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CHRISTOPHER GARDNER CHRISGARDNER@UTEXAS.EDU 62 MAUJER ST.APT #4 BROOKLYN NY 11206

ACADEMIC CULTIVATING TIMBER PARC QUADRILEÉ PROJECTIONS, TYPOLOGIES, CROSSINGS THOMAS C. GREEN SWIM CENTER DESERT CARCASS THE BALANCHINE ARMATURE MAPLE AND CHERRY DESK MOIRE IMPLUVIUM INDEPENDENT MARFA ROW THE LILYPAD PEACE CORPS SINGPOST CANYON METRO PROFESSIONAL TAKA RESTAURANT 88 AND 90 LEXINGTON PLEXUS COMPETITION ENTRY


ACADEMIC WORK


6 ACADEMIC


CULTIVATING TIMBER “What are the things that join us with the future?” – Kenzo Tange Timber has yet to enter the mainstream of building technology in the US, but with its clear advantages it deserves better. Rather than typical construction, which focuses only on the completed building, phasing the building would consistently encourage public interaction through the entire process of manufacturing and construction. Timber is different, and the building community needs to experience this difference for timber to truly be recognized. The seed of timber will be planted in Red Hook, reestablishing it as a center of relevant industry in the 21st century.

The entire development is designed to incorporate the various programs of timber manufacturing and distribution, public education, and low-income housing. These disparate user groups will all revolve around an on-site factory for the production of timber products. With a production facility as part of the program it only makes sense to establish that portion first and have it manufacture the rest of the development on site. Currently, the means of production for CLT exist primarily in Canada, Europe and New Zealand and would require outsourcing for any use in the United States. While the means are remote, the supply of softwood lumber is readily available in the Northeast. Many of these forests and lumber mills are located along the Erie Canal and Hudson River, allowing shipment of the raw lumber to the site via barges thereby revitalizing a historical artery of New York while also drastically reducing greenhouse gases and embodied energy. Unlike typical construction, which only functions as a means to an end in the finished building, this project will progress in unique phases embracing its own construction. This phased development utilizes the context of the site and the uniqueness of timber production to optimize resources and time while openly inviting engagement not only from the building community but the people of Red Hook. Phase one would see the renovation of the lone existing building on the site’s western corner as a hiring facility and showroom, inviting locals and the public to engage the development early. In phase two, the necessary foundation is poured, the only use of concrete on the site. Phase three will see the production machinery and local lumber shipped to the site. During this phase, temporary canopies shelter the means of production while the framing for the factory is manufactured. In phase four the machinery is brought to its final position within the newly assembled factory and production commences on the rest of the site components and the residential tower. During phase five the tower is assembled, drawing attention as it quickly rises. With the completion and inhabitation of the tower comes the sixth and final stage in which the site is fully activated and the now proven factory begins the manufacture of timber products for use outside the site. Location: Red Hook, Brooklyn Professor: Ulrich Dangel - Advanced Studio Spring 2013 Awards: 2nd Place ACSA Timber in the City Student Competition, AIA Austin Student Honor Award, UTSoA Design Excellence Award

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PHASE 3: TRANSITORY

PHASE 4: ESTABLISHMENT

PHASE 5: CONSTRUCTION 8 ACADEMIC


LUMBER FROM UPSTATE AND CANADA SHIPPED TO SITE VIA BARGES NAVIGATING THE HUDSON RIVER

PHASE 1: HARBINGER The existing building will be renovated with timber products to function as a showroom and hiring facility, inviting the public to engage with the future of the site. Timber has emerged as a viable choice for restoration work and would function as a fine introduction of the material to the public.

PHASE 2: FOUNDATION Once the existing building is occupied the primary foundation will be poured, the only use of concrete for the entire site.

RED HOOK DOCK

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PHASE 3: TRANSITORY Here, the means of production (CNC, Planers, etc.) will be brought to the site and placed under temporary structures. Softwood lumber will then be ferried to the site and stacked around the perimeter creating a closed space during the production of CLT members for the creation of the primary production facility.

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PHASE 4: ESTABLISHMENT Once the factory is complete, and production equipment placed in its final position, manufacturing will begin on the CLT panels for a residential tower and the rest of the site components, storing them conspicuously for all to see. TO W PA ER NE LS

PHASE 5: CONSTRUCTION CLT construction allows for the quick erection of floors, rising triumphantly and proclaiming itself as a symbol of the possibilities of timber and the future of Red Hook as a timber hub.

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PHASE 6: COMPLETION The production facility will remain continually active, helping to construct more of Red Hook and Brooklyn after developers see and understand the advantages of timber construction. CLT

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SKYLIGHTS

STEEL PLATES PLANTED ROOF

CLT ROOF PANELS

GANTRY SYSTEM TIMBER FRAME GLAZING

JALOUSIE WINDOWS

STOREFRONT IN-FILL

The production facility relies on CLT framing and CLT panels for the factory floor and green roof. These components will be manufactured on site during the transitory phase. The connections of the CLT framing and the CLT roof panels creates a gap over the primary structure allowing light to pour in to the factory space while also highlighting the columns. The inside edge is clad in steel, reflecting light down while also concealing the frame of the skylight. The factory is enclosed with timber framed glazing shaded by the roof overhang. The bottom of the frame houses Jalousie windows which would allow for cross ventilation while also connecting to the industrial heritage of the area. The roof is planted with locally viable plants, cooling the building and creating a more attractive fifth facade for the occupants of the tower.

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SOIL AND VEGETATION WATER RETENTION LAYER FILTER FABRIC LAYER AERATION LAYER RIGID INSULATION ROOT BARRIER WATERPROOFING MEMBRANE FLASHING CEDAR PLANKS FURRING STRIPS RIGID INSULATION WATERPROOFING 5 LAYER CLT PARAPET 7 LAYER CLT FLOORPLATE

The windows for each unit are inset to prevent solar gain in the Summer and allow thermal heat gain in the Winter. In instances where a unit protrudes further out than the one above it, a green roof is employed, cooling the building and providing a pleasing exterior garden for the residents. Each unit also comes with a Jalousie window which would bring light and air in to the space which would be cross ventilated through to the central hallway which also has operable windows. The configuration of the floor plates responds to the housing requests of the low income residents, maintaining consistent structure but embracing modularity. As the building is leased the floor plans of each level will change depending on the demand for each type of unit. The main structure of the tower comes from the stacking and interlocking of perpendicular CLT panels. These panels support the floor plates as well as create the party walls between the modular units as well as the central hallway which acts in shear.

DOUBLE GLAZED  JALOUSIE WINDOWS FINISH FLOOR

CEDAR PLANKS

UNDERFLOORING

FURRING STRIPS

RADIANT HEATING

FLASHING

7 LAYER CLT FLOORPLATE

RIGID INSULATION WATERPROOFING 7 LAYER CLT FLOORPLATE

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28ft 28ft

28ft

28ft 28ft

28ft

28ft

28ft

28ft 28ft

28ft

28ft

28ft 28ft

28ft

28ft 28ft

24ft 24ft

CLT CORES

24ft

24ft

24ft 24ft

24ft

CLT CENTRAL WALLS

24ft

24ft 24ft

24ft

CLT SHEAR PARTY WALLS

24ft

24ft 24ft

24ft

28ft

28ft

24ft

CLT FLOOR PLATES

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PARC QUADRILLEÉ From Hausmannization through to Mitterand’s Gran Projets, Parisien urban development has evolved around the establishment of singular landmark objects. In an attempt to remove this project form that time line, the entirety of the planned intervention will exist as a field rather than an object, thereby evolving with the site and providing a relevant framework for future developments. For Parc Quadrilleé, this takes the form of a simple Cartesian grid of 4m increments, originating at the center of Ledoux’s Rotonde and emanating out to the nearby Metro stations. Within this grid, specific interventions will take place in the first, second or third dimensions, incorporating a modular temporary system, facilitating a high flexibility of program. Partner: Nick Angelo Location: Jaures, 19th Arrondissement, Paris Professors: John Blood/Danilo Udovicki/David Elalouf Study Abroad Paris - Fall 2012 Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Architecture de Paris-Belleville.

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3RD DIMENSION: VOLUMETRIC

2ND DIMENSION: PLANAR

SCENARIO: MARKET STALLS

1ST DIMENSION: LINEAR SCENARIO: OPEN-AIR GALLERY

0 DIMENSION: POINT

SCENARIO: CONCERT VENUE

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PROJECTIONS TYPOLOGIES CROSSINGS

As a framework for our sketch studies while in Switzerland, Italy and France we adhered to the three categories of typologies, crossings and projections. For my typological study I focused on urban scale elevation change and the formal strategies used to navigate them. Similarly, for my crossings, I investigated elevation change but at the scale of the human body. WIth projections, we were allowed freedom for independent study outside of an established theme. Professors: John Blood/Elizabeth Danze/Larry Doll Study Abroad Europe - Fall 2012

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THOMAS C. GREEN SWIM CENTER In Austin, there is already a well established tradition of outdoor swimming holes and natural springs, the most illustrious being Barton Springs, less than half a mile away from the chosen site. In considering this context, it felt necessary to provide a swim center that offers a new experience for Austin, one celebrating the experience of indoor swimming. To form this new space, I found inspiration in the relationship of the tectonic swimmer and the steretomic datum of the water. Echoing this dichotomy, I split the program and structure into an expressive canopy and a solid and functional plinth. The sound building semester required extensive development of the structure, envelope and building systems, culminating with a detailed bay model and building section. Location: Austin, Texas Professor: Ulrich Dangel Sound Building Spring 2011 Awards: Sound Building with Distinction

SAN N ANTONIO ST.

NUECES NUEC CES ST. W CESAR CHAVEZ ST.

SITE PLAN 1/32” = 1’ - 0”

THOMAS C. GREEN SWIM CENTER SOUND BUILDING SPRING 2011

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DESERT CARCASS Design 5 was a theoretical semester focused on Design/Build projects. Our first assignment was the design and construction of a shelter/art piece in Marfa, Texas at the annual El Cosmico Music and Arts Festival, 3 weeks after the introduction of the project. My group found inspiration in the idea of a dead animal carcass providing shelter and the implied narrative of adaptive reuse. To achieve the natural forms of ribs and spinal column, we CNC routed organic skeletal shapes out of plywood and connected them using acrylic cartilage. We weaved bailing wire around knobs on the outside of the ribs and wrapped the interior with burlap, thereby securing and weatherproofing the structure. The entire structure was erected in 4 hours. As a follow up I created a film documenting the experience: http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=_S8VxLbOTNM Partners: Matt Krolick, Tyler Larson Location: El Cosmico, Marfa, Texas Professor: Jack Sanders Design 5 - Fall 2010

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THE BALANCHINE ARMATURE As part of a greater study of modernism and the work of George Balanchine, I developed a series of animations to analyze the specific dynamics of modern ballet: “Through exploring the ballet of Balanchine and Swan Lake in an objective, linear manner, one becomes aware of the technical evolution of the dancer. In tracing control point across frames occurring every eighth of a second, my animation dynamically follows the specific movements of body within space. Simultaneity is a critical aspect of ballet, coordinating all body parts at the same time within space. In classical ballet, the dancer slows down when “line” is emphasized in positions of arabesque or attention and the audience loses the simultaneity of the movements in exchange for the frozen, pure line poses such as the arabesque. With Balanchine, the line constantly changes with every part of the body in movement. When the control points of Swan Lake were traced I was able to leave parts of the line unchanged from frame to frame, sometimes simply copy/pasting and changing two or three control points. In contrast to this, In some Balanchine frames I would have to completely retrace the line through the control points between the frames. Thus, Balanchine’s choreography exists in dynamic synchronization, becoming the focus rather than the means to an end as in Swan Lake.” Professor: Richard Cleary Four Masters of Modernism - Summer 2011

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BREADBOARD DESK I took cues from mid-century Danish furniture and adapted it to my dimensions with the use of native Texas woods in the creation of this desk. A feature I found particularly interesting was to “breadboard end� which is typically used to cap end grain of a tabletop, I chose to exploit that connection and pull up the breadboard to create a shelf and filing coves. Professor: Mark Macek Wood Design - Spring 2013

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MOIRÉ IMPLUVIUM My partner and I developed a proposal for the school as part of our material investigation of screen-printed glass. The pool in our school courtyard has long been dry due to water bans resulting from a historic drought in Texas. We proposed an intervention within the pool that would evoke water while complying with the water ban. We created a dynamic moirÊ pattern that alludes to the ripples in water and applied it to suspended glass panels. We then designed a simple structure to support the glass within the pool using industrial aluminum stand-offs. While the project remains unfunded, our full scale mock-up and presentation has brought attention to the neglected water feature. Partner: Kyle Knaggs Professors: Elizabeth Danze & John Blood Construction 5 - Spring 2013

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INDEPENDENT WORK


36 INDEPENDENT


How to make density appealing in a location desired for its remoteness? Architecture and location are the twin aspects of Marfa’s appeal. Residents choose the community’s remoteness as a respite from the urban and a return to the vernacular. The goal of any multi-family development should be to maintain this appeal while incorporating the economic and social advantages of higher density. Marfa Row seeks to meet this goal through a hybrid typology. Development in Marfa has moved beyond residential in recent years, though multi-family remains unrealized. The success of places such as El Cosmico and the Thunderbird Hotel demonstrates an interest and appreciation for environments in which people interact and share in their experience of Marfa.

Marfa’s current residential landscape is relatively homogeneous, comprised of single story bungalows situated on large (≈1/2 acre) lots. In this context, typical multi-family building masses (garden apartments/townhouses) would sit conspicuously anywhere in the city. Current code requirement also impede such building masses, dictating only 30% coverage of any site with deep setbacks and a maximum building height of 40’. Thus, single story, unattached units provide the most suitable solution to both context and code in developing Marfa Row. Further research revealed a precedent to this massing in the early housecourts of Los Angeles. Considered an “ideal housing facility” at the time, housecourts offered residents the appealing aspects of a detached home (sunlight, garden space, privacy) with the advantages of higher density (safety, community, consolidated services, etc.) These features address Marfa’s environmental challenges while preserving the community’s cultural attitudes. As one of 3 finalists, MARFA ROW was published in Symposium literature, receiving accolades for its contextual sensitivity. Location: Marfa, Texas Awards: Finalist, Marfa Multifamily Housing Competition, February 2015

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SOLAR PANELS FLASHING +

WATERPROOFING

CORRUGATED ALUMINUM ROOFING EXTRUDED ALUMINUM GUTTER

TIMBER BATTENS BATT INSULATION INTERIOR GYPSUM BOARD CEILING PLYWOOD ROOF BACKING PREFABRICATED STEEL GABLE TRUSS DEC.21 JUN.21

OPERABLE TILT TRANSOM WINDOW FLASHING + WATERPROOFING EMBEDDED STEEL LINTEL

BLACKENED STEEL WINDOW SLEEVE OPERABLE DOUBLE GLAZED WINDOW 12” RAMMED EARTH EXTERIOR WALL TOPPING SLAB RADIANT HEATING IN SITU CONCRETE FOUNDATION WATER PROOFING IN SITU CONCRETE POND

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TYPICAL STUDIO PLAN [672 SF] SCALE: 1/8” = 1’-0”

TYPICAL 1 BEDROOM/ 1 BATH UNIT PLAN [1176 SF] SCALE: 1/8” = 1’-0”

TYPICAL 2 BEDROOM/ 2 BATH UNIT PLAN [1848 SF] SCALE: 1/8” = 1’-0”

TYPICAL 3 BEDROOM/ 2 BATH UNIT PLAN [2184 SF] SCALE: 1/8” = 1’-0”


40 INDEPENDENT


EXPERIENCE

ENERGY

ECOSYSTEM

Wave energy suffers from an image problem. Solar and wind energy both occupy a position in the public conciousness, while few outside the engineering and scientific communities understand the potential of wave generation. What is needed is a new experience, bringing wave power out of the lab and into the amusement park. The lilypad is inhabitable art, an open invitation for the public to explore and experience. What better site than the historic Santa Monica Pier, long home to pleasure seekers in pursuit of new and unique experiences. Santa Monica has the ferris wheel, the roller coaster, and now the Lilypad. Among the burgeoning alternative energies, wave power exists at a uniquely human scale. Waves exist entirely within the discrete range between trough and crest much the same as humans exist between the ground and the crown of our heads. With the Lilypad, these dual planes are combined, creating a new dialog between each other. Lilypad occupies this liminal space, not quite ground and not quite water. Inhabitants experience the wave in real-time, connecting with the movement of the ocean. Through Lilypad, the ocean waves are distilled to their pure kinetic motion, allowing inhabitants to connect in a way never before available. suddenly, the public are struck with the awareness of the immense energy the wave generates. This awareness, coupled with the knowledge of the energy being produced, will help bring wave energy into the public consciousness. Location: Santa Monica Pier, Los Angeles Competition Entry - Spring 2015

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KINETIC PLATFORM

3D-PRINTED POLISHED BIOPLASTIC THAT FLEXIBLE IN X/Y/Z AXIS.

BUOY PISTON

FORGED TO BUOY, TRANSLATES WAVE MOTION TO SINGLE AXIS MOVEMENT.

GASKETED PISTON CONNECTION

PROVIDES WATER-TIGHT SEAL FOR WEC ENGINE AND ITS COMPONENTS

WEC ENGINE

UTILIZES THE WAVES MOTION TO GENERATE ELECTRICITY AND CREATE PRESSURIZED OCEAN WATER FOR DESALINATION ON LAND.

MODULAR STEEL SUPPORT STRUCTURE

A HEXAGONAL TRUSS SYSTEM THAT STACKS TO FACILITATE PLACEMENT OF WEC ENGINE AT PROPER DEPTH IN RELATION TO SURFACE.

GUY WIRE

TIED BETWEEN THE ARRAY OF GENERATOR TOWERS TO CREATE STABILITY WITHIN THE ENTIRE SYSTEM.

WEC OUTPUT CABLES/PIPES

CORROSION RESISTANT HOUSING OF WATER PIPING AND ELECTRICAL CABLES FOR UNDERWATER CONDITIONS.

BUTONG CONCRETE ANCHOR

PRE-POURED CONCRETE BASE TO SECURE TOWER TO OCEAN FLOOR MADE OF UNIQUELY FORMED CELLULAR CONCRETE.

BUOY AT TROUGH

BUOY AT CREST

CONCENTRATED SEA WATER RETURNED TO OCEAN POTABLE WATER FOR THE CITY OF SANTA MONICA

SCREENING

FILTERING

REVERSE-OSMOSIS PROCESSING

DESALINATION PLANT (OFF-SITE)

WEC GENERATED POWER UTILIZED LOCALLY FOR SANTA MONICA PIER

REMAINING WEC GENERATED POWER DELIVERED TO GRID

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C St. NW

Rebuilt Sidewalk

Reflection Pool UTILITY

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UTILITY

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n aw L ee Tr

Reflection Pool

na a i s ui o L

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e. v A

NW


As part of a federally approved bill, a competition was established for the creation of a commemorative work for the Peace Corps on a site adjacent to the National Mall in Washington. My concept for “SIGNPOST” begins with the mapping of Peace Corps deployment sites across an azimuthal map projection. These nodes are linked to the center point (Washington D.C. on the map) and trace up onto the surrounding cylinder. Where these links intersect the bronze walls of the monument, the material is cut away. From within, the viewer is struck with the breadth of the Peace Corps’s influence across the humanosphere. Location: Washington D.C. Competition Entry - Summer 2014

Vertical Projection

The lines of influence continue up the monument wall, eroding away the metal and revealing the world beyond.

Tracing Influence

A line is traced through each volunteers point creating a radial measure of the full influence of the Peace Corps in its history.

Peace Corps Deployment

The locations of every Peace Corps volunteer’s deployment since the program’s inception

World Map

An Azimuthal Equidistant map projection of the earth with its center at the polar coordinates of the Signpost site. With this type of projection, all points on Earth are at proportionately correct distances and directions from the center point.

INDEPENDENT 47


ONE WORLD TRADE CENTER

New York City urbanism since 9/11 has become deeply concerned with issues of security. “One World Trade”, the resurrected symbol of American Capitalism in Downtown Manhattan, epitomizes this new developmental environment. The facade of the ground floor lobby and first ten stories, originally designed to taper in a reflection of the upper form, were surrendered to the installation of a “blast wall” to protect against street level attacks. This impenetrable pedestal, constructed of solid concrete and rebar, measures 48” in width.

VOID OF SECURITY

BLAST WALL

In my entry to the Storefront for Art and Architecture “Street Architecture” Competition, I proposed erecting the temporary concrete form work for the construction of this monumental blast wall as a public art installation. Allowing the public to freely circulate through and around the towering steel forms during the “IDEAS CITY” festival would engender an awareness and discourse about the state of security in our cities.

48 INDEPENDENT

Location: New Museum, Bowery Street, New York City Competition Entry - Winter 2014


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In the urban landscape, the bus shelter is the most purely functional architectural element, with a consistently predictable level of interaction and use. I took this basic program as a framework for exploring various design approaches and my own personal formal vocabulary. While originally open ended, I eventually settled on a goal of 100 bus shelters. Upon completion of this goal, I plan to publish the full collection in a zine through my association with the Austin-based arts collective, Raw Paw. For that, each bus shelter will require some form of representation, so in conjunction with the design investigation I will also develop the forms of representation to communicate each design idea. Design Research June 2016-Present

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ST A IR


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PROFESSIONAL WORK


56 PROFESSIONAL


TAKA RESTAURANT FACADE In response to an objection by the local Preservation Committee, our design for a new restaurant in Asbury Park, NJ needed to be revised to incorporate a facade to match the existing brick of the site. Our goal was to create a unique design solution that would work within the highly prescriptive request. I developed a Grasshopper script which would maintain the required Flemish Bond coursing while extruding the perpendicular bricks to establish depth and create a lively composition. Once receiving approval from the client and community board, I generated the unique construction diagrams required for the contractor to actually build it. Location: Asbury Park, New Jersey Firm: Workshop/APD January-March 2015

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58 PROFESSIONAL


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60 PROFESSIONAL


Hired as project and design architect, Workshop/APD was charged with the conversion from existing rental units to condominiums of both 88 and 90 Lexington Ave. The extensive renovation includes penthouses, townhouses, 150 units (Studio-4BR) and a completely new facade for 90. I have been with the project from the beginning, heavily involved with every major deliverable since conception. Location: Lexington Avenue, New York City Firm: Workshop/APD October 2013 - Present

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62 PROFESSIONAL


PROFESSIONAL 63


OCT 2013

64 PROFESSIONAL

APR 2014

DD 50% DESIGN DOCUMENTS

DD DOB FILING: 88-3,10,11,12,14

CD MODEL UNITS 50% BUILT

DD DOB FILING: 90-,4,6,7,8,9,10

SD FACADE DESIGN PRESENTATION

CD MODEL UNITS CONST. BEGINS

DD DOB FILING: 88-8,9

SD BATHROOMS DESIGN PRESENTATION

SD KITCHENS DESIGN PRESENTATION

DD DOB FILING: 88-7/90-5

SD UNIT PLANS PRESENTATION

PD UNIT MIX DISSEMINATED


05 2 6

26

05

05 26

1

CL

41'-9"

5'-6"

05

1

9'-1"

5'-7"

18

WF

03

02

05

ALIGN

6"

18 1

DW

3'-4" 2'-5"

SIM

FOR SMOKE BAFFLE DETAIL SEE 2/A-760.

5'-4"

1 PNTRY

13'-1"

5'-312"

2'-11" FOYER

01

01

4'-6"

5 A712

HALL

TYP

5'-6"

06

24

5'-0" MIN

1

3'-6" MIN 1

1'-11"

LIVING

05

10'-6" 1'-11"

5'-10"

3'-10" ALIGN

1'-8"

2'-5"

17'-10" 5'-6"

4

4

EXISTING GLAZING: REQUIRED OPERABLE:

BEDROOM

4

5'-5"

NEW 90 MIN FPS MINIMUM STC R TO BE FULL WID FRAMES TO BE S SMOOTH FINISH,

8.

NEW TILT/TURN 4" PER CODE RE INTERIOR FINISH DETAILS TO BE P

9.

NUHEAT (OAE) E MASTER BATHS, HEIGHT, SEE SHE

10.

ALL NEW & EXIS RATED CONSTRU

11.

NEW CUSTOM S COMPONENTS. COMPLIANT WIT

12.

NEW WASHER & SHEET G-003.00 SCHEDULE & SP

13.

EX'G PARAPET & EXISTING HEIGHT WALL TO BE PAR

14.

NEW MEMBRANE RISER. NEW STO MATCH INTERIOR BE REMOVED AS INSTALLATION D

15.

CONCRETE FLOO STRUCTURAL ST FINISH LEVELS T UNIT.

16.

RECONFIGURED DOES NOT FACTO TO MATCH ADJA TYPICAL WATER LINTEL DETAIL.

= 28.0 SQ. FT. 5% = 4.4 SQ.FT. = 12.5 SQ. FT.

EXISTING GLAZING: REQUIRED OPERABLE: EXISTING OPERABLE:

4

= 28.0 SQ. FT. 5% = 6.5 SQ.FT. = 12.5 SQ. FT.

A

ROOM: BEDROOM 3 SIZE OF ROOM: = 104 SQ. FT. REQUIRED GLAZING: 10% = 10.4 SQ.FT. EXISTING GLAZING: = 28.0 SQ. FT.

20'-7"

REQUIRED OPERABLE:

1 A-610

UNIT 705, 805, 905

EXISTING OPERABLE:

18'-4"

9

8

1

7.

ROOM: BEDROOM 2 SIZE OF ROOM: = 131 SQ. FT. REQUIRED GLAZING: 10% = 13.1 SQ.FT. 3'-3"

10'-7"

PROVIDE BLOCK LOCATIONS PER PROVIDE BLOCK FIXTURES & FINI G-003.00 FOR TY TYPICAL BLOCKI

5% = 12.6 SQ.FT. = 25.0 SQ. FT.

EXISTING OPERABLE:

10'-8"

1 2'-0"

10'-6"

6.

ROOM: BEDROOM 1 SIZE OF ROOM: = 88 SQ. FT. REQUIRED GLAZING: 10% = 8.8 SQ.FT.

1

35 01

1'-3" 5'-6"

REQUIRED OPERABLE:

5 05 24

39'-11"

2'-6"

2'-6" MIN

5

BEDROOM

5% = 26.7 SQ.FT. = 62.6 SQ. FT.

ROOM: MASTER BEDROOM SIZE OF ROOM: = 252 SQ. FT. REQUIRED GLAZING: 10% = 25.2 SQ.FT. EXISTING GLAZING: = 56.0 SQ. FT.

D [VENTLESS]

05

205 4

10'-0"

11'-11"

5'-6"

15'-9"

01

5

EXISTING OPERABLE:

07 1

EXISTING OPERABLE:

W

SIM

1

NEW BUILT-IN RO DETAILS ON SHE TYPICAL INSTAL

22 36

34

2'-8" 05 24

07

1

REQUIRED OPERABLE:

05

10 A703

3'-1" MIN

35

5'-6" 29'-3"

35 02

30

35

8"

2 06

01

1

30

29'-3"

2

4BR/3.5BA 2606 SQ. FT.

ROOM: LIVING/DINING ROOM SIZE OF ROOM: = 534 SQ. FT. REQUIRED GLAZING: 10% = 53.4 SQ.FT. EXISTING GLAZING: = 140.0 SQ. FT.

4'-8" MIN 11'-6"

BATH

BEDROOM 3

LIGHT & AIR ANALYSIS

5

2'-314"

4

19'-10"

7'-10" MIN

5'-4"

ALIGN

10'-11" [10'-9" ADA MIN]

3'-9"

B

BEDROOM 2

5

1 04

2

NEW BUILT-IN FU MATCH KITCHEN MILLWORK INST

5.

UNIT PLAN

06

2

2

02

3'-0"

LIVING/DINING ROOM

09 18'-3"

1'-8" 4

1 05

1

DINING

4

30

0 05 3 2'-514"

2'-6"

18'-0"

4

0 05 3

4.

2605 SQ. FT.

5

09 1

SMOKE BAFFLE A INCORPORATED RCP'S & CEILING

LEXINGTON AVE.

BEDROOM 1

22

PNTRY

CL

3.

MASTER BEDROOM

6 1'-4"

NEW KITCHEN C FINAL KITCHEN L MANUFACTURER INCORPORATED PROVIDED FOR A

24

5 A701

REF

24

02 05

BEDROOM

1'-0"

2.

3

36

CL

2

FRZ

02

KITCHENETTE: 76 SQ FT MECH. VENTILATION TO BE PROVIDED. 16'-0" SEE MEP DWGS.

5

6

WOOD FLOOR DIRECTION

8'-4"

1

4'-4"

14'-7"

5'-0" MIN

5'-6"

1

06

35 2

KEYPLAN

05

1

BATH

9'-1"

2

24

24

1'-0"

5'-6" 3'-2"

8'-11" 01

05

5'-0"

06

ALIGN

2

SIM

1

PWDR

2

06

10 A701

09

06 2

06

UNIT 705 805 905

07

3'-0"

2

3'-0"

10'-1"

13'-5"

C

4'-8" MIN

1

AC04 P18

1

05

1

NEW WOOD FLO LEVELED SUBFLO MANUFACTURER DETERMINED BY BY CONTRACTOR DETAILS & TERM

04

6

2

4

4

26

35

TYP

05

4'-1012"

35

MASTER BATH

26

1

3'-4" MIN

18'-0"

17'-6"

3 A702

05 05 26

30

30

1.

6

06

02

2

01

26

5

MASTER SUITE

3'-6" MIN

ALIGN

ALIGN 5'-9"

5

EAST 26TH STREET

4

9'-3"

5

9'-1"

1

5'-2"

5

2'-3"

5

3'-1"

D

UNIT CONS

18'-4"

7

5% = 5.2 SQ.FT. = 12.5 SQ. FT.

[C26-1202.2] 27-733 LIGHT AND AIR REQUIREMENTS ARE MET BY EXISTING AND PROPOSED CONDITIONS

5

6

88L CONSTRUCTION PLAN UNIT 705, 805, 905 SCALE:

1/4" = 1'-0"

OCT 2014

APR 2015

DD DOB FILING: 90-12,PENTHOUSE

DD DOB FILING: 88-PENTHOUSES

SD PENTHOUSES DESIGN PRESENTATION

CD AG APPROVED / SALES BEGIN

CD 90 FACADE INSTALLATION COMPLETE

DD TAX LOT DRAWINGS ISSUED

CD 90% CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS

DD DOB FILING: 90-11

DD DOB FILING: 90-TOWNHOUSES

CD 90 FACADE INSTALLATION BEGINS

CD MODEL UNITS COMPLETE

DD DOB FILING: 88-TOWNHOUSES

SD AMENITIES DESIGN PRESENTATION

CD 50% CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS

DD AG PLANS/REPORTS FILED

CD 15% CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS

DD DOB FILING: 88-15,16,17,18

DD 90 FACADE ISSUED FOR CONST.

WALL TYPE

SEP 2015

PROFESSIONAL 65


66 PROFESSIONAL


PLEXUS COMPETITION ENTRY My first three months at Bade Stageberg Cox were spent on a competition entry for a campus building at Aalto University outside Helsinki. I worked closely with the principals throughout the process, aiding in schematic design, extensively modeling the site and program massing. I developed the 3D model from the early stages all the way through to the final model for rendering. I set up the renderings for all of the perspectives contained here and designed the key diagram for the building used on all of the competition boards. Location: Aalto University, Helsinki, Finland Firm: Bade, Stageberg, Cox Architecture Professional Residency - Fall 2012

PROFESSIONAL 67


MODULAR WORKSHOPS 100

PROJECT WORK AREA 4x30

AREA 5436

STUDENT A LA CARTE FAST FOOD KITCHEN - SERVICE & SOCIAL 2000 OTHER SMALLER COMMERCIAL SPACES 2489

LOUNGE 40

LOCKERS 40

SEMINAR ROOM 5x54 FLEXIBLE STUDIO 100

CLASSROOMS 6x 100

STUDENT A LA CARTE FAST FOOD KITCHEN - SERVICE & SOCIAL 1023 OTHER SMALLER COMMERCIAL SPACES 1308

M OO SR AS 180

OTHER SMALLER COMMERCIAL SPACES 1665

FIRST

CL

R PUTE COM OWN TOUCHD 30

AID 20

FLEXIBLE STUDIO 240

FLEXIBLE STUDIO 120

ON

RECEPTI 30

STORAGE 450

ITE WR P U 6 x 13

(sub divided)

OMS

COATRO 90

FLEXIBLE STUDIO 120

PROJECT SPACE 27

PROJECT SPACE 27

PROJECT SPACE 27

PROJECT SPACE 27

PROJECT SPACE 27

CLASSROOM 180

FLEXIBLE STUDIO 100

FLEXIBLE FLEXIBLE STUDIO STUDIO 20 20 FLEXIBLE MODULAR STUDIO WORKSHOPS 20 54

MODULAR MODULAR WORKSHOP WORKSHOP 45 45

STUDENT A LA CARTE FAST FOOD KITCHEN - SERVICE & SOCIAL 668

FLEXIBLE STUDIO 120

GROCERY STORE 1800

LEARNING CENTRE EXHIBITION GALLERY LOBBIES CAFES 1500

MS

AT

CO

OO

LR

IA

OC ,S ES OX TB 00 ed) 2 id iv bd (su

INTERNAL MEETING 60 (sub divided)

OS

,P

MS

O RO

OFFICES OPEN WORK SPACES 3070 (sub divided)

BREAK ROOM, COPY PRINT 70 (sub divided)

68 PROFESSIONAL

GUILDROOM 30

OFFICES OPEN WORK SPACES 3070 (sub divided)

OFFICES OPEN WORK SPACES 3070 (sub divided)

OFFICES OPEN WORK SPACES 3070 (sub divided)

INTERNAL MEETING 60 (sub divided) BREAK ROOM, COPY PRINT 70 (sub divided)

INTERNAL MEETING 60 (sub divided)

FLEXIBLE STUDIO 100


AREA 30,548

CLASSROOM 100

SEMINAR ROOM 54

SEMINAR ROOM 54

STORAGE 17

SEMINAR ROOM 54

FLEXIBLE STUDIO 20 FLEXIBLE STUDIO 20

STORAGE 17

FLEXIBLE STUDIO 100

PROJECT SPACE 27

PROJECT SPACE 27

AREA 47,945

AREA 30,548 CLASSROOM 100

MODULAR WORKSHOPS 54

FLEXIBLE STUDIO 20 SEMINAR ROOM 54

SEMINAR ROOM 54

CLASSROOM 100

STORAGE 17

CLASSROOM 100

CLASSROOM 100

STORAGE 17

FLEXIBLE STUDIO 100

PROJECT SPACE 27

FLEXIBLE STUDIO 100

PROJECT SPACE 27

STORAGE 17

CLASSROOM 100

SEMINAR ROOM 54

PROJECT SPACE 27

CLASSROOM 100

FLEXIBLE STUDIO 240

FLEXIBLE STUDIO 240 STORAGE 17

CLASSROOM 100

CLASSROOM 100

FLEXIBLE STUDIO 100

CLASSROOM 100

FLEXIBLE STUDIO 100

STORAGE 17

CLASSROOM 100

SEMINAR ROOM 54

FLEXIBLE STUDIO 100

CLASSROOM 100

FLEXIBLE STUDIO 100

STORAGE 17

CLASSROOM 100

PROJECT SPACE 27

CLASSROOM 100

FLEXIBLE STUDIO 100

STORAGE 17

PROJECT SPACE 27

FLEXIBLE STUDIO 100

STORAGE 17

CLASSROOM 100

FLEXIBLE STUDIO 100

STORAGE 17

SEMINAR ROOM 54

FLEXIBLE STUDIO 100

STORAGE 17

CLASSROOM 100

STORAGE 17

CLASSROOM 100

FLEXIBLE STUDIO 100

STORAGE 17

FLEXIBLE STUDIO 100

STORAGE 17

FLEXIBLE STUDIO 100

AREA 47,945

PROJECT SPACE 27

PROJECT SPACE 27

PROJECT SPACE 27

PROFESSIONAL 69


THANKS FOR READING. CHRISTOPHER GARDNER CHRISGARDNER@UTEXAS.EDU 62 MAUJER ST.APT #4 BROOKLYN NY 11206



Chris Gardner Portfolio 2016