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Web lecture goes global

SCENE

SPORTS

-iÂ˜ÂˆÂœĂ€ĂƒĂŠĂƒÂ…ÂœĂœV>ĂƒiĂŠĂƒÂŽÂˆÂ?Â?Ăƒ iĂŒĂŠĂŒÂ…iʓ>`˜iĂƒĂƒĂŠLi}ˆ˜

Economics and finance professor coordinates talks that reach students in Latin American countries.

The musical theatre senior showcase is Saturday, and will include pieces from multiple seniors.

Check out Sports for one columnist’s view on the month-long time of mayhem.

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NEWS

THE

AD MAJOREM DEI GLORIAM “FOR THE GREATER GLORY OF GOD�

CREIGHTONIAN 6ÂœÂ?ՓiĂŠÂ™ĂˆĂŠĂŠĂƒĂƒĂ•iĂŠĂˆĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠUĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠ>Ă€VÂ…ĂŠĂ“Ă“]ÊÓä£ÎÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊUĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠ"“>Â…>]ĂŠ iLĂ€>ĂƒÂŽ>ĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠUĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°VĂ€iˆ}Â…ĂŒÂœÂ˜Âˆ>˜°VÂœÂ“ĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠUĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°ĂŒĂœÂˆĂŒĂŒiÀ°VÂœÂ“Ă‰ 1 Ă€iˆ}Â…ĂŒÂœÂ˜Âˆ>˜

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Jesuit Pope Celebrated "- ĂŠ 1  ,/ Editor in Chief

  Ă&#x160;<1"7- Assistant News Editor

"-Ă&#x160; 1 9 Sports Reporter â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is our moment. This is our great opportunity.â&#x20AC;? No longer can Creighton be considered a mid-major school. On Wednesday, after weeks of speculation, Creighton University announced that it had accepted an invitation to join the new Big East Conference. Joining fellow newcomers Butler University and Xavier University, Creighton will belong to the basketball-centric conference that includes Marquette University, DePaul University, Georgetown University, Villanova University, St. Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s University, Providence College, and Seton Hall University. Creighton University President the Rev. Timothy R. Lannon was not in attendance Wednesday morning at D.J. Sokol Arena, as he was in New York City for the special Big East/Fox Sports press conference that included the other nine presidents of the Big East member schools. In a special video message for Creighton fans, Lannon explained why the Bluejays switched conference affiliations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Creighton has long believed that through the power of vision, we can achieve great things. Now those of us with big dreams have the opportunity to whet our imaginations to bring Creighton to a place of national preeminence and impact that was thought not possible just a few years ago,â&#x20AC;? Lannon said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We see an opportunity for greatness, and we believe that this new affiliation will enhance the visibility of the university through increased national exposure, improving our ability to recruit exemplary students and faculty and cultivate philanthropic opportunities.â&#x20AC;? Creighton University Director of Athletics, Bruce Rasmussen, also had a video message for Bluejay fans. He explained how Creighton was extended an invitation to join the Big East. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the past several months, the rare opportunity to join the Big East conference presented itself to Creighton University as a possibility,â&#x20AC;? Rasmussen said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Since then, we have evaluated the opportunities and exposures of this move and tried to look ahead ten or more years by evaluating trends in education at the college level, trends in division one athletics, and changes in things like economics, technology, and legislation. We sincerely believe this move will help us fulfill our vision not just for athletics, but for Creighton University as a whole.â&#x20AC;? The group of seven schools already in the Big East, dubbed the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Catholic Seven,â&#x20AC;? decided on December 15, 2012, that they wanted to split from the other members of the conference and form a new basketball-oriented conference while retaining the Big East name. For several months, there were rumors that Creighton was

ANNA BAXTER/THE CREIGHTONIAN

Ă&#x20AC;iÂ&#x2C6;}Â&#x2026;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;½Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;iVĂ&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Â?iĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x192;]Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x2022;ViĂ&#x160;,>Ă&#x192;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;iÂ&#x2DC;]Ă&#x160;>``Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;>Ă&#x2022;`Â&#x2C6;iÂ&#x2DC;ViĂ&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; °°Ă&#x160; -Â&#x153;Â&#x17D;Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iÂ&#x2DC;>Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;7i`Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;`>Ă&#x17E;]Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;VÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;iÂ&#x2C6;}Â&#x2026;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;½Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;}Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;iĂ?Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;v>Â?Â?° considered a contender for gaining one of the spots in the new conference, and that dream became a reality when the Big East offered Creighton an invitation last week. Creighton will depart from the Missouri Valley Conference on July 1 of this year. Except for a period of time when Creighton was independent between 1949-1975, Creighton has been a member of the Missouri Valley Conference since 1928. Leaving the Missouri Valley Conference will mean the end of conference games with schools such as the University of Northern Iowa and Wichita State University as well as playing in the annual Arch Madness basketball tournament in St. Louis. gain more exposure because it is now a member of a major conference that was features some of the finest educational institutions in the United States. Father Lannon explained how it was important to join other Jesuit and Catholic schools who had similar mindsets and goals, which is something that the Missouri Valley Conference cannot offer. From another perspective, Creighton goes from being the top dog in the Valley with the largest arena, best facilities, and one of the largest media markets, to the smallest media market in the Big East as well as the most Westward school. However that can all change, as there are rumors that the Big East wants to expand to 12 teams in the future. Potential schools that have been mentioned included

- Founded in 1907

MVC

- Headquartered in St. Louis, Missouri - 9 universities participting in 8 menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and 10 womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s NCAA sports - Second oldest collegiate athletic conference - Butler was member until 1934

ANNA BAXTER/THE CREIGHTONIAN

i>`Ă&#x160;6Â&#x153;Â?Â?iĂ&#x17E;L>Â?Â?Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;>VÂ&#x2026;]Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;>Â?Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;]Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x153;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;ÂľĂ&#x2022;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;vĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x201C;i`Â&#x2C6;>° fellow Jesuit institution St. Louis University and Dayton University. Leaving the Valley for tougher competition excites athletic director Bruce Rasmussen. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We know that continued success and excellence in each of our athletics programs will not be easy. We chose to join the Big East not because it will be easy to be successful; we know it will be difficult.â&#x20AC;? Goodbye Bradley and Evansville. Hello Georgetown and Marquette. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a very exciting time to be a Bluejay fan and student at Creighton University.

Big East

Over spring break, the cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church appointed Pope Francis I as the new leader of the Church and all Catholics. Although this is big news for the Roman Catholic Church, especially after the resignation of Pope Benedict XVI, it is also important and significant for Creighton University. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had never in my wildest imagination [would] have thought that a Jesuit would ever be elected pope,â&#x20AC;? Fr. Michael Flecky, S.J., said. This is not an unusual reaction as Pope Francis I is the first Jesuit to be appointed pope. This is significant for Creighton not only because it is a Jesuit institution, but also because many students participate in service and emphasize justice for those who are less fortunate. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am greatly encouraged to learn that Pope Francis is a man who has experience and concern for the poor and common people, is not fearful, has a sense of humor and opennessâ&#x20AC;Ś,â&#x20AC;? Flecky said. Megan Lightfoot, a first year Pharmacy student and a member of the Catholic Student Organization, had this to say about a Jesuit pope: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pope Francis coming from the Society of Jesus is exciting, especially for students attending Jesuit schools. Pope Francis will be a true inspiration and example for all living out or studying Jesuit spirituality and the simplicity of St. Ignatius,â&#x20AC;? she said. Since 1061, cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church have appointed 225 popes. The worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cardinals, 115 of them present at the time of Francisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; appointment, appoint the next Bishop of Rome, who also has the title of pope. The person who is appointed has to receive two-thirds of the vote. In this case, Pope Francis I received 77 votes, according to Rev. Dennis Hamm, S.J., a Creighton professor of theology. Once the cardinals appoint the new Bishop of Rome, white smoke flows out of the chimney of the Sistine Chapel. James Doyle, a College of Arts & Sciences sophomore and the formation leader of the Catholic Student Organization, was in Rome over spring break and was in St. Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Square as the cardinals appointed and presented the new leader of the Roman Catholic Church. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You could almost reach out and TURN TO â&#x20AC;&#x153;POPEâ&#x20AC;? PAGE 3

- Founded in 2013 - 12 year contract with FOX Sports - 10 universities participating in new conference - Has had 20 Final Four appearances among member schools - Madison Square Garden will host the menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball tournament each year


THE CREIGHTONIAN

22 March 2013

NEWS ou In Case Y t... I d e s s i M

CU law faculty members to speak at ABA conference Four Creighton law facutly members will be making a trip to Chicago on April 3-6 to speak at the American Bar Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 15th annual Section of Dispute Resolution conference. This conference will be held at Fairmont Chicago Millennium Park and will serve as an opportunity for many leaders in this particular field to come together and share various ideas and perspectives on the topics at hand.

Medical students get residency match Creighton fourth-year medical centers were palced within their respective post-doctoral training programs at this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s national medical Match Day which took place on Friday. 94% of the fourth-year medical students eligible to participate in Match Day were placed into their desired areas of choice. 19 CU students were placed into a pediatrics program which is an all time high for this area of speciality. To see what else you missed, log on to creightonian.com.

WEEKLY CAMPUS

SAFETY REPORT

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Despite some students concerns and protests, Campus Recreation has maintained the new policy.â&#x20AC;?

- Grant Engrav and Kara Stockdale, Letter to the Editor page 6

7iLĂ&#x160;VÂ&#x2026;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;}Â&#x153;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;>Â?  -7/Ă&#x160;/**/ News Reporter Dr. Charles Braymen from the Department of Economics & Finance gave a lecture on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Global Perspectives in U.S. Business Educationâ&#x20AC;? to foreign students attending Universidad Iberoamericana en Leon, Mexico via Elluminateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s video live stream. This lecture was the first of its kind at Creighton. According to Maria Mena, Creighton coordinator for the Dual -Immersion for the Modern Languages and Literatures (MLL) Spanish program, this lecture, which is part of the Department of Modern Languages and Literaturesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Dual Immersion Project, was prompted by a request she had received for a webinar in international business for students in a Mexican university delivered by a member of the Creighton faculty. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Dual -Immersion Project at the Hitchcock Language Resource Center (HLRC) offers students real time interaction with native speakers of Spanish,â&#x20AC;? Mena said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is called the Dual-Immersion because students collaborate with their Latin American partners at mainly Jesuit universities to learn each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s language and culture via video chat.â&#x20AC;? The Dual-Immersion Project operates under the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities (AJCU) including those in Latin America. Creighton senior Jared Dorhout, an Economics & Finance major, assisted Dr. Braymen with the lecture. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a unique opportunity as a student to answer questions posed by students my age from a foreign university on global trade and the importance of an international component on a business education,â&#x20AC;? Dorhout said. The lecture was delivered in English and lasted approximately one hour. According to Dorhout, it covered topics such as the importance of global trade, foreign direct investment, trade between the U.S. and Mexico, and an overview of the international component of Creightonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business curriculum. In addition to students in an Introduction to Business Class at Iberoamericana-LeĂłn University, two other Mexican universities, tuned in as well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dr. Braymen and Jared Dorhout did an outstanding job as a team, and having two speakers made the presentation very lively, â&#x20AC;&#x153; Dr. Olaf BĂśhlke, director of HLRC said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The potential for the HLRC [and communication via video chat] goes beyond languages because

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March 17 - 6:01 a.m. A room search was conducted in Gallagher Hall. Suspected marijuana was confiscated.

COURTESY OF OLAF BOLHKE

LÂ&#x153;Ă&#x203A;i]Ă&#x160;vĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2026;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;L>VÂ&#x17D;]Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;°Ă&#x160; Â&#x;Â&#x2026;Â?Â&#x17D;i]Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;>Ă&#x160;iÂ&#x2DC;>Â&#x2021; Â&#x;Â&#x2026;Â?Â&#x17D;i]Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;°Ă&#x160; Â&#x2026;>Ă&#x20AC;Â?iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;>Ă&#x17E;Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;i`Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;i>VÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;Â?iVĂ&#x152;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;>Ă&#x160;-Â&#x17D;Ă&#x17E;ÂŤi°Ă&#x160; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the network of people with similar interests that creates the potential of becoming a world communication hub among Creighton students and international students.â&#x20AC;? As for future plans, Mena explained that she will try to schedule a lecture given by a student or graduate student in the fall semester. In addition, according to BĂśhlke, their next project may deal with connecting foreign business leaders who would speak with

Ă&#x201C;

March 17 - 7:17 p.m. A room search was conducted in Kiewit Hall. Drug paraphernalia, suspected marijuana, and alcohol were confiscated.

Creighton students for free and without any cost of travel, a major benefit of web communication. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We could have lectures on any topic. And it could move in the other direction as well, for example Latin American professors talking to US students,â&#x20AC;? added Mena. For further information and to find out when these prospective lectures will occur, check the HLRC homepage in the Google calendar section.

Ă&#x17D;

March 18 - 12:04 p.m. A student reported that the passenger side of his vehicle was scratched and dented while it was parked on Florence Boulevard east of Opus Hall.

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Ă&#x201C;

To send a letter to the editor, email editor@creightonian.com Editor in Chief Josie Bungert

editor@creightonian.com Individual copies are free, but multiple copies carry a substantial charge.

Ad Manager News Editor Brittany Baldwin Dakotah Braun

Head Copy Editor Jacob Padilla

Online Editor Bobby Becker

Graphics Editor Social Media Editor Photo Editor Anna Baxter Annemarie Weiner Amanda Brandt

Scene Editor Elizabeth Dagle

Opinion Editor Evan Holland

Sports Editor Matt Bourgault

Faculty Adviser Kris Boyle

The full staff list is available at creightonian.com The Creightonian (USPS No. 137.460) is published weekly except during examination and holiday breaks for $8 per year by Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, Nebraska. Periodical postage paid at Omaha, Nebraska. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Creightonian, Hitchcock Communications Arts Center, Creighton University, Omaha, Nebraska, 68178-0119.


THE CREIGHTONIAN Brittany Baldwin, News Editor news@creightonian.com

22 March 2013

PAGE 3

Follow us: @CUCreightonian

POPE: Newly elected pope

brings Jesuit mission to Vatican touch the excitement of the people… when the white smoke went up, the place just erupted,” he said. He mentioned that there was so much joy and so much passion in St. Peter’s Square, even though it was raining all day. Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio, now known as Pope Francis I, is a pope of firsts. He is the first pope from the Western Hemisphere, more specifically, from Latin America. The biggest Catholic population is in Latin America. “I think this will be a game changer for Northern Hemisphere Catholics in the sense that his words and actions will be challenging to our comfort zones…,” Fr. Roc O’Connor, S.J., the rector of the Jesuit Community at Creighton University, said. O’Connor was “immensely surprised that [the cardinals] chose someone outside of Europe.” Although “John” and “Benedict” are the two most popular pope names, Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio will be the first pope named “Francis,” after St. Francis of Assisi. “And when the votes were up to twothirds, there is the usual applause, because I was elected Pope,” Pope Francis I said to the media. “My friend hugged me, kissed me and told me: ‘Do not forget the poor.’ And that word entered me: the poor, the poor. Then, immediately, in relation to the poor I thought of Francis of Assisi.” Poverty and the poor were central themes in St. Francis of Assisi’s life. “[Pope Francis I] has a special concern for ordinary folks, especially the poor,” Hamm said. As archbishop of Buenos Aires he lived in an

COURTESY OF THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND

Jorge Bergaglio became Pope Francis after being elected by the College of Cardinals on March 13. Above, the new pontiff waves to the specators gathered in St. Peter’s Square the night of his election.

Newly elected Pope Francis I, formerly a Jesuit, focuses on the Jesuit value of “Men and Women for and with Others” as he emphasizes the role of the poor in the church.

apartment, cooked for himself, and used public transportation to go to work.” Several of the Jesuits and students on campus are excited to see what Pope Francis I’s leadership will bring to the Roman

Catholic Church. In terms of the pope’s influence on Creighton, O’Connor doesn’t think “he will help Creighton’s seed in the NCAA or recruiting of

ANNA BAXTER/THE CREIGHTONIAN

scholar-athletes…it’ll be interesting to see what sort of student might be attracted to CU in the wake of his election, really.”

OT, Law, PT, Pharm schools ranked among best in the nation KAYCE VAVEREK News Reporter The U.S. News 2014 Best Graduate Schools rankings recently recognized several of Creighton University’s graduate programs. The ranking evaluated more than 1,200 programs in business, law, medicine, engineering and education —including specialties within each discipline — based on a number of different criteria. Admissions selectivity and expert opinions on the program quality were part of the equation for most programs, while job placement statistics and salary data factored into others according to usnews.com. According to Victoria Roche, dean of the School of Pharmacy and Health Professions, these rankings send a positive message to potential applicants about the quality of a Creighton Occupational Therapy (ranked No. 15), Physical Therapy (ranked No. 16), and Pharmacy (ranked No. 37) education, in addition to existing as a point of pride. “High rankings in the U.S. News and World Report’s Best Graduate Schools issue is a public validation of what they [students and graduates] already know to be true — that they received a values-based, high quality health professions education at Creighton that will serve them well, not only upon graduation, but well into the future,” Roche said. Senior Pharmacy student Emily Deters said she has been through the admissions process and seen the selectivity first hand. “Creighton does an excellent job of looking at the candidate as a whole and not just their GPA or entrance exam scores,” Deters said. “This strategy has worked very well for Creighton, especially the College of Pharmacy and Health Professions. Pharmacy students here have had a

100 percent pass rate on their boards for the last five years in a row.” Deters added that it’s excellent to have this national recognition so people don’t have to just take Creighton graduate student’s word for how excellent the school is. Creighton’s School of Law also made the rankings, coming in at No. 19. Prospective Creighton law student Alie Haflett said that this news confirms her decision to come to Creighton and reminds her that she will be receiving a quality education.Haflett said she did a lot of research on other law schools, but her decision ultimately came down to where she felt she would get the attention and encouragement that she needs to succeed. “All of the deans, professors, alumni, and current students that I have met thus far since my admittance to Creighton have assured me that this is the environment where it will happen,” Haflett said. While there may be other law programs that rank higher than Creighton, Haflett acknowledged, the number of students that end up attending those colleges are much larger and students become just another face in the crowd at that point. “I think I’m most looking forward to the small class sizes and the community that I feel from everyone involved in Creighton’s law program,” Haflett said. “I’m excited to enter an environment where everyone wants to be there and is giving 100 percent.” Haflett believes that Creighton’s School of Law is much more than the ranking even shows. “It’s in a safe city, where the cost of living is so low compared to other larger cities harboring the bigger and higher ranked law schools,” Haflett said.

REASONS TO TAKE SUMMER COURSES: - Affordable: 1/3 off fall/spring tuition rate

- Selection: Over 400 courses to choose from - Online: Expanded online course offerings


THE CREIGHTONIAN

22 March 2013

SCENE

Elizabeth Dagle, Scene Editor scene@creightonian.com

Students show musical talents Fast track CAMERON TRACE Scene Reporter While most seniors around this time are looking ahead for the next few months, letting their last college days slip by without too much stress, and taking the last couple classes they need to graduate, two musical theater majors have been working hard to create one last memory here at Creighton. Arts & Sciences seniors Ariel Talacko and Veronica Benton will be showcasing their amazing talents in one culminating performance on Saturday in the Lied Center for the Performing Arts. There will be selections from their individual portfolios that they will later use for auditions. Talacko and Benton are the only two graduating B.F.A. Musical Theatre students this year and the girls’ voice teacher, Diane Owens, suggested they do a senior showcase as a way to display their talents before they graduate. Talacko has been a part of both choral groups offered here at Creighton (University Chorus and Chamber Choir) and is a member of the Creighton dance team. She is also Vice President of fundraising for the theater fraternity, Alpha Psi Omega, and has been in countless musicals, including “Funny Girl,” where she played Fanny Brice this past fall. Upon graduation, Talacko said she will continue to pursue performing in all forms, while following her dream to work for Disney in their musical performances. However, she said that any opportunity to perform would

VERONICA BENTON Arts & Sciences senior

ARIEL TALACKO Arts & Sciences senior

be amazing. “I would be so grateful to be able to earn a living doing what I love, wherever that is,” Talacko said. Veronica Benton is also a member of Alpha Psi Omega, and is a recipient of the Grace Keenan Endowed Scholarship. She was most recently seen as Ruby, the lead in “Dames at Sea.” Benton has interned with the Broadway Dreams Foundation in both Omaha and New York City on the “Express Yourself Tour” “It has been a wonderful learning experience and has really challenged us beyond the music people will hear the night of our showcase,” Talacko said. “I think that having had that opportunity to put on a show like this has been a very valuable experience and has definitely provided me with the opportunity to use a number of skills that are sure to be useful beyond my Creighton career.”

Talacko and Benton have been planning this showcase for a year now. They solidified it by the beginning of last semester, and final choices for music were made over the holidays. “The structure of the recital is going to be interactive between the Ariel and Veronica, rather than them and the audience, which is a little different,” Stephen Sheftz, said conductor and musical director here at Creighton University. He said the best things about working with the girls has been their enthusiasm for their selections of literature and the passion behind the pieces. “They feel like they connect well with the pieces and that makes a huge difference in their singing,” Sheftz said. The showcase promises wonderful talent and the spectacular demonstration of various styles of vocal technique. It will be a great cross section of musical theater literature. There will be music from relatively new musicals, as well as some classics and even some Disney selections.

Where: Lied Education Center for the Arts When: Saturday, 7:30 p.m. How much: Free PHOTOS COURTESY OF WILLI WHITE

Omaha coffee: Offering the best of the best Sometimes Creighton’s old Green Mountain cup of coffee just doesn’t cut it. For those looking to expand their coffee horizons and try something new, I went off the beaten mall and composed a list of some of the best coffeeshops in KATHLEEN the Omaha area. AMBRE From family-owned Assistant Scene staples and non-profits Editor starters to hipster hidden gems, you’re sure to find a new favorite spot for your caffeine fix.

3rd: Urban Abbey

Just a couple years ago, Soul Desires bookstore, longtime Old Market staple, opened their doors to a new partnership. With the help of the Nebraska Conference of the United Methodist Church, Urban Abbey became part bookstore, non-profit coffee shop and faith community. I am in love with the unique concept of Urban Abbey, whose mission is to support other local non-profits like Project Interfaith and Nebraska AIDS Project, but their local artisan coffee is just as great. Beansmith fairtrade coffee and founder Chris Smith has been with them from the very beginning. From Jim the barista and Michelle the book

keeper, to Debra the executive director who often visits for community partner and church meetings–everyone involved with Urban Abbey is warm and inviting. Founded on principles of social justice and sustainability, not only is the coffee freetrade, but everything from tables, chairs and shelves are recycled from reclaimed wood. This place has a lot to offer and at prices lower than your average coffee shop, without all the extra specialty drink options, the mochas and lattes are a steal.

2nd: Caffeine Dreams

Yes, the coffee is good and tea is even better, but I go to Caffeine Dreams for the eclectic atmosphere. Every barista seems to have their own backstory struggling artist working to make ends meet, mellow slam poet, the vegan dude who loves to bake and play his bongos. I suppose this place is a “hipster” alternative to Scooters, Starbucks and Crane coffees. Their menu has a lot of variety, gluten-free options included, and various works by local artists can be seen on every wall. The “Pipe Dream” regular coffee is always a safe choice, but my go-to is their chai latte. There are plenty of people who come to study, some just chat, others sketch. Personally, I don’t find the seating especially comfortable unless I luck out on a comfy armchair. But, it’s not nearly as busy in the morning if I want to snag a study spot. As the weather gets warmer, I definitely recommend the outdoor

patio garden.

1st: 13th Street Coffee Co.

I’m just going to say it, hands down best coffee. Sure, parking can be a pain just like any Old Market locale, but it’s well worth it. 13th Street Coffee is the only family-owned coffeehouse left in downtown Omaha and their family-friendly service speaks for itself. A coffee order can quickly turn into a conversation about music or the new arrivals at the Flying Worm Vintage just down the road. The ambiance is cozy and laid back, there’s a witty sign that reads “friends don’t let friends drink at Starbucks,” it’s a great place for people watching, the upstairs area is a hidden gem of a study spot, the gelato bar is most definitely a plus and the entire wall of coffee bean varieties to choose from is daunting in the best possible way. For those of you who aren’t coffee drinkers, don’t fret, they also have an impressive tea selection. Local art is sold right off the walls, supporting Omaha artists, and they are always open to up-and-coming poets, artists or musicians who want to feature their work. A downtown comfort zone with great coffee and the kind of service that instantly makes you feel like a regular, 13th Street Coffee Co. is definitely a place where you can lose track of time. For more of Kathleen’s top five Omaha area coffee shops, check out “The Creightonian” online at www.creightonian.com.

to a fallout

In college dating takes on a whole new meaning. Things get way more intense and move much faster, the amount of KASSAUNDRA hookups usually HARTLEY outnumbers Scene Columnist the amount of relationships, and lastly there is an entire new vocabulary you have to comprehend. We all know that relationships move faster in college, both physically and emotionally. Three months of dating in college is almost the equivalent to a year of high school dating. There are numerous opportunities to spend with that special someone from consuming all of your meals together to sharing a table at Reinhart and complaining about the construction. Lately it seems that the laws of the dating land have shifted on college campuses. Traditional dating has taken a back seat to the no-commitment, friends-with-benefits type of relationships. The traditional days of going steady and wearing his class ring around your neck seem to be over. The problem is that college couples tend to rush from the getting-to-know-you stage to the we-are-married-and-practicallyliving-together one. The freedom of living without your parent’s restrictions can become addicting. The more intense it gets, the more it hurts when it ends. Slow it down; not only can you lose yourself if you spend all of your time with a significant other, but you also lose the time you’d spend meeting others and potential lifelong friends. Just be sure to make room in your busy love life for the rest of your college experience. How exactly do you slow down and stop yourself from causing a fall out and chasing them off? Treat them as merely “one,” instead of “the one.” You may really like them but it is always a good idea to play it cool and not be overly intense and smothering. Always make sure the both of you are on the same page and see where each of you is at with the other. It may seem awkward at first to bring up the “so where do we stand,” conversation, but in the end it is worth it and can prevent you from getting hurt. Take Elvis’ words to heart, “Wise men say only fools rush in..” and slow it down.

The

Dat in g Scene

?

?

Question of the Week...

?

“What did you do over your spring break?” “I went to Sioux City for a service trip and worked with Habitat for Humanity.”

“I cheered on the Jays in St. Louis, then stayed in Omaha and played Mario Kart for a week.”

Sarah Janes Peter Frei Arts & Sciences sophomore Business senior

“I spent time with family and friends!”

“I spent time with family and friends!”

Brittany Gilbert Arts & Sciences junior

Andrew Prystai Business sophomore


THE CREIGHTONIAN

22 March 2013

PAGE 5

Follow us: @cu_scene

Java Jay: Delicious food not without fault KATHERINE JOYCE Scene Reporter As a Sophomore living on the first floor of McGloin, I am a step away from the small little Java Jay coffee shop. Despite the close proximity and easy access, it was not until recently I decided to have my “You Only Live Once” moment and try the much-talked about Java Jay Taco Salad. With their vegetable base, salads tend to lead others to believe I’m trying to eat “healthy.” Instead, it’s the guilty voice of the slices of pizza I put away for lunch telling me that I ought to make a visit to other food groups that don’t involve so many carbs. As I waited in line, I deliberated whether or not to back down and go for my usual melted cheese covered Philly sandwich. Long lines gave me time to think as I moved slowly up towards the holy grail cash register. Getting in line around 4:30 p.m. would help avoid the dinner rush and waiting. After putting in my order I found a table and then continued to wait as four other Katherines received their orders. Sitting with a couple of friends, I decided to forgo a Po-Boy sandwich and eat my first Taco Salad. I had to agree it was a nice onestep up from normal green and leafy meals. While conversing with two other Arts & Sciences sophomores, Audrey ZuerleinJohnson and Alexis Tafoya, I found that they

normally order the legendary Beef Taco Salad. “It’s like eating a taco, but seems healthier,” Zuerlein-Johnson said. Though they agreed on the deliciousness of the Taco Salad they had different complaints about the service. “Waiting in line (is always a problem),” Tafoya said. “They are always out of everything,” Zuerlein-Johnson said. As students grow up, many move off campus and less frequently eat on campus. Junior, Alicia Cook, however continues to eat at Java Jay. She does have some suggestions. “I would improve the soup selection or open till 8 for meal exchange,” said Cook. Another part of Java Jay that Cook talked about was the back study room. Students can escape the noisy eating environment sometimes found here by sitting in the study room. Both Cook and Tafoya found they eat at Java Jay about once per week. “I wish I thought to eat there more,” Zuerlein-Johnson said. One thing we all agreed on was that Java Jay is unique in the type of food that is offered and what hours of the day they are open. Even after dinner hours are over, Java Jay is most well-known for its late night snacks. Right when it hits 10:30 p.m., many students decide to take a break from their studying to

ANNA BAXTER/THE CREIGHTONIAN

Located in the basement of McGloin Hall, Java Jay offers a variety of sandwiches and salads for Creighton students tired of the monotony of traditional dining halls. line up for delicious chocolate chip cookies that are even comparable to their Mom’s homemade cookies. While Java Jay may be small, its unique food options make it a great option for when students like myself don’t feel like putting on a heavy coat and trucking it through the snow and wind to Brandeis Cafeteria or Warehem Court. Java Jay is no Panera Bakery with a diverse menu, assembly-line speed, and

convenient hours. However, I am grateful that when I eat at Java Jay, I can leave my Michelin-Man coat in my room and show up with just my ID-card, shorts, a t-shirt and a lot of patience.

Java Jay

Disney classic stampedes into Orpheum Theater NICOLE JELINEK Guest Reporter Simba, Nala, Timon, Pumbaa and the rest of the characters of Disney’s the Lion King are being brought to life by Broadway. Broadway follows the plot of Disney’s story of young Simba as he grows, matures and learns lessons in life. Including that famous phrase “Hakuna Matata,” performed by Timon and Pumbaa, who offer some comic relief in this emotional drama, the story of “The Lion King” is enough to bring a woman in the audience to tears. The dancing and chemistry created by the cast is strong enough that the audience can feel the emotions, whether it’s love, anger, sadness or the happiness of a young cub. The entire cast and crew deliver a mixture of sounds, settings, movements and music that create a work of magic. It’s not a far stretch to believe magicians are at work. The head tilts, body sways, and other animalistic movements, combined with the colors and details of the costumes, leaves it difficult to determine where the cast member

ends and the costume begins. At times you would believe there are lions on stage. The audience is brought into scenes as elephants, giraffes and other animals parade down the aisles to the stage. Birds and the beating of the drums from the balconies fill the air so at times it’s difficult to decide where to look. Even the grass was entertaining. The visuals of the musical are just as stunning as the sounds, with layers of scenery, lighting and shadows that seem to play tricks on your mind. I was left feeling like a kid, in awe. Performances are located in the Orpheum Theater at 409 South 16th street until April 9. Tickets start at $50 per seat.

Where: Orpheum Theater 409 South 16th Street When: Now through April 9 How much: Starting at $50

The Creightonian Peeps contest continues! The contest continues through April

2 at 5 p.m.

All appropriate entries will be featured in the April 5 issue.

$5 OFF

your purchase of $10 or more Expires April 5, 2013. See store for details.

Starting April 5, go online to www.creightonian.com to

vote for your favorite!

Email your submissions to editor@creightonian.com For full contest rules and an example, check out the PDF of our March 1 issue on www.creightonian.com

Located in Midtown Crossing 3201 Farnam Street, Suite 6107 Omaha, NE 68131


THE CREIGHTONIAN

22 March 2013

Evan Holland, opinion@creightonian.com

OPINION

Follow us: @cu_opinion

Paying too much to play GRANT ENGRAV 3rd Year Law Student KARA STOCKDALE 3rd Year Law Student Creighton’s Campus Recreation Department implemented a new payment policy at the beginning of the fall semester. Despite some students concerns and protests, Campus Recreation has maintained the new policy. The changes substantially increased the cost to participating students. For example, prior to the change, a participating soccer team was required to pay a total of $80. Today Campus Recreation assesses a $25 charge to each individual student. The $25 fee is assessed without consideration of the number of sports the student participates in. When asked, an individual working for Campus Recreation stated that the purpose behind the policy was to incentivize students to play more intramural sports. However, this stated purpose is not in the best interests of the students. If Campus Recreation’s goal is more student participation, then it should decrease costs, not increase them. Instead, the policy seems to be based on a concept which could aptly be called financial entrapment. Their hope is that students will feel committed to the high $25 price and as a result will sign up for more sports to make the most out of their investment. Campus Recreation has neither the right nor the justification to attempt to control student’s behavior through financial devices. They certainly are justified in advertising IM sports and activities, but this policy has crossed a line. Students should be able to choose how many sports they play without undue financial pressure to play more than they have time for. Campus Recreation fails to realize we are here to be students first, not

Review part of bigger issue

athletes. Those who have time for only one sport are being penalized for having other priorities and commitments. Under the old system, a student who chose to play one sport might have to pay $5 for participation in a sport. However, under the new system, that same student will have to pay $25. For the 99 percent of us not wanting to play five sports, this new policy simply serves as a reason not to play IM sports at all. Campus Recreation has further attempted to justify the change by citing problems team captains had with collecting money from teammates. This excuse is weak. First, Campus Recreation has inflated the problem. Most IM teams are groups of friends and collection is hardly burdensome. Second, the purported solution to the problem has created more hardship on students than existed beforehand. Historically, IM sports have been a service provided purely for the enjoyment of the students. This new policy is inflexible and injurious for students. A creative solution has the potential to serve the needs of both Campus Recreation and students. One possible solution is to give students the option of paying per sport or choosing the $25 pass option allowing them to participate in as many sports as they choose. The authors of this article encourage you to express your opinion on this issue with the Creighton Students Union. The president, John McCoy, can be reached at csupres@creighton.edu.

Visit www.creightonian.com to read our regularly published student columns Stone Age Cartoons

In the Feb. 22 issue, the Scene Section ran a review of Runza restaurants, entitled “Overrated Runza disappoints.” Below is a reader’s response to Jacqueline Lo’s piece. MICHELLE SKAFF Arts & Sciences senior I am writing you in response to “Overrated Runza disappoints,” an article by Jacqueline Lo that was published in the Feb. 22 issue of “The Creightonian.” There were many things about this article that bothered me, but one part made me so upset that I felt the need to bring it to your attention. I will return to that point shortly. At first glance, I was confused as to why someone would choose to critique Runza in a “Scene” article. Runza is a fastfood chain, and although it started as a place for serving to the ethnic German food, it has become pretty Americanized. Critiquing Runza is like going to McDonald’s, Culver’s or Taco Bell and expecting the heavens to open up and drop the most delicious meal ever in front of you. It’s not going to happen. It’s greasy, convenient fast-food and everyone knows it. There’s no need to complain about Runza not having a delivery service or Runza “forcing their customers to drive into the cold weather to hang out with the sketchy fast-food crowd” because it’s fast food and that’s all it’s ever going to be. The article went on to read, “As a Westcoast resident, it is frustrating that Nebraska glorifies mediocre sandwiches and burgers like Runza’s. There is a whole world of foods to try and I have spent many of my weekends wanting to try something beyond the frozen section of Wal-Mart or Sodexo menu.” Reading this part made absolutely no sense. There are plenty of ethnic food places near Creighton’s campus, yet Ms. Lo chose to eat at Runza. That’s her own fault. Sure, Nebraskans love Runza — whether it’s because of the food or because it’s more of an identity/ cultural thing is another issue. But Nebraskans

Letter Editor

also love ethnic food. Obviously Ms. Lo hasn’t tried too hard to find any of this ethnic food she’s been looking for and is passing judgment too quickly on Omaha’s food scene. She could have easily visited Katie’s Greek, Casablanca, Lalibela’s or Indian Oven, and that’s just the tip of the ethnic food iceberg. Omaha is a city rich in cultural diversity, and it doesn’t take much effort to find food choices that reflect this. I was most upset with (and actually ashamed of) Ms. Lo’s labeling and stereotyping, something that shouldn’t be tolerated and definitely not represented in Creighton’s student newspaper. She starts off by judging the “sketchy fast-food crowd” and pointing out a “bearded man wearing a thug-like beanie.” What difference does it make that someone has a beard and is wearing a beanie? And what made this beanie a thug-like beanie? She continues to say, with a tone of sarcasm, “It was great to be in the company of a homeless guy interrogating me … if I’m going to take the time to leave campus for dinner, I would rather shell out extra money so as to not feel like I had to defend myself with a sandwich.” Let me repeat myself: she’s in a fastfood restaurant. What does she expect? She’s going to meet people from all walks of life. A restaurant can’t deny customers based on the way they dress, and if Ms. Lo really felt like she was in any sort of danger or if she was being harassed, she could have let the management know. Instead, she berates a restaurant based on its clientele and unfairly labels a whole group of people based on one visit. I have a confession: I hate Runza — but I’m also not a Nebraskan so I don’t have a reason to feel a connection to it. My requests for Ms. Lo and future reporters are simple: stop perpetuating stereotypes and stop complaining without doing your research. “The Creightonian” is a representation of the Creighton student body, and it was a disappointment to see this piece of journalism as a reflection of the University. Free speech easily shows a person’s ignorance, and “The Creightonian” should hold itself to a higher standard.

by Ed Chapman

Quote of the Week “I want to be clear that because it certainly looks like there is progress being made and nobody expects a government shutdown, that we have every expectation that the Easter Egg Roll will proceed as planned. I hope that settles the matter.” - Whitehouse Spokesman Jay Carney


THE CREIGHTONIAN

22 March 2013

SPORTS

Matt Bourgault, Sports Editor sports@creightonian.com

A fond farewell to the MVC

Here is photo recap of Creighton teams that have won an MVC Championship in the last year.

ANNA BAXTER/THE CREIGHTONIAN

LEFT: Carli Tritz was a key player in the Women’s Basketball team’s victory at the 2012 MVC Championship. This year, after the MVC tournament, the team received an at-large bid and will play Syracuse on Saturday. BELOW: A Creighton baseball player slides into third in the Jays’ win over North Dakota during the 2012 season. The team went on to win the MVC Tournamet. This was the innaugural season at the new TD Ameritrade Park.

TEKA BUNDY/THE CREIGHTONIAN

ANNA BAXTER/THE CREIGHTONIAN

LIBBY VOGT/THE CREIGHTONIAN

ABOVE: Women’s Volleyball team celebrates during their best fall season in program history. TOP LEFT: Doug McDermott dribbles past Witchita State defender en route to a second straight men’s basketball championship. BOTTOM LEFT: Members of the men’s soccer team Sean Kim and Jose Gomez were leading players in the journey to the NCAA College Cup.

TEKA BUNDY/THE CREIGHTONIAN

Creighton goes dancing MICHAEL KOTROUS Sports Reporter Creighton women’s basketball head coach Jim Flanery awoke at 2:20 a.m. Monday with worry that would not allow him to fall back asleep. Over five months of practices, a tough nonconference schedule and an overall record of 24-7 were on the line Monday when the NCAA selection committee announced the 64-team field for the 2013 NCAA women’s basketball tournament. A 64-61 overtime loss to Illinois State University Saturday ruined Creighton’s opportunity to control its own destiny and claim an automatic bid into the NCAA tournament. Monday, the Bluejays could only sit in D.J. Sokol Arena with the Blue Crew, cheerleaders, pep band, family and fans and watch their fate be revealed. The Bluejays were projected to be among the final four teams in the field, but a bid into the NCAA Tournament is no guarantee without a conference tournament title. The Norfolk, Spokane and Bridgeport regions were announced. No Bluejays. The pairings in the top half of the Oklahoma City region were revealed. Still no Bluejays. Only two pairings remained: a 7-10 and a 2-15 matchup to be played in Knoxville, Tenn. “I knew we weren’t going to be a two- or a 15-[seed],” Flanery noted afterward. In the most unpredictable of moments,

Flanery’s prediction was spot on. D.J. Sokol Arena burst in a mixture of overwhelming joy and intense relief when Creighton (24-7, 15-3 MVC) was announced as the last 10-seed in the second-to-last pairing with 7-seed Syracuse (24-7, 11-5 Big East). The game is scheduled to tipoff in Knoxville, Tenn. on Saturday at 10:20 a.m. The game will be televised on ESPN2. Monday marked Creighton’s second at-large bid into the NCAA Tournament in program history. Flanery credits earning the at-large bid to his aggressive approach of scheduling difficult nonconference opponents. Creighton collected three victories this season against NCAA Tournament teams with wins against the University of Nebraska, the University South Florida and South Dakota State University. In all, the Bluejays played five NCAA Tournament teams in non conference play. To compare, Wichita State University, receiving the Missouri Valley’s automatic bid, played two NCAA Tournament teams and lost to both. “I feel like people doubted [Flanery],” junior forward Sarah Nelson said, “To see it payoff ... is awesome.” Flanery was relieved his approach to the nonconference schedule paid off in the end, too. “I’ll sleep better tonight,” he said.

THE

: CREIGHTONIAN Graduation Edition Order your senior ad for our special graduation issue of the Creightonian today!

Congrats, Billy! We’re so proud of you!

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Questions? Contact ads@creightonian.com for more information.


THE CREIGHTONIAN

22 March 2013

PAGE 8

MATT BOURGAULT Sports Editor

brackets, be sure to drop them off with your name in the Creightonian newsroom. I don’t think we have a prize for you, but I will call you a cheater to your face. Competiton aside, just sit back and enjoy another glorious month of basketball. It won’t be long until we all curse this university for destroying our brackets. The below brackets are courtesy of the NCAA and NCAA.com.

have decided to give everyone the opportunity to accomplish something even more impressive. Printed below are my brackets for the upcoming tournaments. I implore you to resist the immediate urge to frame them for your dorm room. Instead use them to compare to your own, and see if you can “beat the editor.” However, be prepared, there is only a miniscule chance you will do better than me. I am the Hoya Destroya of brackets, the Phi Slamma Jamma of March. Anyway, in the off chance you do best my

This is certainly an exciting time to be a Creighton Bluejay. For the second year in a row, both our men’s and women’s basketball teams have recieved a spot in the NCAA tournament. In honor of that great achievement, I

OUT OF BOUNDS

MEN’S BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP BRACKET

2013 NCAA Division I

®

Second Round

Third Round

MARCH 21-22

MARCH 23-24

Regional Semifinals

Regional Finals

National Semifinals

MARCH 28-29

MARCH 30-31

APRIL 6

FILL OUT YOUR BRACKET NATIONAL BRACKET DAY MARCH 18

National Semifinals

Regional Finals

Regional Semifinals

APRIL 6

MARCH 30-31

MARCH 28-29

PRESENTED BY Buick is an Official Corporate Partner of the NCAA®

Third Round

Second Round

MARCH 23-24

MARCH 21-22

First Four® 16 N.C. A&T (19-16)

First Round*

11 Middle Tenn. (28-5)

MW 11 St. Mary’s (CA) (27-6) MW

Mar 19, 6:40PM - truTV

Mar 19, approx. 9:10PM - truTV

16 Liberty (15-20)

DAYTON MARCH 19-20

16 LIU Brooklyn (20-13)

E

13 Boise St. (21-10)

W

Mar 20, 6:40PM - truTV

16 JMU (20-14)

Mar 20, approx. 9:10PM - truTV

13 La Salle (21-9)

Watch On

1 Louisville (29-5)

Mar 23

Mar 24

North

Missouri

Mar 21, approx. 9:20PM - TBS

9 Missouri (23-10)

Louisville

5 Oklahoma St. (24-8)

San Jose Mar 23

4 Saint Louis (27-6) Mar 21, 2:10PM - TNT

13 New Mexico St. (24-10) 6 Memphis (30-4) Mar 21, approx. 2:45PM - CBS

11 Middle Tenn./St. Mary’s (CA) 3 Michigan St. (25-8)

INDIANAPOLIS

St. Mary’s Mar 23

March 29 & 31

SOUTH

Florida

Final Four ®

NORTH TEXAS

Michigan St.

Minnesota

March 29 & 31

ATLANTA APRIL 6 AND 8

Austin

Florida

Mar 24

Michigan St.

Mar 21, 12:15PM - CBS

14 Valparaiso (26-7)

Philadelphia Mar 24

2 Duke (27-5) Mar 22, 12:15PM - CBS

15 Albany (N.Y.) (24-10)

Duke

Indiana

Louisville

1 Gonzaga (31-2)

Philadelphia

GeorgetownMar 24 Georgetown

APRIL 8

Duke

Indiana

Gonzaga

Mar 21, approx. 4:10PM - TBS

16 Southern U (23-9)

Mar 23

8 Pittsburgh (24-8)

Gonzaga

Indiana Gonzaga

5 Wisconsin (23-11)

Kansas City Mar 24

4 Kansas St. (27-7) Mar 22, approx. 3:10PM - truTV

13 Boise St./La Salle

Wisconsin

Syracuse

LOS ANGELES

Arizona

Mar 21, approx. 7:20PM - TNT

11 Belmont (26-6)

Mar 23

3 New Mexico (29-5)

WASHINGTON, D.C.

March 28 & 30

Salt Lake City

Arizona

Marquette

Ohio St.

7 Notre Dame (25-9) Mar 22, approx. 9:45PM - CBS

10 Iowa St. (22-11)

Mar 24

2 Ohio St. (26-7) Mar 22, approx. 7:15PM - CBS

15 Iona (20-13)

Ohio St.

Miami

*On March 17, the NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Committee will select eight teams to play the first-round games on March 19 and 20 in Dayton. The four winning teams will advance to a second-round site to be determined by the committee during selection weekend. Second- and third-round and regional sites will be placed in the bracket by the NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Committee March 17.

Ohio St.

4 Syracuse (26-9) Mar 21, approx. 9:57PM - truTV

13 Montana (25-6)

Mar 21, 12:40PM - truTV

11 Bucknell (28-5)

Mar 23

3 Marquette (23-8) Mar 21, approx. 3:10PM - truTV

14 Davidson (26-7) 7 Illinois (22-12)

Illinois ***ALL TIMES EASTERN***

Mar 22, 1:40PM - TBS

9 Temple (23-9)

6 Butler (26-8)

Lexington

Miami

Notre Dame Dayton

Mar 23

Marquette

New Mexico

Mar 21, approx. 9:50PM - TNT

14 Harvard (19-9)

8 NC State (24-10)

Mar 21, approx. 7:27PM - truTV

Butler

March 28 & 30

Watch the tournament on these networks or online at NCAA.COM/MARCHMADNESS

Mar 22, approx. 6:50 - TBS

15 Fla. Gulf Coast (24-10)

12 California (20-11)

San Jose

EAST

Indiana

2 Georgetown (25-6)

5 UNLV (25-9)

Syracuse

WEST Gonzaga

6 Arizona (25-7)

Mar 24

UNLV

Kansas St.

Mar 22, approx. 9:20PM - TBS

10 Oklahoma (20-11)

Mar 22, approx. 4:10PM - TBS

Indiana

Wisconsin

Mar 22, 12:40PM - truTV

12 Ole Miss (26-8)

7 San Diego St. (22-10)

16 LIU Brooklyn/JMU

Dayton

NC State

Pittsburgh

Mar 21, 1:40PM - TBS

9 Wichita St. (26-8)

Mar 22, approx. 9:57PM - truTV

11 Minnesota (20-12)

1 Indiana (27-6)

Indiana

Salt Lake City

6 UCLA (25-9)

Mar 22, approx. 7:27PM - truTV

San Diego St.

National Championship

Mar 21, approx. 7:15PM - CBS

13 S. Dakota St. (25-9)

14 Northwestern St. (23-8)

Florida

Creighton

Mar 22, approx. 2:45PM - CBS

10 Cincinnati (22-11)

4 Michigan (26-7)

3 Florida (26-7)

Florida Duke

7 Creighton (27-7)

Mar 21, approx. 9:45PM - CBS

Mar 23

Michigan

MIDWEST Louisville

Mar 22, approx. 7:20PM - TNT

9 Villanova (20-13)

12 Akron (26-6)

Auburn Hills

Michigan

8 North Carolina (24-10)

5 VCU (26-8)

VCU Oklahoma St.

Saint Louis

Auburn Hills

Caro-

Kansas

Oklahoma St.

Mar 21, approx. 4:40PM - TNT

12 Oregon (26-8)

Mar 22, approx. 9:50PM - TNT

16 Western Ky. (20-15)

Kansas City

Kansas

Louisville

Lexington

8 Colorado St. (25-8)

1 Kansas (29-5)

Kansas

Louisville

Mar 21, approx. 6:50PM - TBS

16 N.C. A&T/Liberty

Mar 22, approx. 4:40PM - TNT

10 Colorado (21-11)

Austin Mar 24

2 Miami (Fla.) (27-6)

Miami

Mar 22, 2:10PM - TNT

15 Pacific (22-12)

2013 NCAA Division I Women's BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP

Louisville

Purdue (24-8)

12 4

24-Mar, 12:10 p.m. ESPN2

Liberty (27-6) Oklahoma (22-10)

13 6

Columbus

23-Mar, 11:10 a.m. ESPN2

Central Mich. (21-11) 11 UCLA (25-7)

3

23-Mar, 30 min. fol. ESPN2

Stetson (24-8) Syracuse (24-7)

14 7

Knoxville

23-Mar, 11:20 a.m. ESPN2

Creighton (24-7) Tennessee (24-7)

10 2

23-Mar, 30 min. fol. ESPN2

Oral Roberts (18-12) Stanford (31-2)

Stanford

Tulsa (16-16) Michigan (21-10)

Louisville 26-Mar

Liberty

31-Mar

Liberty

8

24-Mar, 30 min. fol. ESPN2

Villanova (21-10)

9

Iowa St. (23-8)

5

31-Mar

Spokane

Gonzaga (27-5) Georgia (25-6)

4

LSU (20-11)

13

Green Bay (29-2) Penn St. (25-5)

11 3

24-Mar, 5:15 p.m. ESPN2

Cal Poly (21-10)

14 7

23-Mar, 30 min. fol. ESPN2

South Fla. (21-10) California (28-3)

10 2

23-Mar, 4:20 p.m. ESPN2

Fresno St. (24-8)

15

Connecticut NATIONAL CHAMPION

New Orleans April 7

31-Mar

Duke

3 Texas A&M (24-9)

Oklahoma St.

23-Mar, 4:05 p.m. ESPN2

14 Wichita St. (24-9) 7 Oklahoma St. (21-10) 24-Mar, 30 min. fol. ESPN2

10 DePaul (21-11) 2 Duke (30-2)

26-Mar

Duke

24-Mar, 12:05 p.m. ESPN2

Connecticut

23-Mar, 30 min. fol. ESPN2

16 Idaho (17-15) 8 Vanderbilt (20-11)

25-Mar

Saint Stanford

Connecticut

Spokane 1-Apr

Green Bay

Maryland

25-Mar

Maryland

Albany

% Subject to blackout restrictions

Delaware 26-Mar

Albany

California

Green Bay

23-Mar, 30 min. fol. ESPN2

12 Marist (26-6) 4 Maryland (24-7) 23-Mar, 11:15 a.m. ESPN2

13 Quinnipiac (30-2) 6 Delaware (30-3)

** ALL TIMES ARE EASTERN** All games available on ESPN3

Green Bay

23-Mar, 11:05 a.m. ESPN2

9 Saint Joseph's (23-8) 5 Michigan St. (24-8)

Bridgeport 1-Apr

Connecticut

Jo-

30-Mar

Marist

Connecticut

Gonzaga

South Fla.

Iowa City

23-Mar, 30 min. fol. ESPN2

11 Chattanooga (29-3)

1 Connecticut (29-4)

Connecticut

26-Mar

California

Chattanooga

15 Hampton (28-5)

Penn St.

25-Mar

23-Mar, 4:10 p.m. ESPN2

13 South Dakota St. (25-7)

6 p.m. ESPN

Stanford

Gonzaga

Green Bay

4 South Carolina (24-7)

25-Mar

South Carolina

Texas A&M Duke

26-Mar

Georgia

23-Mar, 30 min. fol. ESPN2

12 Kansas (18-13)

25-Mar

Villanova

25-Mar

5 Colorado (25-6)

Colorado

Chattanooga

New Orleans April 9

New Orleans April 7

30-Mar

Texas Tech (21-10)

Syracuse

6

24-Mar, 30 min. fol. ESPN2

Norfolk 2-Apr

Baylor

8 p.m. ESPN

Stanford

Notre Dame

24-Mar, 30 min. fol. ESPN2

6 Nebraska (23-8)

12

23-Mar, 30 min. fol. ESPN2

Montana (23-7)

Baylor

Syracuse

30-Mar 23-Mar, 4:15 p.m. ESPN2

Colorado Oklahoma City 2-Apr

Stetson

Tennessee

8 Miami (FL) (21-10) 9 Iowa (20-12)

31-Mar

25-Mar

25-Mar

24-Mar, 5:05 p.m. ESPN2

Miami

Notre Dame

Central Mich. Stetson

Syracuse

1 Notre Dame (31-1) 16 UT Martin (19-14)

26-Mar

Baylor

1 16

Notre Dame

26-Mar

Princeton

15

24-Mar, 5:20 p.m. ESPN2

Notre Dame

Boulder

5

24-Mar, 30 min. fol. ESPN2

Middle Tenn. (25-7)

Baylor

First Round

College Station

Louisville (24-8)

9

Second Round

Regionals

Durham

8

24-Mar, 5:10 p.m. ESPN2

Princeton (22-6)

Baylor

National Semifinals

Storrs

Waco

Florida St.(22-9)

16

National Championship

College Park

1

24-Mar, 30 min. fol. ESPN2

Prairie View (17-14)

National Semifinals

Regionals

Kentucky

March 23 and 25 first-/second-round sites: Boulder, Colo.; College Park, Md.; College Station, Texas; Columbus, Ohio; Knoxville, Tenn.; Lubbock,Texas; Spokane, Wash. and Storrs, Conn. March 24 and 26 first-/second-round sites: Baton Rouge, La.; Durham, N.C.; Iowa City, Iowa; Louisville, Ky.; Newark, Del.; Queens, N.Y.; Stanford, Calif. and Waco, Texas. March 30 and April 1 regional sites: Spokane, Wash. and Bridgeport, Conn. March 31 and April 2 regional sites: Norfolk, Va. and Oklahoma City, Okla. © 2013 National Collegiate Athletic Association. No commercial use without the NCAA's written permission. The NCAA opposes all sports wagering. This bracket should not be used for sweepstakes, contests, office pools or other gambling activities.

24-Mar, 12:15 p.m. ESPN2

11 West Virginia (17-13) 3 North Carolina (28-6) 24-Mar, 30 min. fol. ESPN2

Newark

Baylor (32-1)

Second Round

14 Albany (NY) (27-3)

30-Mar

Dayton Kentucky

26-Mar

Kentucky

7 Dayton (27-2) 24-Mar, 30 min. fol. ESPN2

10 St. John's (NY) (18-12) 2 Kentucky (27-5) 24-Mar, 12:05 p.m. ESPNU%

15 Navy (21-11)

Queens

First Round

Baton Rouge

After months of waiting and anticipation, the best time of the year is finally here: March Madness. The NCAA Tournament is truly a MICHAEL one-of-a-kind special HOLDSWORTH tournament. After Opinion Columnist roughly thirty regular season games, the championship resides on three crazy weekends of one-and-done basketball. Every year there are the Bracket Buster teams who appear out of nowhere and perform a miraculous one-hit wonder, much like Los Del Rio and the Macarena. Almost overnight casual viewers suddenly become bracket experts and people predict the craziest upsets, while pretending to know what would happen all along. The tournament has an incredible following, with almost Olympic-like devotion, only annually instead of once every four years. The company Challenger, Gray, and Christmas, Inc. predict this year’s NCAA Tournament is going to cause at least $134 million in lost wages for companies as people in the workplace watch the Tournament. ESPN’s Bracket Challenge yearly has upwards of 6 million brackets. All the hoopla over hoops though is well deserved as the NCAA Tournament is able to bring out the best in people for a couple of weeks. Consider the following: As a general rule of thumb, at least outside a favorite team, the underdog is always supported. No other time of year would people be willing to cheer for unheard of colleges, like Southern or Florida Gulf Coast, but suddenly during March Madness half of America (give or take) is suddenly behind these teams. It’s always exhilarating when the spunky little team from nowhere is able to show the elite that with determination and a little luck anything is possible. March is also the only time of year people willingly root for teams with nicknames like Jackrabbits, Gaels, Billikens, Hilltoppers, Zips, Blackbirds, and Explorers (all in this year’s tournament). The concept of teamwork trumping talent is found in the entire bracket. Many of the upsets are possible because smaller schools whose players have been together and built a sense of unity and belonging can more easily come together than the teams with half its players’ eyes on the NBA. The teamwork and unselfishness of 5 people is obviously going to be more powerful than 1 or 2 stars. Mid-majors get the chance to prove belonging. The “upper-crust” basketball schools might think they are a notch above, but more and more mid-majors are prevailing. If a team is in the tournament, no matter what they can’t be disregarded as every team enters with the chance to leave with their One Shining Moment. (On a side note, if 15-20 Liberty is able to scrape by North Carolina A & T, it’s probably lights out for the rest of the tournament field.) Every team is given a fresh start. Much like New Year’s for the general populace, every record is wiped clean to 0-0 with 6 games becoming all that matters. What happened in the past doesn’t matter anymore since that was used to get in the tournament, and quite frankly tournament teams are in for a reason. Teams can put bad losses behind them and focus on doing their best in the present. However, on top of the fresh start, teams still only get one loss before they are finished. The single elimination nature of the tournament makes it imperative for the best foot to be put forward, and to be able to handle pressure and make the best out of every situation. The NCAA Tournament is full of incredible metaphors to everyday life and a great example of the abilities of the human spirit. There’s no equal pageantry of the excitement of each game offering the opportunity for the glory of victory or agony of defeat. But above all this, the most important thing to remember for this March: Roll Jays.

Beat the editor challenge

Lubbock

Embracing March

Follow us: @sports_cu

Creightonian 3/22/2013  

Volume 96 of the Creightonian