Issuu on Google+

ANALOG TO DIGITAL CONVERSION PROCESS INTRODUCTION Hi  there,  my  name  is Cristina Guadalupe Juárez Chablé, and I'm from México. This is the lesson analog  to digital conversion process, taught by  the professor Loundon Stearns, of Week 2 for the Introduction to Music Production on Coursera.org. LESSON Analog  to  digital  conversion  is  a  process  to  go  from  the  continually  variable  sound  into  the stream of ones and zeros. Binary information is based primarily on the bit, and a bit is a single, kind of, memory location. A bit = “0” or “1” Every  number  is  collection  of  those  ones  and  zeros.  So   the  number  of  bits,  determines  the maximum  number  of  states, or  the  biggest  number  that  you  can  represent.  Then  if  we  have  a single  bit,  we  can represent two things, on or off. If we want to represent large numbers, we have to start collecting bits into words. And word is a collection of bits. In  the  MIDI  data  is used commonly seven bit words. Or if we’re dealing with digital audio, we use 16 bit words. 2 wordlength

(2)

(4)

(8)

1 Bit word

2 Bit word

3 Bit word

Decimal number

0

00

000

0

1

01

001

1

10

010

2

11

011

3

100

4

101

5

110

6

111

7


If  I   have  a  two  bit word,  we  have  values  of  zero­zero,  zero­one,  one­zero,  one­one,  so  we  can represent four things, like the seasons of the year for example. Now,  it’s  good  to  know  what’s  the  largest  number  you  can  represent. And  it’s always  two to the power  of  the  wordlength  is  going  to  give  you  the  number  of  numbers,  the  value  that  you  can represent. 21 =2 22 =4 23 =8 24 =16 25 =32 Note: the exponential number is the bit word.

You  are  going  to  find  that  there’s  a  couple  standard.  CD standard  is  a  16  bit  word.  It’s  done  in that  quality  but  in  the  studio  we  tend  to  use  a  higher  wordlength,  and  maybe  24  would  be  a great setting for when you’re recording. What that gives you is a wider dynamic range. What  we’re  talking  about  right  now  is  wordlength  is  related  to  amplitude  and  the  sampling rate  is  related to frequency. So, if I have a 24 bit wordlength I have a wider dynamic range (the longer  wordlength).  But what it does allow you to do is not record at such a high value. And when we’re  recording  we  want  to  get  as  loud  as  possible  without  clipping  or  distorting.  So  is  better you set the interface with the DAW to work in 24 bit mode. So  like  we  said   before,  when  we’re  converting  from  analog  to  digital,  we’re  making  many measurements  per  second.  And  each  one  of  those  measurements  has  a specific  wordlength. But how often we do the measurements is known as the sampling rate. The  fact  is,  the higher the sampling rate the higher frequency that can be represented accurately in  the   digital  domain.  So  the  CD  standard  sampling  rate  of  44,100  herts  (it  is  22,050  hertz  in digital  domain)  can  accurately  represent  everything   we  can  hear  as  human  beings.  So  it’s better to use the higher settings we can have in a CD. REFLECTION It’s  elementary to know the analog to digital conversion process for understand how work the two main   parameters  of  digital  audio  (wordlength  and  sampling  rate),  and  what  is  the  function  of each of them. In this way, we can improve the quality of our record.


Analog to digital conversion