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THE NEW RULES OF WEIGHT LOSS (What really works long-term)

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WHY A HIGHFAT DIET =

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BLENDERS 5 THAT STAND THE TEST OF TIME

APRIL 2016

Cheap, Cheerful & SERIOUSLY HEALTHY FAMILY MEALS

DROP 5 LBS IN 2 WEEKS! ALL SLIM, NO STARVE

RING IN SPRING 5 GREENS YOU'RE NOT EATING BUT SHOULD BE!


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contents Sweet Potato Hash with Sunny Side Up Eggs

Clean Eating

p. 43

APRIL 2016

The Weight-Loss Issue

36

YOUR Rx TO HEALTHY WEIGHT LOSS CE’s resident dietitians share their secrets and top tips for losing weight fast, plus 5 waist-whittling recipes to get you started. By Tiffani Bachus and Erin Macdonald

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THE NEW GREENS

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ENERGIZING SMOOTHIE BOWLS

Nature's little-known gems like sorrel and sweet pea shoots take center stage in these 5 stunning and nutrientpacked recipes. By Ivy Manning

Start your day off right with these gorgeous, superfoodstudded smoothie bowls you'll want to have in your breakfast rotation.

THE NEW RULES OF WEIGHT LOSS (What really works longterm)

By Pamela Salzman

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craze !

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YOUR FLAT-BELLY MEAL PLAN Drop 5 pounds in just 2 weeks with our fresh, flavorful and super-slimming meal plan. By Tiffani Bachus and Erin Macdonald

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For less than $3.50 a plate, you can have these 5 easy and thrifty meals on the table for busy weeknights. By Liz Tarpy

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BUDGET WEEKNIGHT DINNERS

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WHY A HIGHFAT DIET =

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APRIL 2016

Cheap, Cheerful & SERIOUSLY HEALTHY FAMILY MEALS

DROP 5 LBS IN 2 WEEKS! ALL SLIM, NO STARVE

RING IN SPRING

A LOWFAT BODY

5

P.

5 GREENS YOU'RE NOT EATING BUT SHOULD BE!

BLENDERS THAT STAND THE TEST OF TIME

cleaneating.com APRIL 2016 $5.99 US

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04/19/2016

On our April 2016 cover we feature Smoothie Bowls, p. 56, Photography by Ronald Tsang, food & prop styling by Terry Schacht

IN EVERY ISSUE: CE Online: 6 / Editor’s Letter: 8 / Advisory Board & Letters: 12 / Contributors: 14 / Recipe Index: 16 / In the Next Issue: 18


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contents

56

Superfood smoothie bowls that will leave you glowing and refreshed.

34

Discover our top-rated blenders for making soups, smoothies, flours, nut butters and more!

be inspired 26

CLEAN LIVING

32

GO GREEN AND GET LEAN

Learn how to make an all-natural herbal mouthwash.

Kate Geagan shares 10 ways eating clean helps nurture the planet while nourishing your body.

84

GEAR & GADGETS

88

SWEET TOOTH

Complement your cleaneating lifestyle with these health and fitness must-haves.

Indulge in this chocolaty peanut butter mousse pie, topped with a to-die-for coconut caramel drizzle.

eat smart 20

BITS 'N' BITES

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SUPERMARKET GUIDE

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FOODIE FAVES

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An indulgent yet incredibly clean chocolate peanut butter mousse pie.

66

Perk up your plate with these nutritious and versatile lesser-known greens.

FATS THAT SLIM Find out why science is increasingly pointing to evidence that a high-fat diet can lead to lasting weight loss.

how to 34

KITCHEN TOOLS From whipping up smoothies and crushing ice to blending nut milks, CE presents the best blenders you’ll want to take for a whirl in your kitchen.

Food, health and nutrition news you can use.

Five scrumptious glutenfree alternatives to wheat wraps.

Curb cravings with these satiating low-cal snacks and drinks.

Beat the bloat with these stomachtaming foods, drinks and supplements.


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Adzuki beans, chia seeds and kimchi are really hot right now, but what’s the science behind the hype? Discover the 20 most powerful superfoods and easy recipes to prepare them at home: cleaneating.com/ superfoods Do you know about our

NEWSLETTER? Did you know you can receive the best of Clean Eating every week in your inbox? Don’t miss our top recipes, step-by-step tutorials, the latest health news and tested tips from our expert bloggers. Maximize your clean eating lifestyle. Sign up for our newsletter at cleaneating. com/newsletter.

FREE 7-DAY SOUP CLEANSE We’ve got a 7-day detox plan that will cleanse your body, boost your immunity and warm your soul. With delicious smoothies for breakfast and nourishing soups for lunch and dinner, you’ll feel lighter and more energized right away! Download your meal plan and shopping list and get started now at cleaneating.com/soup-cleanse.

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clean eating // editor's letter

What is Clean Eating? The soul of clean eating is consuming food the way nature delivered it, or as close to it as possible. It is not a diet; it’s a lifestyle approach to food and its preparation, leading to an improved life – one meal at a time.

Healthy, Lasting

Eat five to six times a day – three meals and two to three small snacks. Include a lean protein, plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables, and a complex carbohydrate with each meal. This keeps your body energized and burning calories efficiently all day long.

Unless you have an ironclad will against any form of temptation, and your pristine health habits are as routine and constant as time itself, your weight likely ebbs and flows a little throughout the year. Here we are again, in the few months before summer, and some of you (like all of us here on the CE team) are a little on the “flow” side of weight gain, looking to get back to your healthiest lean – that sweet spot where you’re feeling buoyantly energized, making all the right choices and you can’t resist giving yourself a little wink in the mirror when you walk by. But how do you claw yourself out of hibernation and get back to that? Here at CE, we turn up the volume on our goals in a few ways: One is with a 30-day elimination diet where we cut out grains, any form of sugar, alcohol and dairy and live primarily on quality proteins and loads of plants. And recently, our senior art director, Stacy, kicked off her annual Shred competition where we all pay to enter, weigh in and take before pics and then spend 10 weeks competing against other hopeful “shredders” to win the pot! (Most will tell you the motivation is prize enough.) And our senior graphic designer, Alaina, and I have been sneaking out at lunch hour a couple of times a week for Lagree Fitness classes (aka “Pilates on crack”), and just recently we’ve added boxing to our buddy system circuit. So just knowing that the entire staff, with years of health and fitness

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magazine experience, need all these tactics to get motivated really had me thinking, Imagine how our readers must feel. And thus, our first WeightLoss Issue was born. What’s in it to ignite your motivation? Start on page 36 with “5 Secrets to Win at Weight Loss” that expand far beyond food by CE Advisory Board dietitians Tiffani Bachus and Erin Macdonald. Erin and Tiffani are the brilliant minds behind our latest Clean Eating Academy course, A Whole-Life Guide to Lasting Weight Loss, which is the most sensible, achievable and comprehensive approach to weight loss we’ve ever produced. Get a head start on stripping away excess pounds on page 75 with “Lose 5 Pounds in 2 Weeks,” a specialized weight-loss meal plan that won’t leave you hungry. If you’re looking for something cutting edge, “Superfood Smoothie Bowls” (p. 56) is where it’s at. Overflowing with healing antioxidants, these bowls are bright, fun and delicious and will help you start each day with a smile. On page 66, let nutrition myth buster Jonny Bowden delve into the science behind why a high-fat diet translates to a low-fat body. And be sure to check out “5 Little-Known Greens to Start Eating This Spring” (p. 46) to switch up your greens game for a wellrounded nutrient intake and a little excitement on your plate. Alicia Rewega Editor-in-Chief

Write to us! We’re listening. CEeditorial@aimmedia.com Clean Eating

APRIL 2016

Choose organic whenever possible. If your budget limits you, make meat, eggs, dairy and the Dirty Dozen (ewg.org/ foodnews) your organic priorities. Drink at least two liters of water a day, preferably from a reusable canteen, not plastic; we’re friends of the environment here! Limit your alcohol intake to one glass of antioxidantrich red wine a day. Get label savvy. Clean foods contain short ingredient lists. Any product with a long ingredient list is human-made and not considered clean.

Avoid processed and refined foods such as white flour, sugar, bread and pasta. Enjoy complex carbs such as whole grains instead. Know thy enemies. Steer clear of anything containing trans fats, anything fried or anything high in sugar. Avoid preservatives, color additives and toxic binders, stabilizers, emulsifiers and fat replacers. Consume healthy fats (essential fatty acids, or EFAs) every day. Learn about portion sizes and work toward eating within them. Reduce your carbon footprint. Eat produce that is seasonal and local. It is less taxing on your wallet and our environment.

Shop with a conscience. Consume humanely raised, local meats and ocean-friendly seafood. Visit seachoice.org for a printable pamphlet. Practice mindful eating. Never rush through a meal. Food tastes best when savored. Enjoy every bite. Take it to go. Pack a cooler for work or outings so you always have clean eats on the go. Make it a family affair. Food is a social glue that should be shared with loved ones. Improve the quality of your family’s life along with your own.

Clean Eating cleaneating.com

ALICIA REWEGA PHOTO BY PAUL BUCETA, HAIR & MAKEUP BY VALERIA NOVA, STYLING BY RACHEL MATTHEWS BURTON

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Clean Eating ISSUE 59 PRINTED IN THE USA EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

VICE PRESIDENT, GENERAL MANAGER

Alicia Rewega

Kim Paulsen

Editorial

GROUP PUBLISHER CLEAN EATING,

FOOD EDITOR Andrea Gourgy ASSOCIATE EDITOR & RESEARCH CHIEF Laura Schober COPY EDITOR Angie Mattison DIGITAL EDITOR Jennifer Davis-Flynn

VEGETARIAN TIMES, BETTER NUTRITION AND AMAZING WELLNESS

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Recipe Creators

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Tiffani Bachus, Kathrin Brunner, Kate Geagan, Erin Macdonald, Ivy Manning, Liz Moody, Pamela Salzman, Liz Tarpy RESIDENT FOODIE Julie O’Hara

EAST COAST SALES DIRECTOR–FOOD

Contributors

EAST COAST SALES DIRECTOR–VHMS*

Tiffani Bachus, Jonny Bowden, Kathrin Brunner, Kate Geagan, Erin Macdonald, Karen Morse, Pamela Salzman, Sarah Tuff Dunn

WEST COAST SALES DIRECTOR–FOOD

Photographers Brandon Barré, Meaghan Eady, Darren Kemper, Dennis Kennedy, Kris Osborne, James Patrick, Vincenzo Pistritto, Ronald Tsang

Food Stylists Bernadette Ammar, John Kirkpatrick, Terry Schacht, Beth Seuferer, Robin Zimmerman

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Clean Eating (ISSN 1913-7532, USPS 003-610) is published nine times per year (Jan/Feb, March, April, May, June, Jul/Aug, Sept, Oct, Nov/Dec) by Cruz Bay Publishing, Inc., an Active Interest Media company. Advertising and editorial offices at 2520 55th St, Ste 200, Boulder, CO 80301. The known office of publication is 5720 Flatiron Pkwy, Boulder, CO 80301. Periodicals postage paid at Boulder, CO and at additional mailing offices.

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© 2016 by Active Interest Media, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced in any manner without written permission from the publisher.

PLEASE NOTE: All readers are advised to consult their physician before beginning or adding a new fitness regimen or changing their diet. Clean Eating does not accept any responsibility for injury sustained as a result of following the advice or suggestions contained within the content of this magazine. APRIL 2016

VICE PRESIDENT, RESEARCH Kristy Kaus VICE PRESIDENT, DIGITAL Jonathan Dorn

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Clean Eating

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advisory board & letters

Meet Our Experts

We Hear You!

Q: Is it true that chronic stress can make it harder to lose and maintain weight?

– KATELYN DUNBAR, SAINT PAUL, MN

create and store fat around the belly (“stress fat”). But the good news is that anything you can do to manage stress will only help you in your weight-loss efforts. Meditation is by far the best stress reducer, but if you find it difficult, try this simple four-minute deep-breathing exercise. Sit quietly with your eyes closed and your palms facing upward, resting on your knees. Set a timer for four minutes. On a count of seven, breathe in deeply and slowly, hold for 1 to 2 seconds, and exhale very slowly on a count of four until your lungs are empty. Concentrate only on your breath – if your mind wanders (and it will), don’t worry – just bring your attention back to your breath. Continue like this until the timer goes off. Repeat as often as you like. – JONNY BOWDEN

Our Culinary & Nutrition Advisers jonny bowden

julie o’hara BA

PhD, CNS

Clean Eating's Resident Foodie, recipe developer and writer. Her work has been featured in Shape, Vegetarian Times and National Geographic Traveler, among other magazines.

Board-certified nutrition specialist, motivational speaker, author and expert in the areas of weight loss, nutrition and health.

erin macdonald RDN tiffani bachus RDN Co-owners of the U Rock Girl nutrition and training program (URockGirl.com), registered dietitians and nutrition, fitness and wellness experts.

james smith MBA Clean Eating Academy instructor and the Culinary Programs and Operations chair at Centennial College with more than 25 years of experience. He completed his culinary training at George Brown College.

heather bainbridge BSc, MA, EdM, RD, CDN

Certified dietitiannutritionist and registered dietitian who specializes in counseling clients to achieve a healthier weight and improve conditions including type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

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APRIL 2016

kathrin brunner CNP Clean Eating's "Clean Living" columnist, nutritionist and yoga teacher. Brunner teaches at The Institute of Holistic Nutrition and has a private practice that offers a variety of workshops, corporate talks and yoga classes.

@cleaneatingmag thank you for your meal plans with grocery lists! – @aroundtownbabe, via Twitter

I made a stellar stir-fry (Orange-Scented Asparagus & Beef Stir-Fry, p. 76, Jan/Feb 2016) last night for dinner. It only took one pot and a few (clean) ingredients and dinner was on the table in less than 30 minutes. Totally gobbled up by my husband and kids too. – Cindy Martinez Lyons, via Facebook

I've twice made the Thai Kabocha Squash Soup (p. 63, Jan/Feb 2016), thinking I had messed it up the first time. It was so spicy-hot! The recipe really needed to mention that the curry paste should be "to taste,” I think. – Carol Park Acurso, via Facebook

EDITOR’S NOTE: We’re sorry to hear that the addition of the red curry paste was too hot for your liking, Carol. As with all of our recipes, if you feel a spice or seasoning is too strong for your personal preference, feel free to adjust the amount! We hope the third time’s a charm! TAG US IN YOUR POSTS WITH HASHTAG

#CleanEatingMag @ KELLYEATS4HEALTH via Instagram

marianne wren BA, CC

As both a recipe developer and food stylist, Wren has worked with print and advertising clients. She completed her culinary training at Dubrulle French Culinary School and The Culinary Institute of America.

jill silverman hough Recipe developer, culinary instructor and author of the 100 Perfect Pairings series and co-author of The Clean Plates Cookbook (Running Press, 2012).

@ EJPICCO1127

This Lemon, Coconut & Cayenne Mousse (p. 88, Jan/Feb 2016) is scrumptious! The cayenne pepper adds an incredible depth to the finished product when you whip it into your coconut milk.

via Instagram

Really trying this #cleaneating thing out. My first actual really clean recipe, Carrot Cumin Coconut Soup (p. 37, Jan/Feb 2016). Tell us what you thought of this issue by emailing us at CEeditorial@aimmedia.com. Plus, get bonus recipes and more clean-eating content on social media.

JULIE O'HARA PHOTO BY PAUL BUCETA, TIFFANI BACHUS & ERIN MACDONALD PHOTO BY JAMES PATRICK, KATHRIN BRUNNER PHOTO BY AMBER ELLIS, CREATING LIGHT STUDIO, JAMES SMITH PHOTO BY 5IVE15IFTEEN PHOTO COMPANY, HEATHER BAINBRIDGE PHOTO BY GRAIG JOLLEY, MARIANNE WREN PHOTO BY PIERRE GAUTREAU, JILL SILVERMAN HOUGH PHOTO BY KEVEN A. SEAVER

A: Unfortunately, yes, stress hormones like cortisol tell the body to


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B

shake cost more than many of the shakes I’ve tried, it was about half the price of my favorite salad, and the nutrition profile looked second to none. Wanting to know more, I reached out to a few of the people who were talking about it on trustworthy fitness forums. By the next morning three people got back to me saying, “As a trainer I love Invigor8. It’s definitely helped me to have more all-day energy, plus build the kind of lean sculpted muscle that burns more fat.” “Yes, I’ll recommend it, it tastes great, and I really like how it keeps me feeling full for hours.” “I’m a marathon runner and a friend recommended it to me. Drinking it has become a part of my regular training routine, because my time has improved, my energy is up, and I’m thinking more clearly than ever before.” I decided to take my investigation one step further by researching the development of INVIGOR8. I was pleasantly surprised to find out that the company went to great lengths to keep INVIGOR8 free of harmful ingredients. The makers of INVIGOR8 were determined to make the first 100% natural, organic, non-GMO nutritional shake & superfood. The result is a meal replacement shake that contains 100% grass-fed whey that has a superior nutrient profile to the grain-fed whey found in most shakes, metabolism boosting raw organic coconut oil, hormone free colostrum to promote a healthy immune system, Omega 3, 6,

9-rich chia and flaxseeds, superfood greens like kale, spinach, broccoli, alfalfa, and chlorella, and clinically tested cognitive enhancers for improved mood and brain function. The company even went a step further by including a balance of pre and probiotics for optimal digestive health, uptake, and regularity and digestive enzymes so your body absorbs the highcaliber nutrition you get from INVIGOR8. As a whole-foods nutritionist with a thriving practice I understand the importance of filling my body with the best Mother Nature has to offer. I have always been reluctant to try new products because I was never sure of the impact they would have on my energy, and weight. INVIGOR8 is different, not only because it’s delicious, but because it helps me to maintain the energy I need to run my busy practice, while helping me to stay fit and toned. Considering all of the shakes I’ve tried, I can honestly say that the results I’ve experienced from INVIGOR8 are nothing short of amazing. A company spokesperson confirmed a special offer: if you order this month, you’ll receive Free Enrollment into the company’s Loyalty Program where you’ll qualify to receive a $10 discount on every bottle of INVIGOR8. And so you don’t go a month without INVIGOR8 - helping you lose weight and getting toned, you’ll automatically receive a fresh bottle every 30-days. There are no minimum amounts of bottles to buy and you can cancel at any time. You can order INVIGOR8 today at www.DrinkInvigor8.com or by calling 1-800-958-3392.


contributors

ERIN MACDONALD & TIFFANI BACHUS REGISTERED DIETITIAN-

TRABUCO CANYON, CA, AND PARADISE VALLEY, AZ

Clean Eating’s resident dietitians and wellness coaches Erin Macdonald and Tiffani Bachus of urockgirl.com developed the scrumptiously clean recipes for “5 Secrets to Win at Weight Loss” (p. 36) and “Lose 5 Pounds in 2 Weeks” (p. 75). “All these recipes feature lots of colorful, antioxidant-rich ingredients, have tons of flavor and are so filling and satisfying, they'll keep you energized for hours!” say Macdonald and Bachus.

LIZ MOODY

RECIPE DEVELOPER/WRITER/ BLOGGER BROOKLYN, NY For this issue, sproutedroutes.com blogger and writer Liz Moody developed the heavenly and deliciously nutty Chocolate Caramel Peanut Butter Pie in “Sweet Tooth” (p. 88). “Peanut butter, caramel and chocolate is such a classic combo, and there was an Oreo freezer pie that I used to get at Denny’s when I was a kid,” she says. “Smoosh them all together, get rid of all the nasty ingredients, and voila!”

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DENNIS KENNEDY

TERRY SCHACHT

URBANDALE, IA

TORONTO, ON

SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Describing himself as a jack-of-alltrades, Dennis Kennedy joins CE ’s photography team with over 33 years of experience. From filming and editing video to photographing spreads for food, woodworking and home improvement publications, Kennedy’s work has been featured in numerous magazines and business ad campaigns in addition to several TV commercials.

FOOD & PROP STYLIST

Although she started out in the culinary world as both a chef and pastry chef, Terry Schacht made the switch to food and prop styling 20 years ago. For her work on “Superfood Smoothie Bowls” (p. 56), she says, “I was inspired by the abundance of healthy ingredients and the vibrant colors of the smoothie bowls." Schacht’s styling work has also appeared on television, online, in magazines and on food packaging.

ERIN MACDONALD & TIFFANI BACHUS PHOTO BY JAMES PATRICK, LIZ MOODY PHOTO BY ZACK MITCHELL, DENNIS KENNEDY PHOTO BY CRAYOLA ENGLAND, TERRY SCHACHT PHOTO BY DARREN KEMPER

NUTRITIONISTS/ RECIPE DEVELOPERS


A Clean, Vegan Alternative to Fish Oil! Dr. Ohhira’s Essential Living Oils™ provides the beneficial fats you need in an ideal balance of Omega-3, 6, and 9. These are called Essential Fatty Acids (EFAs) because humans literally

Flax seed oil Rice bran oil Sunflower seed oil Avocado oil Perilla seed oil Japanese tea seed oil Olive oil Borage seed oil

Discover the Dr. Ohhira Difference!™

Find this formula at better health food stores nationwide. www.EssentialFormulas.com • (972) 255-3918


recipe index

Your Clean Eating Recipe Guide Eat clean and get lean: Feed your mind, body and soul with CE’s deliciously satisfying recipes.

• Quick (under 45 minutes) • Freezable • Vegetarian (may contain eggs and dairy) • Gluten-Free  Make it gluten-free

Recipe contains soy sauce, miso, Worcestershire sauce and/or tamari. All of these ingredients are available in gluten-free and regular varieties.

••••

••••

••••

••••

••••

••••

The Mint Chip P. 63

The Mango Sunshine P. 64

The Pink Pitaya P. 64

The Carrot Cake P. 64

The Mocha P. 64

Dragon Bowl P. 65

PASTAS, CHILIES, SOUPS & SALADS

••••

•••

••

••

•••

Coco-Cado Bowl P. 65

Black Bean Patty Salad P. 43

Purple Potato Egg Salad P. 44

Chicken Pho

Chicken Sausage Penne

White Turkey Chili

WITH DANDELION GREENS

P. 70

WITH PEA SHOOTS

P. 52

P. 53

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Clean Eating

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WITH KALE

SMOOTHIE BOWLS DARREN KEMPER, FOOD STYLING BERNADETTE AMMAR, PROP STYLING THE FOOD GROUP

SMOOTHIE BOWLS


SEAFOOD

••

••

••

Steamed Clams

Arctic Char

WITH SORREL & GARLIC BREAD

WITH WATERCRESS, FENNEL & ORANGE SAUTÉ

P. 54

P. 54

Seafood, Fennel & Tomato Soup P. 73

Nori-Wrapped Salmon Hand Rolls P. 81

POULTRY

BEEF & PORK

••

Chicken & Quinoa– Stuffed Bell Peppers P. 72

Zoodles

Spice-Rubbed Pork Chops

WITH CILANTRO PESTO & GRILLED CHICKEN

P. 81

WITH ESCAROLE & APPLE SAUTÉ

J Asian-Style Meatloaf WITH SAVOY & CARROT SLAW

P. 71

Bake and enjoy your treats knowing they’re made with 100%

P. 55

GRAINS & VEGETABLES

sun-sweetened pure cane sugar that’s sustainably grown. Our sugar cane is grown with

earth-friendly care

•••

••

•••

••

Quick Carrot Top Pesto P. 33

Sweet Potato Hash

Polynesian Stir-Fry P. 44

Indian TwiceBaked Potatoes

WITH SUNNY SIDE UP EGGS

P. 43

WITH CUCUMBER YOGURT SAUCE

P. 72

(DUWK)ULHQGO\ 8QLTXHO\'HOLFLRXV ©2016 Domino Foods, Inc.

SNACKS & DESSERTS

because we know what begins on our farm, ends at your table.

••••

••••

•••

•••

Protein Pancakes

Mini Blueberry Muffins P. 43

Veggie-Filled Egg Muffins P. 80

Chocolate Caramel Peanut Butter Pie P. 88

WITH BERRY COULIS

P. 80

NUTRITIONAL VALUES The nutritional values used throughout Clean Eating are calculated with the use of The Food Processor SQL (Esha Research) and are provided by food manufacturers or found in the USDA National Nutrient Database.

For recipes and to learn more about how we are

Sweet to Mother Nature, visit floridacrystals.com.


eat smart // try this... with that

Next Issue Hits newsstands April 19, 2016

Mix 'n' Match Meals MENU 1

Stay happy and healthy year-round with these scrumptious meal combos.

+

=

642 Calories

Nori-Wrapped Salmon Hand Rolls with Wasabi Aioli, p. 81 Chocolate Caramel Peanut Butter Pie, p. 88

MENU 2

SHEET-PAN DINNERS Churn out epic meals with just a pan or two and one cooking temp for easy prep and even easier cleanup!Â

PROTEIN-PACKED PLATES:

ASIAN-INSPIRED COMFORT FOOD:

+

=

651 Calories

WEEKDAY WARRIOR:

+

=

574 Calories

TRANSFORM MEALTIME WITH 20 fresh, fast & delicious chicken dinners.

MENU 4

White Turkey Chili with Kale, p. 70 Mini Blueberry Muffins, p. 43

FAT-BURNING POWER BREAKFAST:

+

+

Waste-Free, Eco-Friendly

Kitchen Gear

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Clean Eating

APRIL 2016

Sweet Potato Hash with Sunny-Side Up Eggs, p. 43 Protein Pancakes with Berry Coulis, p. 80 The Pink Pitaya, p. 64

=

552 Calories

CHICKEN PHOTO BY GIBSON&SMITH, SHEET-PAN PHOTO BY DENNIS KENNEDY, BROWNIES BY MAYA VISNYEI

GRAIN-FREE BAKING Bread, cookies and brownies all created without a single grain using delicious and nutritious coconut, sweet potato and peanut flours.

MENU 3

Chicken Pho with Pea Shoots, p. 52 Asian-Style Meatloaf with Savoy & Carrot Slaw, p. 71


cleaneating.com Improving your life one meal at a time.

YOUR SOURCE FOR: • Quick, easy & delicious recipes • Budget-friendly meals • Endless recipe slideshows • Detailed meal plans • Food & nutrition news you can use! • Tips for healthier eating • The hottest kitchen tools & gadgets

Follow us on:

cleaneating.com


bits 'n' bites

Luscious

Loquats BY KAREN MORSE

STORE IT: Store ripe fruit in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks. The skin of the fruit is delicate and bruises easily, so take care when handling.

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Clean Eating

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EAT IT: The ripe fruit is golden orange and eaten fresh like an apple or mixed with other fruits in fruit salad. Slightly underripe loquats are yellowish-orange and a bit more tart, making them an excellent choice for piemaking. Bruised and sunburned fruit can be used to make jams, jellies and chutneys.Â

MARKET NAMES: Japanese plum, biwa, nispero, pipa SEASON: Mid-February to June PREP IT: Wash under running tap water or scrub gently with a clean vegetable brush.

HEALTH BENEFITS: Plant chemicals called carotenoids give this orangefleshed fruit its color and provide an excellent source of vitamin A, essential for healthy eyes and a strong immune system. Loquats are also a good source of calcium, potassium and fiber.

LOQUATS MATIN/SHUTTERSTOCK

For centuries, only Chinese royalty had the privilege of enjoying the sweet taste of the apricot-resembling fruit known as the loquat. Brimming with antioxidants called hydroxycinnamic acids, studies have shown loquats may be protective against heart disease and some types of cancer. Along with apples and pears, loquats are members of the rose family, and within the US, they're largely grown in Florida, California and Hawaii. Look for loquats at Asian markets, specialty fruit stores and farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; markets.


THE NEW

OMEGA-3S & THE HAPPY MEAL EFFECT TEXT BY KAREN MORSE, CRICKET ERIC ISSELEE/SHUTERSTOCK, PAPER TOWEL THODONAL88/SHUTTERSTOCK, CUTTING BOARD MONBIBI/SHUTTERSTOCK, HAPPY MEAL BOX AZRISURATMIN/SHUTTERSTOCK

OMEGA-3

HERO?

What if we told you that the best way to get more heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids wasn’t to eat more fish, but to add insect oil to your diet? A team of researchers from Wageningen University in the Netherlands found that the oil extracted from insects was rich in these essential fatty acids and comparable to that found in fish. Americans seem to be getting over the ick factor, with insects making their way into protein powders and bars. Researcher Daylan Tzompa-Sosa thinks it’s a shame to throw away the nutrient-rich oil, a by-product of the protein-extraction process. Her team examined insects such as mealworms, cockroaches and crickets, discovering a bouquet of oil aroma compounds that included buttery, grassy and sour vinegar notes. She hopes to see the oil used in salad dressings or as a healthier choice for frying foods. Bugged out about the prospect of eating bugs? The researchers are working with entomologists and other experts to determine which insects are best for humans. As the world population soars to a projected 9.7 billion by 2050, land will be more scarce and oceans more rapidly depleted. Insects, which are also rich in vitamins and minerals, may be one of the most sustainable ways of meeting the future’s nutrition challenges.

chew on this

#214 To make a “nonslip” cutting board in a pinch, wet a sheet of paper towel and place it underneath the board. This will help keep it sturdy while you chop, preventing any accidental nicks.

The Happy Meal Effect Big portion sizes in America's restaurants have contributed to an overwhelming obesity pandemic in our country, but could the idea behind the Happy Meal set us back on track for a healthier average weight? New research published in the Journal of the Association for Consumer Research showed that pairing smaller food portions with non-food prizes (like a toy or lottery ticket) was just as enticing to both children and adults as the thought of chowing down on larger servings without the bonus reward. In a series of experiments, scientists studied the happiness levels of both adults and children and found that the subjects were equally gratified when receiving half-sized portions of their favorite foods (such as pizza and burgers) when paired with a prize as when they were served full-sized portions alone – even when they were hungry. The key to these findings may be zeroing in on a prize that’s desirable enough to motivate behavior change while keeping us satisfied. Celebrate your next accomplishment by choosing a no-calorie reward such as a new piece of workout clothing. Reward kids with extra playtime or other non-food incentives so they don’t associate good behavior with food.

APRIL 2016

Clean Eating

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bits 'n' bites // the happening

A celeb-revered meal-delivery service, bespoke nut milks and an alarm clock that smells like breakfast – plus, what does “natural” mean anyway when it comes to food labels? Read on for the full scoop. BY LAURA SCHOBER

WAKE UP AND SMELL THE COFFEE If you’re not a morning person, an aromatic alarm clock that debuted at the 2016 Consumer Electronics Show may be your new best friend. SensorWake olfactory alarm clock is set to hit the market with its eco-friendly scented (and interchangeable) capsules smelling of food and drink like espresso, toast, invigorating peppermint, chocolate and hot croissant. While it also features the smells of the sea and even the lush jungle, the breakfast scents are sure to lure you out of bed. The fragrances are designed to wake you up within two minutes, but for deeper sleepers, the alarm has a backup melody as well. $109, sensorwake.com

DEFINING “NATURAL” New research from Consumer Reports reveals that many so-called “natural” ingredients in grocery-store foods are anything but. After conducting a survey on over 1,000 adults, they found that 62% of grocery shoppers actively shop for natural foods; however, nearly two-thirds of them believe the "natural" label means more than it does. In fact, what most people don't know is that foods labeled “natural” can contain GMOs, artificial ingredients, pesticides and hormones. With no government regulations on what defines “natural,” Consumer Reports has launched a petition demanding the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) take a closer look at what foods can or cannot use the classification. The FDA has responded and is asking for public comment for how the word should or should not be used on food packaging. For now, be a label sleuth and read the ingredient lists of packaged foods. Don’t buy anything with a long ingredient list or with ingredients you don’t know or can’t pronounce. To make your voice be heard, visit consumersunion.org/natural to sign the updated petition. 

SUPERFOOD DELIVERY Known for its superfood-studded, Instagramworthy meals, Sakara Life launched its nationwide meal-delivery service in January. Now, Sakaralites – or fans of the company’s organic plant-based philosophy – can get their health fix anywhere in the country. Since its inception in 2012 by best friends Danielle DuBoise and Whitney Tingle, it has amassed a following of celebrities including Victoria’s Secret model Lily Aldridge, Gwyneth Paltrow, Lena Dunham and Oscar-winning producer Jessica Latham. Rather than focusing solely on dieting or losing weight, Sakara’s recipes, which are all free of gluten and dairy, are designed to improve your overall well-being and boost energy. The recipes are developed by nutrition experts, chefs and advisory board members, including Bobby Flay. With a variety of delivery options to choose from, check out sakaralife.com for more details.

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NUT MILK AMAWASRI PAKDARA/SHUTTERSTOCK, ALL NATURAL LOGO ARCADY/SHUTTERSTOCK

FOODIE 411

SMALL-BATCH NUT MILKS With the bulk of store-bought nut milks being shunned for their use of thickeners like carrageenan and for their smaller percentage of nuts compared to homemade blends, a new army of small-batch nut milks are offering naturally flavored and blended options that are free of additives. With companies such as Can Can Nut Milk and NotMilk concocting customized milks and make-your-own kits, you'll find blends of cashew, walnut, macadamia nut, Brazil nut and pistachio mixed with natural flavor enhancers such as vanilla, cinnamon, lavender and honey. Can’t find a small-batch producer in your city? Make your own delicious nut milks at home using a high-powered blender (check out our top picks in “Blender Wars” on page 34).


MIND OVER MATTER TEXT BY LAURA SCHOBER, WOMEN BUYING FRUIT © BLEND IMAGES/MASTERFILE, ICE CUBES VALENTYN VOLKOV/SHUTTERSTOCK

Mind Over Matter The key to staying healthy over the long term could be as easy as visualizing yourself as a healthy person. In the journal Self & Identity, study authors Amanda Brouwer and Katie Mosack reviewed the eating habits of 124 women, dividing participants into three groups and asking them to keep a food diary for six weeks. The first group received educational information on nutrition, the second was a control group and the third was asked to create six statements on their eating goals. The researchers were interested in finding out whether the “self as doer” concept – where you identify yourself as the person you want to be, such as “clean eater” or “athlete,” in order to influence permanent psychological changes – can relate to a person’s behavior with food. (The concept has been researched in other studies and suggests that those who make “doer” statements regarding their goals show greater adherence and persistence.) When participants in the third group identified with a particular healthy-eating ethos, they were more likely to act out that belief. For instance, those who wanted to eat more fruit were encouraged to think of themselves as “fruit eaters.” Researchers found that the third group maintained their wholesome habits throughout the study and ate one portion more of healthy food a day while the other two groups ate less healthy food overall. The promising results suggest that mind prevails over matter and that nutrition education may not be enough for everyone. To stick to your cleaneating lifestyle, make positive affirmations about your diet goals to see them realized.

chew on this

#53

Your secret weapons for skimming away excess fat from stocks, sauces and stews are already in your kitchen – all you need are a few ice cubes, a spoon and a paper towel or cheesecloth. First, wrap a few ice cubes in a paper towel or cheesecloth and skim along the liquid’s surface. Next, use a spoon to scoop out the fat – the ice helps to harden the fat so it’s easier to remove.

APRIL 2016

Clean Eating

23


bits 'n' bites // supermarket guide

WRAPPER’S DELIGHT

These mouthwatering alternatives to whole-wheat wraps are gluten-free, versatile and distinctly delicious. BY LAURA SCHOBER

1 KALE

2 NORI

3 COCONUT

4 TOMATO

5 CORN

Raw Wraps Kale combine the cruciferous veggie with apples, quinoa, psyllium and coconut nectar for a healthy offering of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants including vitamins A, C and K, and fiber. These pair well with steamed veggies, salmon or turkey. $10, rawwraps.org  

Wild harvested from the Sea of Japan, Vivapura Superfoods Raw Organic Nori Sheets make a mineral-rich addition to your meals. Use these glossy dark purple sheets as a wrap for vegetables, salads or sushi. $20 per pack of 50, vivapura.com

Julian Bakery Paleo Wraps are shelf stable up to nine months and contain coconut meat, coconut water and virgin coconut oil from organic coconuts. Try with grass-fed beef, chicken or shrimp and a smattering of veggies. $9, julianbakery.com

Blue Mountain Organics Raw Tomato Wraps are full of big flavor thanks to the addition of organic apples, tomatoes, lemon juice, flax, oregano and marjoram. Load these up with veggies or poultry for a delicious lunch or snack. $6.50, bluemountainorganics.com

Made from organic, non-GMO sprouted corn, Food for Life Sprouted Corn Tortillas are essential for all your beloved Mexican recipes, from tacos to enchiladas. $4, foodforlife.com

1

2 3

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4

PHOTO BY VINCENZO PISTRITTO

5


ASK OUR

Q

What is nutrigenomics?

dietitians

A

The fascinating, emerging science of nutrigenomics explores the relationship between genetics and diet. Nutrigenomics seeks to understand how genes and genetic differences among individuals influence the way people respond to food and nutrients, and how these individual, gene-based responses to diet may affect health and disease. There are certain genetic variations that have been identified that influence metabolism as well as ways that individuals respond to and process nutrients. Nutrigenomics may help us better understand why some people are more prone to developing metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes. It may also shed new light on food sensitivities, intolerances and allergies, from celiac disease to lactose intolerance. Research into nutrigenomics is paving the way to highly personalized, gene-specific diets, which would pair nutrients and food to an individual’s unique needs and genetic profile.

Got a food question? We have the answers.

FLIP TO PAGE 36 FOR ERIN AND TIFFANI'S WEIGHT-LOSS SECRETS AND FAT-BURNING RECIPES!

What’s the difference between natural sugar and processed sugar?

A

Natural sugars are those that are found naturally in food, such as fruit (fructose) and dairy (lactose), as well as raw, unprocessed sources that are often added to food, like raw honey and pure maple syrup. These sugars retain their vitamins and minerals, which can enrich the nutrient profile of a healthy diet. Processed or refined sugars are those that originate from beets or cane and undergo extraction and purification processes, which ultimately turn them into a crystalline form to be added to food. These types of sugars are stripped of their nutrients, leaving them as a source of empty calories. Both natural and processed sugars have 4 calories per gram, which can add up quickly. The American Heart Association recommends limiting daily added sugar to 6 teaspoons (100 calories) for women and 9 teaspoons (150 calories) for men to help prevent inflammation, obesity and related diseases, while the new US Dietary Guidelines recommends limiting added sugars to less than 10% of your daily calories, which equates to 200 calories or 50 grams of sugar if you’re eating a 2,000-calorie diet.

FOXY'S FOREST MANUFACTURE/SHUTTERSTOCK TIFFANI AND ERIN IMAGES BY JAMES PATRICK

Q

Registered dietitians Tiffani Bachus and Erin Macdonald are the co-founders and creators of URockGirl.com, a website dedicated to promoting wellness and a healthy, balanced lifestyle. They are the creators and instructors of the Clean Eating Academy's latest course, A Whole-Life Guide to Lasting Weight Loss.

APRIL 2016

Clean Eating

25


Mouthwash Freshen your breath naturally with this alcoholand fluoride-free herbal rinse. BY KATHRIN BRUNNER, PHOTOGRAPHY BY MEAGHAN EADY

Alcohol-based mouthwashes can be harsh on your teeth and mouth and often contain artificial sweeteners and colors, so why waste your money on chemical-laden rinses when you can make your own at home? In this DIY mouthwash, peppermint, fennel and anise impart soothing sweetness to freshen breath while antimicrobial cinnamon, calendula and sea salt help keep bacteria in check and aid in healing tender areas of the mouth.

Minty Herbal Mouthwash INGREDIENTS: • 1½ cups filtered water • 2 tsp dried peppermint • 2 tsp dried calendula • 1 tsp fennel seeds • ¼ tsp anise seeds • 2-inch piece cinnamon stick • ¼ to ½ tsp sea salt

EQUIPMENT: • Heatproof jar or teapot, for steeping • Large tea ball or tea bag, optional • Glass bottle or jar with lid

INSTRUCTIONS: ONE: Bring 1½ cups filtered water to a boil. Into a heatproof jar or a teapot, pour boiled water.

THREE: Let herbs steep for 30 minutes. Then, using a small fine-mesh sieve to strain herbs, pour infused water into a clean bottle or jar. FOUR: Add ¼ tsp sea salt and stir to dissolve. As you get used to saltiness of your rinse, begin increasing salt to ½ tsp for more germfighting power. TIP: Store rinse in the fridge for 3 to 5 days. To use your herbal mouthwash, after brushing, swish a mouthful gently in your mouth and through teeth for 30 seconds.

26

Kathrin Brunner is a Toronto-based nutritionist and yoga teacher. She has a passion for holistic living and is a superavid DIYer who has created several lines of natural bodycare products. Brunner teaches at The Institute of Holistic Nutrition and has a private practice that offers a variety of workshops, corporate talks and yoga classes. Visit her website at fortheloveofbody.com.

Clean Eating

APRIL 2016

KATHRIN BRUNNER PHOTO BY AMBER ELLIS, CREATING LIGHT STUDIO

TWO: To container with boiled water, add peppermint, calendula, fennel seeds, anise seeds and cinnamon. (TIP: Alternatively, place herbs in a large tea ball or tea bag before immersing.)


Pearly Whites

1

2

3

4

$

4 OFF

Make your smile sparkle with these natural and organic tooth cleaners. BY LAURA SCHOBER

PERFECT POLISH

FRESH & CLEAN

HEALTHIER GUMS

Thanks to a potent yet gentle combination of bentonite clay and food-grade diatomaceous earth, Lumino Organic Tooth Polish Powder strengthens and remineralizes teeth after whitening treatments while also fighting bacteria. $15, luminowellness.com

Nature’s Gate Crème de Peppermint cleans and polishes teeth without fluoride, parabens and sulfates, while its minty scent keeps bad breath at bay. $6, naturesgate.com

Containing natural waxes such as beeswax and jojoba as well as natural spearmint flavor and myrrh resin extract for freshness, Tom’s of Maine Antiplaque Floss is kind to gums and teeth but tough on plaque. $3, tomsofmaine.com


bits 'n' bites

High-fat, low-carb diets are back in the nutritional spotlight. Three new reads by top doctors bring this path to weight loss to the forefront. BY LAURA SCHOBER

Eat Fat, Get Thin:

Smart Fat:

Always Hungry?

Why the Fat We Eat Is the Key to Sustained Weight Loss and Vibrant Health

Eat More Fat. Lose More Weight. Get Healthy Now.

Conquer Cravings, Retrain Your Fat Cells & Lose Weight Permanently

Turning everything you thought you knew about weight loss on its head, Mark Hyman, MD, unveils his 21-day “Eat Fat, Get Thin” plan while debunking the myths surrounding dietary fat and cholesterol. Hyman, the director of the Cleveland Clinic Center for Functional Medicine, explains how eating a diet rich in beneficial fats like avocado, eggs and coconut oil can help you lose weight and fight disease. Eat Fat, Get Thin outlines the foods you should be eating and why, and incorporates them into simple recipes complete with shopping lists to help you jump-start your plan. More than just a short-term approach, Hyman’s method is designed to keep the weight off for good and provides tips for maintaining a slimmer you after the 21 days are up. By Mark Hyman, MD ($28, Little, Brown and Company)

In this groundbreaking book, authors Steven Masley, MD, and Clean Eating’s resident nutrition expert, Jonny Bowden, PhD, CNS, break down the misconceptions about dietary fat and point instead to the right “smart” fats you should be consuming for lasting weight loss, overall health and disease prevention. In Smart Fat, Masley and Bowden highlight the beneficial properties behind healthy fat, including how it can control and influence your hormones and increase energy. Complete with a 30-day meal plan, this book contains more than 50 slimming recipes containing smart fats, high-fiber foods and protein. Compared to other plans, the smart-fat diet isn’t as restrictive, so you’ll find lots of satiating and flavorful recipes that won't leave you feeling deprived. By Steven Masley, MD, and Jonny Bowden, PhD, CNS ($27, HarperOne)

Looking to lose a few extra pounds? Be mindful of portion sizes by using a smaller plate. A recent review study published in the Journal of the Association for Consumer Research found that when plate size was halved, people consumed 30% less food on average in situations where they served themselves, such as at home when meals were served family-style or at a buffet.

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chew on this

#

102

It's time to leave fad diets behind – there’s an easier path to weight loss, and it doesn’t involve counting calories or cutting out fats. In Always Hungry?, David Ludwig, MD, presents a new roadmap to weight loss that incorporates more healthful fats. The researcher, endocrinologist and Harvard professor expounds the latest clinical evidence by bringing to the table a proven fact about weight loss: Your body weight is controlled by your biology. That means the low-fat, ultra-limiting diets of yesterday may result in short-term weight loss, but the weight almost always comes back after you stop dieting. Instead, by working with your body’s biological processes and eating the right types of foods in conjunction with lifestyle changes, fat cells can be “reprogrammed.” These dietary changes, which include consuming more fat, shift our metabolism into weight-loss mode, and who doesn’t want that? Meal plans and recipes are provided, so you can can hit the ground running and reboot your health and body just the way nature intended.  By David Ludwig, MD, PhD ($34, Grand Central Publishing)

EGGS SEVENKE/SHUTTERSTOCK, PLATE VITALY KOROVIN/SHUTTERSTOCK

The Book Club


P R O M OT I O N

A Whole-Life Guide to

LASTING WEIGHT LOSS COURSE HIGHLIGHTS: • 9-week interactive course for healthy and lasting weight loss.

• Begins with an introduction and works through all aspects of successful weight loss including meal planning, fitness and goal setting.

• Includes thorough course materials featuring videos, webinars, recipes, slideshows, quizzes, hands-on assignments and a printable, takeanywhere manual.

Simply register for the course between now and April 15th to be automatically qualified to win the chance to take this course for FREE! (A $250 Value! One winner selected each week)

Register today to start losing weight for FREE!

cleaneating.com/weight-loss

Join weight-loss experts and Clean Eating’s Advisory Board dietitians Erin Macdonald and Tiffani Bachus as they lead you, step-by-step, through a complete 9-week holistic program to lose weight safely and effectively, transforming simple tactics into day-to-day habits that will keep you fit, lean and eating clean for life!


STAFF PICK

bits 'n' bites // foodie faves

CLEANEST NEW FOODS 1

Slimming Snacks & Drinks

6

Reach your health goals with these easy-on-the-waistline foods and drinks. BY LAURA SCHOBER 1 LOW-CAL CRACKERS For a light yet satisfying snack, RW Garcia 3-Seed Sweet Pea Crackers ring in at 130 calories per serving of 16 crackers. They’re also gluten-free, non-GMO and made with nutrient-packed peas, flaxseed, sesame and chia. $6 to $6.50, rwgarcia.com for where to buy

2 SPICY-HOT JERKY At just 100 calories, the EPIC Chicken Sriracha Bar quashes cravings while firing up your taste buds. It’s a moist jerky made from non-GMO poultry that’s laced with spices, red pepper flakes, chia seeds, garlic and paprika for a serious hit of spicy heat. $3, epicbar.com

2 5

3

3 HOME ROASTED The CE team is obsessed with Allgood Provisions Organic Oven-Stoked Roasting Kits, and for good reason. Our fave flavor combo – Black Truffle Rosemary Almonds – takes just 15 minutes to prepare and clocks in at 180 calories per 1-ounce serving. $10, allgoodprovisions.com

4

That’s It. fruit bars are orbiting the earth – literally. Provided as healthy snacks to astronauts aboard the International Space Station (and NASA food lab–approved!), each 100-calorie, high-fiber bar is made with just two ingredients. We recommend the apple and mango variety! $2, thatsitfruit.com for where to buy

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Devoid of the added preservatives many other coconut and aloe waters contain, Taste Nirvana Real Coco Aloe is an all-natural, naturally sweet beverage with 60 calories, 400 milligrams of potassium and 2 grams of natural fiber per bottle. $2.50, tastenirvana.com for where to buy

Only 35 calories per serving, Caliwater Cactus Water in Wild Prickly Pear is a refreshing and beautifying electrolyte-rich bevvie. Prickly pear cactus juice contains a high concentration of betalains, antioxidants that help rejuvenate skin. $2.50, drinkcaliwater.com for where to buy

PHOTO BY VINCENZO PISTRITTO

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be inspired 3. You’ll savor delicious bean dishes from all over the world. Choosing clean proteins is

Food is one of life’s great pleasures. And it’s really a pleasure when the foods we eat are not only incredibly delicious and satisfying but hold the potential to transform our life and our world. Check out these 10 no-fuss ways eating green can help you stay lean as you step into a higher level of health.  BY KATE GEAGAN

1. Shifting your plate to more plants and less meat is the single biggest step you can take to a diet that’s both leaner and greener. Globally, about 70% of all agricultural land and 8% of global water is used to grow crops for livestock, making meat the most energy-intensive part of your plate. So much so that a study in Environmental Science & Technology found that going without meat and dairy less than one day a week can slash your food-related climate footprint more than buying all locally sourced food. Bonus: A diet brimming with a variety of plant foods with smaller portions of animal products is associated with lower body weight, less chronic disease and greater longevity.

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2. You’ll eat closer to the source, the way nature intended. Eating the way nature intended – by choosing real, whole foods that are minimally processed – does more than just deliver a satisfying nutritional bounty (think vitamins, minerals, fiber, phytochemicals and more) in a way that’s designed for your body’s biology. Minimizing highly processed packaged foods and beverages also helps you sidestep questionable ingredients. And you’ll also minimize additional, energy-intensive processing and packaging involved in creating many of those “inner aisle of the supermarket” products.

4. Preparing and serving the right portion size trims your waistline and your waste. In today’s supersized-food environment, quantity is as important as quality. And learning to enjoy the right-sized portions of foods is an essential life skill for staying lean. It can also be a powerful tool to reduce food waste: In the US, approximately 20 pounds of food per American is wasted each month. Not only does all of that discarded food require energy and resources to produce, but when it goes to the landfill, bacteria break it down and release methane, a greenhouse gas that is 25 times more potent, pound for pound, than carbon dioxide.

5. You’ll get to savor high-quality, healthier (ancient) grains over the highly processed modern counterparts linked to weight gain and inflammation. Intact whole ancient grains and seeds (such as quinoa, buckwheat, farro and barley) are some of nature’s most nutrient-

Kate Geagan, MS, RD, is an award-winning dietitian and internationally recognized leader in sustainable eating and nutrition. She is the author of Go Green, Get Lean: Trim Your Waistline with the Ultimate Low Carbon Footprint Diet and she’s regularly appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and Katie Couric’s show Katie.

KATE GEAGAN PHOTO BY KENDAL REY PHOTOGRAPHY, RECIPE IMAGE BY KATE GEAGAN

10 Ways Eating Green Can Keep You Lean

a cornerstone of the Clean Eating philosophy, and beans are one of the cleanest, leanest, greenest superfoods on the planet. In fact, legumes are such a powerful food for personal and planetary health that the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) has declared 2016 the International Year of Pulses, as they provide a bevy of impressive nutrition benefits (including protein, fiber, folate, potassium, magnesium and iron) in a low-calorie package. Pulses are also one of the most sustainable protein sources, as they have unique nitrogenfixing properties, which can help increase soil fertility and improve the health of the planet.


dense, eco-friendly plant-based staples. Complex carbohydrates found in whole ancient grains are absorbed more slowly into the body than refined carbohydrates, helping to maintain stable blood sugar levels. They also provide an important source of fiber, B vitamins, trace minerals like selenium and zinc, and prebiotic fibers that enhance digestive health. Research from Wake Forest University Health Sciences has found that eating 2½ or more servings of whole grains each day can slash heart disease risk by 21%.

6. You’ll reinvigorate your relationship with tap water – your healthiest and greenest water option. Water comprises up to 60% of your body weight, so whether your goal is to flush waste from your system, keep your metabolism primed or help skin stay supple, drinking plenty of water is an essential part of your health journey. Consider that the production of a typical bottle of water, for instance, requires about 2 to 3 times as much water to produce than is found in the final product. So fill up your favorite glass, Mason jar or BPAfree reusable water bottle with freshly filtered water throughout the day and keep it where you can see it and sip it. CE recommends consuming 2 liters of water per day.

7. Enjoying plenty of raw, fresh foods helps fill you up on fewer calories and uses less power. Eating plenty of fresh or raw foods not only helps fight fatigue and sluggishness, but they require little to no additional energy to prepare, helping reduce your power usage. Aim to enjoy several servings of raw, no-cook foods each day, including a variety of vegetables (especially dark leafy greens), fruits, nuts, seeds and sprouted grains. These foods are a rich source of fiber, essential minerals such as iron, magnesium and zinc, as well as detoxifying enzymes and cancer-

fighting phytochemicals. In fact, in a 2013 study in the American Journal of Epidemiology, European researchers found that eating an abundance of raw veggies was associated with a 16% drop in mortality rate.

8. Including more organic foods in your cart can reduce your carbon footprint and may keep you leaner. Research shows that organically managed soil acts as a massive carbon sink and regenerates soil richness. According to the Rodale Institute, if all conventionally farmed cropland were switched to organic agriculture practices, we could prevent more than 40% of annual carbon emissions. What’s the lean benefit? While more research needs to be done, there’s some evidence that chronic, low-dose exposure to antibiotics through livestock may be disrupting the normal, steady state of the gut microbiome, contributing to the surge in obesity. (According to the latest report from the US Food and Drug Administration, approximately 74% of all medically important antibiotics sold in the US are used for livestock feed, in part to promote growth.)

9. Eating “root to tip” enhances nutrition and reduces food waste. Using every nutrient-rich part of the plant – from fiber-packed sweet potato skins to iron-rich beet greens – helps pack even more vital nutrients into your diet and reduces food waste in one delicious bite. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, food waste is the second-largest component of trash in the US, accounting for 18% of the waste stream.

10. Cooking at home helps you stay lean and green all week. While a salad ordered from a restaurant still fares better than a grilled steak at home in terms of environmental impact, when comparing similar foods, home is

the greener choice. That’s due to the refrigeration, heating, cooling, lighting and water that retailers need to keep customers coming back. Dining out is associated with higher body fat, obesity and a higher intake of calories and sodium. Yet today, roughly half of every dollar spent on food in America goes to meals prepared outside the home. Bring your kitchen to life by preparing your own meals and snacks as often as you can.

Quick Carrot Top Pesto MAKES 1 CUP PESTO.

I recommend using organic carrots for this recipe. Store the carrot tops separately from the carrots so that the tops don’t drain energy and moisture from the roots.

INGREDIENTS: • 1½ cups roughly chopped carrot-top leaves • 1 large garlic clove, chopped • 1⁄3 cup extra-virgin olive oil • 1⁄8 tsp kosher salt • 1 tbsp fresh lemon juice • 3 tbsp toasted walnuts or pine nuts • 1⁄3 cup freshly grated ParmigianoReggiano cheese • 1 to 2 organic carrots, sliced ½-inch-thick coins

INSTRUCTIONS: In a blender or food processor, add carrot-top leaves, garlic, oil, salt and lemon juice. Pulse until combined (scrape down sides if needed). Add pine nuts and cheese and pulse until combined. Serve with carrots.

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Blender Wars

EDITORS ’ CE

TOP TOOLS

how to // kitchen tools

TO HAVE •C

H OICE •

We worked up a sweat blending, pulsing and puréeing to bring you our top blender recommendations. So, whether you've saved up for a professional brand or you're on a budget, we've got an option for you. BY ANDREA GOURGY

Choosing a blender is only half the battle – learning how to use it right is equally important. Follow these tips (and, of course, always read the manual) and you'll be a master blender in no time.

REV IT UP SLOWLY: Start on low, then slowly increase speed. This allows ingredients to get cut into pieces before being pulled into liquid – and it's much easier on the machine's motor. WHEN IT'S HOT HOT HOT: When blending hot liquids, the steam can create pressure in the jar. Remove the plastic insert in the lid and firmly hold a clean towel over the opening to allow steam to escape. LAST BUT NOT LEAST: While some of these models offer dishwasher-safe containers, we prefer to clean them the old-fashioned way to avoid stuck-on grime. Fill about halfway with warm water and a drop of dish soap and give it a whirl; then rinse.

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The Cult Classic VITAMIX 5200

Cool Factor

There's no other name in the blender game that's as recognizable as Vitamix, and for good reason. Its high-efficiency 1,380-watt motor can tackle the toughest ingredients with ease: Berry seeds? No problem. Frozen bananas? Toss 'em in. The friction of the blades is so strong that you can even make hot soup. This model comes standard with a wet-blade container (for liquid ingredients, pestos and nut butters), but to grind dry items like grains or coffee, you'll want to purchase a dry-blade container that works with the same base. A tamper to help with thicker mixtures is included.

KITCHENAID TORRENT MAGNETIC DRIVE BLENDER

While the design is retro with its gorgeous cherry red color, this blender is anything but old school. With a 1,300-watt motor, this model works by way of a magnetic system to spin the blades. It has a rotating dial to select the settings, which include various preprogrammed options, including our favorite, a superfine juice setting for extra-smooth drinks. This unit is quite heavy to move around, though, so it's best if you’re planning to keep it in one spot on your countertop.

$449, vitamix.com

$500, kitchenaid.com

PHOTO BY VINCENZO PISTRITTO

LIQUIDS FIRST: Generally, it's best to pour your liquids in first, followed by softer ingredients and the hardest ones on top. The liquid helps get your blades going for best results – plus, keeping the hardest ingredients on top will help protect the blades. Always check the manufacturer's instructions as the order may slightly vary.


Dual Jar

The Ice Obliterator

BLACK + DECKER PERFORMANCE FUSIONBLADE BLENDER

NINJA PROFESSIONAL BLENDER 1000

True to Its Name THE BREVILLE BOSS

With five automatic settings including smoothies, soups and nut butters, this 1,100-watt model is a good option without a hefty price tag. We love that you also get a 20-ounce personal blender jar with a flip-top lid for take-to-go smoothies – so you can blend and then hit the road without any cleanup. Before blending with the larger pitcher, make sure to fit the lid and press firmly to secure it.

This 1,000-watt model has a lot of pep for such a compact, lightweight machine. It blends ice with ease – a real testament to its efficacy. The blade is removable for easy cleanup, but use caution as it can fall out when the jar is turned upside down. The lid locks in place, plus it has a spout, which means you can pour with the lid on without spilling (while keeping the blade safely in the jar). All parts are BPA-free. This is a great choice at a more moderate price point.

This is a blender that truly deserves the name the "Boss." It’s supremely powerful (1,500 watts), and its one blending jar does it all, from smoothies to nut butters and hot soups – you can even grind grains and seeds into flour. It has several easy-to-use automatic settings, so you can turn it on and walk away, or you can choose the manual option if you prefer. It comes with a stunning cookbook to provide inspiration in the kitchen. This is truly a luxurious blender and one of our all-around favorites.

$120, blackanddeckerappliances.com

$100, ninjakitchen.com for where to buy

$400, brevilleusa.com

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recipes

Tiffani Bachus

Erin Macdonald

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Visit cleaneating. com/weight-loss to learn more about our 9-week weightloss course and register to win 1 of 6 free courses!

5 Secrets to

LEAD PHOTO BY JAMES PATRICK, FOOD STYLING BY JOHN KIRKPATRICK, ROBIN ZIMMERMAN, BETH SEUFERER, PROP STYLING BY SUE MITCHELL

Win at Weight Loss

No more yo-yo dieting – sensible, easy-to-follow weight-loss advice is here. In a preview of our upcoming Clean Eating Academy online course, A Whole-Life Guide to Lasting Weight Loss, dietitians Erin Macdonald and Tiffani Bachus give us their recommendations for losing those extra pounds and keeping them off. Plus, their 5 mouthwatering recipes won’t make you feel like you’re missing a thing! BY ERIN MACDONALD, RDN, AND TIFFANI BACHUS, RDN, PHOTOGRAPHY BY DENNIS KENNEDY

Type the words “weight loss” into a Google search and you’ll find web page after web page offering the secret to winning the weight-loss game. Should you cut carbs or fat? Is exercise helpful or will it just make you hungrier? Do all foods really fit? Moderation – what the heck does that even mean? We’ve chewed through the science and digested the data and have come up with our secrets to winning the battle of the bulge. No counting calories – or becoming a slave to your Fitbit – required.

1. Clean up your environment. To be successful in achieving your weight-loss goals, your environment

needs to be supportive. Think about where you spend your time – home, work, the car – and imagine all the changes that could be made to each of these environments to make it easier to eat right, get active, sleep better and reduce stress. For example, at work, replace the jar of candy with a bowl of tangerines. Ask your co-workers for their support by not bringing treats to work. Pack a cooler full of meals and snacks to bring with you so you are nourished throughout the day. At home, place a bowl of fresh fruit on the table or counter because when you're hungry, you usually eat the first thing you see. Hide, or better yet, get rid of all of your trigger foods (foods such as chips that may trigger you to eat uncontrollably) as well as all refined, processed foods. No one

in the family needs to be eating them! Lastly, get your family on board – a family that works together to reach a common goal (such as eating more nutritious food to improve health and weight) will be more successful in attaining that goal.

2. Dump the sugar. Oh, sugar, how sweet you are, but how much damage you cause! Over the last few decades, the amount of sugar in the American diet has steadily increased, and so have the rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Sugar is not only found in the obvious places – desserts, soda, lemonade, sports beverages – but it’s also hidden in many items, like yogurt, cereal and condiments such as salad dressing and barbecue sauce. If you were to keep track of how much sugar

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recipes you consumed in a day, you might be surprised to see your daily total is a whopping 22 teaspoons (the average amount Americans eat; keep in mind the recommendation is no more than 6 teaspoons per day for women and 9 teaspoons for men). Sugar causes the hormone insulin to be produced. Insulin’s main role is to escort sugar from the bloodstream into the cells, where it is burned for energy. High levels of blood sugar call for more

protein and fat so that you feel full and satisfied. Your meals should give you enough energy to power through 2 to 4 hours of school, work or play. Fill up your plate with veggies, seeds, whole grains, fish, beans, eggs and chicken.

4. Get real. Stop buying food from a box, a bag or a can, and look to real food to fuel your body. Real carbs include fresh, seasonal and

Think about where you spend your time — home, work, the car — and imagine all the changes that could be made to each of these environments to make it easier to eat right, get active, sleep better and reduce stress. insulin to be produced, and often, not enough cells are available to take it in. Instead, it packages that excess sugar into fat cells for storage. Sugar also hijacks your brain and gives you a high – the so-called sugar rush. On brain scans, sugar consumption lights up the reward centers of the brain by releasing dopamine, the pleasure hormone. And when we come down from that high, we crave more sugar to achieve that feeling again. Stop the sugar and stop the vicious cycle.

3. Find balance. Carbohydrates, protein and fat are the three macronutrients that make up the food you eat. They provide fuel for your body and brain, nutrients to repair and build tissue, and storage fuel for times of fasting or exercise. The Standard American Diet is too high in carbohydrate and too low in protein – take a typical breakfast of waffles with syrup and orange juice, or a bowl of cereal with fruit. Both are low-fiber, low-protein and high-carbohydrate meals. Gone are the days of “low-fat” and “fat-free” eating, as we now have a better understanding of the satiating power of healthy fats. Every meal and snack should have a balance of carbs,

local fruits and vegetables, and whole (unprocessed) grains. Real proteins include wild-caught fish, organic poultry (no hormones or antibiotics), grass-fed beef, eggs, organic dairy, beans and legumes. Real fats include virgin coconut oil, extra-virgin olive oil, avocados, nuts, seeds and grassfed butter and ghee (clarified butter). Most packaged food contains sugar and sodium that will hijack the pleasure center of your brain (see #2) and chemicals, artificial sugars and preservatives, which can disrupt hormones, overstimulate your brain and even cause cancer. The best foods don’t come with a food label (have you ever seen a label on broccoli?).

5. Nourish the little buggers in your gut. There are more than 100 trillion microbes living inside your intestinal tract, some of them good and some of them bad. Research has discovered two strains that are associated with obesity and being lean. Scientists at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found there was a higher proportion of the Firmicutes strain to the Bacteroidetes strain in obese individuals. They found the opposite was true in lean

BREAKFAST Sweet Potato Hash with Sunny Side Up Eggs (See recipe, p. 43)

folks. Other bacteria are involved in inflammation, vitamin production and overall immunity. What you eat feeds the bacteria in your gut. The good bacteria, aka probiotics, thrive on dietary fiber and prebiotics (indigestible carbohydrates) allowing them to produce compounds that help regulate immune function and weight control. A recent study in the journal Obesity found that lean men given probiotics gained less weight than the placebo group when fed a highfat, high-calorie diet. Probiotic-rich foods include yogurt, miso, kefir and

Flip to page 75 for our 2-week weight-loss Meal Plan!

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SNACK 1 sauerkraut. Prebiotic foods include oatmeal, bananas, asparagus and Jerusalem artichokes.

Mini Blueberry Muffins (See recipe, p. 43)

We’ve designed 5 recipes geared toward weight loss to provide a healthy balance of macronutrients at every meal and snack. You can make them all in one day (as we suggest in our Meal Plan on page 75) and experience what a day’s worth of balanced eating really feels like – or you can tackle one or two at a time and enjoy the novelty for a few days.

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recipes

What Type of Exercise Is Best for Weight Loss?

LUNCH Black Bean Patty Salad (See recipe, p. 43)

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Exercise is an important component of weight loss because it burns calories, helping to put you in a calorie deficit. Simply put, weight loss happens when you burn more calories than you take in – but it’s more complicated than it may seem. When you lose weight, you lose a combination of fat, muscle and water, and as a result, your metabolic rate drops and less calories are burned. Your muscle mass is directly tied to your metabolic rate – the more muscle mass you have, the higher your metabolism will be. To make sure that your muscle mass is preserved and any weight you lose comes primarily from fat, you need to follow an exercise program that both activates your muscles and burns sufficient calories. Aerobic activities, like walking, biking, swimming and dancing, will burn a greater number of calories at the time of exercise, as well as condition your cardiovascular system. Strength training, also known as resistance or weight training, will activate your muscle mass and increase the number of calories you burn over a 24-hour period. Including both types of exercise each day will promote the greatest loss in body fat while keeping your metabolic rate high.


The Sleep-Weight Connection Not getting the recommended 7 to 9 hours of shut-eye a night can affect the hormones that impact your appetite. The two main hormones are leptin, the hormone that tells you you’re full, and ghrelin, the hormone that tells you you’re hungry. When you don’t get enough sleep, leptin levels drop and ghrelin levels rise, so you feel hungrier all day and have a hard time feeling full. Plus, lack of quality sleep increases your level of cortisol (the stress hormone), which increases your desire for sugary and starchy foods and their conversion to body fat. Yikes! There are a number of recommended tips

to improve sleep quality and quantity, but the most important is the shutting down of all electronic devices with a screen at least an hour before bedtime. Cell phones, televisions, computers and tablets all emit blue light, which suppresses the production of melatonin, the hormone that helps make you feel sleepy, from the pineal gland in the brain. It takes at least an hour in an environment with low light for enough melatonin to be produced to make you feel like you could fall asleep. Try to replace your evening Netflix habit with a book and you’ll fall asleep in no time!

Pack it with protein: Keep protein in mind when choosing your snacks and meals. This purple potato salad is given a protein boost with hard-boiled eggs and all-natural turkey bacon to give you 12 grams of protein per serving. Protein combined with slow-burning carbs like purple potatoes can provide you with sustained energy throughout the day.

SNACK 2 Purple Potato Egg Salad (See recipe, p. 44)

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recipes

DINNER Polynesian Stir-Fry (See recipe, p. 44)

Keep your sodium in check: Make sure to keep your salt intake to a minimum to avoid retaining water. This stir-fry uses fresh orange juice and vinegar to add big flavor while helping to keep the sodium level below 400 milligrams per serving.

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Try Our Simple & Slimming 1-Day Meal Plan: BREAKFAST

Sweet Potato Hash with Sunny Side Up Eggs MAKES 2 SERVINGS. HANDS-ON TIME: 20 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 30 MINUTES.

INSTRUCTIONS:

medium and mist same skillet with cooking spray. Crack eggs onto separate sides of skillet and cook until set (or flip over for over easy eggs). Place 1 egg over each serving of hash. Sprinkle egg with additional pepper, to taste. NUTRIENTS PER SERVING (2⁄3 CUP HASH AND 1 EGG): CALORIES: 188, TOTAL FAT: 7 g, SAT. FAT: 2 g, MONOUNSATURATED FAT: 3 g, POLYUNSATURATED FAT: 2 g, CARBS: 17 g, FIBER: 3 g, SUGARS: 6 g, PROTEIN: 14 g, SODIUM: 359 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 211 mg

SNACK 1

• 2 1-oz slices all-natural turkey bacon (no added nitrites or nitrates), chopped • 1⁄3 cup chopped yellow onion • 1 sweet potato, peeled and shredded (about 2 cups shredded) • Pinch sea salt • Pinch ground black pepper, plus additional, to taste • ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro • 2 large eggs

INGREDIENTS: ONE: Mist a large nonstick skillet with cooking spray and heat on mediumhigh. To skillet, add bacon and onion and sauté for 4 minutes, until onion is translucent. Add potato, salt and pepper and sauté, about 7 to 8 minutes, until potato is cooked through. Stir in cilantro; divide between 2 plates. TWO: Reduce heat to

Mini Blueberry Muffins

INSTRUCTIONS: ONE: Preheat oven to 350°F. Mist a mini muffin tin with cooking spray or line with paper cups.

• ½ cup water-packed roasted red pepper

TWO: In a large mixing bowl, whisk flour and baking soda. In another medium bowl, whisk together eggs, honey, vanilla, vinegar, cinnamon and salt; pour into flour mixture and mix until combined. Fold in blueberries.

• ¼ cup oat flour

THREE: Place about 1 tbsp batter in each of 16 muffin cups. Bake for 15 minutes or until lightly golden. NUTRIENTS PER SERVING (4 MINI MUFFINS): CALORIES: 246, TOTAL FAT: 17 g, SAT. FAT: 2 g, MONOUNSATURATED FAT: 10 g, POLYUNSATURATED FAT: 4 g, CARBS: 18 g, FIBER: 5 g, SUGARS: 11 g, PROTEIN: 9 g, SODIUM: 145 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 93 mg

LUNCH

• 1 cup almond flour (TRY: Bob’s Red Mill Almond Flour)

• 2 tbsp raw honey • ½ tsp pure vanilla extract • ½ tsp apple cider vinegar • ¾ tsp ground cinnamon

• ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro • Zest and juice of ½ lime • 1 clove garlic • 1 tsp each chile powder and ground cumin • ½ tsp smoked paprika • ¼ tsp sea salt • 1 tbsp grape seed oil • 4 cups field greens mix • ½ cup all-natural corn salsa or pico de gallo (TIP: You can also make your own corn salsa by mixing corn kernels, chopped cilantro, onion and lime juice.) • 12 grape tomatoes, halved • 1 avocado, sliced

SAUCE • ½ cup plain whole-milk Greek yogurt • Zest and juice of ½ lime

• 1⁄8 tsp sea salt

INGREDIENTS:

• 2 large eggs

• ½ cup cooked quinoa

• ½ chipotle pepper, plus 1 tbsp adobo sauce

MAKES 16 MUFFINS. HANDS-ON TIME: 10 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 25 MINUTES.

• ¼ tsp baking soda

• ½ cup chopped yellow onion

Black Bean Patty Salad MAKES 5 PATTIES AND 2 SERVINGS OF SALAD. HANDS-ON TIME: 20 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 30 MINUTES.

• Pinch sea salt

INGREDIENTS:

• ½ cup frozen wild blueberries (NOTE: Do not thaw.)

• 1 15-oz BPA-free can unsalted black beans, drained, divided (NOTE: Do not rinse.)

INSTRUCTIONS: ONE: To a food processor, add 2⁄3 cup beans, red pepper, onion, quinoa, oat flour, cilantro, lime zest and juice, garlic, chile powder, cumin, paprika and ¼ tsp salt. Pulse until almost smooth. Pour into a mixing bowl and fold in remaining black beans. TWO: In a large nonstick pan on medium-high, heat oil. Use a ½ cup scoop to measure 5 patties; flatten slightly. To pan, add patties Continued on next page APRIL 2016

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recipes and cook for 4 minutes on each side, until golden. THREE: Divide greens, salsa and tomatoes between 2 bowls. Top each with 1 black bean patty and half of the avocado slices. FOUR: Whisk together yogurt, lime zest, lime juice, chipotle pepper, adobo and 1⁄8 tsp salt. Place ¼ cup sauce over top of each salad. NUTRIENTS PER SERVING (1 PATTY, 2½ CUPS SALAD, ¼ CUP SAUCE): CALORIES: 539, TOTAL FAT: 25 g, SAT. FAT: 7 g, MONOUNSATURATED FAT: 12 g, POLYUNSATURATED FAT: 4.5 g, CARBS: 66 g, FIBER: 18 g, SUGARS: 20 g, PROTEIN: 16.5 g, SODIUM: 619 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 10 mg

NOTE: This recipe makes two full servings with salad plus extra patties to freeze for later.

SNACK 2

Purple Potato Egg Salad SERVES 2. HANDS-ON TIME: 15 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 30 MINUTES.

INGREDIENTS: • 2 small purple potatoes, chopped in ¾-inch pieces • 2 large eggs

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• 2 1-oz slices all-natural turkey bacon (no added nitrites or nitrates)

DINNER

• 1 green onion, thinly sliced

TWO: Prepare sauce: In a small bowl, whisk together orange juice, vinegar, tamari, coconut sugar and sriracha; set aside.

• 2 tbsp apple cider vinegar • 2 tbsp Dijon mustard • 1 tsp olive oil • 1⁄8 tsp cracked black pepper

INSTRUCTIONS: ONE: To a saucepan, add potatoes and cover with cold water. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer and cook until fork tender, about 6 to 7 minutes. Drain and place in a large bowl.

Polynesian Stir-Fry SERVES 2. HANDS-ON TIME: 20 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 1 HOUR.

TWO: To another saucepan, add eggs and cover with cold water. Set on mediumhigh and bring to a boil. Set timer for 10 minutes; drain and let sit 1 minute. Refresh under cold water and peel. Chop eggs and add to bowl with potatoes.

INGREDIENTS:

THREE: To a small skillet on medium, add bacon and cook about 2 to 3 minutes per side, or until desired doneness. Remove and chop. Add to bowl with potato-egg mixture. Add onions.

• 2 tsp grape seed oil, divided

FOUR: In a small bowl, whisk together vinegar and mustard. Whisk in oil. Add pepper and whisk again. Pour over potato-egg mixture and fold to coat. NUTRIENTS PER SERVING (½ OF RECIPE): CALORIES: 243, TOTAL FAT: 8 g, SAT. FAT: 2 g, MONOUNSATURATED FAT: 4 g, POLYUNSATURATED FAT: 1 g, CARBS: 27 g, FIBER: 2 g, SUGARS: 1 g, PROTEIN: 12 g, SODIUM: 552 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 197 mg

reduce heat to a simmer; cook until tender, about 35 to 40 minutes.

• ½ cup brown rice • 3 tbsp fresh orange juice • 2 tbsp apple cider vinegar • 1 tbsp reduced-sodium tamari • 1 tbsp coconut sugar • ½ tsp sriracha, or to taste • 1 cup snap peas, halved diagonally • 1 cup cubed red bell pepper • ¾ cup fresh pineapple chunks (or frozen and thawed) • 4 green onions, sliced into 1-inch lengths • 1 5-oz BPA-free can sliced water chestnuts • 8 oz extra-firm organic tofu, drained and cubed (½-inch cubes) • 1 tsp arrowroot mixed into 1 tsp water • 1 tsp toasted sesame oil

INSTRUCTIONS: ONE: To a small saucepan, add rice and 1 cup water and bring to a boil. Cover and

THREE: In a wok or large nonstick skillet on high, heat 1 tsp grape seed oil. Add peas, bell pepper, pineapple, green onion and chestnuts. Stir-fry for 4 minutes then transfer to a plate. FOUR: In the same wok on high, heat remaining 1 tsp grape seed oil. Add tofu and cook for 2 minutes per side, or until golden. Return vegetables to the pan and add sauce. When liquid starts to bubble, add arrowroot mixture. Let bubble, about 15 seconds, and then stir to coat all ingredients. Drizzle sesame oil over top. Serve over rice. NUTRIENTS PER SERVING (3 CUPS AND ½ OF RICE): CALORIES: 516, TOTAL FAT: 14.5 g, SAT. FAT: 2 g, MONOUNSATURATED FAT: 4 g, POLYUNSATURATED FAT: 8 g, CARBS: 77 g, FIBER: 11 g, SUGARS: 23 g, PROTEIN: 20 g, SODIUM: 399 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 0 mg


EVEN KALE CANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T

DO IT ALONE. Grilled Corn & Quinoa Burger Salad with Veggie Bacon

More veggies means more goodness for both you and the world. Try topping your greens with the Roasted Garlic & Quinoa Burger, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll add 7 satisfying grams of delicious veggie protein. Find this recipe and more at MorningStarFarms.com.


recipes

5 Greens Go beyond spinach and arugula and bring some lesser-known leafy greens into your kitchen this spring. From peppery watercress to sweet pea shoots, we’ve BY IVY MANNING, PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRANDON BARRÉ

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FOOD STYLING BY BERNADETTE AMMAR, PROP STYLING BY THE FOOD GROUP, HAND MODEL WILL PUTZ

Little-Known


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recipes

Know Your Greens

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Sorrel This perennial herb may resemble mild spinach, but its flavor is anything but docile. Sorrel is a member of the Polygonaceae (buckwheat) family and boasts a bold, tart citrus flavor that is equally delicious raw in salads as it is in hot soups or sauces. Look for the leafy herb, which is available in green and red-veined varieties, at farmers’ markets or natural-food stores. They’re a good source of vitamin A, which helps protect your eyesight. TIP: Sorrel pairs well with seafood.

Watercress Don’t be fooled by watercress’ delicate leaves and slender stems – this green’s got bite! A member of the Brassicaceae (mustard) family, watercress has a fiery flavor when eaten raw in salads, sandwiches or as a garnish, but it mellows when cooked into soups, pastas or stir-fries. Look for watercress, which is a great source of folate, in the produce section alongside fresh herbs. TIP: If the bunch still has the root attached, plant it in moist soil and keep picking leaves for months.

Pea shoots The delicate young leaves, tendrils and stems of pea plants have long been beloved in Southeast Asian, Chinese and Japanese cooking, and only recently have North American chefs caught on to using pea shoots in stir-fries and salads. The shoots have a sweet, pealike flavor and are rich in vitamin K, a nutrient that

helps your body regulate calcium. Look for them in Asian grocery stores and farmers’ markets. TIP: If your pea shoots have longer stems, cut them into smaller pieces and cook the stems for a bit longer than the delicate tendrils.

Dandelion greens These pleasantly bitter greens are a common ingredient in Italian cooking. While they can be enjoyed raw, they’re best tossed into pastas or served on pizzas along with other assertive ingredients, such as sharp cheeses and spicy red pepper flakes. Look for the iron-rich greens in grocery stores and farmers’ markets alongside fresh herbs. TIP: If your lawn isn’t chemically treated, go ahead and pick those young weeds from your own backyard!

Escarole

The broad, pale green leaves of escarole are easy to mistake for green leaf lettuce, but this high-fiber member of the chicory family is much more versatile than the standard go-to green. Toss escarole’s juicy white stems into salads for a mild crunch, then add the bitter green leaves to a braise in place of mustard greens or kale. Or, use the whole bunch as an extra-flavorful substitute for romaine in a Caesar salad. Look for escarole in the produce section of your grocery store and at farmers’ markets. TIP: Escarole may sometimes be labeled “Batavian endive” or “broad-leaved endive.”

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recipes

Arctic Char with Watercress, Fennel & Orange SautĂŠ (See recipe, p. 54)

Get your omegas: One of the most sustainable fish you can find, arctic charâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s high-fat content means it is brimming with omega-3 fatty acids, which help protect against cardiovascular disease, improve mood and boost brain function.

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Steamed Clams with Sorrel & Garlic Bread (See recipe, p. 54)

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recipes

Chicken Pho with Pea Shoots SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME: 20 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 45 MINUTES.

This flavorful broth-based Vietnamese-style soup is infused with fragrant ginger, garlic and whole spices, then piled high with fresh herbs and delicate pea shoots for a hit of freshness. If your shoots are longer than a few inches, snip them into shorter, bitesize pieces.

Chicken Pho with Pea Shoots

INGREDIENTS: • 4 cups low-sodium chicken broth • 2 ¼-inch slices fresh ginger • 1 large shallot, thinly sliced • 3 cloves garlic, sliced • 4 tsp fish sauce • 2 green cardamom pods • 1 star anise pod • ½ stick cinnamon • ¼ tsp ground turmeric (TRY: Simply Organic Ground Turmeric Root) • 20 oz boneless, skinless chicken breasts (about 2 large) • 3 tbsp fresh lime juice • ¼ tsp ground black pepper • 4 oz brown rice vermicelli noodles • 1 jalapeño chile pepper, seeded and thinly sliced

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Vitamin-rich shoots: In addition to vitamin K, pea shoots are

• 3 cups pea shoots

also jam-packed with vitamins A, C and folate. Vitamin A supports bone growth and immune system health, while vitamin C is necessary for healing wounds and scar tissue. A type of B vitamin, folate is needed in adequate amounts to help ward off anemia and aid in tissue growth.

• ½ cup each loosely packed chopped fresh cilantro and chopped fresh mint

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• 2 green onions, white and light green parts, thinly sliced


INSTRUCTIONS: ONE: In a Dutch oven or large saucepan, combine broth, ginger, shallot, garlic, fish sauce, cardamom, star anise, cinnamon, turmeric and 3 cups water; bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover and simmer for 10 minutes. TWO: Reduce heat to low and add chicken. Simmer gently, uncovered, until chicken is no longer pink inside and reaches 165˚F when tested with an instantread thermometer in center, about 15 minutes. (NOTE: Do not boil.) Using tongs, transfer chicken to a cutting board; let cool slightly. Chop or shred into bite-size pieces. Set aside. THREE: Arrange a fine-mesh sieve over a large bowl; strain broth mixture through sieve, discarding solids. Return liquid to Dutch oven and heat on low. Stir in chicken, lime juice and pepper and cook until heated through, about 3 minutes. FOUR: Meanwhile, cook noodles according to package directions; divide among bowls. Ladle broth mixture over top, dividing evenly. Sprinkle with jalapeño, pea shoots, cilantro, mint and green onions, dividing evenly. NUTRIENTS PER SERVING (¼ OF RECIPE): CALORIES: 348, TOTAL FAT: 6 g, SAT. FAT: 1.5 g, MONOUNSATURATED FAT: 2 g, POLYUNSATURATED FAT: 1 g, CARBS: 33 g, FIBER: 5 g, SUGARS: 4 g, PROTEIN: 42 g, SODIUM: 544 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 104 mg

Chicken Sausage Penne with Dandelion Greens SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME: 20 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 20 MINUTES.

Dandelion greens pack a tasty, bitter punch that is best paired with other bold ingredients that can stand up to its flavor, such as the sharp Parmesan and flavorful sausage in this quick pasta. The leaves mellow as they cook, so hold back some fresh ones to toss in at the end of cooking for an extra kick. Serve with lemon wedges and red pepper flakes.

INGREDIENTS: • 8 oz whole-grain penne (TRY: Jovial 100% Organic Einkorn Whole-Grain Penne Rigate) • 2 tsp olive oil • 8 oz all-natural mild Italian chicken sausage, no added nitrites or nitrates, casings removed • 5 cups dandelion greens, chopped, divided • 1 large clove garlic, thinly sliced • ¼ tsp ground black pepper • Pinch sea salt • 3 tbsp heavy whipping cream (35%)

• 5 tbsp grated Parmesan cheese

INSTRUCTIONS: ONE: Cook pasta al dente according to package directions. Reserve ½ cup cooking liquid before draining. TWO: Meanwhile, in a large sauté pan, heat oil on medium. Add sausage and cook, breaking up meat with a wooden spoon, until no longer pink, about 3 minutes. Add 4 cups dandelion greens, garlic, pepper and salt and sauté, stirring often, until greens are wilted, about 2 minutes.

THREE: Reduce heat to low and stir in cream, scraping up browned bits from bottom of pan with a wooden spoon. Add pasta, reserved cooking liquid, cheese and remaining 1 cup dandelion greens and stir to combine. NUTRIENTS PER SERVING (11⁄3 CUPS): CALORIES: 396, TOTAL FAT: 13.5 g, SAT. FAT: 5.5 g, MONOUNSATURATED FAT: 5 g, POLYUNSATURATED FAT: 2 g, CARBS: 50 g, FIBER: 7.5 g, SUGARS: 2 g, PROTEIN: 22 g, SODIUM: 537 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 68 mg

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recipes

Arctic Char with Watercress, Fennel & Orange Sauté SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME: 30 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 30 MINUTES.

Sweet sautéed fennel and orange juice mellow the peppery taste of watercress in this company-worthy dish. For the best flavor, add the watercress and orange zest to the sauté at the very last minute. If the sauté is done cooking before the fish, simply take it off the heat and stir in the greens and zest when you’re ready to serve. Use clean tweezers to remove the pin bones from the fish, or ask your fishmonger to do it for you.

INGREDIENTS: • 1 navel orange • 4 5-oz skin-on arctic char fillets, pin bones removed

high. Add fennel, shallots and remaining 1⁄8 tsp each salt and pepper and sauté, stirring often, until fennel and shallots are golden brown, about 5 minutes. Add garlic and sauté until fragrant, about 30 seconds. FOUR: Reduce heat to medium and stir in wine and orange juice. Bring to a simmer and cook until fennel is tender and liquid is reduced by half, about 3 minutes. Remove from heat and add watercress and orange zest; toss just until watercress is slightly wilted. Serve with arctic char. NUTRIENTS PER SERVING (1 PIECE FISH AND ¾ CUPS FENNEL MIXTURE): CALORIES: 330, TOTAL FAT: 16 g, SAT. FAT: 4 g, MONOUNSATURATED FAT: 7 g, POLYUNSATURATED FAT: 3 g, CARBS: 16 g, FIBER: 4 g, SUGARS: 8 g, PROTEIN: 33 g, SODIUM: 295 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 50 mg

• 1 tbsp plus 1 tsp olive oil, divided • ¼ tsp each sea salt and ground black pepper, divided

Steamed Clams

• 1 large bulb fennel, trimmed, cored and thinly sliced (about 4 cups)

with Sorrel & Garlic Bread

• 1½ large shallots, thinly sliced (about ¾ cup)

SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME: 20 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 30 MINUTES.

• 1 large clove garlic, thinly sliced • ½ cup dry white wine • 1 bunch watercress, trimmed (NOTE: Leave 1 inch of stems attached.)

INSTRUCTIONS: ONE: Preheat oven to 400°F. Zest orange; set zest aside. Cut 4 thin slices from orange and cut each slice in half; set slices aside. Juice remaining orange; set aside.

Sorrel’s lemony flavor is a perfect pairing for briny shellfish, such as clams. This recipe easily serves four as an elegant appetizer; to make it a meal, toss the clams and broth with 8 oz (4 cups cooked) whole-grain linguine.

INGREDIENTS: • 2 strips organic bacon (about 2 oz), no added nitrites or nitrates, chopped • 1 tbsp olive oil

TWO: Line a small baking sheet with parchment paper and mist with cooking spray. Arrange fish, skin side down, on sheet. Brush tops with 1 tsp oil and sprinkle with 1⁄8 tsp each salt and pepper. Arrange orange slices over top. Bake until fish flakes easily when tested with a fork, about 10 minutes.

• 1 large leek, white and light green parts only, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced

THREE: Meanwhile, in a large sauté pan, heat remaining 1 tbsp oil on medium-

• ½ tsp ground black pepper

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• 2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced

• 2 lb Manila or other small clams, rinsed and scrubbed (NOTE: Opt for fresh, untreated clams as they are lower in sodium. Discard any clams with broken shells or ones that are open and do not close when tapped.) • 2 cups sorrel, stemmed and roughly chopped

GARLIC BREAD • 4 slices whole-grain crusty bread (about 4 oz) • 2 tsp olive oil • 1 large clove garlic, halved lengthwise

INSTRUCTIONS: ONE: Prepare garlic bread: Preheat oven to 350˚F. On a baking sheet, arrange bread in a single layer and brush with 2 tsp oil. Bake until crisp and golden brown, about 10 minutes. Rub cut sides of garlic over bread; discard garlic. Cover bread with foil to keep warm. TWO: Meanwhile, heat a large sauté pan on medium. Add bacon and cook, stirring often, until crisp, about 2 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer bacon to a paper towel–lined plate; set aside. Drain fat from pan and discard. THREE: In same pan, heat 1 tbsp oil on medium. Add leek and sauté, stirring often, until tender, about 3 minutes. Add garlic and thyme and sauté until fragrant, about 30 seconds. FOUR: Increase heat to medium-high and add stock, wine, black pepper, pepper flakes and 1 cup water, scraping up browned bits from bottom of pan with a wooden spoon. Bring to a simmer and add clams, arranging in a single layer. Cover and cook until clams have opened, about 6 minutes. Stir well and discard any unopened clams. Remove from heat and stir in bacon. Gently stir in sorrel until wilted. Serve with garlic bread.

• 1 tbsp chopped fresh thyme • 1 cup all-natural seafood stock (TRY: Bar Harbor All Natural Seafood Stock) • ½ cup dry white wine • Pinch red pepper flakes

NUTRIENTS PER SERVING (1½ CUPS CLAM MIXTURE AND 1 SLICE BREAD): CALORIES: 210, TOTAL FAT: 8 g, SAT. FAT: 1 g, MONOUNSATURATED FAT: 5 g, POLYUNSATURATED FAT: 1 g, CARBS: 24 g, FIBER: 4 g, SUGARS: 3 g, PROTEIN: 11 g, SODIUM: 564 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 13 mg


Spice-Rubbed Pork Chops with Escarole & Apple Sauté SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME: 20 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 30 MINUTES.

Toasting the whole spices and grinding them yourself is the key to this dish’s amazingly fragrant flavor. Choose a crisp, firm apple such as Braeburn or Fuji that will hold its shape when cooked with the slightly bitter greens. When prepping the escarole, trim just the very end of the root, keeping as much of the juicy white stem as possible – it’s the best part.

with an instant-read thermometer in thickest part, about 3 minutes. Transfer to a plate and cover loosely with foil to keep warm. Set aside.

in vinegar and remaining ¼ tsp salt, scraping up browned bits from bottom of pan with a wooden spoon. Serve with pork.

THREE: In same sauté pan, heat oil on medium. Add apple and sauté, stirring occasionally, until beginning to brown, about 2 minutes. Add garlic and thyme and sauté until fragrant, about 1 minute. Gradually add escarole, tossing with tongs to wilt between additions. Stir

NUTRIENTS PER SERVING (1 PORK CHOP AND 1 CUP ESCAROLE MIXTURE): CALORIES: 314, TOTAL FAT: 13 g, SAT. FAT: 4 g, MONOUNSATURATED FAT: 7 g, POLYUNSATURATED FAT: 1.5 g, CARBS: 11 g, FIBER: 5 g, SUGARS: 5 g, PROTEIN: 37 g, SODIUM: 348 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 96 mg

INGREDIENTS:

An apple a day:

• 1 tsp each fennel seeds and coriander seeds

Apples are a rich source of polyphenols and contain a type of soluble fiber called pectins. Both pectins and polyphenols have been found in studies to help reduce LDL cholesterol levels (high levels of which are precursors to cardiovascular disease) and to aid in suppressing tumor growth.

• ½ tsp sea salt, divided • ½ tsp ground black pepper • 4 6-oz boneless pork loin chops, trimmed • 1 tbsp olive oil • 1 Braeburn or Fuji apple, cored and cut into ½-inch wedges • 2 large cloves garlic, thinly sliced • 2 tsp chopped fresh thyme • 1 bunch escarole (about 1 lb), trimmed and roughly chopped • 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar

INSTRUCTIONS: ONE: Heat a large sauté pan on mediumlow. Add fennel and coriander and cook, stirring frequently, until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Transfer to a clean spice grinder and add ¼ tsp salt and pepper; pulse until finely ground. (Alternatively, transfer to a cutting board and crush spices with the bottom of a saucepan.) Rub mixture all over pork. TWO: Mist same sauté pan with cooking spray and heat on medium-high. Add pork and reduce heat to medium-low. Cook, undisturbed, until browned, about 4 minutes. Turn and cook, undisturbed, until just a hint of pink remains in centers and pork reaches 145°F when tested

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recipes

FOOD & PROP STYLING BY TERRY SCHACHT

Smoothie Bowls Meet the next big health-food craze that's garnering loads of attention. Frosty, layered and overflowing with nutrients, these impossibly delicious smoothie bowls let you get creative with a plethora of vibrant and textured toppings for the most stunning breakfast youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever woken up to. Pamela Salzman is a Los Angelesâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;based cooking instructor and certified holistic health counselor. Find her at pamelasalzman.com.

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It seems like everyone is on a smoothie bowl kick lately, and for good reason. They’re delicious, infinitely customizable and, depending on how you make them, packed with nutrition. Smoothie bowls are perfect for breakfast, lunch or a post-workout meal. But what makes them different from a classic smoothie is the thicker consistency and that they are, of course, eaten from a bowl rather than sipped through a straw. As long as the consistency is thick enough to support your toppings without sinking, you’ve got a smoothie bowl! And that’s where the fun really starts since smoothie bowls are as much about the toppings as they are about the base. The smoothie bowl craze started to take off with acai bowls, a soft-serve-like blend of frozen acai and other fruits like bananas or strawberries, plus enough juice to get the blender going. Acai bowls are traditionally covered in granola, fresh fruit and perhaps a drizzle of honey, providing a delicious contrast in texture to the smooth purée. But these days, smoothie bowls come in every color of the rainbow with the most creative flavor combinations and beyondbeautiful arrangements of toppings. These bowls can also pack a nutritional punch when they include superfood boosts such as spirulina, matcha powders or high-quality protein. Like drinkable smoothies, all these smoothie bowl recipes are incredibly versatile and can be seasonally adapted, which adds to the fun and creative possibilities!

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The Pink Pitaya (SEE RECIPE, P. 64)


The bright color of pink pitaya (aka dragon fruit) gives this bowl its distinctive hue. We love the ease of using a packet of the frozen purĂŠe, but if you can find the fresh fruit, you can always purĂŠe and freeze it yourself.

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recipes

No need for that mocha latte today – we’ve got all that delicious chocolaty coffee flavor in this bowl. If you enjoy the caffeine fix, use regular coffee granules; if not, use decaf.

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The Mocha (SEE RECIPE, P. 64)

APRIL 2016


Mango Sunsh e h ine T

(SE

ER

EC

IP

) 64 P. E,

Sweet mango and coconut butter bring a taste of the tropics to your morning. Here, we use cold cauliflower to add fiber and antioxidant value â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry, the mango is the flavor that shines in this gorgeous bowl. (SEE RECIPE, P. 64)

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Carrot cake for breakfast, anyone? We’ve infused this bowl with all the delicious flavor you’d expect from an indulgent carrot cake – but in a frosty, layered bowl.

The Carrot Cake (SEE RECIPE, P. 64)

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Each of our smoothie bowls is designed to serve one hungry person – and each recipe takes less than 15 minutes to assemble!

THE Mint Chip INGREDIENTS: • ¼ cup plain unsweetened almond milk • 1½ frozen bananas • 1⁄3 avocado • 1 cup packed baby spinach • ¼ tsp pure vanilla extract • 1 to 2 drops pure peppermint extract • ¼ tsp chlorella, optional* • 1 tbsp cacao nibs or carob chips

Toppings (Optional): • 2 tsp raw almond butter (TIP: You can bring to room temperature and squeeze out of a zip-top bag with the corner snipped off.) • 1 tsp raw cacao nibs or carob chips • 1 tsp hemp seeds

INSTRUCTIONS: To a blender or food processor, add all ingredients except cacao nibs; blend until smooth. Transfer to a bowl and fold in cacao nibs. Serve with toppings of your choice. NUTRIENTS PER SERVING (1 RECIPE): CALORIES: 366, TOTAL FAT: 16 g, SAT. FAT: 4 g, MONOUNSATURATED FAT: 8 g, POLYUNSATURATED FAT: 2 g, CARBS: 55 g, FIBER: 17 g, SUGARS: 22 g, PROTEIN: 7 g, SODIUM: 99 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 0 mg * OPTIONAL SUPERFOOD BOOST: An amazing

detoxifier and immune booster, chlorella is rich in vitamin B12, chlorophyll and protein.

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recipes

the Mango Sunshine INGREDIENTS: • 6 tbsp plain unsweetened almond milk • 1½ cups frozen mango chunks • ½ cup chilled cooked cauliflower • 2 tbsp coconut butter

the MOCHA

the PINK PITAYA

the Carrot Cake

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

• ¼ cup plain unsweetened almond milk

• ¼ cup plain unsweetened almond milk

• ¼ cup plain unsweetened almond milk

• 6 oz organic firm tofu

• 1 3.5-oz frozen pitaya packet (TRY: Pitaya Plus Smoothie Packs)

• 1 frozen banana

• 2 tbsp raw cashew butter • 4 tsp raw cacao powder or unsweetened cocoa powder • 1½ tsp instant coffee granules • 2 pitted dates

• 1 pitted date • ¼ tsp ground turmeric, optional*

• ½ tsp pure vanilla extract • ½ cup ice

• 1 frozen banana • ½ cup frozen blueberries • 1 tsp maqui berry powder, optional*

Toppings (Optional): • ¼ cup all-natural granola

• 1 cup steamed, cooled carrots • ½ cup cooked, cooled oatmeal • 1⁄3 cup frozen pineapple chunks (TRY: Earthbound Farm Organic Pineapple Chunks) • ¾ tsp ground cinnamon • ½ tsp maca powder, optional*

• Pinch sea salt

• ½ tsp bee pollen

• ¼ cup blueberries

• 1 tsp lucuma powder, optional*

• Several blueberries

• 1 tbsp unsweetened shredded coconut or shaved fresh coconut

Toppings (Optional):

Toppings (Optional):

• 1 tbsp plain wholemilk yogurt

• 1 tbsp toasted sliced unsalted almonds

• 1 tbsp toasted chopped unsalted hazelnuts

INSTRUCTIONS: To a blender or food processor, add all ingredients; blend until smooth. Serve with toppings of your choice.

Toppings (Optional):

INSTRUCTIONS: To a blender or food processor, add all ingredients; blend until smooth. Serve with toppings of your choice. NUTRIENTS PER SERVING (1 RECIPE): CALORIES: 450, TOTAL FAT: 19.5 g, SAT. FAT: 16 g, MONOUNSATURATED FAT: 2 g, POLYUNSATURATED FAT: 1.5 g, CARBS: 74 g, FIBER: 14 g, SUGARS: 59 g, PROTEIN: 6 g, SODIUM: 92 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 0 mg * OPTIONAL SUPERFOOD BOOST: Turmeric is

incredibly anti-inflammatory and can help lower cholesterol, plus it’s an antioxidant, wound healer, digestive stimulant and liver detoxifier.

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• Pinch ground cinnamon

• ¾ tsp chia seeds • 1 tbsp goji berries

INSTRUCTIONS: To a blender or food processor, add all ingredients; blend until smooth. Serve with toppings of your choice. NUTRIENTS PER SERVING (1 RECIPE): CALORIES: 613, TOTAL FAT: 26 g, SAT. FAT: 6 g, MONOUNSATURATED FAT: 12 g, POLYUNSATURATED FAT: 7 g, CARBS: 80 g, FIBER: 16 g, SUGARS: 50 g, PROTEIN: 23 g, SODIUM: 209 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 0 mg * OPTIONAL SUPERFOOD BOOST: Lucuma is a low-

glycemic fruit, which not only has a subtle sweetness, but also contains iron, zinc, calcium, protein and fiber.

NUTRIENTS PER SERVING (1 RECIPE): CALORIES: 214, TOTAL FAT: 2 g, SAT. FAT: 0 g, CARBS: 50 g, FIBER: 8 g, SUGARS: 29 g, PROTEIN: 3 g, SODIUM: 47 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 0 mg * OPTIONAL SUPERFOOD BOOST: Maqui berry powder

is rich in antioxidants, such as vitamin C, and also contains calcium, iron and phytonutrients that are antiaging and anti-inflammatory.

• 1 tbsp unsweetened shredded coconut or shaved fresh coconut • 1 tbsp chopped unsalted walnuts • 2 pitted dates, diced

INSTRUCTIONS: To a blender or food processor, add all ingredients; blend until smooth. Serve with toppings of your choice. NUTRIENTS PER SERVING (1 RECIPE): CALORIES: 285, TOTAL FAT: 3 g, SAT. FAT: 0.5 g, CARBS: 63 g, FIBER: 12 g, SUGARS: 22 g, PROTEIN: 6 g, SODIUM: 194 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 0 mg * OPTIONAL SUPERFOOD BOOST: Maca powder

contains calcium, magnesium and potassium and is known to help boost fertility, balance hormones and give a natural energy boost.


Bonus Bowls Try these two creations straight from the Backyard Bowls kitchen.

Writer Pamela Salzman sits down with Dan Goddard, co-founder of Backyard Bowls, an acai bowl café with four locations in California. What inspired the first Backyard Bowls location in Santa Barbara? My partner, Pete Heth, and I were living in Hawaii at the time and were introduced to a few great acai bowls at various cafés and juice bars around Oahu. We ate them for breakfast or lunch constantly and fell in love with them as a delicious meal that didn’t weigh us down and gave us tons of energy. Our idea was to create a restaurant concept that put the spotlight on the bowl, and at the time in 2008, it had literally not been done before (outside of Brazil, at least). 

Smoothie bowls and breakfast porridge bowls are all the rage. To what do you attribute their popularity? Well, the obvious answer is that they are in line with the current trends toward healthful and ethical foods. And what’s not to like, really? It doesn’t matter who you are – they are just plain delicious when done well, and provide a muchneeded alternative for a healthy, quick and tasty breakfast or lunch.

What is Backyard Bowl's most popular warm bowl? Cold bowl? The warm bowl would currently be our Mama’s Oatmeal – steel-cut oats cooked with our homemade steamed cashew milk, topped with crushed almonds, a local berry jam and bananas. As for cold bowls, the Power Bowl is the current biggest hit; it’s a frozen blend of acai with banana, blueberry, Sacha Inchi protein powder, peanut butter and our homemade hemp milk, topped with granola, crushed almonds, banana, blueberry and hemp seeds.  

Any advice for readers who want to make their own bowls at home? Get a good blender – and use the tamper, along with only a very small amount of liquid, in order to get a nice, thick consistency.

What's the weirdest ingredient you've ever put in your bowls? Weird is a relative word, and I’m sure many of the things you see on our menu are weird to some folks! I find them all perfectly normal though, haha. 

Coco-cado bowl

dragon bowl

SERVES 1.

SERVES 1.

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

• ½ cup cashew milk

• ½ cup coconut water

• 1 pack frozen acai purée • ½ cup diced avocado

• 2⁄3 cup peeled and diced dragon fruit (aka pitaya)

• ½ cup frozen banana chunks

• 2⁄3 cup frozen banana chunks

• ½ cup spinach

TOPPINGS (OPTIONAL):

• 1 tsp coconut oil

• 1⁄3 cup all-natural granola

TOPPINGS (OPTIONAL):

• Sliced banana, as desired

• 1⁄3 cup all-natural granola

• Sliced kiwi, as desired

• Sliced banana, as desired • Sliced strawberries, as desired • 1 tbsp shredded unsweetened coconut • 1 tbsp bee pollen • Drizzle raw honey

INSTRUCTIONS: To a blender or food processor, add all ingredients; blend until smooth. Serve with toppings of your choice.

• 1 tbsp unsweetened shredded coconut • Drizzle raw honey

INSTRUCTIONS: To a blender or food processor, add all ingredients; blend until smooth. Serve with toppings of your choice.

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health

Fats help balance your hormones.

LEAD IMAGE OLEKSANDRA NAUMENKO/SHUTTERSTOCK

They make certain vitamins (A, D, E, K) and other compounds like carotenoids absorbable. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the parent molecules for all kinds of important hormones and mini-hormones known as eicosanoids.

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ARE THEY CRAZY? NOT EXACTLY.

A High-Fat Diet for a Low-Fat Body? The nutrition myth buster Jonny Bowden explains the slimming power of a high-fat diet. BY JONNY BOWDEN, PhD, CNS

Full disclosure: I’m one of those authors. Writing with Steven Masley, MD, a fellow with the American Heart Association and clinical assistant professor at University of South Florida, I recently published a book called Smart Fat: Eat More Fat. Lose More Weight. Get Healthy Now. (HarperOne, 2016) But I’m hardly the only one talking about high-fat diets. This year, Mark Hyman, MD, who is the Clintons’ doctor as well as the director of the Cleveland Clinic Center for Functional Medicine, released Eat Fat, Get Thin (Little, Brown and Company, 2016). The “First Lady of Nutrition,” Ann Louise Gittleman, PhD, CNS, also recently released an updated version of her classic Eat Fat, Lose Weight (Blue Hills Publishing, 2015). And that’s just the beginning. The esteemed endocrinologist and Harvard Medical School professor David Ludwig, MD, PhD, just released a superb book, Always Hungry? (Grand Central Publishing, 2016), which pretty much buries low-fat dogma once and for all and supports a diet higher in fat along with proteins, whole grains and starchy vegetables.

SO, WHAT’S GOING ON?

High-fat diets are making a comeback. If you just blinked your eyes real fast when you read that sentence, you’re hardly alone. Recently, I was asked by a reporter to describe a healthy diet. I mentioned that I personally – for my own health – like a diet high in fat. But when the reporter filed the story, he quoted me as saying that I recommended a diet low in fat. He had never heard a nutritionist recommend a high-fat diet before; what I said was so foreign to his ears that he just assumed he had misunderstood. (He

wrote what he expected I would say, rather than what I actually said.) Get used to it, Mr. Not-Very-Good Reporter. Several high-profile docs are releasing books this year that promote higher-fat diets as a way of balancing hormones, promoting cardiovascular and brain health, preventing diabetes and, oh yes, losing weight. Especially losing weight. (More on that in a moment.) Turning 40 years of dietary advice on its ear, the current crop of diet books are advocating a recipe for weight loss that is almost unheard of: They’re telling us to eat more fat, not less.

Let’s start with the crumbling of a couple of myths that the dietary establishment has accepted as gospel for the last 40 years. The first is that weight loss is all about cutting calories. The second is that all calories are created equal. Both assumptions turned out to be stunningly wrong. If all calories are equal (a calorie equals a calorie no matter where it comes from), and if weight loss is accomplished by cutting calories – and if those were the only things to consider – then sure, it makes sense to cut out fat. Gram for gram, fat has more than twice as many calories as carbs and protein. So, like an accountant trimming the budget,

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health

we cut out the most calorically “expensive” item on the menu: dietary fat. It was a simplistic and shortsighted solution. Fats help balance our hormones. They make certain vitamins (A, D, E, K) and other compounds like carotenoids absorbable. They’re the parent molecules for all kinds of important hormones and mini-hormones known as eicosanoids. And, because of their lack of effect on insulin (the fatstorage hormone), adding more fat to your diet, while at the same time reducing carbs, makes weight loss a heck of a lot easier.

the fat-loss drama is insulin, which the pancreas secretes whenever blood sugar rises. Insulin’s job is to get rid of sugar in the bloodstream and escort it into the muscle cells to be used as fuel. When most people eat the conventional American high-carb, low-fat diet, their blood sugar will elevate frequently and it will go high, causing a lot of insulin to be released. Remember, insulin is the fat-storage hormone, not the fat-releasing hormone. When insulin is high, the fat cells lock their doors and won’t release their goodies. You wind up relying on more sugar and starch for energy because your fat can’t be burned for fuel. It’s like having a huge bank account, but you don’t have the code for the ATM card – so you can’t access your fortune. The food group that has the greatest and most profound effect on insulin is – you guessed it – carbohydrates. Protein has a moderate effect; it doesn’t compare to the effect of carbs, but it’s still there nonetheless.

Food has a hormonal effect, and hormones, after all, run the show when it comes to fat loss (and fat gain). It's actually because of the hormonal effect of food that high-fat diets are making a comeback. Meanwhile, the best thinkers in nutrition these days are rethinking the primacy of calories in the weight-loss equation and looking instead to see how those calories affect hormones. Calories from sushi are processed differently than calories from broccoli or, for that matter, butter or candy or apple juice, or just about any food you can name. The old notion of “a calorie is a calorie” is just no longer tenable. Food has a hormonal effect, and hormones, after all, run the show when it comes to fat loss (and fat gain). It’s actually because of the hormonal effect of food that high-fat diets are making a comeback. And the hormone that’s center stage in

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Guess what has no effect on insulin. Fat. Think about the absurdity of the health establishment recommending a weightloss diet high in the food group most likely to raise fat-storing hormones (carbohydrates) while low in the food group that has virtually zero effect on that hormone (fats). It’s just breathtakingly wrong. One of the many benefits of fat is energy. Fat produces more energy

per gram than any other food group. You want to be burning fat. After all, your body can only store about 1,400 to 1,800 calories as sugar (either as glucose or glycogen). But it has a virtually unlimited storage capacity when it comes to storing calories as fat! Fat’s your best energy source, but most people aren’t able to use their body-fat stores effectively because the food we’re eating locks them up. So it sits there, taunting us, on our waist, hips, belly and thighs, while we reach for another bagel to fuel our tired bodies.

HENCE THE REBIRTH OF HIGH-FAT DIETS. High-fat diets – also known as ketogenic diets, for reasons I’ll explain in a minute – have been used for weight loss since at least 1851 when William Banting published what was probably the very first international best-selling diet book, A Letter on Corpulence. But ketogenic diets didn’t get really popular until the publication of Dr. Atkins’ New Diet Revolution by Robert Atkins, MD, in 1972. Atkins advocated a diet very low in carbs (20 grams a day or less) because when you eat so few carbs, your body will almost invariably switch fuel sources. Instead of primarily burning sugar, it’s now forced to burn fat. With so little sugar in the diet, the


CHOCOLATE LASSE KRISTENSEN/SHUTTERSTOCK, COCONUT LOPATIN ANTON/SHUTTERSTOCK, OIL DOLPHFYN/SHUTTERTOCK & LEVENT KONUK/SHUTTERSTOCK

body begins to cannibalize its own storage sites (fat tissue), break down the fat and use the by-products of this breakdown for fuel. The by-products of that fat metabolism are called ketone bodies, and that’s why very-low-carb, high-fat diets are called “ketogenic” diets. Ketone bodies (or ketones) make a very tasty fuel source for the body. By some accounts, they’re an even better fuel than sugar – especially for the heart and brain. Ketogenic diets had a bad rap in conventional medical circles for a very long time because doctors, not trained in nutrition, confused the nutritional ketosis that Atkins advocated with the life-threatening condition of diabetic ketoacidosis. But these high-fat, ketogenic diets are making quite a comeback these days and they’ve expanded their résumé way beyond weight loss. They’re used so commonly as a treatment for childhood epilepsy that hospitals typically lose points in evaluation metrics when they don’t offer it. More and more high-performance athletes are experimenting with them. Wiry, athletic health professionals and researchers like former powerlifter Jeff Volek, PhD, RD, of The Ohio State University and physician-scientist Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD, swear by them. So does the great integrative medical neurologist and author of Grain Brain (Little, Brown and Company, 2013), David Perlmutter, MD. I recently attended a conference at The University of Tampa in which presentations were given showing how and why the navy is testing these diets for possible special forces applications. Ketogenic diets are notoriously difficult to stick with, and not everyone can do them. Fortunately, it’s not necessary to be in nutritional ketosis to get the awesome benefits of smart fats. You just have to include more smart fats in your diet while at the same time including fewer of the

ingredients that make us fat, sick, tired and depressed.

HERE’S THE TRUTH. Some fats are terrible for you, some are wonderful for you, and some are, well, neutral. But the old division of “good fat” and “bad fat” didn’t go deep enough. It was a crude categorization that stuck any food high in saturated fat (meat, butter, coconut oil) in the “bad” category and any food of non-animal origin (soybean oil, canola oil, margarine) in the “good” category. That turned out to be not only simplistic, but also wrong. Vegetable oils are loaded with omega-6, which, for all intents and purposes, are pro-inflammatory. In contrast, omega-3 fats are antiinflammatory. You actually need both, but they need to be in a balanced ratio, somewhere between 1:1 and 4:1. Largely due to the myth that vegetable oils are always good, we’re currently consuming a staggering 16 times more omega-6 than omega-3. No wonder inflammation – a promoter of every degenerative disease we know of, including obesity – is so prevalent. One Achilles’ heel of high-fat diets is that they’ve been low in fiber. After all, fat has no fiber at all, protein has only trace amounts, and high-fiber foods like beans have too many carbs for those trying for nutritional ketosis. On the Smart Fat plan, you’re encouraged to eat high-fiber foods, specifically legumes, low-sugar fruits like grapefruit and berries and some low-glycemic carbs like quinoa and oatmeal. As far as we know, Smart Fat is the first time high-fiber and highfat have been combined in one plan. A high-fat, high-fiber, highflavor, moderate-protein eating plan is looking to be a winner for weight loss. Emerging research suggests it may also be good for a whole lot more.

A BETTER WAY TO CLASSIFY FATS Healthy fats, shown in research to have specific health benefits (aim for 5 servings a day):

• Extra-virgin olive oil • Fish oil • Wild salmon and other cold-water fish • Nuts • Coconut oil • Nut oils (macadamia nut, almond, pistachio, walnut) • Dark chocolate • Free-range eggs • Red palm oil (from sustainable producers such as Malaysian red palm oil) • Fats from grass-fed meat • Grass-fed butter

Toxic fats, which have negative health consequences or have been contaminated with toxins from pesticides, hormones and other additives:

• All fat from factory-farmed meat that’s been raised on a grainbased diet with hormones, antibiotics and steroids • Man-made trans fats • Highly processed, omega-6-rich vegetable oils (such as corn, soybean or canola) • Fats damaged by cooking at temperatures not suitable for that particular oil

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budget recipes

MONDAY COST PER PLATE:

TOTAL COST:

$3.00

$12.00

White Turkey Chili with Kale

Healthy on the cheap Shake up your Monday-to-Friday dinner routine with 5 cheap, cheerful and seriously healthy family meals. RECIPES BY LIZ TARPY, PHOTOGRAPHY BY KRIS OSBORNE

SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME: 30 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 30 MINUTES.

This lighter take on chili is made without tomatoes, leaving room for fiber-rich greens. We’ve kept the spices mild to please many palates, but you can easily add more chile powder if you prefer a spicier dish – here at the CE office, we love this meal smothered in hot sauce!

INGREDIENTS: • 2 tsp olive oil, divided • 1 lb ground turkey or chicken • 2 tsp chile powder • 1 tsp each ground cumin and dried oregano • ½ tsp sea salt • 1 large yellow onion, chopped • 2 cups stemmed and chopped kale • 4 green onions, chopped, light and dark green parts divided • 1 stalk celery, chopped • 1 small jalapeño chile pepper, seeded and minced • 4 cloves garlic, minced • 2 cups low-sodium chicken broth • 1 15-oz BPA-free can unsalted cannellini or great northern beans, drained and rinsed (TRY: Eden Organic Great Northern Beans)

INSTRUCTIONS: ONE: In a Dutch oven on medium-high, heat ½ tsp oil. Add turkey, chile powder, cumin, oregano and salt and cook, breaking up turkey with a spoon, until no longer pink, 4 to 5 minutes. Transfer turkey mixture to a plate and set aside. TWO: In same Dutch oven still on medium-high, heat remaining 1½ tsp oil. Add yellow onion, kale, light parts of green onion, celery, jalapeño and garlic and cook, stirring, until softened, 3 to

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4 minutes. Stir in turkey mixture, broth and beans. Bring to a gentle simmer and cook, stirring, until heated through and slightly thickened, 1 to 2 minutes.

SLAW • ¼ cup rice vinegar • 1 tbsp sesame oil • 2 tsp pure maple syrup

THREE: Divide among bowls and sprinkle with dark green parts of green onion.

• 2 cups shredded savoy cabbage

NUTRIENTS PER SERVING (¼ OF CHILI): CALORIES: 328, TOTAL FAT: 14 g, SAT. FAT: 3 g, MONOUNSATURATED FAT: 5 g, POLYUNSATURATED FAT: 3.5 g, CARBS: 23 g, FIBER: 6.5 g, SUGARS: 3.5 g, PROTEIN: 30 g, SODIUM: 451 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 84 mg

• ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro, divided

Asian-Style Meatloaf with Savoy & Carrot Slaw SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME: 20 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 1 HOUR, 15 MINUTES.

• 1 cup shredded carrot • 2 green onions, thinly sliced

INSTRUCTIONS: ONE: Preheat oven to 350˚F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil and mist with cooking spray. TWO: In a large bowl, soak bread in milk. Let stand 5 minutes then tear into very small pieces. Add beef, egg, 4 green onions, garlic, soy sauce, chilegarlic sauce and Worcestershire and mix with your hands until just combined. (NOTE: Do not overmix.) Shape into a 6 x 4-inch rectangle on prepared baking

sheet. In a small bowl, whisk together hoisin and ketchup. Brush over top and sides of meatloaf. Bake until an instant-read thermometer reads 160˚F when inserted in center, 50 minutes to 1 hour. Let stand for 10 minutes before slicing. THREE: Meanwhile, prepare slaw: In a separate large bowl, whisk together vinegar, oil and maple syrup. Add cabbage, carrot, 2 green onions and 2 tbsp cilantro and toss to coat. FOUR: Sprinkle remaining 2 tbsp cilantro over meatloaf. Serve with slaw. NUTRIENTS PER SERVING (¼ OF MEATLOAF AND ¼ CUP SLAW): CALORIES: 303, TOTAL FAT: 13 g, SAT. FAT: 4 g, MONOUNSATURATED FAT: 5 g, POLYUNSATURATED FAT: 2 g, CARBS: 19 g, FIBER: 3 g, SUGARS: 11 g, PROTEIN: 28 g, SODIUM: 515 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 123 mg

Brushing the meatloaf with a mix of hoisin sauce and ketchup keeps it from drying out in the oven while also adding an extra layer of savory umami flavor. To prevent the slaw from becoming soggy, toss the veggies with the dressing just before serving. To get this dish on the table quickly on a weeknight, you can shape the meatloaf the night before; cover with plastic wrap, then brush with the glaze and bake the next day.

INGREDIENTS: • 1 slice whole-grain bread • ¼ cup whole milk • 1 lb lean ground beef

TUESDAY COST PER PLATE:

TOTAL COST:

$3.26

$13.05

• 1 large egg, lightly beaten • 4 green onions, finely chopped • 4 cloves garlic, minced • 1 tbsp reduced-sodium soy sauce • 1 tbsp chile-garlic sauce (TIP: Look for it in the Asian section of most grocery stores or in Asian markets.) • 1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce • 1½ tbsp hoisin sauce • 1 tbsp ketchup (NOTE: Look for allnatural options such as Tessemae’s, or check out our homemade ketchup recipe at cleaneating.com.)

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budget recipes and coarsely mash. Fold in 2 tbsp cilantro. Spoon into potato skins, dividing evenly. FOUR: Preheat broiler to high. Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil and arrange potatoes, skin side down, on sheet. Broil until filling is golden, 3 to 5 minutes. Serve with yogurt mixture and sprinkle with remaining 2 tbsp cilantro. NUTRIENTS PER SERVING (2 POTATO HALVES AND ¼ OF YOGURT MIXTURE): CALORIES: 448, TOTAL FAT: 9 g, SAT. FAT: 5 g, MONOUNSATURATED FAT: 2 g, POLYUNSATURATED FAT: 1 g, CARBS: 78 g, FIBER: 10 g, SUGARS: 8 g, PROTEIN: 15 g, SODIUM: 443 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 18 mg

WEDNESDAY COST PER PLATE:

TOTAL COST:

$1.96

$7.82

Indian TwiceBaked Potatoes with Cucumber Yogurt Sauce SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME: 25 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 1 HOUR, 15 MINUTES.

Russet potatoes have a dry, starchy flesh that becomes wonderfully fluffy when baked, making them the ideal candidate for these richly spiced twice-baked potatoes. Serrano chiles can be quite hot, so reduce the amount used (or substitute with milder jalapeño) if you prefer this dish to be milder.

INGREDIENTS: • 4 large Russet potatoes • ½ cup whole-milk Greek yogurt • ½ cup diced English cucumber • ½ tsp plus 1⁄8 tsp sea salt • 1 tbsp organic unsalted butter • ½ tsp each yellow mustard seeds and ground cumin • 2 tbsp peeled and minced fresh ginger • 4 cloves garlic, minced

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Chicken & Quinoa– Stuffed Bell Peppers • 1 serrano chile pepper, seeded and minced • ¾ cup buttermilk • 1 cup BPA-free canned chickpeas, drained and rinsed • ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro, divided

INSTRUCTIONS: ONE: Preheat oven to 375˚F. With a fork, prick potatoes all over. Bake directly on rack until tender, about 1 hour. Let cool just enough to handle. Halve each potato lengthwise and carefully scoop flesh into a bowl, being careful not to scrape skins. Set potato flesh and skins aside. TWO: Meanwhile, in a small bowl, stir together yogurt, cucumber and 1⁄8 tsp salt. Set aside. THREE: In a saucepan, melt butter on medium. Add mustard seeds and cook, stirring, until seeds begin to pop, about 1 minute. Add cumin and cook, stirring, for 30 seconds. Add ginger, garlic and chile pepper and cook, stirring, until softened, about 1 minute. Add potato flesh and buttermilk. With a potato masher, coarsely mash mixture together. Add chickpeas and remaining ½ tsp salt

SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME: 20 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 55 MINUTES.

For an eye-catching contrast of colors, try using red or tricolor quinoa. To save time, buy the frozen spinach that’s already chopped and thaw it in your fridge overnight; just be sure to squeeze it dry before using.

INGREDIENTS: • 1 cup low-sodium chicken broth, divided • 1⁄3 cup quinoa, rinsed • 4 green bell peppers, halved lengthwise and seeded • 2 cups jarred or boxed unsalted tomato sauce, divided • 1 tsp dried oregano • 2 tsp olive oil, divided • 1 lb ground chicken or turkey • 1 tsp each dried basil, thyme and rosemary • ½ tsp each smoked paprika, sea salt, ground black pepper and red pepper flakes • 1 large yellow onion, finely chopped • 1 stalk celery, finely chopped


• 3 cloves garlic, minced • 1 10-oz pkg frozen chopped spinach, thawed and squeezed dry • 1 tbsp balsamic vinegar

INSTRUCTIONS: ONE: Preheat oven to 350˚F. In a small pot, bring ¾ cup broth to a boil. Add quinoa, return to a boil, cover and reduce heat to medium-low. Simmer until liquid is absorbed, 10 to 12 minutes. Remove from heat, let stand 5 minutes and fluff with a fork. Fill a separate large pot with water and bring to a boil; cook green peppers until tender-crisp, 3 to 5 minutes. TWO: Meanwhile, in a 13 x 9-inch baking dish, whisk together 1 cup tomato sauce, remaining ¼ cup broth and oregano. Arrange peppers over sauce, skin side down. Set aside. THREE: In a large deep skillet, heat ½ tsp oil on medium-high. Add chicken, basil, thyme, rosemary, paprika, salt, black pepper and pepper flakes and cook, breaking up chicken with a spoon, until no longer pink, 4 to 5 minutes. Transfer chicken mixture to a plate and set aside. FOUR: In same skillet still on mediumhigh, heat remaining 1½ tsp oil. Add onion, celery and garlic and cook, stirring, until softened, 3 to 4 minutes. Stir in chicken mixture, quinoa, spinach and remaining 1 cup tomato sauce and vinegar until well combined and heated through. Spoon into peppers, dividing evenly. Cover with foil and bake just until tender, 25 to 30 minutes. To serve, top peppers with sauce from baking dish.

Seafood, Fennel & Tomato Soup SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME: 25 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 25 MINUTES.

• ½ cup jarred or boxed unsalted finely chopped tomatoes (TRY: Pomì Finely Chopped Tomatoes) • 1 lb skinless sea bass fillets, cut into 8 pieces • 4 oz bay scallops • 1 tbsp chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Frozen scallops and thin white fish fillets are real time-savers for busy weeknights, as they thaw in a flash and take just minutes to cook. If your fennel bulb comes with the green fronds attached, feel free to use them as a pretty garnish on the soup instead of the parsley. You can use any firm white-fleshed fish for this soup – Pacific cod is another great option.

INGREDIENTS: • 1½ tsp olive oil • ½ bulb fennel, trimmed, cored and thinly sliced (about 2 cups) • 2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced • ½ tsp each sea salt and fennel seeds • ¼ tsp red pepper flakes • ½ cup dry white wine • 1 cup low-sodium chicken broth

FRIDAY COST PER PLATE:

TOTAL COST:

$3.38

$13.52

INSTRUCTIONS: ONE: In a Dutch oven, heat oil on medium-high. Add fennel, garlic, salt, fennel seeds and pepper flakes and cook, stirring, until fennel is softened and slightly browned, 5 to 6 minutes. TWO: Add wine and bring to a simmer. Cook until liquid is reduced by half. Add broth, tomatoes and ½ cup water and bring to a simmer. THREE: Using a large spoon, gently lower sea bass and scallops into soup just until submerged. Simmer gently, stirring occasionally, just until fish flakes easily with a fork and scallops are opaque throughout, 4 to 5 minutes. Divide among bowls and sprinkle with parsley. NUTRIENTS PER SERVING (¼ OF SOUP): CALORIES: 262, TOTAL FAT: 13.5 g, SAT. FAT: 3 g, MONOUNSATURATED FAT: 5 g, POLYUNSATURATED FAT: 4 g, CARBS: 7 g, FIBER: 2 g, SUGARS: 3 g, PROTEIN: 28 g, SODIUM: 413 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 87 mg

NUTRIENTS PER SERVING (2 STUFFED PEPPER HALVES): CALORIES: 345, TOTAL FAT: 14 g, SAT. FAT: 3 g, MONOUNSATURATED FAT: 6 g, POLYUNSATURATED FAT: 3 g, CARBS: 31 g, FIBER: 8 g, SUGARS: 10 g, PROTEIN: 29 g, SODIUM: 408 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 98 mg

THURSDAY COST PER PLATE:

TOTAL COST:

$3.43

$13.73 APRIL 2016

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budget recipes

TEAR OUT YOUR SHOPPING LIST FOR FIVE INCREDIBLE WEEKNIGHT MEALS! MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

White Turkey Chili

Asian-Style Meatloaf

Indian Twice-Baked Potatoes

Chicken & Quinoa– Stuffed Bell Peppers

Seafood, Fennel & Tomato Soup

U 1 lb ground

U ½ bulb fennel

turkey

$7.99

grain bread

$0.30

potatoes

$1.11

U 1 large

yellow onion

$0.55

U ¼ small

Greek yogurt beef

bunch kale

$0.19

cucumber

U 2 cloves garlic $0.08

peppers

$3.63

chicken

$6.99

$1.06

$11.03

fresh ginger

$0.20

$0.75

$0.18

bass fillets

$0.08

scallops

savoy cabbage $0.40

chile pepper

$0.09

frozen chopped spinach $1.34

fresh cilantro

TOTAL: $12.00 U Olive oil U Chile powder

$6.99 $3.42

flat-leaf parsley $0.20

TOTAL: $13.52

U 1 15-oz BPA-free

PANTRY STAPLES

U 1 lb skinless sea

U ¼ bunch fresh

U 4 cloves garlic $0.16

can unsalted cannellini or great northern beans $2.33

$1.33

U 4 oz bay

U 1 small jalapeño

chile pepper

U 4 oz dry

white wine

U 4 green onions $0.40 U 1 stalk celery

$1.50

$0.40

unsalted chickpeas (aka garbanzo beans) $2.15

PANTRY STAPLES U Olive oil U Jarred or

cilantro spray

$0.40

TOTAL: $7.82

broth salted tomato sauce

boxed unsalted finely chopped tomatoes U Sea salt U Fennel seeds

soy sauce

U Ground cumin

U Red pepper flakes

U Dried oregano

U Low-sodium

U Sea salt

chicken broth

butter

U Low-sodium

chicken broth

seeds

Chicken & Quinoa– Stuffed Bell Peppers

pepper

$

60.12

(SEE RECIPE, P. 72)

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A week of GROCERIES FOR JUST

APRIL 2016


meal plan // recipes

Lose 5In Pounds 2 Weeks WITH THIS HEALTHY AND SATISFYING MEAL PLAN Leave the thinking to us and follow this easy plan to shed pounds healthfully and efficiently. We’ve calculated the right amount of protein and fiber to keep your energy and metabolism up, just in time for summer!

LUNA VANDOORNE/SHUTTERSTOCK

BY ERIN MACDONALD, RDN, & TIFFANI BACHUS, RDN PHOTOGRAPHY BY KRIS OSBORNE

GET MORE HEALTHY MEAL PLANS AND EASY SHOPPING LISTS ONLINE! VISIT CLEANEATING.COM/MEAL-PLANNING APRIL 2016

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WEEK ONE

recipes // meal plan

NOTE: Clean Eating shopping lists include all the items you’ll need to prepare 70 meals for one adult.

SHOPPING LIST: WEEK 1 PROTEINS & DAIRY

2 sweet potatoes

1 container old-fashioned

1 bottle extra-virgin olive oil

2 oz grated Parmesan cheese

1 small Yukon Gold potato

9 oz ricotta cheese

2 Medjool dates

rolled oats 1 bag brown rice 1 bag quinoa (TRY: NOW Foods Living Now Certified Organic Whole Grain Quinoa)

(TRY: Santiago Premium Extra Virgin Olive Oil) 1 bottle olive oil 1 jar unrefined coconut oil 1 jar raw almond butter 2 oz raw unsalted chopped walnuts 2 oz unsalted pine nuts 1 oz raw unsalted almonds 1 bag ground flaxseed

5½ oz cottage cheese 2 dozen large eggs 21 oz plain whole-milk

Greek yogurt 4 oz lean grass-fed ground bison 3 oz lean beef tenderloin chunks 8 oz lean ground turkey 2 oz thinly sliced deli turkey, no added nitrites or nitrates 1 package lean uncured turkey bacon, no added nitrites or nitrates 14 oz boneless, skinless chicken breasts 1 lb boneless, skinless chicken tenders (NOTE: Freeze half for week 2) 4 oz smoked wild Alaskan salmon 1 4-oz can wild tuna, packed in water

VEGGIES & FRUITS 2 apples 4 bananas (freeze 1) 2 lemons 1 lime 1 orange 1 grapefruit 16 oz fresh strawberries 12 oz fresh blueberries 2 pears 2 avocados 6½ oz carrots (3 medium) 2 stalks celery 2 red bell peppers 2 cucumbers (1 English) 2 large zucchini

WHOLE GRAINS 1 loaf sprouted whole-grain

bread (TRY: Food for Life Ezekiel 4:9 Flax Sprouted Whole Grain Bread) 1 package 8-inch sproutedgrain tortillas

NUTS, SEEDS & OILS 1 jar ghee (clarified butter)

or 1 stick organic unsalted butter

meal plan: week 1 MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

BREAKFAST: 1 slice sprouted-grain bread, toasted, with 1⁄8 avocado, mashed, ¼ cup spinach and 1 egg, soft-boiled ½ grapefruit

BREAKFAST: Yogurt Berry Bowl: Mix ¾ cup Greek yogurt, 1 cup sliced strawberries, 2 tbsp chopped walnuts and 1 tbsp chia seeds

BREAKFAST: 1 serving Protein Pancakes with Berry Coulis (see recipe, p. 80; save leftovers) 2 strips turkey bacon; cooked 1 egg, hard-boiled ½ grapefruit

SNACK: 1 pear, 8 almonds

SNACK: 1 slice sprouted-grain bread, toasted, with 1⁄3 cup cottage cheese and ¼ cup mango salsa

LUNCH: 1 serving Nori-Wrapped Salmon Hand Rolls (see recipe, p. 81; save leftovers) ½ cup cooked brown rice ½ cup edamame; steamed

LUNCH: 1 serving Nori-Wrapped Salmon Hand Rolls (leftovers, p. 81) with ¾ cup cooked brown rice and ½ cup edamame, steamed

SNACK: Sonoma Salad: Mix 6 oz chicken breast, cooked and diced, 2 stalks celery, chopped, ½ apple, chopped, 1 tbsp hemp seeds, 1 tbsp almonds, chopped, 2 tbsp lemon juice and 1⁄3 cup Greek yogurt (eat half; save leftovers) 1 sprouted-grain tortilla DINNER: Steak Kabobs*

SNACK: 1 banana, sliced, dip in 1 tbsp ground flaxseed DINNER: Turkey Taco Lettuce Wraps: Mix 4 oz ground turkey, cooked, ½ cup cooked brown rice, ¼ cup salsa, ¼ cup black beans, ¼ avocado, cubed, 2 tbsp chopped green onion and 2 tbsp chopped red pepper; serve in Bibb lettuce leaves

1 pint grape tomatoes 1 small head broccoli

SNACK: ½ cucumber, sliced, and 1 carrot, sliced, with 2 tbsp hummus and 2 oz deli turkey LUNCH: Tuna Salad: Mix 1 can tuna with 1 tbsp Dijon mustard, 1 tbsp Greek yogurt and 1 green onion, chopped; serve over 1 cup baby spinach, ¼ cup cooked quinoa, ½ cup chopped cucumber and 1 carrot, chopped SNACK: 1 banana, sliced; dip in 1 tbsp ground flaxseed ½ apple, sliced, with 2 tbsp almond butter and 1⁄3 cup cottage cheese DINNER: Smoky Lentils & Quinoa*

5 oz sliced mushrooms 1 large yellow onion 1 shallot 1 bunch green onions 1 head garlic 5½ oz baby spinach 1 head Bibb or butter lettuce 1 large bunch fresh cilantro 1 bunch fresh rosemary

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TOTAL NUTRIENTS:

TOTAL NUTRIENTS:

TOTAL NUTRIENTS:

CALORIES: 1,627, FAT: 71 g, SAT. FAT: 15 g, CARBS: 152 g, FIBER: 30 g, SUGARS: 48 g, PROTEIN: 101 g, SODIUM: 1,075 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 434 mg

CALORIES: 1,546, FAT: 65 g, SAT. FAT: 18 g, CARBS: 170 G, FIBER: 33 g, SUGARS: 56 g, PROTEIN: 84 g, SODIUM: 1,988 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 357 mg

CALORIES: 1,488, FAT: 52 g, SAT. FAT: 8 g, CARBS: 158 g, FIBER: 37 g, SUGARS: 54 g, PROTEIN: 99 g, SODIUM: 1,699 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 446 mg

* Steak Kabobs: Make skewers from 3 oz beef, cut into chunks, 4 grape tomatoes and 1 zucchini, cut into rounds; brush with 1 tsp EVOO and sprinkle with salt and pepper; grill 1 sweet potato; baked


1 bag chia seeds (TRY:

1 bag almond flour

1 bottle ground oregano

Nutiva Organic Chia Seeds) 1 bag hemp hearts (raw shelled hemp seeds)

1 package nori

1 bottle ground cumin

EXTRAS

1 jar all-natural salsa

32 oz carton unsweetened

vanilla almond milk 12 oz low-sodium vegetable broth 1 15-oz BPA-free can unsalted black beans 16 oz bag frozen shelled edamame 1 bag red lentils

(seaweed sheets) 1 jar all-natural mango salsa 1½ oz dried unsweetened

cranberries 1 8-oz container hummus 1 jar Dijon mustard 1 jar raw honey (TRY: Wedderspoon Gold Gourmet Raw Wild Rata Honey) 1 bottle rice vinegar 1 bottle ground cinnamon

1 bottle smoked paprika 1 jar wasabi paste 1 bottle ground black pepper 1 bottle sea salt 1 box baking powder 1 bottle pure vanilla extract

EVOO = extra-virgin olive oil

Nori-Wrapped Salmon Hand Rolls with Wasabi Aioli (See recipe, p. 81)

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

BREAKFAST: 1 serving Veggie-Filled Egg Muffins (see recipe, p. 80; save leftovers) 1 apple, sliced; sauté in 1 tsp coconut oil and sprinkle with cinnamon

BREAKFAST: Yogurt Berry Bowl: Mix ¾ cup Greek yogurt, 1 cup blueberries, 2 tbsp chopped almonds and 1 tbsp chia seeds

BREAKFAST: 1 serving Protein Pancakes with Berry Coulis (leftovers, p. 80), reheated, with 2 strips turkey bacon, cooked

SNACK: ½ cucumber, sliced, and 1 carrot, sliced, with 2 tbsp hummus

SNACK: Yogurt Berry Bowl: Mix ¾ cup Greek yogurt, 1 cup blueberries, 1 tbsp chia seeds and 1 tsp honey

BREAKFAST: 1 slice sprouted-grain bread, toasted, with ¼ avocado, mashed, ¼ cup spinach and 1 egg, soft-boiled ½ cup strawberries

SNACK: 1 cup strawberries 8 almonds LUNCH: Smoky Lentils & Quinoa (leftovers), reheated SNACK: Banana Nut Butter Shake: Blend 1 cup almond milk, ½ frozen banana, 1 tbsp almond butter, 1 tbsp hemp seeds and 1 Medjool date with ice

LUNCH: 1 serving Veggie-Filled Egg Muffins (leftovers, p. 80) ½ cup cooked quinoa mixed with 2 tbsp dried cranberries, 2 tbsp pine nuts and 1 tbsp rice vinegar SNACK: Sonoma Salad (leftovers) with 1 sprouted-grain tortilla

LUNCH: Turkey Taco Lettuce Wraps: Mix 4 oz ground turkey, cooked, ½ cup cooked brown rice, ¼ cup salsa, ¼ cup black beans, ¼ avocado, cubed, 2 tbsp chopped green onion and 2 tbsp chopped red bell pepper; serve in Bibb lettuce leaves

SNACK: 1 pear sprinkled with 1 tbsp hemp seeds, 1 tbsp walnuts LUNCH: Baja Salad: Mix 4 oz chicken breast, grilled and chopped, ½ cup cooked quinoa, ½ cup black beans, 6 grape tomatoes, sliced, 1 tbsp chopped green onion, 1 tbsp cilantro leaves, juice of 1 lime and 1⁄8 tsp cumin SNACK: 1 slice sprouted-grain bread, toasted, with ½ tbsp almond butter and ½ banana, sliced

DINNER: Rosemary Chicken: Sauté 1 clove garlic, minced, 1 Yukon Gold potato, chopped, and ¼ cup chopped yellow onion in 1 tsp ghee; set aside on a plate; sauté 4 oz chicken breast, chopped, and 1 tbsp rosemary in 1 tsp ghee; when chicken is done, return vegetables to pan and toss

SNACK: Banana Nut Butter Shake: Blend 1 cup almond milk, ½ frozen banana, 1 tbsp almond butter, 1 tbsp hemp seeds and 1 Medjool date with ice

TOTAL NUTRIENTS:

TOTAL NUTRIENTS:

TOTAL NUTRIENTS:

TOTAL NUTRIENTS:

CALORIES: 1,592, FAT: 78 g, SAT. FAT: 20 g, CARBS: 161 g, FIBER: 40 g, SUGARS: 65 g, PROTEIN: 74 g, SODIUM: 1,177 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 258 mg

CALORIES: 1,771, FAT: 77 g, SAT. FAT: 25 g, CARBS: 156 g, FIBER: 30 g, SUGARS: 42 g, PROTEIN: 124 g, SODIUM: 1,079 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 244 mg

CALORIES: 1,559, FAT: 69 g, SAT. FAT: 16 g, CARBS: 146 g, FIBER: 31 g, SUGARS: 70 g, PROTEIN: 106 g, SODIUM: 1,787 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 321 mg

CALORIES: 1,319, FAT: 37 g, SAT. FAT: 8 g, CARBS: 152 g, FIBER: 30 g, SUGARS: 36 g, PROTEIN: 95 g, SODIUM: 944 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 386 mg

DINNER: 1 serving Zoodles with Cilantro Pesto & Grilled Chicken (see recipe, p. 81; save leftovers)

DINNER: 1 serving Zoodles with Cilantro Pesto & Grilled Chicken (leftovers, p. 81), reheated

DINNER: 4 oz bison; form into a patty and grill 1½ cups broccoli florets, sautéed in 1 tsp ghee 1 sweet potato, baked

* Smoky Lentils & Quinoa: Cook ½ cup chopped yellow onion, 1 clove garlic, minced, 1 red bell pepper, chopped, ½ cup red lentils, ½ cup rinsed quinoa and ½ tsp smoked paprika in 1½ cups vegetable broth; bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, cover and cook until quinoa is tender (eat half; save leftovers) APRIL 2016

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WEEK TWO

recipes // meal plan

NOTE: Clean Eating shopping lists include all the items you’ll need to prepare 70 meals for one adult.

EXTRAS

1 bag coconut sugar

1 bottle ground chile powder

22 oz plain whole-milk

1 jar low-sugar marinara sauce

1 15-oz BPA-free can unsalted

1 bottle cracked black pepper

Greek yogurt 8 oz medium shrimp 9 oz thinly sliced deli turkey, no added nitrites or nitrates 8 oz wild Pacific halibut fillet 4 oz wild smoked Alaskan salmon 8 oz extra-firm organic tofu

1 4-oz bag shirataki noodles

black beans 1 5-oz BPA-free can sliced water chestnuts 1 jar water-packed roasted red peppers 1 jar or can chipotle chiles in adobo sauce

1 bag arrowroot

VEGGIES & FRUITS

meal plan: week 2

PROTEINS & DAIRY

2 apples

1 bottle wheat-free low-

sodium tamari sauce 1 container baking soda 1 bottle sriracha sauce 1 bottle apple cider vinegar

MONDAY

2 bananas 15 oz fresh strawberries

(slice and freeze 9 oz) 13 oz blueberries 1 pear 1 orange 1 lime 1 cucumber 1 papaya 1 pineapple 2 avocados 4 oz snap peas 1 red bell pepper 1 large zucchini 1 yellow onion 1 bunch green onions 1 sweet potato 2 small purple potatoes 4 portobello mushroom caps 4 oz shiitake mushrooms 1 large bunch fresh cilantro 6 oz field greens mix 1 head bok choy

WHOLE GRAINS

On Monday and Wednesday, use recipes from our Weight Loss section (p. 43). Be sure to prep on the weekend so that you'll have everything ready to go! BREAKFAST: 1 serving Sweet Potato Hash with Sunny Side Up Eggs (see recipe, p. 43; save leftovers) SNACK: 1 serving Mini Blueberry Muffins (see recipe, p. 43; save leftovers) LUNCH: 1 serving Black Bean Patty Salad (see recipe, p. 43; save leftovers) SNACK: 1 serving Purple Potato Egg Salad (see recipe, p. 44; save leftovers) DINNER: 1 serving Polynesian Stir-Fry (see recipe, p. 44; save leftovers)

1 bag oat flour

NUTS, SEEDS & OILS 1 bottle grape seed oil

Clean Eating

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BREAKFAST: Yogurt Berry Bowl: Mix ¾ cup Greek yogurt, 1 cup sliced strawberries, 1 tbsp chopped walnuts and 1 tbsp chia seeds SNACK: Strawberry Smoothie: Blend ¾ cup frozen strawberries, ¼ cup Greek yogurt, ¼ cup almond milk, 1 tbsp chia seeds, 1½ tsp ground flaxseed and 1 tsp honey with ice LUNCH: Smoked Salmon Bowl: Top ½ cup cooked quinoa with ½ cup edamame, steamed, 2 oz smoked salmon, 2 tbsp each chopped cucumber and avocado, 1 tbsp chopped cilantro; drizzle with ½ tsp each tamari and rice vinegar SNACK: Turkey Wrap: To 1 tortilla, add 2 tbsp hummus, 3 oz deli turkey, 1⁄8 avocado, sliced, and 2 tbsp cilantro

EVOO = extra-virgin olive oil

WEDNESDAY This day uses all leftovers from Monday's recipes – so it's a really light day in the kitchen! BREAKFAST: 1 serving Sweet Potato Hash with Sunny Side Up Eggs (leftovers, p. 43) SNACK: 1 serving Mini Blueberry Muffins (leftovers, p. 43) LUNCH: 1 serving Black Bean Patty Salad (leftovers, p. 43) SNACK: 1 serving Purple Potato Egg Salad (leftovers, p. 44) DINNER: 1 serving Polynesian Stir-Fry (leftovers, p. 44)

DINNER: Papaya Shrimp: Sauté ½ cup chopped yellow onion, 2 cloves garlic, 8 oz shrimp and ½ papaya, peeled and chopped, in 2 tsp ghee (eat half over 2 oz shirataki noodles; save leftovers)

1 bottle toasted sesame oil

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1 8-oz container hummus

TOTAL NUTRIENTS:

TOTAL NUTRIENTS:

TOTAL NUTRIENTS:

CALORIES: 1,732, FAT: 71.5 g, SAT. FAT: 15 g, CARBS: 205 g, FIBER: 39 g, SUGARS: 61 g, PROTEIN: 71.5 g, SODIUM: 2,074 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 511 mg

CALORIES: 1,448, FAT: 59 g, SAT. FAT: 13 g, CARBS: 129 g, FIBER: 35 g, SUGARS: 45 g, PROTEIN: 112 g, SODIUM: 1,578 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 273 mg

CALORIES: 1,732, FAT: 71.5 g, SAT. FAT: 15 g, CARBS: 205 g, FIBER: 39 g, SUGARS: 61 g, PROTEIN: 71.5 g, SODIUM: 2,074 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 511 mg

BLUEBERRIES EVGENYI/SHUTTERSTOCK

SHOPPING LIST: WEEK 2


Zoodles with Cilantro Pesto & Grilled Chicken (See recipe, p. 81)

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

BREAKFAST: 1 serving Veggie-Filled Egg Muffins (leftovers, p. 80), thawed and reheated 1 apple, sliced; sauté in 1 tsp coconut oil and sprinkle with cinnamon

BREAKFAST: 1 serving Protein Pancakes with Berry Coulis (leftovers, p. 80), thawed and reheated, with 2 strips turkey bacon, cooked 1 banana

BREAKFAST: 1 serving Veggie-Filled Egg Muffins (leftovers, p. 80), thawed and reheated 1 apple, sliced; sauté in 1 tsp coconut oil and sprinkle with cinnamon

BREAKFAST: 1 serving Protein Pancakes with Berry Coulis (leftovers, p. 80), thawed and reheated, with 2 strips turkey bacon, cooked 1 pear

SNACK: Turkey Wrap: To 1 tortilla, add 2 tbsp hummus, 3 oz deli turkey, 1⁄8 avocado, sliced, and 2 tbsp cilantro LUNCH: Portobello Mushroom Pizzas* 1⁄3 cup cooked quinoa mixed with 2 tbsp dried cranberries, 1 tbsp pine nuts and 1 tbsp rice vinegar

SNACK: Yogurt Berry Bowl: Mix ½ cup Greek yogurt, 1 cup blueberries, 1 tbsp chia seeds and 1 tbsp ground flaxseed LUNCH: Smoked Salmon Bowl: Top ½ cup cooked quinoa with ½ cup edamame, steamed, 2 oz smoked salmon, 2 tbsp each chopped cucumber and avocado, 1 tbsp chopped cilantro; drizzle with ½ tsp each tamari and rice vinegar

SNACK: ½ banana, sliced; dip in 1 tbsp almond butter and 1 tbsp ground flaxseed LUNCH: 1 serving Zoodles with Cilantro Pesto & Grilled Chicken (leftovers, p. 81), reheated SNACK: Yogurt Berry Bowl: Mix ½ cup Greek yogurt, 1 cup blueberries, 1 tbsp chia seeds and 1 tbsp ground flaxseed

SNACK: Quinoa-Turkey Snack: Mix ½ cup cooked quinoa with 2 tbsp dried cranberries, 1 tbsp pine nuts, 1 tbsp rice vinegar and 3 oz deli turkey, chopped LUNCH: Halibut with Vegetables (leftovers), reheated, with ¾ cup cooked brown rice SNACK: Strawberry Smoothie: Blend ¾ cup frozen strawberries, ¼ cup Greek yogurt, ¼ cup almond milk, 1 tbsp chia seeds, 1½ tsp ground flaxseed and 1 tsp honey with ice

SNACK: 1 slice sprouted-grain bread, toasted, with 1 tbsp almond butter ¼ papaya, sliced

SNACK: ¼ papaya, sliced, and 1 tbsp chopped walnuts

DINNER: Papaya Shrimp (leftovers), reheated, over 2 oz shirataki noodles

DINNER: 1 serving Zoodles with Cilantro Pesto & Grilled Chicken (see recipe, p. 81; save leftovers)

TOTAL NUTRIENTS:

TOTAL NUTRIENTS:

TOTAL NUTRIENTS:

TOTAL NUTRIENTS:

CALORIES: 1,618, FAT: 77 g, SAT. FAT: 31 g, CARBS: 150 g, FIBER: 30 g, SUGARS: 55 g, PROTEIN: 95 g, SODIUM: 1,977 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 448 mg

CALORIES: 1,453, FAT: 63 g, SAT. FAT: 13 g, CARBS: 132 g, FIBER: 31 g, SUGARS: 60 g, PROTEIN: 103 g, SODIUM: 1,379 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 299 mg

CALORIES: 1,475, FAT: 56 g, SAT. FAT: 14 g, CARBS: 158 g, FIBER: 35 g, SUGARS: 69 g, PROTEIN: 97 g, SODIUM: 1,504 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 344 mg

CALORIES: 1,506, FAT: 53 g, SAT. FAT: 18 g, CARBS: 165 g, FIBER: 33 g, SUGARS: 54 g, PROTEIN: 103 g, SODIUM: 2,097 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 290 mg

DINNER: Halibut with Vegetables: In a large piece of foil, place 8 oz halibut fillet, 2 cups shredded bok choy, 6 shiitake mushrooms, sliced, 2 tbsp fresh cilantro, 1 tbsp rice vinegar and 1 tbsp tamari; wrap and fold foil to enclose food; bake packet at 350°F for 15 minutes (eat half with ¾ cup cooked brown rice; save leftovers)

DINNER: Portobello Mushroom Pizzas*

* Portobello Mushroom Pizzas: Remove gills from 2 portobello mushroom caps; fill each cap with 2 tbsp marinara sauce and ¼ cup ricotta cheese; bake at 400°F for 20 minutes in a covered pan APRIL 2016

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recipes // meal plan

Protein Pancakes with Berry Coulis SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME: 15 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 15 MINUTES.

INGREDIENTS: • ½ cup old-fashioned oats • 2 large eggs • 1⁄3 cup ricotta cheese • 1 tbsp ground flaxseed • 2 tsp baking powder • 1 tsp pure vanilla extract • ¼ tsp ground cinnamon • 1 tsp raw honey • 1 tsp coconut oil • ¼ cup blueberries • ¼ cup chopped strawberries • 2 tbsp fresh orange juice

INSTRUCTIONS: ONE: Place oats in a blender; pulse until a powder forms. Add eggs, ricotta, flaxseed, baking powder, vanilla, cinnamon and honey; blend until smooth. Transfer batter to a bowl and clean out blender.

TWO: Heat an electric griddle to 325°F and coat surface with oil (or use a nonstick griddle pan on medium). Add 1 heaping tbsp batter per pancake and cook until bubbles form on the surface of batter, about 2 minutes. Flip and cook until golden, 2 minutes more. THREE: Prepare coulis: In clean blender, combine blueberries, strawberries and orange juice. Process until roughly blended. Serve coulis over pancakes. NUTRIENTS PER SERVING (2 PANCAKES AND 1 TBSP COULIS): CALORIES: 150, TOTAL FAT: 8 g, SAT. FAT: 4 g, MONOUNSATURATED FAT: 2 g, POLYUNSATURATED FAT: 1 g, CARBS: 13 g, FIBER: 2 g, SUGARS: 4 g, PROTEIN: 7 g, SODIUM: 235 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 103 mg

TIP: If following our Meal Plan, refrigerate 1 serving (2 pancakes and 1 tbsp coulis) for leftovers in Week 1 and freeze 2 servings (4 pancakes and 2 tbsp coulis ) for leftovers in Week 2; thaw and reheat when called for.

Veggie-Filled Egg Muffins SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME: 25 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 55 MINUTES.

INGREDIENTS: • 8 tbsp almond flour • 8 tsp coconut oil • 2 cups sliced white mushrooms • ¼ cup chopped yellow onion • 2 cups baby spinach • 4 large eggs • 4 large egg whites • 5 tbsp plus 1 tsp grated Parmesan cheese, divided • 1⁄8 tsp ground black pepper

INSTRUCTIONS: ONE: Preheat oven to 350°F. Mist 8 cups of a standard muffin tin with cooking spray. TWO: In a bowl, combine almond flour and coconut oil. Divide evenly among bottoms of the 8 prepared muffin cups and pat to flatten. Bake until lightly golden, about 10 minutes. THREE: Mist a medium nonstick skillet with cooking spray and heat on mediumhigh. Add mushrooms and onion and cook until soft, about 4 minutes. Add spinach

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and cook 1 minute more. Transfer cooked vegetables to a bowl; set aside to cool 5 minutes. FOUR: In a large bowl, whisk eggs, egg whites, ¼ cup cheese and black pepper. Add vegetables to bowl and stir to combine. Divide egg mixture among prepared muffin cups, filling each about ¾ full. Sprinkle remaining 4 tsp cheese over top. Bake until puffed up and lightly golden, about 17 minutes. NUTRIENTS PER SERVING (2 MUFFINS): CALORIES: 299, TOTAL FAT: 23 g, SAT. FAT: 11 g, MONOUNSATURATED FAT: 8 g, POLYUNSATURATED FAT: 3 g, CARBS: 8 g, FIBER: 3 g, SUGARS: 2 g, PROTEIN: 17 g, SODIUM: 270 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 192 mg

TIP: If following our Meal Plan, refrigerate 1 serving (2 muffins) for leftovers in Week 1 and freeze 2 servings (4 muffins) for leftovers in Week 2; thaw and reheat when called for.


FOUR: Mist same skillet with cooking spray and heat on medium-high. Add zoodles, cook for 2 to 3 minutes, until slightly softened. Remove from heat; toss with reserved pesto. Divide among plates; top with chicken.

Zoodles with Cilantro Pesto & Grilled Chicken SERVES 2. HANDS-ON TIME: 40 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 1 HOUR, 10 MINUTES.

INGREDIENTS: • 2 large or 4 small zucchini, trimmed • ¼ tsp sea salt • 1 cup packed fresh cilantro • 2 tbsp chopped unsalted walnuts • 2 tbsp chopped shallot • 1½ tbsp Parmesan cheese • Zest and juice of ½ lemon

Line a large baking sheet with a double layer of paper towel and spread zoodles on sheet in a single layer. Gently squeeze with more paper towels. Sprinkle with salt; set aside 30 to 45 minutes. Working in batches, transfer to another sheet lined with paper towel; gently squeeze out moisture.

• 1⁄8 tsp ground black pepper

TWO: In a small food processor, pulse cilantro, walnuts, shallot, Parmesan, lemon zest and juice, garlic and oregano. With machine running, stream in 1 tbsp oil. Set aside.

INSTRUCTIONS: ONE: Working one at a time, secure zucchini in a spiral maker and turn crank to create “zoodles,” long strands that resemble spaghetti. (NOTE: Always read directions for your spiral maker as directions vary by brand.) Cut any zoodles that are very long in half.

THREE: Place chicken between 2 sheets of wax paper. Using a mallet, pound to 1-inch thickness. In a large skillet on medium-high, heat remaining ½ tsp oil. Season chicken with pepper. Cook for 4 to 6 minutes, turning once, until cooked through and golden. Transfer to a cutting board, let rest 5 minutes and then slice.

• 2 small cloves garlic • ½ tsp dried oregano • 1 tbsp plus ½ tsp extravirgin olive oil, divided • 8 oz chicken breast tenders

NUTRIENTS PER SERVING (2 CUPS ZOODLES AND ½ OF CHICKEN): CALORIES: 326, TOTAL FAT: 17 g, SAT. FAT: 3 g, MONOUNSATURATED FAT: 8 g, POLYUNSATURATED FAT: 5 g, CARBS: 16 g, FIBER: 4 g, SUGARS: 9 g, PROTEIN: 30 g, SODIUM: 337 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 66 mg

TIP: If following our Meal Plan, refrigerate 1 serving zoodles and ½ of grilled chicken for leftovers in Week 1. You'll make a fresh batch in Week 2; refrigerate 1 serving as well.

Nori-Wrapped Salmon Hand Rolls with Wasabi Aioli SERVES 2. HANDS-ON TIME: 25 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 25 MINUTES.

INGREDIENTS: • 2 sheets nori, each sheet cut in half • 4 oz wild Alaskan smoked salmon • ½ English or hothouse cucumber, seeded and cut into matchsticks

AIOLI • 1 large egg yolk • 1 tsp Dijon mustard • 1 tsp wasabi paste • 1 tbsp olive oil • 1 tsp fresh lemon juice

INSTRUCTIONS: ONE: Prepare aioli: In a large bowl, whisk together egg yolk, Dijon and wasabi. Slowly drizzle in oil while whisking vigorously until mixture thickens. Mix in lemon juice. Set aside. TWO: Lay nori on a flat surface. Lay 1 oz salmon along one side of each sheet, toward one of the corners. Divide cucumber, avocado and cilantro among nori, layering over salmon. Starting from the corner with filling, roll into a cone shape. (You may need a few drops of water to seal.) Serve with aioli. NUTRIENTS PER SERVING (2 ROLLS AND 1½ TBSP AIOLI): CALORIES: 248, TOTAL FAT: 19 g, SAT. FAT: 4 g, MONOUNSATURATED FAT: 11.5 g, POLYUNSATURATED FAT: 2.5 g, CARBS: 5 g, FIBER: 1 g, SUGARS: 1 g, PROTEIN: 14 g, SODIUM: 551 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 105 mg

TIP: If following our Meal Plan, refrigerate 1 serving of rolls and sauce; alternatively, you can save half the ingredients for the rolls and wrap them freshly the next day.

• ½ avocado, thinly sliced • 2 tbsp chopped fresh cilantro

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eat smart // complements

Sneaky Tricks for a Tamer Tummy

(and a Better Mood) BY SARAH TUFF DUNN

Increasingly, researchers are discovering the strong connection between your brain and your belly, and it’s not just your stomach letting you know when you’re hungry. As reported recently in The New York Times and other major news outlets, the Human Microbiome Project is revealing how bacteria in your gut affects brain chemistry and behavior, thanks to mood-regulating neurons like dopamine, serotonin and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) secreted by the trillions of microorganisms traveling through your intestinal systems. It’s a body of work in progress, but in the meantime, here are surefire ways to settle the flames that might be burning deep inside.

Go pro: As in probiotics. Probiotic foods and supplements are the new superheroes of the well-being world, thanks to a slew of recent studies linking them to better brain and overall health. In August 2015, Brain Behavior and Immunity reported that taking probiotic supplements for four weeks

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LEAD PHOTO © PREMIUM ROYALTY FREE/MASTERFILE

Belly Up

We’ve all had gut feelings, but what happens when those good gut feelings go bad, leaving you gassy instead of sassy, low instead of “let’s go!” and sick instead of slick?


WOMAN ON COUCH WAVEBREAKMEDIA/SHUTTERSTOCK, BUBBLES PHITPIBUL2014/SHUTTERSTOCK

made participants feel less sad and aggressive, while another study from Canada, published in CNS & Neurological Disorders in 2014, suggests that “probiotics may mitigate anxiety symptoms” and that “the modulation of the gut microbiota may provide a novel therapeutic target for the treatment and/or prevention of mood and anxiety disorders.” Probiotics may also help prevent obesity, according to Indian researchers who have found that metabolic syndrome – for which obesity is the main precursor – might be managed through the right foods and supplements. The authors write that implementing dietary strategies with probiotics, along with other nutrients such as CLA and polyphenols, “could have relevant implication in planning a successful dietary regimen and/ or neutraceutical/pharmaceutical preparations for achieving and maintaining a normal body weight in obese individuals.” Some of the best food sources for probiotics include yogurt, kefir, sauerkraut and even ginger beer. For supplements, look for probiotics that contain strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus.

PROBIOTIC PICKS Flora Complete Care Probiotic

$17, florahealth.com

Nature’s Way Primadophilus Optima Max Potency 100 Billion

$50, naturesway.com

Rainbow Light ProbioActive 1B

$20, rainbowlight.com

Arthur Andrew Medical Floraphage

$20, arthurandrew.com

Nordic Probiotic

$30, nordicnaturals.com

GIVE YOUR MOUTH A REST: Eschewing calories by constantly chewing sugar-free gum and sipping seltzer water? You might actually be making your midsection larger by swallowing air. A report from the American College of Gastroenterology notes that “belching and flatulence are normal body processes.” But those who have “excessive gas passages” may benefit from keeping a “flatus” diary for three days. Yes, a fart diary. Soda, beer, cauliflower, broccoli, cabbage, beans and bran are all tummy triggers, as are milk and other dairy foods, along with chewing gum, even sugar-free gum, which has flatulencecausing sweeteners.

Talk it out: Therapy is no longer a four-letter word, and new research shows that it may even alleviate distress from a threeletter acronym: IBS. In a December 2015 article published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, scientists show that psychological therapies can reduce abdominal pain and other gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). “Psychological therapies reduce GI symptoms in adults with IBS,” conclude the study authors. “These effects remained significant and medium in magnitude after short- and long-term follow-up periods.”

Sip ginger tea: The herb is “mighty and amazing,” according to the National Center for Biotechnology Information, thanks to its effectiveness as an anti-nausea agent, among other benefits.

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be inspired // gear & gadgets HIT THE TRAIL The REI Trail 25 Pack in Black Sapphire has padded meshcovered straps to keep you cool and comfy while hiking. Plus, it has pockets and storage for everything from your water bottle and phone to snacks and sunglasses. $69.50, rei.com

STICK TO IT Prevent your feet from sliding on the dance floor, at the barre or on the mat with the nonslip ToeSox Half Toe Bella Grip Socks in Siren. Made from organic cotton, these socks have a five-toe design, offering flexibility and comfort. $18, toesox.com

Movement Must-Haves Exercise plays a starring role in weight loss. Sweat it out with these fun items that will inspire a more active lifestyle. BY LAURA SCHOBER

TURN UP THE MUSIC The Beats by Dr. Dre urBeats block out background noise while you’re working up a sweat, making these ideal for any type of exercise. The ear tips come in a variety of sizes so you can ensure they stay in place whether you’re walking, jogging or lifting weights. Available in six colors. $100, beatsbydre.com

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WORDS TO LIFT BY Show your passion for fitness with FTD Apparel's motivational "Live Love Lift" racerback tank top. $18, ftdapparel.com

FASHIONABLE FITNESS Keep track of your fitness goals in style with the super-sleek Q Dreamer Sand Leather Activity Tracker, which tracks daily steps and calories burned. $125, fossil.com


GET YOUR “OM” ON Made from recyclable PLUSfoam, the earth-friendly Manduka LiveON Mat 5mm is lightweight yet sturdy enough for all your poses. $58, manduka.com

FULL SUPPORT The Valleau Apparel Sunset Sports Bra features crossed double shoulder straps that offer comfortable support for everything from yoga to running. $42, valleauapparel.com

Editors’ Choice SMART WATCH Call it your very own personal trainer – the water- and sweatresistant Fitbit Blaze offers free onscreen workouts, measures your heart rate and has a smartphone-connected GPS that delivers your run stats to track your progress. $200, fitbit.com 

JUMP, JUMP! Choose from among five colors and five cable weights to customize your own jump rope from the Rx Custom Jump Ropes. Use the online sizing chart to find the best rope length for your

YOGA BAG

FILTERED H20 With its spill-proof bite valve and plant-based filter, the BPA-free CamelBak Groove water bottle keeps your water free of contaminants so you can drink easy. It comes in a variety of colors as well as stainless steel. $20, camelbak.com for where to buy

Transport your mat to yoga class in this pretty Gaiam On-the-Go Yoga Mat Carrier, which has two thin shoulder straps and an expandable zipper pocket to store your phone, wallet and keys. $15, gaiam.com

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It doesn’t get more indulgent than this — a velvety peanut butter mousse filling over a cocoa and nut crust, all topped with a coconut caramel drizzle!

CHOCOLATE CARAMEL PEANUT BUTTER PIE SERVES 14. HANDS-ON TIME: 30 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 1 HOUR (PLUS CHILLING AND FREEZING TIME).

out the thick white cream that separates the next day, reserving water for another use.) • 1 cup creamy all-natural unsalted peanut butter

INGREDIENTS:

• 2 tbsp pure maple syrup

CRUST

• ½ tsp pure vanilla extract

• 1 cup dried unsweetened shredded coconut

• 1⁄8 tsp sea salt

• ½ cup packed pitted Medjool dates • ½ cup raw unsalted walnuts • ½ cup raw unsalted almonds • 5 tbsp unsweetened cocoa powder • 1 tsp pure vanilla extract

MOUSSE • 2 cups coconut cream (from about 2 13.5-oz BPA-free cans) (TRY: Native Forest Unsweetened Organic Coconut Milk Classic) (TIP: Refrigerate cans overnight and scoop

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APRIL 2016

DRIZZLE • 1 13.5-oz BPA-free can coconut milk • ½ cup coconut sugar • 1 tsp pure vanilla extract • 1 tbsp coconut oil

INSTRUCTIONS: ONE: Prepare crust: In a food processor, combine all crust ingredients and process for 3 minutes, until mixture sticks together and forms a large single mass. Line a 9-inch round pie pan with parchment paper on bottom and up the sides. Press crust

mixture into pan; use your fingers to press it in firmly, pushing up the edges of the pan to form the crust’s edge. Transfer to freezer to set. TWO: Meanwhile, prepare mousse: Using an electric hand or stand mixer, beat coconut cream on high until very smooth, about 1 minute. Add peanut butter, maple syrup, ½ tsp vanilla and salt and beat on high for 1 minute more. Remove crust from freezer and spread peanut butter mousse evenly inside crust, then return to freezer to set for at least 4 hours. THREE: Prepare drizzle: In a medium saucepan on medium-high, mix together coconut milk and coconut sugar. Bring just to a boil, stirring frequently, then reduce heat to medium or low so that mixture stays at a gentle simmer. Cook for

30 minutes, stirring occasionally, until it’s reduced by about half and turned a rich, deep brown. Remove from heat and vigorously stir in 1 tsp vanilla and coconut oil. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour before serving. FOUR: To serve, remove pie from freezer and let sit at room temperature for 10 minutes before slicing. Drizzle sliced pie with caramel sauce. Pie can be stored in freezer for up to 1 month; caramel sauce keeps in a tightly covered container for 4 to 5 days in the refrigerator. NUTRIENTS PER SERVING (1⁄14 OF PIE): CALORIES: 394, TOTAL FAT: 32 g, SAT. FAT: 18 g, MONOUNSATURATED FAT: 7 g, POLYUNSATURATED FAT: 6 g, CARBS: 22 g, FIBER: 4 g, SUGARS: 16 g, PROTEIN: 8 g, SODIUM: 42 mg, CHOLESTEROL: 0 mg

RECIPE BY LIZ MOODY, PHOTOGRAPHY BY DENNIS KENNEDY, PROP STYLING BY SUE MITCHELL, FOOD STYLING BY JOHN KIRKPATRICK, ROBIN ZIMMERMAN & BETH SEUFERER

Chocolate Peanut Butter Freezer Pie


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