain yoghurt  1 tablespoon raw honey or pure

maple syrup  1 medium mango (430g), sliced  1 tablespoon goji berries  2 tablespoons pistachios, roasted,

chopped coarsely

1 Combine quinoa and the water in a small saucepan; bring to the boil. Reduce heat; simmer, covered, for 10 minutes. Add milk; cook, covered, for a further 5 minutes or until quinoa is tender. Stir in apple until combined. 2 Place yoghurt and honey in a small bowl; stir gently to swirl through. 3 Serve porridge topped with mango slices, goji berries, pistachios and honey yoghurt. per serve 9.3g total fat (2.4g saturated fat); 1923kJ (460 cal); 76.5g carbohydrate; 16g protein; 3.5g fibre

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20 MINUTES QUINOA PORRIDGE RECIPE OPPOSITE

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ON THE GO HORCHATA PORRIDGE SHAKE RECIPE OPPOSITE

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Start The Day

HORCHATA PORRIDGE SHAKE PREP + COOK TIME 15 MINUTES (+ REFRIGERATION) SERVES 4 (MAKES 1 LITRE)

You will need to start the recipe the night before. This recipe is perfect for a breakfast on the go, simply pour into a bottle, jar or jug with a lid and away you go.  1 vanilla bean  1 litre (4 cups) unsweetened almond milk  1 cup (90g) rolled oats  1 tablespoon raw honey  ½ teaspoon sea salt

COOK’S

NOTES KORCHATA PORRIDGE SHAKE For a quick version, leave out the oats (and the overnight refrigeration); blend chilled milk, vanilla seeds, honey and salt together. Serve immediately.

 1 tablespoon rolled oats, extra  ⅓ cup (24g) flaked almonds  ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon

1 Split vanilla beans in half lengthways; using the tip of a small knife, scrape out seeds. Combine vanilla seeds and pod with almond milk, oats and honey in a medium jug. Cover; refrigerate overnight. 2 Preheat oven to 180°C/160°C fan. Place extra oats on an oven tray; roast for 5 minutes. Add almonds; roast for another 5 minutes or until lightly golden. 3 Discard vanilla bean from milk mixture. Blend or process milk mixture until smooth; stir in salt. 4 Pour shake into four glasses, top with roasted almond mixture; sprinkle with cinnamon. Serve immediately. per serve 8.7g total fat (0.6g saturated fat); 829kJ (198 cal); 27g carbohydrate; 8.6g protein; 3.5g fibre

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NUTS They have been a well-loved food for thousands of years. And what a WORLD OF TEXTURE AND FLAVOUR they bring to just about every global cuisine.

Nuts make NUTRITIOUS SNACKS, providing healthy oils, dietary fibre, vitamins, minerals and protein, and serve us as great ingredients for both flavour and texture in hundreds of dishes. NUT OILS ARE AMONG THE FINEST FOR SALAD DRESSINGS and cooking, and nut meals (ground nuts) are especially prized for making recklessly rich cakes. Freshness is vital and ROASTING BRINGS OUT WONDERFUL NEW FLAVOUR in many nuts.


Spotlight


Spotlight

KNOW YOUR

NUTS 1

PECANS

are like walnuts but sweeter and milder. Best known in pecan pie, which originated in the American South, they are good in cakes, biscuits and breads, in salads and with cream cheese, celery or apple. They are usually available shelled.

5

WALNUTS

are delicious with cheeses, especially blue ones, and in salads, cakes and desserts. They are usually sold shelled but because they stale quickly, are best bought in shell. Walnut oil is a fine salad and cooking oil.

9

CANDLENUTS

are very oily and their name comes from the fact that they were once used to make candles. The raw nuts are toxic so they are always roasted. They are often crushed and added to soups, used as a thickener or mixed with garlic, chilli and shrimp paste as a flavour base. They can be substituted with macadamias.

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2

HAZELNUTS

when roasted have a sweet flavour that is wonderful with watercress, orange and rich meats such as duck, and also in meringues, biscuits, cakes and chocolate. Hazelnut oil is a fine and delicate salad and cooking oil. Hazelnuts are available in shell and shelled.

6

ALMONDS

sweet almonds are mild when raw, but roasting brings out warm flavour that goes with a wide range of sweet and savoury dishes. Available in shell or as whole kernels either raw or roasted, blanched kernels, flaked, slivered or ground.

10

CHESTNUTS

are often used more like a vegie than a nut. They can be boiled and puréed to serve with meat and game or used in stuffings. Hot roast chestnuts are eaten in Europe as a winter snack. They are also used in cakes and puddings and are candied for glacés. In Italy chestnut meal is used as a thickener and chestnut flour is also produced.

3

CASHEWS

have a full, sweetish flavour that works especially well with spices and strong, savoury tastes so they are often used in Chinese and Indian cooking. They are always sold shelled as their shells contain caustic oils which makes removing them a difficult task.

7

BRAZIL

are gathered in the Amazonian rainforest as they are difficult to cultivate. Their sweet, rich taste makes them ideal for sweets and biscuits and they are delicious dipped in butterscotch toffee. Available shelled and in the shell. Shells are easier to crack if they are frozen.

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PISTACHIOS

are usually sold in their halfopened shells but are also available shelled, either salted to use as a snack or unsalted to use in cooking. Their flavour is mild and slightly resinous. Decoratively bright green, they are used to stud pâtés and terrines, in biscuits, cakes and confectionery, and for a delicate green ice-cream.

4

PEANUTS*

are a favourite nut used in baking, salads, sauces (like the famous satay sauce), confectionary, and are used also for peanut butter. Peanut oil is used in cooking and can be heated to high temperatures They are available in shell, as skin-on or skinned raw, roasted or roasted and salted kernels. *

8

MACADAMIAS

are native to Australia and have a buttery flavour. They are roasted and used in baking, confectionery, and in savoury contexts such as browned butter to dress brussels sprouts, or freshwater fish. Available shelled, raw, roasted, or roasted and salted.

* WARNING Peanuts can cause lifethreatening allergic reactions in some people. Peanuts, or products containing peanuts, should not be offered to children unless it is known that it is safe for them to eat them. Many schools now forbid any nuts anywhere on the premises.

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30 MINUTES SMOOTH NUT & SEED BUTTER RECIPE OPPOSITE

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Spotlight

SMOOTH NUT & SEED BUTTER PREP + COOK TIME 30 MINUTES MAKES 1½ CUPS

This is a delicious non-dairy butter alternative for vegans and for those who are lactose intolerant. This butter is very lightly sweetened; however, it may still be used as a spread for savoury sandwiches or, if you prefer, you could omit the honey all together.  1 cup (160g) blanched

almonds, roasted  ½ cup (70g) unsalted

peanuts, roasted  ½ cup (75g) sunflower seed kernels  ¼ cup (40G) linseeds  ¼ cup (60ml) EXTRA virgin olive oil  1 tablespoon honey  ½ teaspoon sea salt flakes

1 Before you start, read jar preparation and sterilising methods instructions on page 77. 2 Process all ingredients, scraping the side of the bowl regularly, until the mixture is smooth. Alternatively, use a high speed blender for a faster and smoother result. (This step may take up to 25 minutes depending on the processing power of your processor or blender. Powerful commercial processors and blenders will take around 10 minutes, while small retail home-use blenders/processors can take up to 25 minutes before the mixture becomes smooth.) 3 Spoon nut and seed butter into a sterilised jar and refrigerate (see tip) . Stir the nut butter before using as the oil will settle on the top.

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PREPARATION COOK’S

NOTES SMOOTH NUT & SEED BUTTER For crunchy nut butter, reserve ½ cup of nuts and pulse through at the end of blending. Try swapping the almonds and peanuts with cashews and macadamias; omit the linseeds, and stir in 2 tablespoons poppy seeds at the end. For a nutty-chocolate spread, add 1½ tablespoons dutch-processed cocoa and an extra 1 tablespoon honey into the ingredients.

Roasting nuts enhances their flavour and makes them crunchier. Roast small amounts in a small, dry frying pan over medium heat, stirring until fragrant and just changed in colour. Larger amounts can be ROASTED IN A SINGLE LAYER ON AN OVEN TRAY IN A MODERATE OVEN for about 5 minutes, checking and stirring once or twice. Blanching, chopping or grinding are BEST CARRIED OUT JUST BEFORE USING NUTS, as their exposed surfaces rapidly lose flavour when exposed to air. The skins of almonds and hazelnuts are quite bitter so you will want to remove as much as possible before using them for baking. SKIN ALMONDS BY BLANCHING THEM. Place nuts in a heatproof bowl and cover with boiling water for a couple of minutes. Drain and place them in a bowl of cold water. Drain again and the skins should slip off easily when the almond is squeezed between thumb and forefinger. TO SKIN HAZELNUTS, ROAST THE NUTS ON AN OVEN TRAY in a moderate oven for about 15 minutes, shaking the tray occasionally and checking to make sure they’re not burning. Remove the tray from the oven and turn the nuts out onto a clean dry tea towel. Wrap the nuts in the towel and rub them together vigorously – the skins should flake off quite readily. You won’t get all the skins off, but this is fine for most baking purposes.

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Spotlight

Nut

FACTS

PASTA WITH NUT PASTE, PEAR & BORLOTTI BEANS PREP + COOK TIME 40 MINUTES SERVES 4

 600g fresh borlotti beans, shelled  ½ cup (80g) blanched almonds, roasted  ½ cup (50g) walnuts, roasted

CHOOSING Shelled nuts on sale are often stale, so it is BEST TO BUY NUTS IN THE SHELL, which protects them from rancidity, unless you can get them from a trusted retailer with a high turnover, or find vacuum− packed ones. AVOID ANY NUTS IN THE SHELL THAT RATTLE or are light for their size as these may mean the nuts are wizened.

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 1 clove garlic, crushed  ¼ cup firmly packed fresh flat-leaf        

parsley, chopped coarsely ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper ½ cup (125ml) EXTRA virgin olive oil 375g penne pasta 2 medium pears (460g), unpeeled, cut into thin wedges 1 tablespoon EXTRA virgin olive oil, extra 1 medium radicchio (200g), leaves separated, torn 120g blue cheese, crumbled ¼ cup loosely packed fresh flat-leaf parsley sprigs, extra

1 Place borlotti beans in a large saucepan of cold water. Bring to the boil; boil 25 minutes or until tender. Drain. 2 Process nuts, garlic, parsley and pepper until finely chopped. With the motor operating, gradually pour in ¼ cup of the oil until combined. Season with salt. 3 Cook pasta in a large saucepan of boiling salted water 8 minutes or until almost tender. Drain; reserving ½ cup of the cooking water. Return pasta to pan; cover to keep warm. 4 Meanwhile, season pears. Heat extra oil in a large frying pan over medium heat; cook pear for 2 minutes each side or until golden. Drain on paper towel. Add beans to same pan, stirring for 2 minutes or until heated through. 5 Add nut paste to pasta with enough reserved cooking water for the paste to coat the pasta (do not return the pan to the heat or the nut paste will thicken and make the mixture dry). Add pears, beans and radicchio; toss gently to combine. Season. 6 Serve pasta topped with cheese and parsley sprigs, drizzled with remaining oil.

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DINNER PARTY PASTA WITH NUT PASTE, PEAR & BORLOTTI BEANS RECIPE OPPOSITE

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WOW FACTOR! PISTACHIO, WALNUT & CHOCOLATE BAKLAVA RECIPE OPPOSITE

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Spotlight

PISTACHIO, WALNUT & CHOCOLATE BAKLAVA PREP + COOK TIME 1 HOUR 10 MINUTES (+ COOLING & STANDING) MAKES 36

 12 sheets fillo pastry  120g butter, melted  2 tablespoons finely chopped walnuts

FILLING  1½ cups (210g) pistachios  2 cups (200g) walnuts  200g dark chocolate, chopped coarsely  ⅓ cup (75g) caster sugar  2 teaspoons ground cinnamon  1½ tablespoons finely grated orange rind

    

HONEY SYRUP 1½ cup (330g) caster sugar 1½ cups (375ml) water ½ cup (175g) honey 1 medium orange (240g), rind peeled in long strips ⅓ cup (80ml) orange juice

1 Preheat oven to 190°C/170°C fan. Grease a 22cm x 40cm x 2.5cm oven tray, then line with baking paper. 2 Make filling. 3 Layer three pastry sheets, brushing each with a little of the butter. Spread a quarter of the filling over pastry, leaving a 3cm border along both long sides. Starting at one long side, roll up pastry to form a log. Place log on oven tray, brush with butter. Repeat with remaining pastry, butter and filling. 4 Bake baklava 20 minutes or until golden. 5 Meanwhile, make honey syrup. 6 Stand baklava in tray for 5 minutes to cool slightly. Using a small sharp knife, cut each log, on the diagonal, into nine 2cm wide pieces in the tray. Pour hot syrup over baklava; stand 3 hours or until syrup is absorbed. Serve topped with chopped walnuts. FILLING Place nuts on an oven tray; roast in oven 5 minutes or until browned lightly. Cool completely. Process nuts with remaining ingredients until finely chopped. HONEY SYRUP Stir sugar, the water, honey and rind in a small saucepan, over medium heat, without boiling, until sugar dissolves. Bring to a simmer. Simmer 20 minutes or until thickened slightly. Stir in juice.

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COOK’S

NOTES PISTACHIO, WALNUT & CHOCOLATE BAKLAVA Serve with greek-style yoghurt.

Nut

FACTS

STORING Store nuts in the shell in an airtight container away from heat, light and moisture. Store loose shelled nuts under the same conditions for a short period or in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 3 months or in the freezer for 6 months. STORE SHELLED NUTS IN UNOPENED PACKETS IN AIRTIGHT CONTAINERS (only one kind to a container); once opened, store as described for shelled nuts.

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Spotlight

COOK’S

NOTES

FENNEL, ALMOND & PINE NUT DUKKAH PREP + COOK TIME 10 MINUTES (+ STANDING)

 ½ cup (80g) pine nuts  1 cup (160g) dry-roasted almonds  1 teaspoon sea salt flakes

FENNEL, ALMOND & PINE NUT DUKKAH

 ¼ cup (35g) sesame seeds

Dukkah is a coarsely ground nut and seed mixture of Egyptian origin. It is traditionally served with bread and olive oil. First the bread is dipped in olive oil before the dukkah. However its uses as a seasoning are addictively endless.

 2 tablespoons cumin seeds

Dukkah IDEAS!

 2 tablespoons coriander seeds  2 teaspoons fennel seeds

1 Place pine nuts in a small frying pan; stir continuously, over medium heat, for 3 minutes or until golden. Place in a food processor with almonds and salt. 2 Place sesame, coriander, cumin and fennel seeds in same pan; stir over medium heat for 2 minutes or until sesame seeds are golden. Add to the food processor. Stand until cooled. 3 Pulse the nuts and seeds until finely chopped. Place in a jar, seal; store at room temperature.

TRY THIS Use this as a crust for pan-fried meats, such as chicken, fish or lamb. Sprinkle over soft-boiled eggs, dips, salads and vegetables. Serve as a dip with extra virgin olive oil and toasted turkish bread. ANOTHER IDEA For sweet dukkah, omit the cumin seeds and add ¼ cup of finely chopped dried figs or apricots at the end.

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To eat: dip bread into EXTRA virgin olive oil then into the dukkah to coat. Delicious served with soft-boiled quail eggs. AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN


COCKTAIL SNACK FENNEL, ALMOND & PINE NUT DUKKAH RECIPE OPPOSITE

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BEST THE OF

season There is something special about a jar of homemade preserves. Perhaps it invokes memories of Grandma, or perhaps it’s the anticipation of tasting what’s inside the jar. Here, we have gorgeous preserves − and top tips for beginners. P H O T O G R A P H E R B E N D E A R N E LY

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L O C AT I O N S T Y L I S T O L I V I A B L AC K M O R E

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Preserves

ON TREND POMELO, LEMON GRASS & KAFFIR LIME MARMALADE RECIPE ON PAGE

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Preserves CLASSIC

MINT JELLY RECIPE OPPOSITE

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MINT JELLY PREP + COOK TIME 2 HOURS (+ STANDING) MAKES 6 CUPS

 1kg green−skinned apples, unpeeled,

chopped coarsely  1.5 litres (6 cups) water  5½ cups (1.2kg) white sugar, approximately green food colouring 1 cup firmly packed fresh mint leaves

1 Before you start, read jar preparation and sterilising methods instructions on page 77. 2 Combine apple and the water in large saucepan; bring to the boil. Reduce heat; simmer, covered, about 1 hour or until apple is pulpy. 3 Strain mixture through a fine cloth into large bowl. Stand 3 hours or overnight until liquid stops dripping. Do not squeeze cloth; discard pulp. 4 Measure apple liquid; allow 1 cup sugar for each cup of liquid. Return apple liquid and sugar to same pan; stir over high heat, without boiling, until sugar dissolves. Bring to the boil; boil rapidly, uncovered, without stirring, about 30 minutes or until jelly jells when tested. 5 Pour jelly into large heatproof jug; stir in a little food colouring. Stand until jelly is lukewarm (but not set). 6 Meanwhile, drop mint into small saucepan of boiling water for 2 seconds; drain. Rinse under cold water; drain, pat dry with absorbent paper. Chop mint finely; stir into lukewarm jelly. 7 Pour jelly into hot sterilised jars; seal immediately. Label and date jars when cold.

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POMELO, LEMON GRASS & KAFFIR LIME MARMALADE PREP + COOK TIME 2 HOURS MAKES 4 CUPS

2kg pomelos 2 x 10cm sticks fresh lemon grass (40g), chopped coarsely  6 fresh kaffir lime leaves, torn  1.5 litres (6 cups) water  4½ cups (990g) white sugar, approximately

1 Before you start, read jar preparation and sterilising methods instructions on page 77. 2 Remove rind thinly from pomelos; slice rind thinly. Discard white pith; chop pomelo flesh coarsely, reserve seeds. Tie seeds, lemon grass and lime leaves in muslin. 3 Combine rind, flesh, muslin bag and the water in large saucepan; bring to the boil. Reduce heat; simmer, covered, about 1 hour or until rind is soft. Discard muslin bag. 4 Measure fruit mixture, allow ¾ cup sugar for each cup of fruit mixture. Return fruit mixture and sugar to pan; stir over high heat, without boiling, until sugar dissolves. Bring to the boil; boil, uncovered, without stirring, about 30 minutes or until marmalade jells when tested. 5 Pour hot marmalade into hot sterilised jars; seal immediately. Label and date jars when cold.

POMELO, LEMON GRASS & KAFFIR LIME MARMALADE

COOK’S

NOTES MINT JELLY Store mint jelly in a cool, dark place for 3 months. Refrigerate after opening. The jelly has a natural soft pink colour before the colouring is used; you can omit, if you prefer.

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Preserves

BEE ROO

Top

TYPES MARMALADES Marmalades are jams based on citrus fruit. Citrus rind is suspended in a clear syrup that jells at the same temperature as jams and conserves (105°C).

JAMS & CONSERVES A conserve is a jam that contains large pieces of fruit. The method used for both doesn’t vary much. The fruit is cooked with or without liquid – usually water – depending on the type of fruit, until it is tender, then sugar is added and the mixture is cooked until it is thick but spreadable at room temperature. A lot of jams simply become a thick, sweet fruit spread after cooking, others have larger pieces of fruit suspended in a clear syrup that jells at a temperature of around 105°C.

CHUTNEYS, PICKLES, RELISHES & SAUCES These condiments are all made from a variety of vegetables, fruits, sugar, spices and vinegar. During storage they usually mellow and improve in flavour. Their keeping qualities depend on the amount of acid (vinegar or sometimes citrus juice) and sugar used. Most chutneys, pickles and sauces will keep for a year if made and stored correctly.

COOK’S

NOTES BEETROOT, CARAWAY & HORSERADISH RELISH Granny Smith apples are best for this recipe. Store relish in a cool, dark place for at least three weeks before opening. Refrigerate after opening.

P+

K TIM

RA AY & MA

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aspo s way e s, crus rge fr ro 800g , ed, gr oars y 1 dium r o on 170g , d e inne ples g , , core pe oves cru ed cups ) re wine vinega p (2 hite uga aspo c rse okin salt piec ho eradish, eled,

ore rt, re ar aratio eril in methods in ctio ge 7. e se usli ombine in b h beet ot, onion, apple, ic, vi ugar and salt in large a epan; ir o r hi heat, without ing, u ar d solves. Bring to oi . ea simmer, vere g casiona y, a out inut u re is t ic . Stir in era car mus in a oon is i o ot steri ise sea iate . La e an ate w e

Relishes however, are often made with a variety of vegetables and fruit that are not ideal for long-term storage. Also, relish recipes often don’t contain enough acid (vinegar/citrus juice) and sugar to preserve them; so, generally, relishes must be stored in the fridge and should be used within weeks, not months.

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ON TREND BEETROOT, CARAWAY & HORSERADISH RELISH RECIPE OPPOSITE

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GREAT GIFT CRACKED OLIVES RECIPE ON PAGE

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Preserves

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Preserves

CRACKED OLIVES

LEMON CURD

PREP TIME 1 HOUR 30 MINUTES (+ STANDING)

PREP + COOK TIME 20 MINUTES MAKES 2 CUPS

MAKES ABOUT 25 CUPS (3KG) DRAINED OLIVES

 6 egg yolks  5kg green olives

 1 cup (220g) caster sugar

 2 tablespoons coarse cooking salt

 80g unsalted butter, chopped

 2 cloves garlic, crushed

coarsely

 1 teaspoon dried chilli flakes

 1 tablespoon finely grated

 2 teaspoons dried mixed herbs  4 litres (16 cups) EXTRA virgin

CRACKED OLIVES

lemon rind ⅔ cup (180ml) lemon juice

olive oil, approximately

1 Before you start, read jar preparation and sterilising methods instructions on page 77. 2 Using a small hammer, or the flat side of a meat mallet, carefully crack, but do not seed, each olive on a kitchen board. Place olives in large non−metallic bowl, plastic tub or bucket; cover with cold water. Cover with a large plate or a sealed plastic bag filled with water to keep olives submerged. Stand 12 to 16 days, changing the water every day, until olives become dark and tender. Drain olives, but do not rinse. 3 Combine drained olives, salt, garlic, chilli and herbs in large strainer; stand in sink overnight. 4 Spoon olives into sterilised jars; pour in enough olive oil to cover olives. Label and date jars.

COOK’S

NOTES CRACKED OLIVES You must use fresh, raw green olives, not those from the deli, as these have already been brined. Store in a cool, dark place for at least two weeks before opening. Olives will keep for up to 12 months; refrigerate after opening. The amount of olive oil you will need depends on the size and shape of the jars used. Pack olives tightly into the jar but be gentle to avoid bruising. Olives may float to the surface; to keep them submerged, place a slice of lemon or a sealed small plastic bag filled with water on top of the olives before closing the jars. You can change the flavourings of marinated olives to suit your taste. Try adding sprigs of thyme, rosemary or dried oregano, strips of lemon or orange rind, bay leaves, peppercorns, sun-dried tomatoes or mustard seeds.

1 Before you start, read jar preparation and sterilising methods instructions on page 77. 2 Whisk egg yolks and sugar in medium bowl until combined; transfer to small saucepan with remaining ingredients. Cook, stirring, over low heat, about 8 minutes or until mixture thickly coats the back of a wooden spoon. Remove from heat immediately; stir for 30 seconds. 3 Pour into hot sterilised jars; seal immediately. Label and date jars when cold. TIPS It is important to cook the curd over a low heat to prevent curdling. If you’re making curd for the first time, stir the ingredients in a medium glass or china heatproof bowl over a medium saucepan of simmering water. Make sure the base of the bowl does not touch the water in the pan. If you prefer a completely smooth curd, you can strain the mixture through a fine sieve before spooning into jars. You will need about 4 lemons for this recipe. Lemon curd will keep for several weeks in the fridge. Freeze the egg whites and use them later in friands, omelettes or a pavlova. You can make this recipe with almost any citrus fruit; simply replace the lemon rind and juice with the same amount of rind and juice of whatever citrus fruit you like – lime, orange, blood orange, mandarin, grapefruit and tangelo would all work well. If your oranges are very sweet, you might want to reduce the sugar to ¾ cup.

Warn anyone eating these olives that they still contain the seed.

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CLASSIC

LEMON CURD RECIPE OPPOSITE

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PICNIC FAVE BRANSTON-STYLE PICKLE RECIPE OPPOSITE


Preserves

BRANSTON-STYLE PICKLE PREP + COOK TIME 2 HOURS MAKES 6 CUPS

 500g cauliflower, chopped finely  2 medium brown onions (300g),   

         

chopped finely 2 medium green-skinned apples (300g), peeled, cored, chopped finely 2 medium carrots (240g), chopped finely 1 medium swede (225g), chopped finely 1 cup (140g) seeded dried dates, chopped coarsely ½ cup (80g) finely chopped sweet, spiced gherkins 2 cups (440g) firmly packed dark brown sugar 2 teaspoons coarse cooking salt 2 teaspoons brown mustard seeds 2 teaspoons ground allspice ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper 2 cups (500ml) malt vinegar 1 cup (250ml) water ⅓ cup (80ml) lemon juice 2 tablespoons treacle 1 tablespoon worcestershire sauce

COOK’S

NOTES BRANSTON-STYLE PICKLE Granny Smith apples are best for this recipe. Store pickle in a cool, dark place for at least three weeks before opening. Refrigerate after opening.

1 Before you start, read jar preparation and sterilising methods instructions on page 77. 2 Stir ingredients in large saucepan over high heat, without boiling, until sugar dissolves; bring to the boil. Reduce heat; simmer, uncovered, stirring occasionally, about 1½ hours or until mixture is thick. Cool 10 minutes. 3 Blend or process 3 cups of mixture until almost smooth; stir through the remaining mixture. 4 Spoon hot pickle into hot sterilised jars; seal immediately. Label and date jars when cold.

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Preserves

PICCALILLI PREP + COOK TIME 30 MINUTES (+ STANDING)

COOK’S

NOTES PICCALILLI

MAKES 10 CUPS

 ½ cup (140g) coarse cooking salt  2 cups (500ml) boiling water  1.75 litres (7 cups) cold water  1 small cauliflower (1kg),

Store piccalilli in a cool, dark place for at least three weeks before opening. Refrigerate after opening. Serve as part of a ploughman’s lunch – a cold lunch usually consisting of thick crusty bread, cold meats, cheese and pickles.

    

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cut into small florets 250g green beans, trimmed, chopped coarsely 2 medium carrots (240g), chopped coarsely 1 cup (220g) white sugar ⅓ cup (50g) plain flour 2 tablespoons mustard powder 2 teaspoons ground turmeric ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 litre (4 cups) cider vinegar

1 Before you start, read jar preparation and sterilising methods instructions on page 77. 2 Peel onions, leaving the roots intact to hold the onions together. Combine salt and the boiling water in large non-metallic heatproof bowl; stir until salt dissolves. Add the cold water. Add vegetables; mix well. Cover with a large plate or a sealed plastic bag half-filled with water to keep vegetables submerged; stand overnight. 3 Rinse and drain vegetables well; drain on absorbent paper. 4 Combine sugar, flour and spices in large saucepan; gradually whisk in vinegar until smooth. Cook, stirring, until mixture boils and thickens. Add vegetables; simmer, uncovered, about 10 minutes or until vegetables are barely tender. 5 Spoon hot piccalilli into hot sterilised jars; seal immediately. Label and date jars when cold.

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GREAT GIFT

PICCALILLI RECIPE OPPOSITE

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Preserves

Preparation

Top

TIPS

EQUIPMENT

JAR PREPARATION

• Choose a pan made from STAINLESS STEEL, HEAVY ALUMINIUM OR ENAMEL; don’t use copper or unsealed cast-iron pans, as the natural acids in fruit and vegetables will damage the surfaces of these pans, spoiling the flavour of the preserve. Don’t leave preserve mixtures standing in aluminium pans for more than an hour as natural acids could affect the surface of the pan and the flavour of the preserve. In most recipes, about HALF OF THE LIQUID EVAPORATES DURING THE FINAL COOKING PROCESS, so a large, wide-topped pan is essential. Either a large saucepan or small boiler is fine for most recipes. As a guide to the size saucepan to use, the PRESERVE MIXTURE SHOULD NOT BE MORE THAN 5CM DEEP after all the ingredients have been added to the pan.

Jars must be glass and have no chips or cracks; the LIDS NEED TO BE TIGHT-FITTING. Some poor quality metal lids might corrode if they touch the surface of the preserve during storage. If in doubt place a DISC OF BAKING PAPER INSIDE THE LID before securing. Metal lids that have a lining to prevent contact with the preserve are the best of all to use. SCREW-TOP LIDS FORM A GOOD SEAL on jars, clipon plastic lids don’t seal as well. Jars that have a clamped-down lid with a rubber seal also work well – the seal must be tightfitting and firm. Old seals perish, if in doubt, buy new rubber seals for the lids.

• Most preserve recipes have a stage where they are cooked covered; THE LID SHOULD BE TIGHT-FITTING, as this is the stage where evaporation is not wanted.

Use one of the three methods, below.

STERILISING

1

PUT JARS AND LIDS through the hottest cycle of a dishwasher without using detergent; or

• Stir preserve mixture with a strong large, really clean spoon. A WOODEN OR METAL SPOON will do, however a wooden spoon won’t scratch the pan.

2

• Use a SHARP KNIFE when chopping vegetables and fruit for preserves, particularly for any fine cutting of citrus fruit peel.

3

• A CANDY THERMOMETER takes the guess work out, but it’s not essential. A digital one works best.

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LIE JARS DOWN in a boiler with the lids, cover with cold water, cover the boiler with a lid. Bring the water to the boil over a high heat, boil the jars for 20 minutes; or STAND JARS UPRIGHT, without touching each other, on a wooden board on the lowest shelf in the oven. Turn the oven to the lowest temperature possible, close the oven door and leave the jars to heat through for 30 minutes.

DRYING STERILISED JARS Remove the jars from the oven or dishwasher with a towel, or from the boiling water with tongs and rubbergloved hands. Stand jars upright, not touching each other, on a wooden board or a bench covered with a towel to protect and insulate the bench. STORAGE Most of the recipes say ‘store (preserve) in a cool dark place’. The area needs to have a constant air flow and be dry, cool and dark – when a preserve is exposed to light during storage, the preserve will discolour. If the climate you live in is hot, wet and/or humid, the safest place to store preserves is in a fridge.

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Preserves

Top

TIPS

Hints DON’T INCREASE THE QUANTITIES of the recipes unless you have the right large equipment. During cooking, about half the liquid evaporates; a wide-topped boiler is ideal for making most preserves. DON’T REDUCE THE SUGAR CONTENT in recipes as it is the preservative; preserves made without enough sugar will not keep. MOULD If mould develops on any preserve, throw the preserve in that particular jar away (the mould may not have developed in every jar in the same batch). The visible mould will be on the top of the preserve, but it will have penetrated the preserve within the jar – it is not safe to eat any food that has become mouldy during storage. Once a jar of any preserve is opened, store it in the fridge.

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share fresh, homemade food all year long

We’re here to help you make great tasting food today, that you can share 365 tomorrows. From fresh, homemade jams to perfectly preserved pickles, we’ll be with you every step of the way with recipes, supplies and loads of encouragement. freshpreserving.com.au or

/BallPreservingAU


fast

What’s for dinner? It’s a much-pondered question. But with our delicious meal ideas, the question is answered!

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PHOTOGRAPHER MAREE HOMER STYLING LUCY TWEED

FRESH


What’s For Dinner?

35 MINUTES SEAFOOD LAKSA RECIPE ON PAGE

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25 MINUTES CHAR-GRILLED STEAK WITH SIAN PESTO RECIPE OPPOSITE

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What’s For Dinner?

CHAR-GRILLED STEAK WITH ASIAN PESTO

SEAFOOD LAKSA

PREP + COOK TIME 25 MINUTES • SERVES 4

 375g dried rice stick noodles

 4 x 150g beef eye-fillet steaks  2 teaspoons cracked black pepper  cooking-oil spray  180g soba noodles  4 baby buk choy (600g), halved

       

PREP + COOK TIME 35 MINUTES • SERVES 4

 3¼ cups (810ml) coconut milk  ½ cup (120g) laksa paste  4 fresh kaffir lime leaves, torn  2 tablespoons peanut oil  750g fresh seafood marinara mix

lengthways

 500g uncooked shelled medium

ASIAN PESTO

 200g snake beans, chopped coarsely

 2 cups firmly packed fresh

coriander leaves 1 cup firmly packed fresh mint leaves 1 green onion, chopped coarsely 1 fresh long green chilli, chopped coarsely 1 clove garlic, crushed 3 teaspoons light soy sauce 1 tablespoon lime juice ¼ cup (60ml) water 1 teaspoon sesame oil

1 Make asian pesto. 2 Sprinkle beef with pepper. Lightly spray a heated grill plate (or grill or barbecue) with cooking oil; cook beef for 4 minutes each side or until cooked as desired. Cover; rest 5 minutes. 3 Meanwhile, cook noodles in a large saucepan of boiling water about 2 minutes. Add buk choy; cook a further 2 minutes or until buk choy and noodles are tender; drain. 4 Serve beef with noodles, buk choy and pesto. ASIAN PESTO Blend or process ingredients until well combined.

SEAFOOD LAKSA

king prawns  ½ cup loosely packed fresh thai

basil leaves  ½ cup (70g) coarsely chopped roasted unsalted peanuts  2 fresh long red chillies, sliced thinly

1 Place noodles in a large heatproof bowl, cover with boiling water; stand until tender, drain. 2 Meanwhile, place coconut milk, paste and lime leaves in a wok; bring to a simmer over medium heat, stirring, for 15 minutes or until mixture reduces by a third. 3 Meanwhile, heat oil in a large frying pan over high heat; cook marinara mix and prawns, in batches, for 2 minutes or until just changed in colour. Drain on paper towel. 4 Add beans and seafood to curry mixture in wok; cook, uncovered, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes or until beans are just tender and seafood is cooked as desired. 5 Divide noodles into serving bowls; top with curry, sprinkle with basil, nuts and chilli.

COOK’S

NOTES SEAFOOD LAKSA Laksa pastes vary in heat, so use only as much as suits your heat tolerance. If you can’t buy snake beans, use green beans.

CHAR-GRILLED STEAK WITH ASIAN PESTO Pesto can be made a day ahead. drizzle with some oil and cover surface with plastic wrap; store in the refrigerator.

per serve 66.7g fat (41.3g saturated fat); 4983kJ (1192 cal); 76.6g carbohydrate; 68.1g protein; 8.4g fibre

per serve 10.5g total fat (3.3g saturated fat); 1417kJ (339 cal); 13.3g carbohydrate; 42.6g protein; 9.4g fibre

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What’s For Dinner?

COOK’S

NOTES

RED WINE SAUSAGES & HERB SALAD ROLLS

TUNA & CHILLI PASTA

PREP + COOK TIME 25 MINUTES (+ REFRIGERATION) • MAKES 6

 1 cup (250ml) red wine  2 tablespoons brown sugar

RED WINE SAUSAGES & HERB SALAD ROLLS Use chipolatas and mini rolls for party finger food.

 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar  2 cloves garlic, crushed  4 fresh bay leaves  1 tablespoon each coriander and    

cumin seeds 6 thick beef sausages (900g), split lengthways 6 long rolls (780g), split lengthways 30g butter, softened 1½ tablespoons english mustard HERB SALAD

 2 green onions, sliced  ½ cup fresh flat-leaf parsley

leaves, torn  ½ cup fresh chervil leaves, torn  2 teaspoons red wine vinegar  2 teaspoons olive oil

TUNA & CHILLI PASTA PREP + COOK TIME 15 MINUTES SERVES 4

1 Combine wine, sugar, vinegar, garlic, bay leaves and seeds in a large shallow dish; season. Add sausages; toss to coat. Cover; refrigerate at least 3 hours or overnight. 2 Remove sausages from marinade; discard marinade. Cook sausages on a heated grill plate (or grill or barbecue) over medium heat for 10 minutes or until browned on both sides and cooked through. 3 Meanwhile, make herb salad. 4 Spread rolls with butter and mustard; top with sausages and salad. HERB SALAD Combine ingredients in a small bowl; season to taste. per serve 54.2g fat (22.7g saturated fat); 4142kJ (991 cal); 78.5g carbohydrate; 38.2 protein; 10.9g fibre

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Cook 375g angel hair pasta in large saucepan of boiling water until tender; drain, reserving ¼ cup cooking liquid. Rinse pasta under cold water, drain. Meanwhile, drain 425g canned tuna in oil, reserving 2 tablespoons of the oil. Heat oil in medium frying pan, add 4 thinly sliced garlic cloves; cook, stirring, until fragrant. Add 1 teaspoon dried chilli flakes and ⅓ cup dry white wine; cook, uncovered, stirring occasionally, until liquid is almost evaporated. Add 400g undrained canned chopped tomatoes, tuna and reserved cooking liquid to pan; simmer until liquid has reduced slightly. Remove from heat; stir in 1 tablespoon lemon juice. Combine pasta and sauce in large bowl. per serving 22.3g total fat (3.2g saturated fat); 2617kJ (626 cal); 67.5g carbohydrate; 32.5g protein; 4.8g fibre

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25 MINUTES RED WINE SAUSAGES & HERB SALAD ROLLS RECIPE OPPOSITE

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35 MINUTES STICKY PORK STIR-FRY RECIPE OPPOSITE

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What’s For Dinner? STICKY PORK STIR-FRY

STICKY PORK STIR-FRY PREP + COOK TIME 35 MINUTES • SERVES 4

 ⅔ cup (130g) brown rice  cooking-oil spray  440g pork fillets, sliced thinly  1 large red onion (200g),

cut into wedges  ¼ cup (60ml) sweet chilli sauce  1 tablespoon light soy sauce  2 tablespoons brown sugar  1 large red capsicum (350g),

sliced thinly  30g fresh ginger, cut into matchsticks  ½ cup fresh thai basil leaves  500g baby choy sum, cut into 10cm lengths

BEEF IN BLACK BEAN SAUCE WITH RICE NOODLES & GREENS PREP + COOK TIME 30 MINUTES SERVES 4

Place 250g dried rice stick noodles in large heatproof bowl, cover with boiling water; stand until just tender, drain. Meanwhile, heat 1 tablespoon peanut oil in wok; stir-fry 600g minced beef, 1 medium thinly sliced brown onion and 2 thinly sliced fresh long red chillies until beef is cooked through. Add 350g coarsely chopped wombok and 150g sugar snap peas; stir-fry until wombok is tender. Add noodles and ¼ cup each black bean sauce, kecap manis and beef stock, 1 tablespoon rice vinegar and 4 thinly sliced green onions; stir-fry until hot. per serving 16.4g total fat (6.4g saturated fat); 1559kJ (373 cal); 19.2g carbohydrate; 35.2g protein; 3.3g fibre

COOK’S

NOTES STICKY PORK STIR-FRY Use regular basil if Thai basil is unavailable. Use vegetables of your choice such as green beans, snow peas or buk choy.

1 Cook rice in a large saucepan of boiling water, uncovered, for 30 minutes or until tender. Drain. 2 Meanwhile, lightly spray a heated wok with cooking oil; stir-fry pork and onion over high heat, in 3 batches, for 2 minutes or until browned. 3 Combine sauces and sugar in a small jug; stir until sugar dissolves. 4 Return pork mixture to wok with capsicum, ginger and sauce mixture; stir-fry for 2 minutes or until capsicum is tender. Remove from heat. Add half the basil and toss to combine. 5 Place choy sum in a heatproof bowl; cover with boiling water, drain well. 6 Spoon rice and choy sum between serving plates. Top with stir-fry mixture; sprinkle with remaining basil. per serve 4.5g fat (1.1g saturated fat); 1542kJ (369 cal); 44.4g carbohydrate; 33.5g protein; 8.1g fibre

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As the the new with it a season brings cornuco pi fresh, fa bulous p a of roduce. And the at their are finest in these deliciou s recipe s.

P H O T O G R A P H E R B E N D E A R N E LY

PHOTOCHEF DOMINIC SMITH

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S T Y L I S T L U CY T W E E D


A Taste Of Autumn

AUTUMN TREAT SPICED PUMPKIN & HONEY PIES RECIPE ON PAGE

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A Taste Of Autumn

SIDE OR MAIN BEETROOT & HEIRLOOM CARROT SALAD WITH PERSIAN FETTA RECIPE OPPOSITE

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BEETROOT & HEIRLOOM CARROT SALAD WITH PERSIAN FETTA PREP + COOK TIME 1 HOUR SERVES 8

 1 egg yolk  1 tablespoon chilled water  1 egg yolk, extra  ½ cup (125ml) thickened cream  3 teaspoons honey  ¼ cup (25g) coarsely chopped walnuts

 500g golden baby beetroot, trimmed  500g red baby beetroot, trimmed  800g baby carrots, trimmed



 800g baby purple carrots, trimmed  1 large red onion (300g), cut into



thick wedges  2 teaspoons dijon mustard  ½ cup loosely packed fresh mint leaves  180g tub persian fetta, drained, crumbled

    

DRESSING



SPICED PUMPKIN FILLING 1kg jap or butternut pumpkin, chopped coarsely pinch of sea salt ¾ teaspoon ground ginger ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon 2 eggs 2 tablespoons milk ¼ cup (90g) honey 2 tablespoons caster sugar

 ½ cup (125ml) EXTRA virgin olive oil  ¼ cup (60ml) red wine vinegar  1 tablespoon honey

1 Make dressing. 2 Preheat oven to 200°C/180°C fan. Line two oven trays with baking paper. 3 Scrub beetroot and carrots. Divide beetroot, carrot and onion between trays. Spoon half the dressing over vegetables; toss to coat. Season. Roast 45 minutes or until vegetables are tender; cool slightly. Peel beetroot; cut in half (or quarters if large). Cut carrots in half lengthways. 4 Stir mustard into remaining dressing. 5 Arrange vegetables on a platter; top with mint and remaining dressing. Serve warm topped with fetta. DRESSING Whisk ingredients together in a small bowl; season to taste.

SPICED PUMPKIN & HONEY PIES PREP + COOK TIME 1 HOUR 45 MINUTES (+ REFRIGERATION & COOLING) MAKES 6

 1½ cups (225g) plain flour  125g cold butter, chopped  2 tablespoons icing sugar

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1 Process flour, butter and sugar until mixture resembles breadcrumbs. Add egg yolk and the water; process until ingredients come together. Divide pastry into six portions, wrap each in plastic wrap; refrigerate 30 minutes. 2 Meanwhile, make spiced pumpkin filling. 3 Roll pastry between sheets of baking paper until large enough to line six 10cm round, 3cm deep, loose-based tart tins. Lift pastry into tins, press into base and sides, trim edge; prick bases all over with fork. Cover; refrigerate for 20 minutes. 4 Meanwhile, preheat oven to 180°C/160°C fan. 5 Place tins on an oven tray; line each with baking paper, fill with dried beans or rice. Bake 15 minutes. Remove paper and beans; bake a further 10 minutes or until browned lightly. Cool on tray. 6 Spoon pumpkin filling into pastry cases. Brush tops with extra egg yolk. Bake pies 25 minutes or until set and light golden. 7 Just before serving, spoon cream onto pies, drizzle with honey and top with nuts.

SPICED PUMPKIN & HONEY PIES

COOK’S

NOTES SPICED PUMPKIN & HONEY PIES The pies can be made a day ahead. Before serving, reheat in a 160°C/140°C fan oven for 10 minutes or until warm.

SPICED PUMPKIN FILLING Boil, steam or microwave pumpkin until just tender; drain. Process pumpkin, salt, ginger and cinnamon until smooth. Add eggs, milk, honey and sugar; process until smooth. Cool.

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SPICY PUMPKIN EMPANADAS PREP + COOK TIME 1 HOUR 30 MINUTES (+ STANDING) MAKES 20

 580g butternut pumpkin, peeled,

chopped coarsely  2 tablespoons EXTRA virgin olive oil  2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh

flat-leaf parsley

or until foamy. Combine flour and salt in a large bowl; make a well in the centre. Add yeast mixture and oil. Using your hands, mix until combined. Turn dough onto a floured surface; knead 10 minutes or until smooth and elastic. Place dough in an oiled large bowl; turn to coat in oil. Cover with plastic wrap; set aside in a warm, draught-free place for 1 hour or until dough doubles in size.

 2 tablespoons finely chopped

fresh coriander

 1 teaspoon ground coriander

HARISSA EGGPLANT & CHORIZO SALAD

 1 small red onion (80g), chopped finely

PREP + COOK TIME 30 MINUTES SERVES 4

 2 teaspoons ground cumin  ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper

SPICY PUMPKIN EMPANADAS

 ⅔ cup (130g) greek fetta, crumbled  1 egg, beaten lightly

COOK’S

NOTES SPICY PUMPKIN EMPANADAS Serve with a chunky Mexican tomato salsa, if you like. You can make the filling up to a day ahead; store, covered, in the fridge until ready to use. Unbaked empanadas can be frozen for up to 2 months. Bake them from frozen for 40 minutes or until golden.

HARISSA EGGPLANT & CHORIZO SALAD Try using a variety of mushrooms such as flat, cup, button, portobello, oyster and enoki, keeping small mushrooms halved or whole and large types sliced. Cooking the potatoes whole with the peel on keeps the potatoes dry and fluffy doing this helps to create lightly textured pillows of gnocchi.

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DOUGH  1½ cups (375ml) water  2 teaspoons (7g) dried yeast  1 teaspoon caster sugar  4 cups (600g) plain flour  2 teaspoons fine salt  ¼ cup (60ml) EXTRA virgin olive oil

1 Make dough. 2 Preheat oven to 200°C/180°C fan. Line two oven trays with baking paper. 3 Meanwhile, combine pumpkin and oil in a large roasting pan; season. Roast, turning occasionally, 20 minutes or until pumpkin is tender. Transfer pumpkin to a heatproof bowl; mash. Stir in herbs, spices, onion and fetta; season to taste. Refrigerate until cooled. 4 Divide dough into 20 balls. Roll each ball on a floured surface into a 10cm round. Spoon 1 rounded tablespoon of the filling mixture onto half of each round; brush edge with a little egg, fold over tightly to enclose filling and form a half-moon shape. Twist the edge to seal filling (or crimp with a floured fork); place on trays. Brush tops with a little more egg. 5 Bake empanadas 30 minutes or until golden. Serve hot or at room temperature. DOUGH Combine the water, yeast and sugar in a small bowl. Set aside for 5 minutes

 2 x 420g canned chickpeas,

drained, rinsed  ½ cup (140g) greek-style yoghurt  1 large eggplant (500g)  2 tablespoons EXTRA virgin olive oil  2 cured chorizos (340g), sliced thinly  180g bocconcini cheese, torn  1 cup loosely packed fresh basil leaves

HARISSA DRESSING  2 tablespoons red wine vinegar  2 tablespoons EXTRA virgin olive oil  2 teaspoons harissa paste  1 teaspoon caster sugar

1 Make harissa dressing. 2 Process half the chickpeas with yoghurt until smooth. Season to taste. 3 Cut eggplant lengthways into thin slices; place in a medium bowl with oil, toss to coat. Season. Cook eggplant on a heated oiled barbecue (or chargrill plate or grill) for 1½ minutes each side or until tender. Transfer to a plate; cover to keep warm. 4 Meanwhile, cook chorizo on barbecue until browned both sides. 5 Place remaining chickpeas, eggplant and chorizo in a large bowl with bocconcini, basil and dressing; toss gently to combine. 6 Arrange salad on a platter, top with chickpea puree. HARISSA DRESSING Whisk ingredients together in a small bowl. Season to taste.

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30 MINUTES HARISSA EGGPLANT & CHORIZO SALAD RECIPE OPPOSITE

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A Taste Of Autumn CROWD PLEASER SPICY PUMPKIN EMPANADAS RECIPE ON PAGE

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COOK’S

NOTES POTATO GNOCCHI WITH MUSHROOMS & THYME Gnocchi are a type of Italian dumpling. Don’t be put off by having to make the dough because it’s actually quick and easy.

POTATO GNOCCHI WITH MUSHROOMS & THYME PREP + COOK TIME 1 HOUR (+ REFRIGERATION) SERVES 4

 2 tablespoons EXTRA virgin olive oil  375g assorted mushrooms, sliced thinly  2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh

lemon thyme  2 cloves garlic, crushed  300ml pouring cream  ⅓ cup (25g) finely grated parmesan  2 teaspoons fresh lemon thyme sprigs, extra

    

POTATO GNOCCHI 500g desiree potatoes, unpeeled 1 egg, beaten lightly 15g butter, melted 2 tablespoons finely grated parmesan 1 cup (150g) plain flour, approximately

1 Make potato gnocchi. 2 Heat oil in a large frying pan over high heat; cook mushrooms and thyme, allowing the mushrooms to brown well before turning occasionally, for 5 minutes or until golden. Add garlic; stir 30 seconds or until softened. Add cream; bring to the boil. Reduce heat; simmer, uncovered, until sauce thickens. Stir in half the parmesan. Season to taste. 3 Meanwhile, cook gnocchi, in batches, in a large saucepan of boiling water until gnocchi float to the surface and are cooked through. Remove from pan with a slotted spoon to a bowl; cover keep warm. 4 Once gnocchi is cooked, add to mushroom sauce; stir gently. Serve topped with remaining parmesan and extra thyme sprigs. POTATO GNOCCHI Boil whole potatoes until tender; drain. When cool enough to handle, peel away skins. Mash potatoes, using a ricer or potato masher into a medium bowl; stir in egg, butter, parmesan and enough flour to make a firm dough. Divide dough into four portions; roll each portion on a floured surface into 2cm thick ropes. Cut each rope into 2cm pieces. Place gnocchi, in a single layer, on a lightly floured tray; cover refrigerate 1 hour.

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CLASSIC

POTATO GNOCCHI WITH MUSHROOMS & THYME RECIPE OPPOSITE

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DINER CLASSIC KUMARA & GOAT’S CHEESE TART RECIPE OPPOSITE

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KUMARA & GOAT’S CHEESE TART PREP + C

IME 1 HOUR 25 MINUTES

(+ REFRIGERATION) SERVES 6

 1 medium kumara (400g), diced  1 tablespoon EXTRA virgin olive oil  3 eggs  ⅔ cup (160ml) pouring cream  ⅓ cup (25g) finely grated parmesan  100g soft goat’s cheese, crumbled  125g mixed baby salad leaves  2 shallots (50g), sliced thinly  ½ cup (75g) drained semi-dried

tomatoes, chopped coarsely  ⅓ cup (25g) shaved parmesan  1½ tablespoons EXTRA virgin olive oil  2 tablespoons lemon juice

    

PASTRY 1½ cups (225g) plain flour 1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves 125g cold butter, chopped 1 egg yolk 2 tablespoons chilled water

1 Preheat oven to 200°C/180°C fan. Place kumara on an oven tray; drizzle with oil. Roast 30 minutes or until tender. 2 Meanwhile, make pastry. 3 Roll pastry between sheets of baking paper until large enough to line a 24cm round loose-based tart tin. Lift pastry into tin, press into side, trim edge; prick base all over with fork. Cover; refrigerate 20 minutes. 4 Reduce oven to 190°C/170°C fan. 5 Place tin on an oven tray; line with baking paper then fill with dried beans or rice. Bake 15 minutes. Remove paper and beans; bake a further 10 minutes or until browned lightly. Cool on tray. 6 Whisk eggs, cream and parmesan in a medium jug until combined. Season. Place kumara in pastry case; pour in egg mixture. Top with goat’s cheese. 7 Bake tart 35 minutes or until just set. 8 Place salad leaves, shallots, tomatoes, parmesan, oil and juice in a medium bowl; toss gently to combine. Season to taste. 9 Serve tart topped with salad.

COOK’S

NOTES KUMARA & GOAT’S CHEESE TART We used baby kale leaves, available from selected supermarkets, but you could also use watercress or your favourite mix of baby salad leaves. Kumara can be roasted a day ahead. Pastry case can be made a day ahead. You can also make six individual tarts in 3cm deep, 10cm round loose-based tart tins; bake for 25 minutes.

PASTRY Process flour, thyme and butter until crumbly. Add egg yolk and the water; process until ingredients come together. Wrap in plastic wrap; refrigerate 30 minutes.

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NOTES WALNUT & SPICE CAKE WITH ROSÉ PEARS The cake and pears can be made a day ahead. Store cake in an airtight container at room temperature; pears and syrup in the fridge. Assemble on day of serving.

WALNUT & SPICE CAKE WITH ROSÉ PEARS PREP + COOK TIME 1 HOUR 30 MINUTES SERVES 8

             

4 small firm corella pears (720g) 3 cups (660g) caster sugar 3 cups (750ml) shiraz rosé (see tip) 3 whole star anise 2 cinnamon sticks 300g (3 cups) walnuts, roasted lightly 1 cup (70g) fresh white breadcrumbs 1½ teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, plus extra, for dusting ¼ teaspoon ground cloves ¼ teaspoon ground star anise 4 eggs, separated ⅔ cup (150g) caster sugar 125g butter, melted

MASCARPONE CREAM  250g mascarpone  300ml thickened cream  2 tablespoons icing sugar

1 Peel pears, keeping stalks attached; cut in half. Place sugar, wine, whole star anise and cinnamon sticks in a medium saucepan. Bring to the boil, over medium heat, stirring to dissolve sugar. Reduce heat to low; simmer for 5 minutes. Add pears; cover with a round of baking paper and a small heatproof plate to keep pears submerged. Simmer gently for 20 minutes or until tender. Cool.

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2 Preheat oven to 180°C/160° fan. Grease a 20cm springform pan; line base and side with baking paper. 3 Pulse nuts in a food processor until finely chopped. Place nuts in a large bowl with breadcrumbs, baking powder and ground spices; stir until combined. 4 Beat egg yolks and sugar in a large bowl with an electric mixer until creamy. Add nut mixture; mix well. Fold in butter. Beat egg whites in a large bowl with an electric mixer until soft peaks form. Fold egg whites into cake mixture, in two batches. Pour mixture into pan. 5 Bake cake for 45 minutes or until a skewer inserted in the centre comes out clean. Stand cake in pan for 10 minutes before transferring top-side up, onto a wire rack to cool. 6 Place 2 cups of pear poaching liquid in a small saucepan; simmer, over medium heat, for 10 minutes or until thickened. Cool. 7 Make mascarpone cream. 8 Place cake on a cake stand or plate; top with cream, pears and syrup. Dust with extra cinnamon. MASCARPONE CREAM Whisk ingredients in a small bowl of an electric mixer until thick, taking care not to over beat. TIPS You can also use small packham pears. The pears will intensify in colour if stored overnight in the syrup. For deep garnet coloured pears, substitute red wine for rosé wine.

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COVER RECIPE WALNUT & SPICE CAKE WITH ROSÉ PEARS RECIPE OPPOSITE

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Whipping up a weeknight meal in 25 minutes or less might seem like an impossible dream. Well, dreams can come true – as our delicious recipes show! PHOTOGRAPHY JOHN PAUL URIZAR STYLING VIVIEN WALSH, SOPHIA YOUNG PHOTOCHEF KIRSTEN JENKINS

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Food in a Flash

20 MINS

20 MINUTES FIVE-SPICE PORK CUTLETS WITH PLUM SAUCE RECIPE ON PAGE

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Food In A Flash

20 MINS

20 MINUTES PEPPERED STEAK SANDWICH WITH GRILLED TOMATOES RECIPE OPPOSITE

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PEPPERED STEAK SANDWICH WITH GRILLED TOMATOES

FIVE-SPICE PORK CUTLETS WITH PLUM SAUCE

PREP + COOK TIME 20 MINUTES SERVES 4

PREP + COOK TIME 20 MINUTES SERVES 4

 2 tablespoons EXTRA virgin olive oil

 4 pork cutlets (940g)

 2 teaspoons cracked black pepper

 1 tablespoon chinese five spice

 4 beef minute steaks (400g)

 2 tablespoons peanut oil

 250g cherry truss tomatoes,

 1 bunch choy sum (400g)

   

cut into four clusters 8 slices sourdough bread (560g) ⅓ cup (100g) aïoli ½ cup (70g) caramelised onion relish ½ cup loosely packed trimmed watercress

 450g packaged white microwave rice  ¼ teaspoon dried chilli flakes

PLUM SAUCE  ⅓ cup (75g) firmly packed 

1 Combine oil and pepper in a shallow dish; add steaks, turn to coat. 2 Heat an oiled chargrill pan (or barbecue or grill) over medium-high heat; cook steaks for 2 minutes each side or until cooked as desired. Remove from pan, cover; rest 5 minutes. 3 Cook tomato clusters in chargrill pan for 3 minutes or until softened. Remove from pan. 4 Toast bread slices in chargrill pan for 30 seconds each side. Spread aïoli onto half the toasted slices; top each with steak, onion relish and watercress, then remaining toasted bread slices. Serve sandwiches with tomato clusters. per sandwich 34.4g total fat (6.7g saturated fat); 3149kJ (752 cal); 62.3g carbohydrate; 38.2g protein; 10.3g fibre

     

brown sugar ½ cup (125ml) water 6 drained canned whole plums (250g) 1 tablespoon chinese cooking wine 1 cinnamon stick 2 star anise 2 tablespoons fish sauce 2 teaspoons malt vinegar

1 Heat a large frying pan over mediumhigh heat. Combine pork, five spice and oil in a large bowl; season. Cook pork 3 minutes each side or until cooked through. Remove from heat, cover; rest 5 minutes. 2 Meanwhile, make plum sauce. 3 Microwave choy sum until just wilted. 4 Microwave rice according to directions on packet; sprinkle with chilli. 5 Serve pork with choy sum and rice; drizzle with plum sauce. PLUM SAUCE Stir sugar and the water in a medium saucepan over low heat until sugar dissolves. Discard stones from plums; add plums to pan with wine, cinnamon and star anise. Bring to the boil. Reduce heat; simmer, covered, 6 minutes or until plums are pulpy. Remove and discard cinnamon stick. Stir in fish sauce and vinegar; season to taste.

FIVE-SPICE PORK CUTLETS WITH PLUM SAUCE

COOK’S

NOTES PEPPERED STEAK SANDWICH WITH GRILLED TOMATOES Aïoli is garlic mayonnaise, available from the condiment aisle in most supermarkets. You can make your own quick version by stirring 1 crushed clove garlic into ⅓ cup (75g) whole-egg mayonnaise.

FIVE-SPICED PORK CUTLETS WITH PLUM SAUCE You can use fresh plums when in season.

per serve 16.1g total fat (4.1g saturated fat); 2282kJ (545 cal); 58.6g carbohydrate; 37.9g protein; 5.1g fibre

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Food In A Flash

COOK’S

NOTES

SALT & FIVE-SPICE CRISP CHICKEN PREP + COOK TIME 20 MINUTES SERVES 4

 vegetable oil, for shallow-frying  800g chicken thigh fillets  ⅓ cup (45g) rice flour

SALT & FIVE-SPICED CRISP CHICKEN

 1 tablespoon chinese five spice

For shallow-frying, add enough oil to come halfway up the side of the food to be fried.

 1 teaspoon salt

 ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper  ¼ cup (60ml) mirin  1 teaspoon sesame oil  1 long fresh green chilli,     

sliced thinly 2 green onions, sliced thinly 1 cup (80g) bean sprouts, trimmed 1 tablespoon thinly shredded ginger ⅓ cup (75g) aïoli 1 lime (90g), cut into wedges

1 Heat oil in a large frying pan or wok over medium-high heat. 2 Cut chicken into 2cm slices. Combine flour, spices and salt in a large bowl; add chicken, toss to coat. 3 Shallow-fry chicken, in three batches, for 2 minutes each side or until browned lightly and cooked through. Drain on paper towel. 4 Meanwhile, combine mirin and oil in a small bowl, then add chilli, green onion, bean sprouts and ginger; toss gently to combine. 5 Serve chicken with bean sprout mixture, aïoli and lime wedges. per serve 40.6g total fat (8.1g saturated fat); 2520kJ (602 cal); 17.3g carbohydrate; 39.1g protein; 0.8g fibre

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20 MINUTES SALT & FIVE-SPICE CRISP CHICKEN RECIPE OPPOSITE

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Food In A Flash 25 MINUTES

25 MINS

TURKEY PILAF RECIPE OPPOSITE

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TURKEY PILAF PREP + COOK TIME 25 MINUTES SERVES 4

 1 stalk fresh coriander with

root attached  1 tablespoon EXTRA virgin olive oil  600g turkey breast fillets,          

sliced thinly 1 medium brown onion (150g), sliced thinly 1 clove garlic, sliced thinly 1 cinnamon stick 1 teaspoon yellow mustard seeds 1½ cups (300g) basmati rice 1½ cups (375ml) water 1½ cups (375ml) chicken stock ⅓ cup (45g) dried sweetened cranberries ¼ cup (35g) pistachios, roasted, chopped coarsely ½ cup fresh coriander leaves, extra

COOK’S

NOTES TURKEY PILAF Make sure to rinse the coriander root well as dirt can be trapped in it. Chicken breast fillets can be used instead of the turkey, if you like. Dried sweetened cranberries are sold as ‘craisins’ and can be found in the baking aisle of supermarkets.

1 Remove leaves from coriander stalk; reserve. Finely chop root and stem. 2 Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat; cook turkey, in batches, until browned. Remove from pan. 3 Cook onion in same pan, stirring, until softened. Add garlic, coriander root and stem, cinnamon and mustard seeds; cook, stirring, until fragrant. Stir in rice, the water and stock; bring to the boil. Reduce heat; cook, covered, over low heat, 10 minutes or until water is absorbed. 4 Stir turkey and cranberries into pilaf; cook 5 minutes. Season to taste. Cover; stand 5 minutes. 5 Serve pilaf topped with nuts, and reserved and extra coriander leaves. Per serve 10g total fat (1.4g saturated fat); 2335kJ (558 cal); 69.9g carbohydrate; 43.8g protein; 3.5g fibre

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Biscuit

TIN It doesn’t matter if it’s for the kids racing in from school, or if it’s for you to , a filled biscuit tin is a

enjoy with a cuppa treasure trove of yumminess!

PHOTOGRAPHER DEAN WILMOT

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TEA TIME BLACK & WHITE COOKIES RECIPE ON PAGE

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TWIST ON CLASSIC LEMON & BASIL MACAROONS RECIPE OPPOSITE

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LEMON & BASIL MACAROONS

BLACK & WHITE COOKIES

PREP + COOK TIME 1½ HOURS

PREP + COOK TIME 1 HOUR (+ COOLING & STANDING)

(+ REFRIGERATION, STANDING & COOLING) MAKES 20

MAKES 16

 3 egg whites

 90g unsalted butter, softened

 ¼ cup (55g) caster sugar

 ½ cup (55g) caster sugar

 1¼ cups (200g) icing sugar

 1 egg

 1 cup (120g) ground almonds

 1¼ cups (185g) plain flour

BLACK & WHITE COOKIES

 ¼ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda      

LEMON & BASIL CURD 16 medium basil leaves, torn 3 egg yolks 2 tablespoons caster sugar 2 teaspoons finely grated lemon rind 2 tablespoons lemon juice 30g butter

1 Make lemon and basil curd. 2 Grease two oven trays; line with baking paper. 3 Beat egg whites in a small bowl with an electric mixer until soft peaks form. Add caster sugar; beat until sugar dissolves. Transfer mixture to a large bowl. Fold sifted icing sugar and ground almonds into egg-white mixture, in two batches. 4 Spoon mixture into piping bag fitted with a 2cm plain tube. Pipe 4cm rounds, about 2cm apart, onto trays. Tap trays on bench so macaroons spread slightly. Stand 30 minutes. 5 Meanwhile, preheat oven to 150°C/130°C fan. 6 Bake macaroons about 20 minutes. Cool on trays. 7 Sandwich macaroons with curd.

 ⅓ cup (80ml) buttermilk  1 teaspoon vanilla extract  1½ cups (240g) icing sugar  1 tablespoon glucose syrup  2 teaspoons lemon juice  1 tablespoon warm water  ¼ cup (25g) cocoa powder

1 Preheat oven to 180°C/160°C fan. Line two oven trays with baking paper. 2 Beat butter and caster sugar in a small bowl with an electric mixer until light and fluffy. Beat in egg until combined. Stir in sifted flour and soda, and combined buttermilk and extract. 3 Spoon 1½ tablespoons of the mixture, about 5cm apart, onto trays. Bake about 15 minutes or until puffed and browned lightly. Transfer to a wire rack to cool. 4 Sift icing sugar into a small bowl; stir in glucose, juice and the water until smooth. Transfer half the icing to another small bowl; stir in sifted cocoa, adding a little water if necessary. 5 Turn cookies flat-side up; spread white icing over one half of each cookie. Spread chocolate icing over remaining half. Stand on a wire rack until set.

COOK’S

NOTES LEMON & BASIL MACAROONS For a flavour variation, use lime rind and juice instead of lemon, or use coriander instead of basil. Unfilled macaroons can be frozen for up to a month.

BLACK & WHITE COOKIES The biscuits will keep in an airtight container for up to three days.

LEMON & BASIL CURD Place 12 of the basil leaves, egg yolks, sugar, rind, juice and butter in a small heatproof bowl; stir over a small saucepan of simmering water until mixture thickens slightly and coats the back of a spoon. Remove from heat; strain curd into a small bowl, discard basil. Add the remaining basil leaves, cover; refrigerate curd until cold.

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Baking

HAZELNUT CRESCENTS PREP + COOK TIME 1 HOUR

COOK’S

NOTES HAZELNUT CRESENTS Crescents will keep in an airtight container for up to 1 week. Greek almond crescents are usually made using ground almonds; here we use ground hazelnuts instead.

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(+ REFRIGERATION & COOLING) MAKES 30

 250g (8 ounces) butter, softened  1 egg  1 vanilla bean  2 cups (300g) plain flour  1 cup (160g) icing sugar  ¾ cup (75g) ground hazelnuts  1 teaspoon finely grated orange rind  1 teaspoon ground cinnamon  1 cup (160g) icing sugar, extra

1 Place butter and egg in a medium bowl. Split vanilla bean lengthways; scrape seeds into butter mixture. Beat with an electric mixer until combined. Stir in sifted flour and icing sugar, ground hazelnuts, rind and cinnamon. Wrap dough in plastic wrap; refrigerate 2 hours. 2 Preheat oven to 160°C/140°C fan. 3 Divide dough into 3 portions; split each portion evenly into 10 pieces. Roll each piece into a small crescent shape. 4 Place crescents, about 5cm apart, on baking-paper-lined trays. Bake crescents about 15 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack to cool. 5 Place extra icing sugar in a medium bowl, toss crescents, one at a time, in sugar to coat generously.

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ON TREND

CHAI LATTE BISCOTTI RECIPE OPPOSITE

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Baking

CHAI LATTE BISCOTTI PREP + COOK TIME 1½ HOURS (+ COOLING) MAKES 36

 1 english breakfast tea bag  1 cup (150g) plain flour  ¼ cup (35g) self-raising flour  1 teaspoon ground ginger  ½ teaspoon each ground cardamom,    

cinnamon and cloves ½ cup (110g) firmly packed dark brown sugar 1 egg 1 tablespoon honey ½ cup (70g) roasted unsalted shelled pistachios

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1 Preheat oven to 180°C/160°C fan. Grease oven tray. 2 Empty contents of tea bag into processor; process tea with flours and spices until fine. 3 Whisk sugar, egg and honey in a medium bowl until combined; stir in flour mixture and nuts. Knead dough on a floured surface until smooth. Shape dough into a 25cm log; place on tray. Bake about 30 minutes. Cool on tray completely. 4 Reduce oven temperature to 150°C/130°C fan. 5 Using a serrated knife, cut log diagonally into 5mm slices. Place slices, in a single layer, on ungreased oven trays. Bake about 30 minutes, turning halfway through baking time, or until biscotti are dry and crisp. Cool on wire racks.

COOK’S

NOTES CHAI LATTE BISCUITS Chai is a sweet spiced milky tea found throughout India, although it has now gained popularity around the world. Biscotti will keep in an airtight container for up to two weeks.

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Baking

COOK’S

NOTES SUGAR & SPICE SHORTBREAD STICKS Rice flour is a very fine flour made from ground white rice; it is available from health food stores and major supermarkets.

SUGAR & SPICE SHORTBREAD STICKS PREP + COOK TIME 45 MINUTES (+ COOLING) MAKES 36

 250g butter, softened  ¼ cup (55g) brown sugar  1 teaspoon vanilla extract  2 cups (300g) plain flour  ⅓ cup (60g) rice flour  2 teaspoons ground fennel  ½ cup (110g) demerara sugar

1 Preheat oven to 170°C/150°C fan. Grease and line two oven trays. 2 Beat butter, brown sugar and extract in a small bowl with an electric mixer until combined; stir in sifted flours and spice, in two batches. Knead dough lightly on floured surface until smooth. 3 Divide dough into 6 equal portions; roll each portion into long 1.5cm-thick lengths. Cut each length into 6 pieces. Place demerara sugar on a plate; roll each piece in sugar, place on trays. 4 Bake shortbread about 15 minutes. Cool on trays.

Shortbread will keep in an airtight container for up to a week. The ground fennel adds a touch of anise flavouring to the shortbread.

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Eating meat free one night of the week is easy with top-tasting recipes like these. sun

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COMFORT FOOD KUMARA & EGGPLANT CURRY RECIPE ON PAGE

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No Meat Monday

SEEDED CARROT & CABBAGE FILLO PIE PREP + COOK TIME 1 HOUR SERVES 6

     

¼ cup (60ml) EXTRA virgin olive oil 1 small leek (200g), white part only, sliced thinly 2 cloves garlic, crushed 2 teaspoons caraway seeds 2 medium carrots (270g), grated coarsely 250g savoy cabbage, sliced thinly ¼ cup (40g) dried currants 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh mint 14 sheets fillo pastry (210g) ⅓ cup (80ml) EXTRA virgin olive oil, extra TOPPING

 ¼ cup (50g) pepitas

¼ cup (35g) slivered almonds ¼ cup (25g) coarsely chopped walnuts 1 tablespoon poppy seeds  1 tablespoon sesame seeds

    

HERB SALAD 2 small lebanese cucumbers (260g) 1 cup each loosely packed fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves and curly parsley leaves ½ cup each loosely packed fresh mint leaves and fresh dill sprigs 2 green onions, sliced thinly 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar 2 tablespoons EXTRA virgin olive oil 75g soft goat’s cheese, crumbled

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1 Heat oil in a large frying pan over medium heat; cook leek, garlic and seeds, stirring, for 5 minutes. Add carrot; cook, stirring, for 3 minutes. Add cabbage; cook for a further 5 minutes or until vegetables are soft. Stir in currants and mint. Cool. 2 Make topping. 3 Preheat oven to 180°C/160°C fan. 4 Divide filling into seven portions. Brush one sheet of pastry with a little of the extra oil; top with a second sheet. Keep the remaining pastry sheets covered with a clean, damp tea towel. Place one portion of filling lengthways, in a thin line, along the pastry edge; roll pastry over filling. Starting at the centre of a 24cm springform pan, carefully form the pastry roll, seam-side down, into a coil. 5 Repeat with remaining pastry, oil and filling, joining each roll to the end of the last one and coiling it around until the base of the pan is covered. Brush the top with any remaining oil. 6 Bake fillo pie for 18 minutes. Sprinkle topping evenly over pie; bake for a further 8 minutes or until golden. 7 Meanwhile, make herb salad. Serve salad with the pie.

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TOPPING Combine ingredients in a small bowl. HERB SALAD Using a vegetable peeler, peel cucumbers into ribbons. Place cucumber in a medium bowl with herbs, onion, vinegar and oil; toss gently to combine. Top with cheese.

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No Meat Monday

KUMARA & EGGPLANT CURRY

SOFT-BOILED EGG & BROWN RICE NASI GORENG

PREP + COOK TIME 1 HOUR SERVES 6

PREP + COOK TIME 45 MINUTES SERVES 4

 650g finger eggplants  olive-oil spray  2 tablespoons EXTRA virgin olive oil  1 large brown onion (200g),

     

chopped finely 1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh ginger 1 fresh small red thai chilli, chopped finely 2 cloves garlic, crushed 4 cardamom pods, crushed lightly 1 teaspoon each ground cumin, turmeric and garam marsala 800g kumara, cut into 3cm pieces 270ml can coconut milk 400g canned diced tomatoes 1 cup (250ml) vegetable stock 2 tablespoons EXTRA virgin olive oil, 1 tablespoon brown mustard seeds 24 fresh curry leaves 400g cavolo nero, chopped coarsely 2 tablespoons water

1 Preheat oven to 180°C/160°C fan. Line two oven trays with baking paper. 2 Quarter eggplants lengthways; place on trays, spray with oil. Bake for 20 minutes or until golden and soft. 3 Heat olive oil in a large saucepan over medium-high heat; cook onion, ginger, chilli and garlic, stirring, for 3 minutes. Reduce heat to low, add cardamom, cumin, turmeric and garam marsala; cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Increase heat to medium, add kumara; stir to coat in spices. 4 Add coconut milk to pan with tomatoes and stock; bring to the boil. Reduce heat; simmer, covered, for 20 minutes or until kumara is tender. Stir in eggplant; return to the boil. Season to taste. 5 Meanwhile, heat extra oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat; cook mustard seeds, stirring, for 1 minute or until seeds pop. Add curry leaves; cook for 1 minute. Stir in cabbage and the water; cook, covered, until cabbage is just wilted. 6 Serve curry with cabbage mixture.

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KUMARA & EGGPLANT CURRY

    

COOK’S



NOTES KUMARA & EGGPLANT CURRY SERVING SUGGESTION Steamed basmati rice and yoghurt.

SOFT-BOILED EGG & BROWN RICE NASI GORENG You will need to cook 1½ cups (300g) brown rice for the amount of cooked rice needed in this recipe.



400g gai lan 375g choy sum ½ cup firmly packed fresh coriander leaves 4 free-range eggs 2 tablespoons peanut oil 6 shallots (150g), halved, sliced thinly 4cm piece fresh ginger (20g), cut into thin matchsticks 2 cloves garlic, crushed 2 fresh long red chillies, sliced thinly 150g button mushrooms, quartered 100g shiitake mushrooms, sliced thinly 115g baby corn, halved lengthways 3½ cups (625g) cooked brown rice 1 teaspoon sesame oil 2 tablespoons kecap manis

1 Cut stalks from gai lan and choy sum. Cut stalks into 10cm lengths; cut leaves into 10cm pieces. Keep stalks and leaves separated. Chop half the coriander; reserve remaining leaves. 2 Cook eggs in a medium saucepan of boiling water for 5 minutes or until soft-boiled; drain. When cool enough to handle, peel eggs. 3 Meanwhile, heat half the peanut oil in a wok over medium heat; stir-fry shallots for 8 minutes or until soft and light golden. Add ginger, garlic and half the chilli; stir-fry for 4 minutes or until softened. Transfer mixture to a plate. 4 Heat remaining peanut oil in wok over medium-high heat; stir-fry mushrooms and corn for 4 minutes or until just tender. Add asian green stalks; stir-fry 3 minutes. Add asian green leaves, rice, sesame oil, kecap manis, shallot mixture and chopped coriander; stir-fry 3 minutes or until rice is hot and leaves are wilted. Season to taste. 5 Serve nasi goreng topped with reserved coriander leaves, remaining chilli and eggs.


SPICY

SOFT-BOILED EGG & BROWN RICE NASI GORENG RECIPE OPPOSITE

125


LOCATION PHOTOGRAPHER GEOFF LUNG

TAPAS TEMPATATIONS

Tapas is probably the most famous culinary concept of Spain. It is a series of small dishes shared communally. Served hot and cold the idea is simple, yet offers a sumptuous way to sample various Spanish delights.


World On A Plate

VEG

CHEESE & SPINACH POLENTA RECIPE ON PAGE

128


World In Season On A Plate

CHEESE & SPINACH POLENTA

GAZPACHO

PREP + COOK TIME 45 MINUTES (+ REFRIGERATION)

PREP TIME 25 MINUTES (+ REFRIGERATION) SERVES 4

MAKES 30

 3 cups (750ml) tomato juice  1 litre (4 cups) milk

 8 medium egg tomatoes (600g),

 1 cup (170g) polenta  ½ cup (50g) coarsely grated     

mozzarella cheese ¼ cup (20g) finely grated parmesan cheese 250g finely chopped thawed, drained frozen spinach 250g vine-ripened cherry truss tomatoes, halved 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar 1 tablespoon EXTRA virgin olive oil

1 Grease 20cm x 30cm lamington pan. 2 Bring milk to the boil in medium saucepan; gradually stir in polenta. Cook, stirring, about 10 minutes or until polenta thickens. Stir in cheeses and spinach. Spread polenta mixture into pan, cover; refrigerate 2 hours or overnight or until firm. 3 Preheat oven to 200°C/180°C fan. 4 Turn polenta onto board; cut into 30 squares. Place polenta onto bakingpaper-lined oven tray. Bake about 20 minutes or until browned lightly. 5 Meanwhile, combine tomato, vinegar and oil in small baking dish. Roast, alongside polenta, about 15 minutes or until tomato softens slightly. 6 Serve polenta squares topped with tomato halves; drizzle with tomato pan juices.

   CHEESE & SPINACH POLENTA

 

COOK’S

NOTES



 

GAZPACHO Served cold, gazpacho is a traditional soup made of a mix of raw vegetables. Its origins are in the Andalusian region of Spain. It is now a global favourite.

   

chopped coarsely 1 medium red onion (170g), chopped coarsely 1 clove garlic 1 lebanese cucumber (130g), chopped coarsely 1 small green capsicum (150g), chopped coarsely 2 slices white bread, crusts removed, chopped coarsely 2 teaspoons Tabasco sauce CUCUMBER SALSA 1 small white onion (80g), chopped finely ½ lebanese cucumber (65g), seeded, chopped finely ½ small yellow capsicum (75g), chopped finely 2 teaspoons EXTRA virgin olive oil 1 tablespoon vodka 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh coriander

1 Blend or process juice, tomato, red onion, garlic, coarsely chopped cucumber, green capsicum, bread and sauce, in batches, until smooth. Strain through sieve into large bowl. Cover; refrigerate 3 hours. 2 Make cucumber salsa. 3 Serve soup topped with salsa. Serve with crusty bread, if you like. CUCUMBER SALSA Combine ingredients in small bowl.

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AWW AWW FOOD FOOD • ISSUE • ISSUE FOUR FIFTEEN


25 MINUTES GAZPACHO RECIPE OPPOSITE

AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN

129


World On A Plate

NICE ‘N’ SPICY CHIPOTLE BEEF TOSTADITAS RECIPE OPPOSITE

130

AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN


CHIPOTLE BEEF TOSTADITAS PREP + COOK TIME 55 MINUTES (+ STANDING) MAKES 36

 2 chipotle chillies  ½ cup (125ml) boiling water

ABOUT

Tapas

 12 x 17cm round white corn tortillas  vegetable oil, for deep-frying  1 tablespoon vegetable oil, extra  1 small brown onion (80g), sliced thinly  1 clove garlic, crushed  280g minced beef  1 tablespoon tomato paste  1 cup (250ml) beer  ¼ cup coarsely chopped fresh coriander  ½ cup (120g) sour cream

1 Cover chillies with the boiling water in small heatproof bowl; stand 20 minutes. 2 Meanwhile, cut three 7cm rounds from each tortilla. Heat oil in wok; deep-fry rounds, in batches, until browned lightly. Drain tortilla crisps on absorbent paper. 3 Drain chillies over small bowl; reserve liquid. Remove stems from chillies; discard stems. Blend or process chillies and reserved liquid until smooth. 4 Heat extra vegetable oil in medium frying pan; cook onion, stirring, until softened. Add garlic and beef; cook, stirring, until beef is changed in colour. Stir in paste, beer and chilli puree; bring to the boil. Reduce heat; simmer, uncovered, about 15 minutes or until liquid is almost evaporated. Stir in coriander. 5 Top each tortilla crisp with rounded teaspoon of the chipotle beef then with ½ teaspoon of the sour cream.

AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN OURTEEN

DID YOU KNOW? Spain’s coastline, rocky mountain ranges and lush farm lands offer produce that is fresh and unpretentious − much like the dishes that this part of Europe is famous for. Tapas is an easy way to sample a variety of iconic Spanish dishes and encourages people to share.

131


EASY

SARDINES WITH CAPER & PARSLEY TOPPING RECIPE ON PAGE

135

132

AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN


World On A Plate

AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN

133


CROWD PLEASER ARTICHOKE & ASPARAGUS FRITTERS WITH OLIVE RELISH RECIPE OPPOSITE

134

AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN


World On A Plate

ARTICHOKE & ASPARAGUS FRITTERS WITH OLIVE RELISH

SARDINES WITH CAPER & PARSLEY TOPPING PREP + COOK TIME 45 MINUTES SERVES 8

 8 sardines (360g), cleaned

PREP + COOK TIME 40 MINUTES MAKES 15

 ⅓ cup (50g) self-raising flour  ½ teaspoon sweet paprika

 170g asparagus, trimmed,      

     

chopped finely 280g jar artichokes in brine, drained, chopped finely 2 eggs 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh mint ½ cup (40g) finely grated parmesan cheese ¼ cup (35g) self-raising flour vegetable oil, for shallow frying OLIVE RELISH ½ cup (60g) seeded green olives, chopped finely ½ cup (60g) seeded black olives, chopped finely ¼ cup finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh chives 1 tablespoon EXTRA virgin olive oil 1 tablespoon lemon juice

1 Make olive relish. 2 Combine asparagus, artichoke, eggs, mint, cheese and flour in medium bowl. 3 Heat oil in large frying pan; shallow-fry heaped tablespoons of fritter mixture, in batches, until browned all over and cooked through. Drain fritters on absorbent paper; serve hot with olive relish.

SARDINES WITH CAPER & PARSLEY TOPPING

 EXTRA virgin olive oil, for

shallow-frying CAPER & PARSLEY TOPPING  2 tablespoons rinsed, drained baby

capers, chopped finely  1 clove garlic, crushed  ¼ cup finely chopped fresh

COOK’S

NOTES ARTICHOKE & ASPARAGUS FRITTERS WITH OLIVE RELISH These fritters are delicious as part of a tapas feast, but they are also perfect finger food for a cocktail party.

flat-leaf parsley  2 teaspoons finely grated lemon rind  2 teaspoons lemon juice

1 Make caper and parsley topping. 2 To butterfly sardines, cut through the underside of the fish to the tail. Break backbone at tail; peel away backbone. Trim sardines. 3 Coat fish in combined flour and paprika; shake away excess. Heat oil in large frying pan; shallow-fry fish, in batches, until cooked through, drain on absorbent paper. 4 Sprinkle fish with caper and parsley topping. Serve with lemon wedges, if you like. CAPER & PARSLEY TOPPING Combine ingredients in small bowl.

OLIVE RELISH Combine ingredients in small bowl.

AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN

135


World On A Plate

Guess WHAT?

BARBECUED SEAFOOD PLATTER PREP + COOK TIME 1 HOUR (+ REFRIGERATION) SERVES 8

 16 uncooked medium king prawns (720g)  1 teaspoon finely grated lemon rind

DID YOU KNOW? Each region of Spain has its own unique cuisine. This is why tapas has such a breadth and depth of flavour.

 ½ teaspoon dried chilli flakes  1 clove garlic, crushed  1 tablespoon finely chopped

fresh oregano  2 tablespoons EXTRA virgin olive oil  8 slices prosciutto (120g)  8 butterflied sardines (240g)  300g baby octopus, quartered  200g squid hoods, sliced into rings  2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar  ¼ cup coarsely chopped fresh

flat-leaf parsley  500g small black mussels  ¼ cup (60ml) lemon juice  1 medium tomato (150g), seeded,

chopped finely

136

1 Remove and discard prawn heads. Cut prawns lengthwise, three-quarters of the way through, (and down to 1cm before the tail) leaving shells intact; press down on prawns on board to flatten. 2 Combine prawns, rind, chilli, garlic, oregano and half the oil in medium bowl; cover, refrigerate 1 hour. 3 Wrap a prosciutto slice firmly around each sardine. 4 Cook octopus and squid on heated oiled grill plate (or grill or barbecue). Combine octopus and squid in medium heatproof bowl with remaining oil, vinegar and 2 tablespoons of the parsley. Cover to keep warm. 5 Cook prawns and sardines on heated oiled grill plate (or grill or barbecue). 6 Meanwhile, cook mussels, covered, on heated oiled flat plate about 5 minutes or until mussels open (discard any that do not). Place mussels in medium heatproof bowl; drizzle with juice, sprinkle with tomato and remaining parsley. Serve seafood with lemon wedges, if you like.

AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN


LOVELY LUNCH BARBECUED SEAFOOD PLATTER RECIPE OPPOSITE

137


Book Extract

BOOK COVER

THE PERFECT GIFT FOR MOTHER’S DAY!

EVERYDAY POWERFOODS ($39.99) available where all good books are sold or online at aww.cookbooks.com.au

KEEP AN EYE OUT FOR THIS BRILLIANT NEW COOKBOOK

BOOK EXTRACT With busy lives, women often think about everyone else’s wellbeing ahead of their own. What we eat impacts on how we look, feel and function. Everyday Powerfoods is packed with delicious recipes to help you look good and feel great!

138

AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN


POWER START APPLE PIE PANCAKES WITH BLACKBERRY COMPOTE

AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN

139


Book Extract

APPLE & PEPITA BLISS BALLS PREP TIME 20 MINUTES

MACADAMIA & FIG CACAO & HAZELNUT PISTACHIO BLISS BALLS BLISS BALLS & CRANBERRY BLISS BALLS PREP TIME 20 MINUTES

PREP TIME 20 MINUTES

(+ REFRIGERATION) MAKES 35

(+ REFRIGERATION) MAKES 30

(+ REFRIGERATION) MAKES 30

Process 1 cup natural sliced almonds until finely chopped. Add 200g chopped medjool dates, 50g coarsely chopped dried apple, ¼ cup shredded coconut and ½ cup pepitas; process until well combined. Add about 2 teaspoons hot water; process until mixture comes together. With damp hands, roll 2 level teaspoons of mixture into balls. Rolls balls in 1 cup shredded coconut to coat; place on a baking-paperlined oven tray. Refrigerate for 1 hour.

Process 1 cup macadamias until finely chopped. Add 200g chopped medjool dates, 75g soft and juicy dried figs, 2 tablespoons white chia seeds and ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon; process until well combined. Add about 2 teaspoons hot water; process until mixture comes together. With damp hands, roll 2 level teaspoons of mixture into balls. Roll balls in 1 cup white chia seeds to coat; place on a baking-paperlined oven tray. Refrigerate for 1 hour.

Process 1 cup roasted skinless hazelnuts until finely chopped; reserve. Process another 1 cup roasted skinless hazelnuts until finely chopped. Add 200g chopped medjool dates, 2 tablespoons cacao powder and ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg; process until well combined. Add about 2 teaspoons hot water; process until mixture comes together. With damp hands, roll 2 level teaspoons of mixture into balls. Roll balls in reserved nuts to coat; place on a baking-paper-lined oven tray. Refrigerate for 1 hour.

140

PREP TIME 20 MINUTES (+ REFRIGERATION) MAKES 35

Process 1 cup shelled pistachios until finely chopped; reserve. Process another 1 cup shelled pistachios until finely chopped. Add 200g chopped medjool dates and ½ cup dried unsweetened cranberries; process until well combined. Add about 2 teaspoons hot water; process until mixture comes together. With damp hands, roll 2 level teaspoons of mixture into balls. Roll balls in reserved nuts to coat; place on a baking-paperlined oven tray. Refrigerate for 1 hour.

AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN


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What’s on the menu this month

RECIPE INDEX MEAT, POULTRY & SEAFOOD

PRESERVES

barbecued seafood platter 136 beef in black bean sauce with rice noodles & greens char-grilled steak with asian pesto chicken, burghul & pomegranate salad chipotle beef tostaditas five-spice pork cutlets with plum sauce harissa eggplant & chorizo salad kaffir lime & red curry fish parcels peppered steak sandwich with grilled tomatoes red wine sausages & herb salad rolls

87

20 131

92 27

branston-style pickle

73

berry beet jam

10

black & white cookies

113

70

chai latte biscotti

117

date & rose pomegranate molasses

16

chocolate mousse cake with pomegranate syrup 23

lemon curd

70

hazelnut crescents

mint jelly

65

pomelo, lemon grass & kaffir lime marmalade

lemon & basil macaroons

65

pistachio, walnut & chocolate baklava

preserved artichokes

38

smooth nut & seed butter

55

SALADS

salt & five-spice crisp chicken

106

sardines with caper & parsley topping

beetroot & heirloom carrot salad with persian fetta 91

135

seafood laksa

83

chicken, burghul & pomegranate salad

20

sticky pork stir-fry

87

harissa eggplant & chorizo salad

92

tuna & chilli pasta

84

turkey pilaf vegetable rosti with smoked salmon & sour cream

109

quinoa salad with haloumi & pomegranate

kumara & goat’s cheese tart

74

105 84

artichoke & asparagus fritters with olive relish 135

66

piccalilli 105

VEGETARIAN

beetroot, caraway & horseradish relish

cracked olives 83

SWEET & SAVOURY BAKING

32

99 113 59

walnut & spice cake with rosé pears

100

seeded carrot & cabbage fillo pie

123

spiced pumpkin & honey pies

91

spicy pumpkin empanadas

92

sugar & spice shortbread sticks

118

RICE kitchari

19

114

27

soft boiled egg & brown rice nasi goreng

124

turkey pilaf

109

DESSERTS STEP-BY-STEP preserved artichokes

38

rosewater & pistachio cheesecake cups

19

spiced pumpkin & honey pies

91

BREAKFASTS baked beans & tomato pots with rosemary sourdough crumble 42 mushroom, tomato & goat’s cheese omelettes quinoa porridge horchata porridge shake

144

AWW FOOD • ISSUE FIFTEEN

45 46 49

baked beans & tomato pots with rosemary sourdough crumble 42 beetroot & heirloom carrot salad with persian fetta 91 cheese & spinach polenta

128

gazpacho

128

kumara & onion pizza

28

kumara & goat’s cheese tart

99

kumara, eggplant & coconut curry

124

mushroom, tomato & goat’s cheese omelettes

45

pasta with nut paste, pear & borlotti beans

56

potato gnocchi with mushrooms & thyme

96

quinoa salad with haloumi & pomegranate

19

seeded carrot & cabbage fillo pie

123

SNACKS apple & pepita bliss balls

140

cacao & hazelnut bliss balls

140

fennel, almond & pine nut dukkah

60

macadamia & fig bliss balls

140

pistachio & cranberry bliss balls

140

sweet potato chips with chilli salt

31


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