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AMPLIFYING THE VOICE AND VISION OF YOUNG PHILLY

OCTOBER 2012


EMPOWERING YOUNG LIVES THROUGH ART Fresh Artists is an innovative nonprofit empowering compassionate, creative & capable young people to tackle the critical shortage of arts funding in our public schools.

ABOUT FRESH ARTISTS: Fresh Artists creates real–life opportunities for kids to engage as philanthropists, to exhibit their artwork in high profile places for decision–makers to see, and to deliver innovative visual art programs & art supplies to public schools struggling with shrinking art budgets.

Artist–philanthropist Juania at the headquarters of SAP America with a 6’ x 9’ reproduction of her artwork

HOW TO GET INVOLVED: 1

Corporations can include us in their corporate art program.

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Public schools can host our art education programs.

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Children can participate in our programs.

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Public school art teachers can apply for free art supplies.

Community members can donate, volunteer & share our message.

SEE WHAT WE’RE DOING:

www.freshartists.org

SEND US A MESSAGE:

info@freshartists.org

LIKE & FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK:

Fresh Artists is honored to work with the hundreds of children represented in its collection and the art teachers who ignite their creativity, inspiring them to share their stories. Through Fresh Artists, children’s brilliant artwork goes where they cannot. Their art stands like a sentinel, advocating for a quality public education for all children. We believe all children can succeed. Collectively, there is much we all can do to insure this outcome.

facebook.com/freshartists.org

FOLLOW US ON T WIT TER:

@freshartists


THE VILLAGE OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES THANKS ALL THE YOUNG ARTISTS, ACTIVISTS, JOURNALISTS AND ENTREPRENEURS WHO HELPED CREATE THIS MAGAZINE

Keep being creative. Keep making stuff. This magazine is for you.

To submit your work to the CRED 4, visit: credmagazine-philly.com To subscribe or send a gift subscription email: cred@villagearts.org


CRED PHILLY IS CRED Philly is a tri-annual arts and culture publication dedicated to promoting and publishing the work of Philadelphia’s young artists, writers, performers and activists. The contents of CRED are created, submitted and curated by individuals ages 25 and under who live in the Philadelphia region.

THE OLD(ER) STAFF

THE YOUNG(ER) STAFF

“The Mixtape” contains written and photographic contributions from:

Chief Editor and Creative Director Aviva Kapust

Managing Editor Heather Jones

Junior Music Executives

The Village of Arts and Humanities

Art Director/Designer Gina Swindler Rebecca Blessing

Executive Director Elizabeth Grimaldi Programs Director Aviva Kapust Business Manager Jordan Kocak

Street Team Attiah Brockington Briana Fennell Jamar Dorsey John Hargrove Leon Sanford Raheem Reeder Tyree Scott

SPECIAL THANKS TO

THIS ISSUE IS FUNDED BY

SUBMISSIONS

The Arts Blog

The Knight Foundation DonorAdvised Fund

credmagazine-philly.com

BAJ Design/ex;it Bus Stop Fresh Artists Mighty Writers Mural Arts Program Philly Earth Sabrina’s Café Salon on 4th Vision Mortgage Capital

Philadelphia Cultural Fund Youth Arts Enrichment Impact100 Philadelphia The Village of Arts and Humanities … and all our new subscribers.

CONTACT CRED CRED is based at The Village of Arts and Humanities: 2506 N. Alder Street Philadelphia, PA 19133 215.225.7830 x206 cred@villagearts.org

Village Clay Workshop

COVER ART Andy Hood, 23 Mail Pig Adventures #1 Ink


IN THIS ISSUE STREET CRED 06

MUSIC 20

08 URBAN ZOMBIE 10

CAFÉ BLUE MOOSE

11

KAYUH PEDAL

12

EPIC ADVENTUREZ

14

STICK AND MOVE

16

PHILLY HOODS

18

YOUNG-FASHIONED

22

TITLE FIGHT

24 GOING UP 26 ILLA STRAIGHT / DIZZLE 28 YOUNG PHILLY SPINS

THE PORTFOLIO 30

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STREETCRED Street CRED is young Philly’s unique perspective on the people, places and local businesses that nourish our neighborhoods. This issue profiles some of Philly’s most dynamic, up-and-coming artists, athletes, entrepreneurs, activists and performers.

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URBANZOMBIE By Katherine Boline, 22 When we think about “makeup” our minds automatically invoke decked-out runway supermodels or the smoky-eyed Kardashian sisters. But Cindy Comerford’s interest lies far from what society considers “beautiful.” This 23-yearold Philadelphian is not typical. After spending four years at Scranton University, Cindy is now finding that her bachelors degree in psychology goes hand-in-hand with her favorite brand of fake blood. From zombies to wrinkled up faces, making beautiful people ugly is Cindy’s passion. With a few brushes and tricks up her sleeve, Cindy is able to give an everyday face a horrifyingly hideous edge. This fall, she is pursuing her dreams of becoming a special effects makeup artist at the Tom Savini School for Special Effects in Monessen, PA. While transforming the faces of CRED’s editorial team, Cindy told CRED about her gory obsession.

DOES YOUR INTEREST IN SERIAL KILLERS CREATE THE INSPIRATION FOR YOUR MAKEUP? You could say that. Zombie makeup is usually what comes to everyone’s mind when they think of special effects makeup. But I’m not just a person who’s into “zombie” makeup because it’s trendy right now. Zombie makeup is all about blood, guts, and gore. It definitely draws me in. I think it’s because I grew up watching a lot of horror movies, so it’s just second nature to me.

DO YOU FEEL LIKE COLLEGE WAS A WASTE? No. I think psychology and makeup are both forms of art. Neither is a precise science. Psychology was what I wanted to pursue when I was 18 but is no longer something I’m as interested in. I’m glad I had the opportunity to experience college, though. There are a lot of things you learn when you’re away from home.

WHY DO YOU PREFER TO MAKE SOMEONE UGLY RATHER THAN BEAUTIFUL? I think because it’s not the “norm.” It’s actually really hard work making someone look ugly. It’s more of a challenge than just slapping on mascara and, “BOOM” you’re pretty. There are so many different routes I can take with this type of makeup art. I can make you look like a zombie, an alien, a forest creature, the list goes on. That’s what I love about it—it’s not typical. I hate typical.

WHERE DOES YOUR INSPIRATION STEM FROM? Dr. Seuss and Tim Burton. They have totally different styles but I appreciate their work equally. I like their different aesthetic styles and how they challenge me intellectually. When you get older, you realize Dr. Seuss has many adult themes that you aren’t aware of when you’re young. It kind of makes you rethink everything you knew as a little kid. Tim Burton and Dr. Seuss keep you guessing and keep you thinking. I like the mystery behind it. THIS MAY BE OFF-TOPIC, BUT WHAT IS THE STORY BEHIND YOUR JACK THE RIPPER TATTOO? Initially, I got it because of my attraction to psychology. Deranged people have always interested me. There was this whole period where I was obsessed with researching serial killers. I knew all the facts about them because I just thought they were fascinating. Jack the Ripper was the first serial killer I was really interested in.

I ENJOY MAKING PEOPLE LOOK

HOW DO YOUR PARENTS FEEL ABOUT YOUR CHOICE TO GO TO MAKEUP SCHOOL? A part of me went to college just to please them. I thought they’d freak out when I told them I wanted to go to makeup school, but they were totally okay with it. They said “whatever makes you happy.” I’m certain they appreciate that, this time, I’m taking the initiative to cover my own tuition. I’m going to think things through a little bit more before I make decisions. Not only that, but I also want to be able to truly say I’m doing things for me. For more info, contact: comerfordc2@gmail.com


STREETCRED Photography by Morgan Gilbreath, 21

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YOUNG GOURMET It’s 7 o’clock and Café Blue Moose is packed with foodies and BYOB-ers from New Hope, PA. Young servers move from the upper dining room, down the stairs, to the lower dining room and then into the kitchen. They emerge with beautifully plated French cuisine from the restaurant’s European-style prix fixe menu. You wait for a mature, silver-haired chef to emerge from the kitchen to greet his customers, but at Café Blue Moose, you’d be waiting until your soup à l’oignon got cold. No one that works at this hotspot is older than 25. In fact, the founder-owner-head chef-manager, Skylar Bird, just celebrated his 20th birthday. In 2006, Skylar and his friend, Patrick Rodgers, launched Café Blue Moose in his parents’ backyard. Just two 14-year-olds with ten chairs and four tables, serving meals to family and friends. It was a humble beginning, to say the least. “Today, we are still humble. But now, we own a lot more chairs,” says Skylar. “When I started the restaurant, I knew almost nothing about cooking. I quickly realized that for the restaurant to achieve its full potential I would need some training.” After finishing high-school, Skyler worked under chefs at restaurants in Bucks County, France and New York City and attended culinary school. Except for four months when he was in France, Skylar continued to run the Café on weekends. Last year, he ventured out on his own again. Café Blue Moose re-opened its doors in 2011 with a staff comprised of high school and college students from the New Hope area. Skylar’s objectives were clear: serve amazing

NEW HOPE’S CAFE BLUE MOOSE By Emily E. Steck, 20

food; teach young people about food and cooking; help them make a little cash; and run a profitable, well-respected restaurant business. At any age, running a successful restaurant is daunting: it requires a balance of business savvy and culinary art skills. Skylar has the added challenge of mentoring his young employees in culinary technique and training them on the best practices of good customer service while ensuring that the dining experience remains top-notch. “The managerial work is most chal-lenging. I have to be about 50% boss and 50% friend,” he explains. “What my team lacks in experience, they make up for in energy. It’s their top quality.” This energy, juxtaposed with refined French cuisine is one of many unexpected features that set Café Blue Moose apart from the typical trendy new restaurants. The style of food is directed towards adults, yet the atmosphere is appealing to young and old alike without being unbearably hip. Each week the main entrees change, taking advantage of locally grown food and the head chef ’s creativity. Diners are encouraged to take advantage of the BYOB—so long as they don’t ask the underage staff to open their bottles! Skylar describes his decision to start his own restaurant at the age of 20 and hire a staff of his peers as, “probably being a little weird.” Whether weird, or just a great idea—Skylar seems to have set Café Blue Moose on a smooth path. For more info visit: www.cafebluemoose.com

Photography courtesy of Caf Blué Moose


KAYUH PEDAL BIKES, BUSINESS AND THE AMERICAN DREAM Photography by Ryan Powell, 24

By Darrien Johnson, 14 As a child, Izzat Rahman, 23, was encouraged to find adventure and make his mark on the world. Izzat traveled thousands of miles to Philadelphia and found that his adventure was more than he hoped for. Surrounded by wheels, chains and pedals, Izzat tells CRED what it’s like to start up a bike shop from nothing.

WHY DIDN’T YOU MOVE BACK TO MALAYSIA? I was faced with the choice of going solo or going home. I wanted to stay here to prove that I could make the best of it and build something out of nothing. I didn’t know too much about bikes, so I was really stepping out of my comfort zone.

developing quickly enough for us to add an organic café. Because I’ve had a strong learning curve with bikes, I’d like to master that service before venturing into another—that way, my model is sound.

WHAT PROMPTED YOU TO MOVE TO THE US? I

HOW CAN SOMEONE WITH NO INTEREST OR EXPERTISE IN BIKES START A BIKE SHOP? I became a sponge

WHAT IS THE STRANGEST THING THAT HAS HAPPENED TO YOU AT THE STORE? I’m pretty amused when

and learned everything I could about bikes. I interned at another bike shop; my co-worker, Paul, mentored me. I started fixing bikes on my own; selling them to kids on campus and recruited Paul to come work with me. Sometimes acting like you know what you’re doing can build your confidence and convince others that you can handle whatever comes your way.

people come into the store and ask if we sell or fix bikes.

was born in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and lived there with my two older sisters and our parents. We grew up learning English and were encouraged to travel to the U.S. for school. I applied to the American Degree Transfer Program at Fox School of Business at Temple University, and came to the U.S. to study and find adventure. There’s a pretty big Malaysian community in the U.S., so the culture shock I experienced wasn’t terrible.

WHAT MADE YOU DECIDE TO START A BIKE SHOP? My friend and I had to come up with a business plan for one of our classes. We designed a hybrid bike shop and organic café aimed towards local college students. Our professor wasn’t impressed, but we decided to enter it into Fox’s Spring 2011 Business Competition anyway and the positive feedback we received was overwhelming. We had planned to start the business, but my friend moved back to Malaysia after graduation.

WHAT SETS KAYUH BIKES APART FROM OTHER BIKE SHOPS? We focus on honesty. Every person who walks in my shop gets a true assessment of what they need. Ripping people off isn’t what we do here. We make our profits by providing good, reliable service and promotions. We sold 6 bikes within the week after starting our promotion—far exceeding my expectations for the first 3 months.

DO YOU ANTICIPATE EXPANDING TO INCLUDE A

CAFÉ IN THE SHOP, LIKE YOU PITCHED IN YOUR ORIGINAL BUSINESS PROPOSAL? North Philly isn’t

WHAT KEEPS YOU MOTIVATED? It’s only been three months since we’ve opened. This is a fledging business that could fall apart easily. That’s what keeps me in check and makes me push harder. I know that my mom really misses me because I’m her only son. She owns her own boutique so I know firsthand what it means to stay determined in the face of challenge. WHAT ADVICE CAN YOU OFFER FOR FUTURE ENTREPRENEURS? Find people to work with that have the same values and principles as you and who truly care about the business. Also, find people to work with who are experts in what they do. You can’t be good at everything. Learn more about Kayuh Bikes at: kayuhbicycles.com

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STICK AND MOVE Q+A WITH PHILLY STICKER ARTIST, QCKND

By Camille Ferruzzi, 20 Plastered across the streets of Philadelphia lives a goopy little gumdrop named Gummy. While you may have seen Gummy hanging around downtown, you probably haven’t seen the artist behind those cute little eyes. “Qcknd,” who prefers to only be addressed as such, is part of the underground street art scene—decorating the city with her Gummy character one news bin, telephone pole and trashcan at a time.

What kind of materials do you use? My favorite materials are free ones! Postal materials are a classic, but any adhesive paper will do. Lately I've just been painting over Sunoco stickers with house paint I found in a free bin at a yard sale. Are you solely a sTICKER artist or do you work IN other mediums? I am almost entirely a street artist. I did release a limited run of paintings over the summer, but that was only to generate funds to continue street art projects. I’m usually so busy with my next street art idea it feels wasteful to sit down and paint something that I can’t glue to a pole in Center City.

Why do you like displaying your work OUT on the streets? Because this way, my art can be accessed by everyone and there are no requirements. All of Philadelphia is my gallery, and I didn't even have to go to art school to get into “the scene.”

How do you decide where to put your stickers? When I started I would just put them in places I frequented, like school and my favorite coffee spots. But after exploring the city more my stickers sort of became my 'bread crumb' trail. Now I'm so acquainted with the city, I have stickers pretty much everywhere.

How do you feel about stickering and street art being illegal? Ha. I really wouldn’t know anything about that.

DO YOU REGRET putting a face to your work? When I started, sticker making was just a hobby of mine that I used to blog about along with my daily life. But as I continued making stickers, and posting more, it was almost too late to go back and separate my personal blog from my street art. At times I wish I could be more anonymous with my work. I believe I lost some respect from other street artists, and it put a lot of restraints on my work. But it's far too late to separate myself now, so I try not to dwell on it.

What is YOUR MOST memorable stickering experience? Over the summer I created a run of extra large, full box-stickers. One night, while crouching down next to a news box, trying to peel the backing off a giant teal Gummy, a group of seemingly drunk crust punks yelled from down the street, "Hey chick,

I like your hair!" I was a little shocked that people were watching, so I called back to them, "Hey, keep look out!" And without hesitation, this group of kids all got into position and stood guard while I wiped down the box and placed the sticker. I even had time to snap a photo. Afterwards I shook their hands, gave them a fake name and biked away. It was one of the weirdest, most random acts of kindness ever.

Do you have any long-term goals for your sticker Art? Expand and travel. I have plans to release another limited run of paintings that might give me the sort of funds to help Gummy and I travel the country, and go on a sticker frenzy.

WHAT advice DO YOU HAVE FOR someone who is just getting started in the street art scene? Get up, stay up, and don’t step on any toes.


100% AGE 18

ASKER AGE 17

SEEK AGE 16

R2F AGE 23

FOSTER AGE 19

YERP AGE 19

G-ROT AGE 16

KRISPY AGE 17

BASH AGE 12

BZAR AGE 24

EXIT AGE 13

STREETCRED

GLITCH AGE 18

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when the kids are here, they are heros.


STREETCRED

EPICADVENTUREZ LARPING IN CLARK PARK

By Heather Jones, 22

Running swiftly across the open field, Ari quickly swings his sword against his opponent’s lower leg. With a loud, guttural scream, his opponent falls to the dirt and remains still. At the age of 15, Ari has had more practice with a sword than most adults. He is poised, confident and most important, feels honored to defend his most valuable trait—his inner nerd.

While there are no explicit rules to free form LARPing, even the youngest kids seem to understand the boundary between playing around and acting-out violence. “I usually attack on their legs—no face and no real swords,” demonstrates Zahli, 10. “If someone gets hit, you pretend to die by falling and yelling, “ahhhhh!”

On Saturday afternoons, Ari and others like him meet at Clark Park in West Philadelphia. They are greeted with bags of foam weaponry and a set of guidelines from a group called Epic Adventurez. Nika, the 21-year old senior staff member, sees to it that everyone has a permission form and handles the gear properly. As Live Action Role Players, or LARPers, these people aren’t just playing around with foam swords and shields; they’re fostering a safe and welcoming community for all the wannabe wizards, knights, warlocks and, of course, average kids.

When a player is accidentally hurt, the tears and teasing that would normally occur isn’t anywhere to be seen. With a quick word of encouragement, players hop back into the game, focused on their next move. “We try and create a safe space,” says Chris, 17. “There will always be people here; it will always be a place where you can have friends and be safe and happy.” Beneath the battle cries of these young warriors, one benefit of LARP is not immediately obvious: for most of the LARPers, the Saturday afternoons spent at Clark Park are a time free from the teasing and misunderstanding they face at school and at home.

“Youth in this society spend a lot of time not having any power,” Nika explains. “They have to listen to their parents, their teachers and their older siblings. When they’re here they can be that wizard or that knight. They have the power. When they’re here, they’re the heroes.” Each week, the senior staff and volunteers at Epic Adventurez lead the community in freeform play and structured games. Running back and forth across the field, swords and shields in hand, the group barely notices the occasional wide-eyed passer-by. “Sometimes people might stare or point—this is where the mob mentality really comes in handy,” explains Ari. “In school I might deal with ridicule, but here I’m part of a community. Besides, this is a college area; someone’s always doing something stupid.”

“We had a camper this summer who was hyperactive,” Nika recalls. “At the end of the four-week camp his father came up to me and handed me $200. He told me that this was the first time his son had ever felt comfortable with a group of people.” Call it geeky or call it weird—sometimes battling with foam swords is all you need to feel normal. For more info, visit: www.epicadventurez.com

Photography by Gina Swindler, 20

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NEIGHBORHOODS PHILLY HAS OVER 150 NEIGHBORHOODS. HERE IS A LOOK AT NEIGHBORHOODS IN WEST PHILLY AND NORTH PHILLY THROUGH THE EYES AND WORDS OF YOUNG ARTISTS.

MY STREET Zipporah Mooney, Grade 4, Mighty Writers There are lots of dogs and cats on my street and the sidewalk has lots of dog poo on it, it even smells like dog poo. There are a bunch of trees. The houses are light-brownish. There are a bunch of plants like sunflowers, daisies, and lavender. The most important thing to know about my street is that I have lots of neighbors who are nice to me. My favorite neighbor is Girly’s mom. She has brown hair and eyes and wears brown clothes a lot. Everything is brown about her! She is great because she makes a whole tray of macaroni egg salad for holidays and birthdays. There are a lot of schools in my neighborhood and there is also a lot of trash. There are a lot of little kids you have to be careful not to run over, and there is a lot of crime. Last year a cop was shot and he died. They wouldn’t let us in our houses until they searched each family’s house. It took about 30 minutes. We waited till the police were done but I was still mad. Now you know about my street. Hope you can visit.

Mural was created by students 9 to 12-years-old at The Village of Arts and Humanities: Daisha, Josh, Eliza, Unique, Sanaya, Keeshawna, Kayleis, Kamaya, Nyshae, Rosemary, Lenani, Genesis Drawings by R. Finkelstein’s 2nd Grade Students at Ferguson Elementary School


STREETCRED

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YOUNGFASHIONED MONSTERFEET JESSE ROSS (MONSTER SHOES), 25, SHOES

WHERE’D YOU GET YOUR BARNACLES MICHELLE LATTNER, 20, JEWELRY

WHAT DO YOU WANT YOUR DESIGNS TO SAY ABOUT THE PERSON WHO WEARS THEM? I want my designs to read as unique pieces of jewelry that are not commercial or store bought. The person that wears them is someone that values handmade jewelry that is different than everyone else’s.

WHAT IS THE BEST METAL TO WORK WITH FOR BEGINNERS? Brass and bronze are great for beginners because they’re cheap and pretty easy to work with. The only downfall is that it’s not food safe and it turns your skin green!

CONTACT: cargocollective.com/michellelattner

WHERE DO YOU DRAW YOUR INSPIRATION? I use ideas and thoughts that stand out in my everyday life. Every pair of shoes is handmade and unique; they have their own lives. They’re wearable art that is meant to be worn until it’s destroyed. They have a life span—they’re born when created and they die when they wear out.

DID YOUR PARENTS EVER GET MAD AT YOU FOR DRAWING ON YOUR SHOES AND CLOTHES? No, I never really

SHERBERTSHORTS KAYLA CAFARELLA (THROWN AND SEWN), 21, APPAREL WHERE’S YOUR GO-TO SECRET SPOT FOR SHOPPING IN PHILLY? I love Buffalo Exchange. I love the concept, the clothing, and the prices. That place makes me release endorphins. Gets my creativity going.

got in trouble with my folks for painting on my clothes—or anything else. It was always OK to draw on whatever worked for my idea. The walls of my room where always changing— being painted over and over again.

WHERE DO YOU DRAW YOUR INSPIRATION? Living in Philly has really inspired me. There are so many different people here who are not afraid to show who they are and project their personality through their clothes. I come from a small town where people wouldn’t dare make such bold moves.

CONTACT: etsy.com/people/jesseross

CONTACT: etsy.com/shop/OldNewNow


STREETCRED

FROM FASHIONABLE FEET TO HANDMADE HARDWARE, CRED PROFILES SIX OF PHILLY’S MOST CREATIVE YOUNG DESIGNERS.

PORCUPINE FLARE NOEL CHRONISTER, 22, JEWELRY

DO YOUR DESIGNS FOCUS MORE ON FORM OR FUNCTION? I think jewelry should be an even balance of both. I have seen some abstract jewelry based solely off of form and think it’s beautiful and unique, but that very few people will want to take the effort to wear it. There’s a way to make simple and functional jewelry interesting, and there’s a way to make couture jewelry wearable—it’s just a matter of striking a balance.

WEARABLE HARDWARE VAKARIS VAITKUNAS, 22, JEWELRY + OBJECTS

WHAT TYPE OF MATERIALS DO YOU LIKE TO WORK WITH? I typically use metals such as copper and sterling silver. Copper mainly because it is so malleable. It’s easily manipulated into the form and color desired. Sometimes I’ll use unconventional materials, like porcupine needles, to create a unique form.

CONTACT: noel.chronister@temple.edu

PLEDGE 1LLEGIANCE ZAK PARSONS (1LL SOCIETY), 22, APPAREL DO YOU CONSIDER YOURSELF A “FASHION DESIGNER?” No, not yet. I have a tremendous amount of respect for those in the profession of crafting and creating pieces from raw materials, and until I start to create the canvas I’m not quite there yet.

DESCRIBE YOUR CREATIVE PROCESS FROM START TO FINISH. Sketch. Lurk on Tumblr. Stare. Sketch. Lurk some more. Netflix. Coffee. Scan. Digital sketch. Hassle friends for critiques. Coffee. Revise. Hassle. Revise again. Netflix. Instagram. Revise. Read. Finish. Coffee. Hassle. Revise. Finish again.

CONTACT: 1llsociety.bigcartel.com

WHAT WAS THE FIRST PIECE OF JEWELRY YOU WERE PROUD TO SAY YOU MADE? I once made two small objects out of polymer clay for a girl that I liked. They were stylized heads of animals that I know were dear to her. It was a way of appreciating her patience with me after some conflicts in our friendship. She didn’t care to respond upon receiving the gifts… The End.

DO YOU DESIGN ANYTHING OTHER THAN JEWELRY? Yes, with the advent of 3-D printing anyone can now design and manufacture unique products in a variety of materials. It’s pretty magical and I am taking advantage of it. Besides that I am learning a bit about electronics with a dream of one day developing gadgets. CONTACT: vaitkunasv@gmail.com

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THEMIXTAPE Philly’s got no shortage of young and talented musicians. And with the help of Philly’s Junior Music Executives, CRED created a spot just for them. So read on, listen up and keep it loud—it’s time to show Philly’s young musicians some love.

Left: Malakai, Ground Up / Photography by Ian Hirst-Hermans, 22

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HARDCORE FROM THE STICKS


CREDMIXTAPE

TITLE FIGHT TAKES THE STAGE By John Stish, 25 Not too far from America’s favorite dry humored fictional paper company, Dunder Mifflin is a place called Wilkes-Barre, PA. Further down the road is a place called Kingston, PA. Doesn’t ring a bell? Ok, how about the Poconos? It may be familiar to some as mom and dad’s getaway on the weekends where the pizza is really good and people use local jargon like “Heyna,” which translates to “Is that right?” Many would consider this the middle of nowhere but the young men of DIY Hardcore outfit, Title Fight, call this home and claim there’s much more going on here than just quad-riding, tobacco chewing and the imminent demise of the English language.

cord deal with SideOneDummy and a spot headlining Warped Tour, while their oldest member is only 23-years-old. Ned, Ben, Jamie and Shane have all put their college careers from Temple, Tyler School of Art and Luzerne County Community College on hold since their first big tour opening for New Found Glory. So far, it seems like a pretty sound decision. Through the years they’ve really inherited the hardcore DIY ethics and are very prideful of their little town nestled in the mountains. “There’s a lot of people doing really great things here with local art and music,” said rhythm guitarist Shane Moran. “I just wish the papers and everyone would get behind them.” After the area’s staple local music venue Café Metropolis closed in 2010, the local music scene came to a halt. Using a lot of their own money, the band decided to open up Redwood Art Space in Wilkes-Barre to pick up where the Café had left off. “I learned a lot from going to shows there. It meant a lot to the band. We just figured that the least we can do is give back to the community that gave so much to us.” The space was inspired by the aesthetics of 80’s DIY club, Gilman Street, in Oakland, CA. Known for its extreme open-mindedness based on true punk values, Gilman Street’s walls read “No Racism, No Sexism and No Homophobia” tagged in graffiti and were covered with flyers from old shows. “We just felt like it was the epitome of the perfect venue.” The band played at the legendary Gilman not too long ago. “Thanks to everybody in this club. It gives people like us a place to go,” said bassist and lead vocalist Ned Russin at their show at Gilman in 2011.

Title Fight is a surging hardcore band inspired by 90’s melodic punk acts like Lifetime and Jawbreaker. Their sound falls somewhere in purgatory between the extremes of New Found Glory anthems to the aggression of the hardcore legend, Bane, which attracts both younger and older ears on behalf of these attributes. Playing shows since the young age of 14 has played out to their advantage of creating curiosity and grabbing the attention of scenesters. Their success landed them a re-

our music fixes today. It’s interesting to think about how these kids were drawn to a sound that wasn’t very accessible, especially to the younger crowd who were really digging those guys from Hanson at the time. The guys got their music from older siblings and their sisters’ older boyfriends who were in local hardcore bands. It’s much harder to find obscure music in these towns than it would be in an urban setting like Philadelphia with countless record stores and venues. “It’s hard to stumble upon the scene. It’s there, but it’s still sort of off the grid here,” said Shane. With Title Fight’s new album, Floral Green, released September 2012, the band will continue to expose their young listeners to some more quality hardcore inspired rock tunes. There’s a good chance a lot of their fans are now searching for Jawbreaker, H20 and Lifetime records. It’s sort of a gateway drug sound for kids to start investigating a wonderful new side of music they probably never knew existed. Not everyone has an older sibling to suggest new music but with their snowballing success and appeal to younger fans, Title Fight passes the torch of hardcore to another generation and captures the attention and respect from the older veterans of the scene. Follow Title Fight on facebook @titlefight

They seem to really care about kids having a place to see shows despite their recent success, probably because they still are those same kids at heart. Generally, their fan base is rather young. However, their musical influences are bands that were in their prime when the guys in Title Fight were just toddlers. Jawbreaker is an undeniable influence to the band’s sound and admittedly 1995’s major label debut “Dear You,” is one of Title Fight’s favorite albums. It’s interesting considering they were about 4 when that album dropped and you can guarantee that you were not going to hear this on any Kingston, PA rock radio stations or MTV. It’s also important to note that this was the beginning years of the internet, where a lot of us get

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STRAIGHTUP Photo courtesy of Illa Straight

and helped me get some perspective on what I wanted to create. I was able to come up with my own style because there aren’t a lot of strong opinions about hip-hop over there. I could isolate myself and not be brainwashed by what’s on the radio.

Q+A WITH ILLA STRAIGHT By Reggie Myers, 22 The 23-year-old emcee Illa Straight knows what he wants, says what he means and won’t stop until his voice is heard across Philadelphia—across the world. At age 10, he debuted his freestyle skills in lunchroom ciphers at his elementary school. At 17, he brought the house down as the opening act for Akon and Flo Rida. CRED caught up with the ambitious emcee for a glimpse into his past, present, future and a few things that every young emcee should know about the biz.

On learning the business side of the music industry: I’ve always had an entrepreneurial spirit, so when it came to music, knowing the business side was not an afterthought. I learned mostly on my feet—by being flexible and always prepared. My biggest challenge was an event I threw in 2010, in Pune, India. I had to handle every aspect of the event because I didn’t have a manager or event person to take care of it. I did it all by myself—to me that’s the best way to learn. I think that if you study all parts of the industry you’ll be better able to manage the people who work with and for you. You’ll know what their role requires them to do, whether they’re doing their job right, and, most importantly, you will have gained an appreciation for what they have to do.

On going back to India: I moved to India right after my freshman year in high school. I’m of Indian descent, but it was still a major culture shock for me. Living there was really different

On opening for Akon in 2006: I feel really fortunate to have had this opportunity at such a young age. I also learned some serious lessons from it. One: tour promoters may not be the most accommodating, especially if you’re on the come-up. Don’t take it personally and stay level headed—you never know if you’ll have to work with them again. Two: you have to go out and put on a good show despite the pressure or what’s going on backstage. Three: make sure you have a business person with you. But at the same time—do your own homework and read up about business agreements. On opening for Flo Rida in 2007: This opportunity came up at the very last minute so I had to meet with the venue manager to give him my pitch. I gave him a list of venues I’d performed at, pictures, video footage and an estimate of how many people I can draw to the venue. I also had to perform for him on the spot—it’s important to always be ready for that. On the importance of branding: Knowing who you are and projecting that through your brand is important. But people are becoming successful today because of their image rather than their skills. That’s fine if you just want to make it for a minute—but if you want to last, you need to focus on making really good music. On his future plans: I’ll be releasing my first full album titled More Than a Name after I graduate from college this year. I also plan to start a movement for people passionate about making and listening to music called The Get Back Movement. The name says that life is not defined by how and when you fall, but by how and when you get back up. final advice for NEW emcees: Remember everyone you meet can be a future partner or fan. People don’t owe you anything. They’re your network and your future, so make sure you treat them that way. Connect with them. Respect them. Be persistent. Be consistent. Follow Illa Straight on Twitter @illastraight


CREDMIXTAPE

EMCEE DIZZLE DIZZ IS THE REAL DEAL

I don’t need to show skin to get everyone to watch me or listen

By Jordan Payne, 18 At just 17-years-old, Dizzle Dizz commands the respect of every emcee her senior—newschool, old-school, male or female. Her freestyling calls to mind the lyrical wordplay of such greats as KRS-One, BIG L, Eminem, and MC Lyte, while her quirkiness and sense of humor put her into a category all her own. If you haven’t heard Dizzle Dizz perform, go do it, now. And if you think you have skills, we dare you to go bar for bar in the ring with this young emcee.

When did you start rapping? I began writing poetry at age 9 in my reading class. I got the chance to recite a poem in front of the class and loved the attention. Eventually, I started putting rhymes to beats, talking about whatever I felt at the moment. I think that’s why some folks think I’m not talking about anything coherent or relative to them—but I am. I just have a different way of saying it. I have a wild imagination! They’ll understand later.

WHO HAS HELPED shape you as a rapper? Definitely my mom. She reminds me that it’s actually cool to be myself. I’m also inspired by artists that have already made their way: Fugees, Andre 3000, Eminem, MC Lyte, Missy Elliot, Erykah Badu, Ludacris, Lords Of The Underground.

sex and things that degrade females; I don’t need to show skin to get everyone to watch me or listen. I have skill and the fellas respect me as an artist. I’m not too worried about what other female or male emcees are doing. I’m focused on Dizz!

How would you spend your time if you weren’t rapping? If I wasn’t rapping I would probably play a lot of basketball. Or maybe become a stand-up comedian because everyone always tells me that I’m hilarious, that I put smiles on people’s faces. Follow Dizzle Dizz on Twitter@DizzleXDizz Listen at: www.werunthestreetstv.com

SPITTIN VERBALGYMNASTICS

What challenges do you face being a full time high school student and a full time artist? It’s hard to balance everything. I take both so seriously, but school comes first. Knowledge is power.

How did you become affiliated with “We Run The Streets,” and what have they done for youR career?

How do you feel about being grouped into the female rap category? I don’t have to rap about

Photo courtesy of Dizzle Dizz

My mom and I were driving when we saw a group of guys on the street rapping in front of a camera. My mom said, “Get out there and show them you can rap, this could be your chance!” I hesitated, but eventually got out and spit. I found out that Anthony, the CEO of We Run The Streets, was the man behind the camera. He released my footage that night and the response was unbelievable. Anthony became my manager and it’s been groovy ever since.

25


CREDMIXTAPE

GOING

UP

Q + A WITH AZAR, MALAKAI AND BIJ LINCS FROM GROUND UP

By Spenser S. Hogans, 22 As one of the few local, independent acts from Philly to sell out the TLA, hip-hop collective Ground Up has quite a reputation to uphold. With eleven mixtapes under their belt, the crew is setting a high standard for DIY music production. CRED sat down with the faces of Ground Up: Azar, Malakai, and Bij Lincs on the eve of their 2012 East Coast tour to talk life, loyalty, floating away, and hip-hop homework.

LET’S START WITH THE NAME, “GROUND UP,” ANY STORY BEHIND IT? Malakai: The name embodied what we were doing at the time because we were at the very bottom—the only place to go was up. That was freshmen year of college, about four years ago.

PHILLY IS WHERE YOU MET EACH OTHER AND STARTED THE BAND. HOW DOES THIS CITY PLAY INTO YOUR MUSIC? Malakai: I don’t think that Ground Up would have begun any other place but here. It’s weird how we all ended up in this place at the same time and everything just worked out so perfectly. I think it sparked a love affair with Philadelphia in each of us. Bij Lincs: I was in 9th grade at The Trocadero when I first watched Reef The Lost Cauze play. A couple of years later, I got him on one of our songs. I never thought that would happen. Since we’re still in Philly, we’re able to work with a lot of local artists that we looked up to when we were younger.

WHERE DOES GROUND UP STAND ON THE “CORPORATE” SIDE OF THE MUSIC INDUSTRY? Azar: We’re pretty strong-willed about staying independent until we reach a point where we can’t do anything more. That’s when things will

have to change. We love that our fans take the time out of their day to download the mixtapes we make ourselves and upload ourselves.

HOW DO YOU PREDICT YOUR FANS WILL REACT IF YOU SIGN WITH A LABEL? 

 Malakai: There will be a small percentage of people that will tell us that we’ve sold out. But, then again, we already have people tell us that now because we play bigger venues and are getting more attention. Azar: I would like to think that our truest fans would be happy for us. The only thing a major record deal could do for us is help us build on what we’ve already grown. We’ll always maintain our independence but we all know the benefits of a record deal.

HOW DO YOU FEEL WHEN ARTISTS SAMPLE YOUR MUSIC?

WITH YOUR DO-IT-YOURSELF APPROACH TO PRODUCING, DO YOU EVER FIND IT DIFFICULT TO STAY ON TASK? Malakai: Yes, we’d eventually float off into the abyss if it weren’t for our managers. We also have a merch guy who is just like another manager — he yells at us when we’re not following through on what we need to do. That’s the benefit of being part of group. If one of us is off, the others bring us back.

WHO ARE YOU LISTENING TO RIGHT NOW? Bij: I listen to a lot of old music. I like Squirrel Nut Zippers a lot—they’re a crazy band. Two of my all time favorites are Enrico Caruso and Django Reinhardt. Malakai: I’m all over the place. I’ll listen to Jimi Hendrix, A$AP Rock, Coldplay, and Action Bronson one after another.

Malakai: As long as they create something new out of it I think it’s great. But I’m not just gonna release our instrumentals. If someone happens to hear a part of track that they can loop up and bring back around and make it into something sick, I’m not mad. But it’s gotta be sick.

Azar: I listen to a ton of hip-hop. It’s like doing homework… that you like doing. These artists are our competition. At the end of the day, our fans will compare us to artists who have sold platinum records whether we like it or not.

ARE THERE ANY CURRENT TRENDS IN MUSIC THAT YOU DON’T SUPPORT?

Malakai: So, this guy sends me a photo…he got the Ground Up “G” tattooed on his ankle. Craziest shit! That is a fan. I’ve never met him before in my life, but I love him to death.

Azar: I think I speak for the group when I say that we’re all huge music fans—we listen to a lot of different things. We came into our own music thinking that the best approach was to give the people that appreciate our music the most music that we could possibly give. In order to do that we have to appreciate what’s good about a wide variety of music. Some new things, like autotuning, are a little hard to handle. But it’s ‘cause we didn’t grow up with it. Things change.

TELL US ABOUT AN EXPERIENCE WITH A WILD FAN.

Download their latest mixtape, Supernatural, for free at: www.groundupsounds.com

Photography by Ian Hirst-Hermans, 22

27


DJ DAMAGE, 23 MP3S OR VINYL?

Both. Serato Vinyls controlling

the MP3s.

CLUB OR PRIVATE PARTY? Clubs, the energy is unmatched with the right sound and lighting. COOLEST THING YOU'D BUY WITH $60,000? An 18-wheeler decked out like a night club inside, partying city to city. DJ Booth, Dance Floor, and VIP.

FAVORITE NEW RECORD? Clique by Kanye Featuring Jay-Z & Big Sean. BIGGEST FEAR? Failure.

DJ RL, 21

INSPIRATION? My biggest inspiration is disap-

YOUR PREFERENCE, MP3S OR VINYL?

I prefer vinyl. There’s just nothing like that good ol’ vinyl feeling when you’re mixing and, of course, the classic look itself gives me the chills.

pointment. It inspires me to grind harder.

CONTACT: Twitter: @TheRealDjDamage

YOUR PREFERENCE, CLUB OR PRIVATE PARTY?

I prefer clubs—my nickname is the “CLUB KING.”

COOLEST THING YOU'D BUY WITH $60,000? I would

DJ R TO DA IZZA, 25 MP3S OR VINYL? Records, because that’s where it all started. Sometimes I use MP3s for the convenience.

CLUB OR PRIVATE PARTY? Clubs for sure. Much better energy and vibe.

COOLEST THING YOU’D BUY WITH $60,000? Pay all my bills.

FAVORITE NEW RECORD? Pop That by French Montana

BIGGEST FEAR? Failing to meet my potential. INSPIRATION? Being successful. It inspires me everyday. CONTACT: Twitter/Instagram: @rtodaizza

use it to buy some property to rent out. That’s one of my plans to get into real estate.

FAVORITE NEW RECORD?

Meek Mill’s Young +

Gettin It

BIGGEST FEAR? Not being remembered for anything after I die.

INSPIRATION? When I take trips out of the hood to look at all of the mansions. CONTACT: Twitter/Instagram: @TheRealDJRL


CREDMIXTAPE

PHILLY SPINS MEET FIVE OF THE HOTTEST UP-AND-COMING DJ’S IN PHILLY

YOUR PREFERENCE, MP3S OR VINYL? This is a no brainer! I love vinyl! Nobody wants to carry crates around so MP3s are the most efficient. Because I use Scratch Live, I get the best of both worlds because I get to use Control Vinyl and stay true to Turntablism and avoid dragging crates around by using MP3s. Technology at its best! YOUR PREFERENCE, CLUB OR PRIVATE PARTY? Clubs. You get a better feel of the crowd because you know for sure that once they stepped into the building they came to party. Your brand gets to reach more people at a club, therefore you obtain more fans and supporters. Private parties are always a toss up because you don't know who the client is inviting. Plus, a club allows the DJ to be themselves, you can't always guarantee that with a private event.

By: Angeline Campbell, 22 Immanuel Hill, 24

DJ PHSH, 24 YOUR PREFERENCE, MP3S OR VINYL? Vinyl. It sounds better, and is more fun to collect.

YOUR PREFERENCE, CLUB OR PRIVATE PARTY? Definitely a club. There’s usually a larger variety of people that way.

COOLEST THING YOU'D BUY WITH $60,000?

DJ LEAN WIT IT, 21

I’d buy

some kind of boat.

FAVORITE NEW RECORD? Control System by

COOLEST THING YOU’D BUY WITH $60,000? I'd probably buy a car. If you know me, you know that I don't drive but having a car would be clutch especially since I'm always on the move, all over the city as well as the East Coast. FAVORITE NEW RECORD? Making Mirrors by Gotye. I just love the feel.

BIGGEST FEAR? Failing at the same task twice. When you fail you want to learn from your mistakes, regroup and try again to guarantee a success the next time. That doesn't always happen for everybody.

Ab-Soul

INSPIRATION? My Mom. She is the reason why

BIGGEST FEAR? Maybe being set on fire...

CONTACT

I never give up and why I am so productive. She is an artist herself, and never was provided opportunities so she made them available to herself by creating them. I admire her grace, determination and her genuine passion for what she does. That's why I do what I do.

Twitter/Instagram: @djphsh

CONTACT: Twitter: @DJLEANWITIT

or drowning.

INSPIRATION?

West Philly, my parents,

and my OGs.

29


THEPORTFOLIO

THE PORTFOLIO Young artists and writers spanning the Philadelphia region submitted 628 works to this issue of CRED. In an online poll, they voted for their favorite pieces. Here are their top picks.

Tali Purkerson, 25 / The Real Militant / collage

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THEPORTFOLIO

Shyan Alvarez, grade 8, Fresh Artist / Untitled / watercolor and tempera on paper / Celine McBride, 22 / Black / mixed-media collage

33


THEPORTFOLIO Michelle Lattner, 20 / Self-portrait / lithograph / Laura Adams, 22 / Liam’s Couch / oil on linen

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THEPORTFOLIO

Kyle Kogut, 22 / Congregation / etching and graphite / Asjih Brown, grade 2, Fresh Artist / Untitled / oil and pastel Katie Miller, 22 / News Stand / gauche with ink

37


THEPORTFOLIO

Derrick Toler, 23 I walked out my house yesterday and was greeted with a .44 automatic firearm I was told if I made any move I’d be fired on now this was some shit I could not take lightly cause the philadelphia police do not mind killin’ a nigger

Ashley Santee, 23 / Wait / photography

HISTORY’S SHOWN

like me now remember I ain’t sayin “nigga” like the slang word I’m sayin NIGGER like the color of my skin is dark so they won’t hesitate to pull the trigger so I stood still not makin’ a move cause I didn’t want them to do me, my fiance and my three-year-old son like they did The MOVE Members…and murder me in cold blood then get on tv like, I’d do it again. so what. then they got on some extra shit and took me down to the District. but before i even start to bitch I think lucky me cause right then and there they could’ve pumped 6 in me these are the same people who gave Mumia the death penalty and once they let me go I still didn’t know what I did wrong but then history shows that being black in the city of Philadelphia is a crime by itself alone

39


THEPORTFOLIO Kelsey Niziolek, 22 / Body Oddities - The Legs / pen, ink, pencil, gel pen, highlighter, coffee, digital Akiro Rodriguez, 19 / Coney Island Devil / c-print

41


THEPORTFOLIO

Kelsey Niziolek, 22 / Chen Tao / pen, ink, pencil, gold leaf, gel pens / Scientology / pen, ink, pencil, gold leaf, gel pens

43


THEPORTFOLIO

BRANDON DIXON, 15 It was stale on my tongue, the color of streetlights making salt and pepper of the murky haze of twilight; and my eyes, leaden with unnerving dreams of firefights and falling ash fought to soak in the stories that made the air blaze and pulse with adventure. My ears begged forgiveness of the crickets tearing silence into naught with their ballads, but of course they couldn’t, wouldn’t,

Adam Peditto, 24 / Stranger / polaroid / The King / polaroid

GREEDY NIGHT

didn’t listen. They were too busy. My fingers tried to grasp the gray before it gave its innocence up; but grey was just as quick as silver, and the only thing these dream-dipped digits caught was black. My soul almost danced its way into death when the sun fell beneath the hills and the fading orange blurs made music of the horizon, but it fell out of rhythm when the night slipped a blindfold over its eyes. And my heart; well, it just sat there, swelling to the size of a universe while this greedy night took prisoner my being.

45


THEPORTFOLIO Roxana Azar, 23 / But I Am Not This / digital c-print / Hannah Agosta, 21 / Brad / charcoal

47


THEPORTFOLIO Samantha Gratz, 25 / Birdine / nylon / Nate Harris, 21 / Elementary Blues / digital rendering

49


THEPORTFOLIO Akiro Rodriguez, 19 / Release / charcoal and graphite / Skye Olson, 22 / Scape 01 / silkscreen print Sasha Parker, 22 / Mountain / digital rendering

51


THEPORTFOLIO Megan McIntyre, 21 / Untitled / serigraphy / Untitled / lithography / Untitled / serigraphy

53


CARRYING AN INFANT THOUGH A RIOT BRIAN SKOVRON, 21 Consciously concise and Vertebrae verbatim; They either reached With clawed hands For my throat, Or tried to sell me A Bible. Partially integrated, Sort of corrected but still cracked, I rushed to be intertwined Into moral rage; And I came out the other side slathered In pungent shame and baby-sludge.


THEPORTFOLIO Elishah Villafuerte, 17 / Lyrica / pen / Ekaterina Popova, 23 / Evening Walk / oil on canvas

55


THEPORTFOLIO Adam Mazur, 23 / Presence / acrylic, gold and silver leaf on paper / Iconography / acrylic and gold leaf on paper

57


THEPORTFOLIO Michelle Lattner, 20 / Dwelling / silkscreen / Christian Conrad, 19 / Place for my Head / acrylic and sumi ink

59


THEPORTFOLIO Daniel Dzierzynski, 21 / Going Up / digital rendering / Ashley Marcovitz, 22 / The Climb / silver gelatin print

61


THEPORTFOLIO

Jaclyn Kessel, 21 / Fountain of Faces / charcoal / Azana P., 9 / Untitled / tempera / Naima Merella, 22 / Philly in Retrograde #07 / gumbichromate

63


EDEN BRANDON DIXON, 15 I tore the innocence from your breath-beaten lips and threw it into the night sky where it fastened itself among the angels. And when it tried to give up its will to gravity, I stole its place in the universe away from it and grafted the remaining wisps of its luster into the back of your eyelids. You were stripped now, bare flesh shining with the paradoxical light of your dark maturity, and I couldn’t keep my eyes off of you. We picnicked in the gardens of our tempters, feasting on the fruits of our intelligence until authority figured that we weren’t old enough, that we weren’t wise enough, and chased us into the hills of our embarrassment where moonlight wrapped our bodies in its lullaby-like embrace


THEPORTFOLIO Ryan Caruthers, 18 / The Red Feather / ink and watercolor

65


THEPORTFOLIO Paige Thatcher, 21 / Conversation / digital photo / Maya Bjornson, 16 / Untitled / mixed media Ryan Powell, 24 / Pandorama / digital photo / designer: Shooney Frederic, 23

67


THEPORTFOLIO Bryan L., 9 / Apple World / marker / Brendan Coleman, 21 / Plastique / digital photograph

69


THEPORTFOLIO Quidajah, 10 / Untitled / tempera / Joy Waldinger, 20 / Tree Pose Series / ink Daniel Dzierzynski, 21 / Insomnia / digital rendering

71


THEPORTFOLIO

Pagdon, 24 / I Want To Be A Zebra! / digital rendering / Nicole Saltzer, 21 / Two Young Bulls Sitting on a Log / woodcut Andrew Diemer, grade 12, Fresh Artist / Scream / oil on canvas

73


THEPORTFOLIO

MICHELLE KRYSZTOFIAK, 19 Early Bird gets the worm, but the other birds still hate him Cuz he has the same favorite Sonic Youth song everyone else does And it just ain’t fair. But such is life, filtered and re-filtered until the plot line’s coherent.

Lorna Williams, 25 / Trap(ped) / mixed media

EARLY BIRD

A romantic joke though isn’t it? But what’s the point of all this time, if I have to spend it all waiting? Early Bird gets the worm, but he also has to make his own coffee Cuz he wakes up next to no one every single time. The working world needs cooperation and if you’re lucky, that’s just showing up. It’s not as pathetic to be a player, if you end up being the winner too (but no one’s counting, but no one knows). Early bird gets the worm, but for minimum wage, that’s too much for the asking And the other birds still hate him And his rotten wormy guts. Tomorrow is a new day, And the worm colony gets an armored tank.

75


THEPORTFOLIO Andy Hood, 23 / Sue and Henry In The Summertime / digital and ink / Caitlin Peck, 24 / WAITING / video installation Katrina Tapper, 25 / Self-Portrait / oil on canvas

77


THEPORTFOLIO

Carey Pietsch, 23 / Haven’t I seen You Before? / digital rendering / Caitlin Peck, 24 / Shortshortsandlongsocksareappropriate / ink on paper

79


THEPORTFOLIO

I love like Tuesday morning. Like cuddling through storms, Like something perfect getting Born. I love like pennies Left heads up. Like lost then found, Like Caffeinated salvation on midnight trains, Homeward bound.

Doreen Garner, 25 / Shift: 1 / acrylic on canvas

LOVE LIKE VICTORIA MARCHIONY, 20

I love like You. Like, I, Like you, Because I, “Like you, like you,” I mean I Love you. Like the movie you turned on for background noiseWe love that scene but we didn’t have a choice, Attention spans shot for anything but each other. I think it’s cute you bothered With pretense. I love like A stopped clock that isn’t broken it’s just caught up in the moment Like a flame so hot it’s frozen Like I love you Dime a dozen. I love like Mommy loved Daddy When Mommy and Daddy still loved enough to make Me Like love.

81


THEPORTFOLIO Alison Giannone, 19 / Step Seven / batik / Brian Jerome, 22 / Name Drop / silkscreen

83


THEPORTFOLIO Kevin McWilliams, 25 / Jesus’ Note / photograph / Chloe Blessing, 20 / Breach / clay and photo

85


THEPORTFOLIO

NOOR BOWMAN, 5TH GRADE to my ancestors the slave the hopeless the rarely hopeful slave they say we’re uncivilized what we had before you took us away

Tali Purkerson, 25 / What’s Next? / mixed-media collage

THE BLACK UNCIVILIZED ANIMAL THEY SAID

was gold kingdoms true religion peace and hope our families life freedom care love for every kind those people so-call civilized animals we are not people yes we are they lived in caves in the time of the viking we lived in kingdoms big huts homes yes they were we the black so-called uncivilized

87


THEPORTFOLIO Rosie Carlson, 21 / Untitled / pen, ink and acrylic / Carey Pietsch, 23 / Tom Tildrum / digital rendering

89


CONSTANT CONJUNCTION KELLY KOHL, 22 Walking those large and quiet rooms filled with art, I remember how much you detested museums and all of their pretentious space. My heels click loudly against the stone floors, Rhythmically reminding me of Eliot. Rhythmically reminding me that I, too, Should have been destined to spend my days Scuttling across the floors of silent seas. As the speakers surrounding me shout days of the week, My brain replaces every TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday With the screams of Miles’ horn, Blocking out the extrinsic thrumming that I knew you heard, too. The neon sign I ponder hums like the incandescent bulbs of the kitchen we’d cook in. The kitchen you’d cook in. I was never much of a cook. But I can taste you, Connected to my memories of peppermint tea In a constant conjunction only Hume could cherish. I don’t want to move to Baltimore. Tucked away deep in Modern Art, My tea set has been replaced by something else, Entirely forgettable. A surrogate I knew would be coming eventually.


THEPORTFOLIO Samad Thompson, 10 / Untitled / crayon and marker

91


THEPORTFOLIO

Kate Eagle, 23 / I Get What I Deserve / gouache and acrylic / Jacob Greenberg, 21 / Tirtha Dance / etching and softground Ryan Caruthers, 18 / Willow / photograph

93


THEPORTFOLIO Michelle Lattner, 20 / Untitled / mixed media / Nate Harris, 21 / I’m Amazed / silkscreen

95


ARTSRISING functions as a builder, broker and bridge of arts education opportunities. For more information, visit www.myartsrising.org or facebook.com/artsrising


ARTSRISING BUILDS: Capacity in our schools to provide high quality arts instruction and activities

Connections to meaningful artistic and cultural experiences for children, youth and families •

The environment for a thriving creative economy


WE'RE GIDDY IN HEELS!

busstopboutique.com • 727 S. 4th St. Phila, PA 19147 • 215.627.2357

A fine shoe boutique


PHILLYEARTH

CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION urban farm & farm stand

Every Thursday 4:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m. 2544 Germantown Ave.

Youth education & Entrepreneurial programming Vertical Gardening Edible Forest Gardening Rocket Stove Construction Solar Still Build Vermiculture

CONTACT

VISIT www.phillyearth.org www.facebook.com/PhillyEarth

Jon Hopkins Director jon@phillyearth.org

salon4th.com • 215-625-2654

736 S. 4th St. Phila, Pa 19147

URBAN WORKSHOP

The Urban Workshop at Temple University is a design collaborative of architecture and other place-making disciplines formed to address design opportunities and challenges that emerge in rebuilding neighborhoods in the post-industrial city.

AN AVIAN ALLEGORY A children’s book based on the 26-year history of The Village of Arts and Humanities. If we were birds.

Written and illustrated by K-Fai Steele

Working at the scales of urban design, architecture, landscape, and site specific installation, the Urban Workshop directly engages community partners, helping them to build places that are beautiful, sustainable, and humane.

contact Sally Harrison sally.harrison@temple.edu

COMING SOON storyofthevillage.tumblr.com/about


For program information & ways to get involved contact us at Katia@ katiatiles.com or visit us at Villagearts.org 2544 Germantown Ave, Philly

Village Clay

Workshop

@ The Village


POSTER PROJECT CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS


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2

OnSite CRED OnSite brings the pages of CRED Philly to life with exhibits, performances and pop-up shops. In June 2012, CRED took over the space at 325 South Street through the Arts On South program. For programs, events and exhibit details please visit CRED’s blog at credmagazine-phily.com

GRAND

3

OPENING

1. Store interior 2. Youth workshop: designing a storefront window display 3. Storefront before/after 4. Philadelphia Youth Network intern Briana Fennell 5. Yarn installation by Matthew Sullivan 6. Bad Rap event hosted by Khemist 7. Sticker art exhibit and youth work session 8. Store window display by Rebecca Blessing

JULY

6

27 @ 6 PM

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5

7

8 103


OPEN CALL FOR ENTRIES CRED4

AGES 25 AND UNDER SHOULD SUBMIT FINE ART CREATIVE WRITING POETRY FASHION DESIGN PHOTOGRAPHY INDUSTRIAL DESIGN GRAPHIC DESIGN ILLUSTRATION JOURNALISTIC STORIES CREDMAGAZINE-PHILLY.COM $$ HONORARIA FOR PUBLISHED WORK


INDEX 100%, 13 Adam Mazur, 56-57 Adam Peditto, 44 Akiro Rodriguez, 41, 50 Al Azar, 26-27 Alan S., 16 Alexandra B., 16 Alison Giannone, 82 Andrew Diemer, 73 Andy Hood, 76 Angeline Campbell, 28-29 Ari Peck, 15 Ashley Marcovitz, 61 Ashley Santee, 38 Asjih Brown, 37 ASKER, 13 Azana P., 63 BASH, 13 Ben Russin, 22-23 Bijan Houshiarnejad, 26-27 Brandon Dixon, 45, 64 Brendan Coleman, 69 Brian Jerome, 83 Brian Skovron, 54 Briana Fennell, 103 Briana P., 16 Bryan L., 68 BZAR, 13 Caitlin Peck, 77, 79 Camille Ferruzzi, 12-13 Carey Pietsch, 78, 89 Celine McBride, 33 Chloe Blessing, 85 Christian Conrad, 59 Cindy Comerford, 8-9 Daniel Dzierzynski, 60, 71 Darrien Johnson, 11 Derrick Toler, 39 Dizzle Dizz, 25 DJ DAMAGE, 28 DJ LEAN WIT IT, 29 DJ PHSH, 29 DJ R TO DA IZZA, 28 DJ RL, 28

Doreen Garner, 80 Ekaterina Popova, 55 Elishah Villafuerte, 55 Emily E. Steck, 10 EXIT, 13 FOSTER, 13 G-ROT, 13 Gina Swindler, 15 GLITCH, 13 Hannah Agosta, 47 Heather Jones, 14-15 Hien N., 16 Ian Hirst-Hermans, 20, 26-27 Illa Straight, 24 Immanuel Hill, 28-29 Izzat Rahman, 11 Jaclyn Kessel, 62 Jacob Greenberg, 93 Jamie Rhoden, 22-23 Jesse Ross, 18 Joel B., 16 John Stish, 22-23 Jordan Payne, 25 Joy Waldinger, 70 Kate Eagle, 92 Katherine Boline, 8 Katie Miller, 37 Katrina Tapper, 77 Kayla Cafarella, 18 Keith M., 16 Kelly Kohl, 90 Kelsey Niziolek, 40, 42-43 Kevin McWilliams, 84 KRISPY, 13 Kyle Kogut, 36 Laura Adams, 35 Lorna Williams, 74 Malcolm McDowell, 20, 26-27 Marcellis K., 16 Matthew Sullivan, 103 Maya Bjornson, 67 Megan McIntyre, 52-53 Michelle Krysztofiak, 75 Michelle Lattner, 18, 34, 58, 94

Morgan Gilbreth, 9 Naima Merella, 63 Naki H., 16 Nate Harris, 49, 95 Ned Russin, 22-23 Nicole Saltzer, 73 Nika Zeitlin, 15 Noel Chronister, 19 Noor Bowman, 87 Pagdon, 72 Paige Thatcher, 66 QCKND, 12 Quidajah L., 70 R2F, 13 Reggie Myers, 24 Rosie Carlson, 88 Roxana Azar, 46 Ryan Caruthers, 65, 93 Ryan Powell, 11, 67 Samad Thompson, 91 Samantha Gratz, 48 Sasha Parker, 51 SEEK, 13 Semaj N., 16 Semaja M., 16 Shane Moran, 22-23 Shawn M., 16 Shooney Frederic, 67 Shukri K., 16 Shyan Alvarez, 32 Skye Olson, 50 Skylar Bird, 10 Spenser S. Hogans, 27 Tali Purkerson, 31, 86 Vakaris Vaitkunas, 19 Victoria Marchiony, 81 Yarielys V., 16 YERP, 13 Zahli Bhayroo, 15 Zak Parsons, 19 Zakiyah J., 16 Zipporah Mooney, 16


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CRED Philly : Issue 3  

CRED Philly is a tri-annual arts and culture publication dedicated to amplifying the voice and vision of Philadelphia’s young artists, write...

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