Page 1

fall2009 ISSUE no.1

winter 2009 dwellings


7 10 14 16 20 24 28 46 54

color muse & mutter sketchbook design spur reality bytes: eunha choi some assembly required 3 c : city hostel seattle theme: dwellings old school: Leah giberson ideation


i n t Hi s issue

Sarah Louden Clare Rosean Myriam Tapp Sandra Lucia Builes Rachel Brady Brittany Marcoux Ingrid Marrero Kasia Ozga John Troxel Maria Bologna Quoleena Sbrocca

latin for to create • a quarterly, online magazine that explores visual culture from the student perspective • on a mission to create real-world opportunities for burgeoning artists to explore the collision of art and culture • dedicated to empowering students to interpret their world, cultivate discussions, and inspire others while sharing their own work • a venue for students to be active participants rather than passive recipients of their world.

A special thanks to all the student artists who contributed to this issue.

Share your perspective.

Find out how at www.creomagazine.com

Original photograph by Flickr user karpov the wrecked train


dwell


Vector images by Eduardo Recife

The ache for home lives in all of us, the safe place where we can go as we are and not be questioned. {Maya Angelou}


“Young Photographers Alliance is a global community where young photographers connect with the inspiration, resources and contacts they need to build successful and sustainable careers as the great artists and communicators of the future.”

vol .

00

6

1

YOUNGPHOTOGRAPHERSALLIANCE.ORG

issue

N o . 02

creomagazine.com


Upload a photo and let Pictaculous analyze it and suggest a color palette. To make your workflow that

much smoother, download an Adobe swatch file from the suggested palette. You can also snap a picture with your

Modern History is a series of collages, by artist Josh Poehlein, assembled exclusively from screen grabs of YouTube videos. This is a work in progress and the site will be updated as new pieces are finished. “I am offering large files for personal printing at no cost. Computer files are the most

iPhone, email it to COLORS@MAILCHIMP.COM

and your color palette will be sent to you. WWW.PICTACULOUS.COM

easily reproducible information on the planet. In this particular case I see no reason to imbue a false sense of preciousness on the work. The information I gathered to create the collages is publicly available, and the collages themselves are no different.� WWW.JOSHPOEHLEIN.COM


vol .

00

8

1

WWW.BACKSPACE.COM/INFODESIGN.PDF.

issue

N o . 02

creomagazine.com

Designers and programers come together to illustrate how government works...“The Sunlight Foundation is committed to helping citizens, bloggers and journalists be their own best watchdogs, by improving access to existing information

and digitizing new information, and by creating new tools and Web sites to enable all of us to collaborate in fostering greater transparency.� For more information and how to get involved visit SUNLIGHTFOUNDATION.COM.


LL

L

IL

W

Be

any ve ha n’t and do in you live ot n if e you u’re o o aus d t ec worl in, y ing ,b h te the live anyt era lit g of you ress lse. e p in ly re ral tand ultu o ex body cher tu s S c t y n a a cul nder he ing aul t go u -P

issue

N o. 02

vol

creomagazine.com

9

R G

.O

U

YO

AD VO CA

T E

YO

U

R

CA U

Info graphics are a quick and straight-forward way of illustrating information...but only if done well. For some free guidelines and inspiration, dowload this free ebook.

F Ill rom R ust a de igh rat di Be sig ts ed sta m ll, ne by Bi nc ka an re r, em ll o e, Af lei da sem Ph er f th ter do las b ilip gin m g ap oug a sco or les i c co uch pa h, lo pe in ns m ra re it b ser s. al o di nt e lo ie to ore f A a d c t es m nab dia . U re l p ha om ok o , pr at t t e g i e am ne gn rica le r ram tiliz es te he s en rns se en of t rep ns ight th ing B t dm he re , e s e gr ell w en firs sen ach th ad is a ea her t e t u ts t s In Sh rn e t a r Ar stit Ma te ece . en de ow ed his t i ut ryl fro nt co sig ” “B se n e an m m n for es ri s Ba C d h ow me at gr t o es lti olle W . m g W . nc the ap f W 001 or e .P em 2 hic e of H IL en 00 IP BE t 9

W

HO

S E?

C o l o r muse & mutte r


1 vol .

00

10

issue

N o . 02

creomagazine.com


Sandra Lucia Builes

Miami, Florida • Ringling College of Art and Design

Page”

issue

N o. 02

1

Watercolor +Marker

vol .

(above) “Chanel”

Watercolor+Marker

00

(left) “Ellen

11

creomagazine.com


“Working with

charcoal, pencil,

ballpoint pen, and

marker, I did several sketches analyzing

the shapes that make up a clothespin...My main focus was on

the teeth & spring that are distinct to

the clothespin. These

two elements are what distinguish

a clothespin from something like a

vol .

00

12

1

safety pin.�

issue

N o . 02

creomagazine.com


Maria Bologna Detroit, Michigan Wayne State University & College for Creative Studies

excerpts from “ Icon

Book�

vol .

N o. 02

00

issue

1

graphite, ink, photography & digital design

13

creomagazine.com


D esiGn s pur

is a call to action. How can you use your creativity to inspire change? Each issue will pose a design challenge. The goal? To create a solution that promotes awareness in your own community.

Make your own plantable seed paper and use it to create tear-off flyers that encourage urban beautification within your community. This interactive design campaign will allow people to “tear-off” your message and pass it on, or plant the paper themselves and watch the seeds grow. Just how will your message get on the paper? Well, that’s up to you - be creative - not everything has to be printed. Consider embossing or stitching. But if you want to write or print on the paper, don’t forget to use natural or organic inks.

Submit your designs and images of your flyers in action to editor@creomagazine.com by December 31. We’ll feature some brilliant ideas in our next issue.


RESOURCES

images by Flickr user dev nul & Julia Manzerova

seed paper directions

eco-friendly art supplies

about.com www.handmadenews.org urbandebris.typepad.com

www.stubbypencilstudio.com www.ecoartworks.com www.realmilkpaint.com www.earthandrowan.com

*search “how to make flower seed paper�


A VIEW FROM THE OTHER

SidE eunha choi talks about her

experiences after art school

vol .

00

16

1

Eat (from Illusion of my Dollhouse) 2007

issue

N o . 02

creomagazine.com


when did you graduate from sva and what did you study?

I graduated with a degree in Computer Art from the School of Visual Arts in 2009. I focused on Multimedia, Motion Graphics, and Video. As a recent graduate, what are your plans or goals as an artist?

Professionally, I’ve worked as a designer at Nail Gun, a Broadcasting and Motion Graphics Company based in New York. It was a wonderful chance to collaborate with creative people. Personally, I will create experimental visual storytelling integrated with unique illustrations, sound, and interactive play as a new cinema form. What was the best piece of advice you received as a student?

While I was taking an illustration class at the Art Center College of Design, I became stuck trying to build up my ideas and I made various excuses about how impossible it was to build concrete ideas. This limited the creative results. My teacher, Jason Holly, told me, “There is no ‘should be’.” This sentence penetrated and rooted in my mind. What do you wish you had learned in school (or paid attention to) that would help you today?

I always struggle with storytelling. When I watch my animation in a public theater, I wonder if people can understand my story. If I could attend school again, I would concentrate on story development. It is crucial for me to adopt a strong structure in my art and film. Besides finding a job, what has been the greatest challenge since graduating?

Learning how to advertise my artwork has been the biggest challenge for me. I didn’t learn about self-marketing in school. After graduating, I realized I needed a bridge between my artwork and real world. So, I began to submit my work to film festivals and art programs. You were selected for this year’s Chicago International Film Festival? What was the process like? What did you learn from it?

vol .

N o. 02

00

issue

1

One of my friends recommended Withoutabox, which is an online service for film festivals. I researched many festivals that match my work, like experimental art film festivals. Chicago International Film Festival created one movie section, Animation Nations, which is a strong short animation collection. Selected works are examples of unique and powerful visual story telling. I learn again the most significant point in movie making is what I observe and how to represent it, and sharing my animation with the public is the greatest motivation for creating the next project.

17

creomagazine.com


vol .

00

18

1

Recipe for Revenge Red Fire Heavy Memories issue (from Red Revenge) 2009 o. N 02

creomagazine.com


r eali ty by tes

a view from the other side

Describe your concept for “Red Revenge.”

Based on quirky, yet poignant vignettes from pre-adolescence, Red Revenge is a surreal animation that takes us on a journey through a woman’s trials and tribulations while coming into her self, as she sinks deeper into her psyche and comes to a startling self-revelation. This story represents the complex psychological emotions lifted from Freud’s Dream Theory and helps us to understand our own coming of age stories. It is also a personal narrative derived from real experiences and visualizations derived from my diary and doodling. How did you develop your illustration style?

When I’ve faced working on paper, I’ve made efforts to be honest, only representing the story with mood. I love the moods in the films of Fritz Lang and David Lynch. I enjoy the ways of expression in collage works. Juxtaposing each element, like pictures and hand drawings, creates an unexpected new world and form. In addition, some soundtracks are my biggest inspiration for representing my images. In this tough economy, how are you creatively marketing yourself?

It is tough at this time. However, I’ve tried to submit my animation to some film festivals, galleries, and film productions. Fortunately, I caught a chance to participate as a graphic designer and animator in an independent short movie, Our Daily Life, which is an environmental documentary. This experience led to another short film, Fantastic Glass Portrait, directed by Arkii Mun Jung. It’s often suggested to have a thirty second “elevator speech” prepared at all times. What’s yours?

I became an artist to create picture stories. Mostly I pick up dream fragments, which relate to my subconscious and are affected by my mundane life. This expands and influences my art works, like my animation, Red Revenge. My perspective on art forms, illustrations, and experimental animation can solve problems and project questions to people in terms of an interesting subject, real and beyond real.

vol .

N o. 02

00

issue

1

For more information about Eunha Choi and her work visit www.ilikeeunha.com.

19

creomagazine.com


WILL

fo r

CREATE FOOD

DIY Marketing

• prepare a thirty second elevator speech (and memorize it!) • create a mobile portfolio on your cell phone • shoot a stop-motion animation and post it on YouTube or Vimeo - see if it can go viral • submit your work to blogs and leave comments on those that you read

vol .

00

20

1

• make an interactive promo piece - like an activity book, a postcard with a 3D image (make the glasses, too), or a kit that has to be assembled issue

N o . 02

creomagazine.com


s ome as sembly r eq u ir e d wo rks in prog r ess

FOLDED BOOK SCULPTU RES


1. Find a book or magazine

2. Fold each page

Choose small format magazines

Start from the middle and work your

that have many pages (over 100).

way out - it’s easier to manage than

This is a great way to use the

starting at the beginning. Take the

Reader’s Digest subscription your

lower right corner of your page and

grandma bought you! If you use

fold it up to make a triangle. Do the

a hardback book, you will need

same with the upper right corner.

to remove the hard cover. Using

When you’re finished, your page

a craft knife, open the cover and

should look like a triangle.

cut where the first page and spine meet.

vol .

00

22

1

What happens to the form if you fold the pages into something other than a triangle? What if

issue

N o . 02

creomagazine.com


s ome as sembly r eq u ir e d wo rks in prog r ess

3. Manipulate the pages

4. Glue it together

Once your book or magazine pages

At this point, you have two options:

are folded, it’s time to alter your

glue the form onto a base (wood,

form. Cut the pages into different

foamcore, etc.) or glue the front

shapes, curl the paper, shred the

and back together to create a full-

tips - anything you want. Use craft

round sculpture. For magazines you

punches to remove negative space

will need to glue two together. For

and glue them on somewhere else.

books, just bend the spine and glue

See if you can create a spiral effect.

the front and back.

vol .

N o. 02

00

issue

1

each individual page was folded into a different shape? What types of patterns would this create?

23

creomagazine.com


what we’re going to do here is go back, way back. watch the dust lift off the windows while paint peels off in thick curls. witness the luster return and the unique beauty emerge once again. the stage is set and the doors of seattle’s historic lorraine hotel open to reveal a new cast of characters.

The makeover of a neglected neighborhood icon into an international hostel continues to be a dream in progress for Lee Kindell, who operates the property with his wife, Nancy Gambin. It started with a big picture observation: In order to have a true global community, travel is essential. “This is an issue in the United States,” said Kindell. “We don’t have a global view because we don’t travel as much.” At the epicenter of that experience is culture - food, daily life, language, and, of course, art. By providing a friendly, social accommodation for the budgetconscious traveler, Kindell hopes to encourage Americans to travel and, while doing so, shine a light on Seattle exclusively.

enter city hostel seattle.

1 vol .

00

24

seattle was a major film center in the 1920-40s with more than fifty theaters. from the 1920s until the 1960s, belltown was the center of the film industry issue northwest. in the pacific o. N 02

the lorraine hotel became a neighborhood landmark, as it was located in the middle of film row, where theater managers from throughout the northwest came to meet studio

{excerpted from the department of neighborhoods on seattle.gov} creomagazine.com all images courtesy of City Hostel Seattle

representatives to select films for their theaters. reportedly, many of the managers, the studio representatives, and the movie stars on publicity tours, stayed at the lorraine.


C O MMUN I TY • CREA TIV ITY•CO LLA B O R A TIO N CitY host eL seatt Le

N o. 02

vol .

issue

00

To give a “collective voice” to the local art scene, the lobby boasts a gallery for emerging artists as well. This public venue is merely the beginning of what this Belltown neighborhood can come expect. Kindell sees City Hostel Seattle as a catalyst for other creative ideas like hosting local bands and poetry readings. A public sculpture space is already in the works. And the garden houses a large screen for outdoor movies; the perfect stage for a budding filmmaker.

1

The result is an art collective inside the walls of a hostel. Much more than standard metal bed frames in sterile cubes, the heart of this project is the art within the rooms. Murals or installations created by 47 local artists surround travelers in nearly every space. From local, established names to emerging students to graffiti taggers, the artists recruited are as diverse as the styles and moods they produced. Travelers will find themselves pulled into densely layered worlds inhabited by colorful creatures or surrounded by the familiarity of more classic figures.

25

creomagazine.com


But inspiring travelers through local culture is only half of the equation. Kindell also promotes fair trade and believes in sustainability, a model business ethic sure to inspire an entire community. Artists are charged zero commissions when their work is sold from the lobby gallery and work-trade opportunities are available as well. The building itself is partially run on solar power with plans to be off-grid in the near future. While the rainwater-collection system marries art and science, every opportunity to recycle or repurpose elements of the original hotel was captured during renovation. Old doors became tables; mailboxes turned into bookshelves. “The building,” Kindell described, “is recycled into itself.” The neighborhood, with its youthful vibe, seems relieved to see this historic landmark welcoming travelers again. One person’s dream in progress may just prove to ignite a little wanderlust in us all.

215

pgee davin spridgen and

205 one seven nine

314 video merlot and

217 vol .

00

26

1

John Osgood

issue

N o . 02

creomagazine.com


C O MMUN I TY • CREA TIV ITY•CO LLA B O R A TIO N CitY host eL seatt Le

218 soule

City Hostel Seattle • 2327 2nd Avenue • Seattle, WA {between the Space Needle & Pike Place Market}

reservations@seattlehostel.com or 1.877.8.HOSTEL rates: $30-$90 (tax included)

vol .

N o. 02

00

issue

1

Visit cityhostelseattle.com for a virtual tour of each room.

27

creomagazine.com


Vector images by Eduardo Recife

dwellings

shelterhomedig cribpadcasaten habitatretreat abodedenlovel rendevouzflop nestcastlebas bunkhomestead safetypadcasa tenthabitatret homedigscribpa lairshelternes


d w e llin gs gs nt t lair p se d a treat ad st


00

vol .

1

30

issue

N o . 02

creomagazine.com (below) 3rd Street Night Light, digital photograph (right) A Place to Call Home, digital photograph

Brittany Marcoux Portland, Maine The Maine College of Art

.001


1 vol .

N o. 02

00

issue

31

creomagazine.com


1 vol .

00

32

issue

N o . 02

creomagazine.com


.002

Clare Rosean Chicago, Illinois The School of the Art Institute of Chicago Eat an Oreo, oil on canvas, 18” x 18”

N o. 02

1 vol .

issue

00

(below) Gone With the Wind, 35mm color photograph (bottom) Roof Child, 35mm color photograph

.003

John Troxel Chicago, Illinois TC High School

33

creomagazine.com


1 vol .

00

34

issue

N o . 02

creomagazine.com


.004

Ingrid Marrero Mission Viejo, California California State University, Fullerton

vol .

N o. 02

00

issue

1

(bottom left) Beach, oil on panel, 9” x 12” (top left) Brickell Bay, oil on panel , 9” x 12” (below) Cove, acrylic and oil on canvas, 46” x 42”

35

creomagazine.com


1 vol .

00

36

issue

N o . 02

creomagazine.com


(left) White House I, digital photography construction (right) White House IV, digital photography construction

Rachel Brady Austin, Texas School of Visual Arts

.005


.006

Myriam Tapp Albuquerque, New Mexico University Of New Mexico

vol .

00

38

1

Maisons Intérieures (details) porcelain installation

issue

N o . 02

creomagazine.com

“...houses contain memories, imagery, histories, and dreams of those that live or lived within them. I believe that we, as people, carry our houses (like turtles) everywhere we go in a poetic sort of way.”


1 vol .

N o. 02

00

issue

39

creomagazine.com


1 vol .

00

40

issue

N o . 02

creomagazine.com


Untitled from Central Maine, Mid-August series 35mm color photograph, double exposure

Quoleena Sbrocca Miami, Florida Academy of Art University

.007

Sarah Louden Chicago, Illinois The School of the Art Institute of Chicago

.008

vol .

N o. 02

00

issue

1

(top left) Untitled, digital photograph (bottom left) Urban Trees, digital photograph

41

creomagazine.com


1 vol .

00

42

issue

N o . 02

creomagazine.com


Kasia Ozga St. Denis, France University of Paris 8 Donnez, wicker installation “The title is a play on words it means ‘give’ but the french word ‘nez’ also means nose. The work features two large noses sculpted out of wicker. The pieces are about 2 yards high and are open structures so that visitors can actually sit or stay inside of them.”

vol .

N o. 02

00

issue

1

.009 43

creomagazine.com


vol .

00

44

1

La Finca, watercolor & digital design

issue

N o . 02

creomagazine.com

Original images by Flickr users jenschaoter3, mury, and foxypar4

.011

Sandra Lucia Builes Miami, Florida Ringling College of Art & Design


nature vs. nurture neXt issue AVAILABLE FEBRUARY 2010 SUBMISSION DEADLINE: DECEMBER 31, 2009 GO TO WWW.CREOMAGAZINE.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION


After receiving her BFA from Massachusetts College of Art in 1997, Leah made her living as an interactive designer and art director in Boston for over ten years, painting only periodically. Thanks in great part to the audience she’s found through various online art sites, she has been able to paint almost full time since the spring of 2008. Her current body of work falls somewhere between the worlds of photography, painting and collage. She begins her pieces with photographs of seemingly ordinary and mundane scenes, which she then paints directly upon to distill and reveal the visually poignant moments that exist all around us, but are usually overlooked. Despite all the suburban scenes and mid-century modern design in her work, she was actually raised by artists deep in the woods of New Hampshire and now lives and works on the top floor of a sunny triple-decker apartment in Boston.

Caravan Series (Two) 2009, 9” x 12” x 2” acrylic, digital print, embroidery thread based on image by Ben Mountseer


(right) Komfort 2009, 8” x 8” x 2” acrylic, digital print based on image by Fred Quezada (below) Dungeness

Dwellings 2009, 9” x 12” x 2” acrylic, digital print based on image by Dave Mason

You started your career as an interactive designer and art director. What did you learn in those roles that now apply to you as a painter? I’m sure I probably learned lots of the useful skills you’d expect like managing my time, dealing with clients and presenting my work. What has influenced me the most however was that I discovered I didn’t want to spend hour after hour in meetings, commuting to an office, or only creating work meant to sell products for big corporations. Plus with the rapid pace of evolution in technology coupled with the demand for fresh content, most of my design projects had very short life spans on the Web. The money was great and the work could be interesting, but I started to feel like everything I designed was just evaporating into thin air. There was no lasting tangible evidence of my creations.

vol .

00

48

1

While I still do some freelance flash design projects, I now spend most of my time creating art that I can hold in my hands or hang on a wall, art that doesn’t require any special technology or username and password in order to view it, work that is clearly in my particular voice and I hope will resonate and remain relevant for years to come.

issue

N o . 02

creomagazine.com

All that said I am also the first to admit that the success I’ve found with my paintings and prints is in great part due to the exposure I’ve been able to find online for my work. So I suppose that learning how to work on the Web as a designer has helped to make it possible for me to work offline as an artist.


Although your work reflects otherwise, you were raised in what some would consider extraordinary surroundings. When did you start to take notice of ordinary, suburban environments? I grew up in a small town in the foothills of New Hampshire that was home to a number of farmers, artists, and craftspeople. My parents and many of their friends had grown up in the suburbs, but chose to raise their own children in the woods and took pride in making everything they possibly could by hand. Most of us lived in old farmhouses built in the 1700’s, we heated with and cooked on wood stoves, grew our own

food, wore lots of hand sewn, hand-me-down or thrift shop bought clothes and were surrounded by art and craft throughout our typically cluttered homes. Suburbia was both foreign and intriguing to me. It was a place I mostly learned about from TV shows and on trips to visit my grandparents or cousins. In 6th grade I began going to a regional middle school and met kids from nearby towns who lived in tidy homes with manicured front lawns, wall to wall carpeting, rec rooms in the basements, and shockingly polite parents. From my limited and naĂŻve perspective, the families in these homes all seemed so happy and at ease in their organized and seemingly predictable worlds.


1 vol .

00

50

issue

N o . 02

creomagazine.com


1 vol .

N o. 02

00

issue

51

creomagazine.com


There’s an interesting dialog between what you call “the ‘fact’ of the photographic image and the ‘fiction’ of the paint.” Did you intend for that same tension to be present within the subject matter as well – the fact vs. fiction of suburban life? Absolutely. The fact vs. fiction of suburban life continues to remain an object of fascination for me in my work and my life. Although the suburbs remain places I know of only second hand, the tension between the simplified facades presented to the world and the underlying complicated realities of life is the story I am most interested in exploring.

vol .

00

52

1

So many of your subjects are homes, but this last year you painted many camp trailers. What is it about these “homes” that caught your attention? issue

N o . 02

creomagazine.com

Despite the fact that I was raised to believe that camping in a trailer was environmentally irresponsible and


wasn’t “real” camping, I admit that the vintage travel trailers appeal to me on many levels. On the surface I am taken with their lovely curving lines and pretty colors, but I am also interested in the simplification of what we require to call a place, “home” and the desire to have that sense of home with us wherever we go.

that I’m an instant gratification addict, so posting to Flickr is a perfect fit for me. And while I usually love working from home, it can also feel pretty isolating at times, which makes these kinds of mini studio visits and exchanges with other artists a treasured part of my day.

Some of these trailers break my heart as they sit in disrepair on fragile supports, others look like they are still waiting for a trip to the moon despite the fact that (thus far) they’ve only found themselves at crowded campgrounds or parked indefinitely in the backyard. With all of them, there is the possibility of great adventures, without ever having to leave the comfort and perceived safety of home.

For further information about Leah Giberson and her work, visit www.leahgiberson.com. (previous) Lift 2009, 7.5” x 11.5” x 1.5” acrylic, digital print based on image by Jason Silvererk

(left) Metzendorf Your work also pays homage to postmodern design. 2009, 8” x 10” x 2” Who are some of your favorite artists/designers of acrylic, digital print that era? based on image by Fred Quezada Ed Ruscha and Gordon Matta-Clark continue to amaze and inspire me. Artist statement & images courtesy of the Artist.

If you were to paint your ideal home or environment, what would we see? The homes I love to paint most are not always the ones I’d choose to live in. We’re still in a triple-decker apartment, but dream about owning our own place someday. I’m still not sure if it would be an old farmhouse, a midcentury modern ranch or an artist’s loft, but with any of them I would want plenty of windows to let in light during the day, a wood stove to keep us warm at night and garden out back. How do you define success in terms of being an artist? Being able to make my art every day and pay the bills every month is a good starting point for me. What advice do you have for students who want to become professional artists?

N o. 02

vol .

issue

00

Other than that, I know I need interactions with other artists as well as deadlines to complete work. The internet has helped on both counts. Between blogs, online markets and social networking sites, we can now find venues to sell our work and ways to connect with an audience from around the world. Obviously the possibilities online are always changing, but I’ve been on a big Flickr kick this past year. To begin with, it’s amazing to be able to post work in progress or finished pieces and moments later start getting feedback. I admit

1

I really and truly believe that you need to do the work you love and do it everyday.

53

creomagazine.com


As a participatory

ART PROJECT,

Ideation starts with a single image. The idea is that everyone uses the same picture

to create a neW piece of Work. Print it out & draw over the top of it. Import it into your photo editing software and create a digital collage.

USE IT TO SPARK A NEW IDEA. You can download the file at

WWW.CREOMAGAZINE.COM. Send us pictures showing how you used the image and we’ll feature them ALSO,

VISIT THE WEBSITE TO FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN CONTRIBUTE

AN IDEATION IMAGE to be used in an upcoming issue.

Image by D Sharon Pruitt

on our website & in the next issue.


i d eati on

Un) i•de•a•tion [ahY-dee-eY-shUhn] (no or images the proCess of forming ideas


Š 2009 All rights reserved. www.creomagazine.com

Original photographs by Flickr users chaps1, Duchamp, karen horton, Lordcolus, miemo, sflovestory, and sholeh!!

CREO Winter 2009  

CREO is a quarterly, online magazine that explores the collision of art and culture from the student perspective. We are dedicated to empowe...

CREO Winter 2009  

CREO is a quarterly, online magazine that explores the collision of art and culture from the student perspective. We are dedicated to empowe...

Advertisement