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AMPLIFYING THE VOICE AND VISION OF YOUNG PHILLY

ISSUE TWO, MAY 2012


EMPOWERING YOUNG LIVES THROUGH ART Fresh Artists is an innovative nonprofit empowering compassionate, creative & capable young people to tackle the critical shortage of arts funding in our public schools.

ABOUT FRESH ARTISTS: Fresh Artists creates real–life opportunities for kids to engage as philanthropists, to exhibit their artwork in high profile places for decision–makers to see, and to deliver innovative visual art programs & art supplies to public schools struggling with shrinking art budgets.

Artist–philanthropist Juania at the headquarters of SAP America with a 6’ x 9’ reproduction of her artwork

HOW TO GET INVOLVED: 1

Corporations can include us in their corporate art program.

4

Public schools can host our art education programs.

2

Children can participate in our programs.

5

6

Public school art teachers can apply for free art supplies.

Community members can donate, volunteer & share our message.

SEE WHAT WE’RE DOING:

www.freshartists.org

SEND US A MESSAGE:

info@freshartists.org

LIKE & FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK:

Fresh Artists is honored to work with the hundreds of children represented in its collection and the art teachers who ignite their creativity, inspiring them to share their stories. Through Fresh Artists, children’s brilliant artwork goes where they cannot. Their art stands like a sentinel, advocating for a quality public education for all children. We believe all children can succeed. Collectively, there is much we all can do to insure this outcome.

facebook.com/freshartists.org

FOLLOW US ON T WIT TER:

@freshartists


THE VILLAGE OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES thanks all the young artists, activists, journalists and entrepreneurs who helped create this issue of CRED.

Keep being creative. Keep making stuff. This magazine is for you.

To submit your work to the next issue of CRED visit: credmagazine-philly.com

To advertise your local business or organization in CRED, contact cred@villagearts.org


CRED PHILLY IS CRED Philly is a tri-annual arts and culture publication dedicated to promoting and publishing the work of Philadelphia’s young artists, writers, performers and activists. The contents of CRED are created, submitted and curated by individuals ages 25 and under who live in the Philadelphia region.

THE OLD(ER) STAFF

THE YOUNG(ER) STAFF

PARTNERING ORGANIZATIONS

Chief Editor and Creative Director Aviva Kapust

Managing Editor Heather Jones

“The Mixtape” contains written and photographic contributions from:

The Village of Arts and Humanities

Art Director, Designer Rebecca Blessing

Junior Music Executives

Executive Director Elizabeth Grimaldi Programs Director Aviva Kapust Teaching Artist, Photography Jared Gruenwald Business Manager Jordan Kocak

SPECIAL THANKS TO The Arts Garage Arts Rising Arts on South Asociación Puertorriqueños en Marcha BAJ Design Brian Nothing Free Library of Philadelphia Foundations, Inc. Fresh Artists Get Real...Get Raw! Headlong Performance Institute Hess Printing Company I AM PHRESH Dance Studio Indigo, by The Blues Babes Foundation John & Kira’s Chocolates Junior Music Executives Leeway Foundation K-Fai Steele Mad Science Mighty Writers

Philly Music Magazine

Promotions Manager Reggie Johnson Street Team Leon Sanford Rakim Hardaway Sherrieff McCrae

Outlaw Clothing Company Philadelphia Film Society Philly Earth Philly Magical Garden Philly Music Magazine Public Citizens for Children and Youth Spells Writing Lab Temple Ad Club

SUBMISSIONS credmagazine-philly.com

CONTACT CRED CRED is based at The Village of Arts and Humanities: 2506 N. Alder Street. Philadelphia, PA 19133

COVER ART Tom McQuaid Digital Design

THIS ISSUE IS FUNDED BY Knight Foundation The Village of Arts and Humanities

215.225.7830 x206 cred@villagearts.org


IN THIS ISSUE STREET CRED 06

MUSIC 18

08 I AM PHRESH 10

AU NATURAL

12

KICK PUSH

13

MAD SCIENCE

14

KAPOW!

15

PRETTY LIKE PRAGUE

16

THE BAD AND THE HEALTHY

17

CHEAP ART STUFF

20 KITE PARTY 21

KHEMIST

22

THEY GOT NEXT

24 DIY RECORDING

THE PORTFOLIO 26

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STREETCRED Street CRED is young Philly’s unique perspective on the people, places and local businesses that nourish our neighborhoods. This issue profiles some of Philly’s most dynamic, up-and-coming artists, athletes, entrepreneurs, activists and performers.

Left: I AM PHRESH Dancers Skateboarder, Jahmir Brown


I AM PHRESH POP, LOCK, BREAK AND WHACK WITH PHILLY’S ACADEMY OF PHRESH By Pricilla Ward

Above: Phreshest Kids Dance Crew Lo, Imani, Ski, Leek, Whitney, and Mone Photos courtesy of I AM PHRESH

Driving through Northeast Philly on an unseasonably warm night in April, I pass playgrounds and street corners jam-packed with kids and teenagers. They lounge around, shoot hoops, listen to music… they stay out so they don’t have to go home. “When you’re on the block hangin’ out every night, it’s just a matter of time before you end up geting into some kind of trouble,” says Mark Boston, aka “Smart Mark,” founder and artistic director of the dance studio I AM PHRESH. “Lot’s of kids that hang out on the street love to dance but they have no idea that dance can change their life. It can give them something to care about, a place to be and keep them away from all the bad stuff that’s out there.”

studio teaching other young people how to dance. “Phresh is a team,” says Steward. “It’s different from other studios because we all want to see each other succeed and do big things. Mark brings in big name choreographers and dancers so that we can take workshops and get noticed—it expands everyone’s view of the hip-hop dance world.”

As I met with the young dancers at Boston’s studio, a single sentiment rang out. “If I didn’t dance, I don’t know what I’d do.” It’s clear that at Phresh, these young artists have found a safe haven from the negative influences of the streets, a family with which they share their passion for dance, and a stomping ground where they push the limits of hip-hop dance.

The culture of Phresh extends beyond providing safe, family-like atmosphere and cutting edge dance education. Dancers must have balance on the dance floor and in the rest of their life. “Lo Smooth” Saunders, is caught between his passion for dance and his respect for his family’s hopes of him pursuing a more traditional career path. Saunders joined his first dance crew at age 13. Now an 18-year-old member of the dance crews at Phresh, Saunders bonds with other teens whose passion for dance is not fully embraced or understood by family and friends. “The people who care about us most don’t always understand us,” Boston tells his students. “But we can help them understand by being passionate about our craft and by doing everything full out. Get good grades, respect our families, and take care of our personal responsibilities.”

It’s 7PM and Boston calls the students together to warm up. As they move in unison, their focus in on perfection. “I wake up every morning and cannot think about doing anything but dancing,” says 23-yearold Gerald Steward, a member of Phresh’s full company, Academy of Phresh. Steward’s first experience with hip-hop dance came from watching YouTube videos. “The more I watched the dancers in the videos, the more I wanted to be in them.” Fast-forward to today, where one can find Steward in countless YouTube videos as well as in the

THERE’S NOTHING I’D RATHER DO THAN DANCE.

Perhaps the most profound example of Phresh’s “never-say-can’t” dance philosophy

Right: “Lo Smooth” Saunders Photography by Sherrieff McCrae


is 18-year-old dancer, Daniel “Ski” Sevitski. Sevetski lost sensation on the right side of his body at age four due to a stroke. But this did not stop him from pursuing his dream of dancing. “I was the only guy from my county who liked to dance. Growing up, my friends only cared about sports.” Sevitski taught himself the entire Lloyd “Get it Shawty” routine (not easy for even the most seasoned dancers) earning him a spot dancing in the companies at Phresh. When observing the dancers at Phresh, it’s apparent that their diversity is beyond skin color and age. Twenty-year-old dancer Alex Marasigam spent her youth studying ballet in the Philippines. Her exposure to hip-hop began when she moved to Philadelphia after high school. The transition from ballet to hiphop can be jarring for some dancers but, at Phresh, where teachers advocate for students to explore all styles in order to become wellrounded dancers, ballet has actually given her a leg up. “I can use the discipline that I learned in ballet but really get into the freedom that comes with hip-hop dance.” Coincidently, the hip-hop class takes an abrupt turn when Boston announces, “Alright. Let’s practice our swing dancing now.” Without missing a beat, the dancers fall in line as if they’ve been studying swing dancing for years. “This is gonna be the craziest swing dance anyone’s ever seen.” Check out the I AM PHRESH 3rd Annual Dance Showcase on Saturday, June 2. More info at www.iamphresh.com


AU NATURAL By Heather Jones


STREETCRED

FASHION. ZEBRAS. BEADS. SWAG. It’s not often you can string those four things together. But when you do, you know Saul Zayas is somewhere on the scene. The 19-year-old founder of Natural Clothing Company sits down with CRED and shares all, from the latest on his new clothing line to trading diamonds for kids’ toys. A LITTLE BACKGROUND: I grew up in Philly near Norris Square Park with my grandmother and went to Kensington Culinary Art High School. I was definitely the class clown. I didn’t smoke or drink and still don’t. I’d rather focus my time on helping others.

WHEN DID YOU FIRST KNOW YOU WANTED TO BE INVOLVED IN THE FASHION WORLD? I have always loved clothes. When I was 16 I started to picture my own clothing line. I’ve been designing ever since. WHO, FROM THE FASHION OR ART WORLDS, INSPIRES YOU? Everyone. I try not to stay with just one style or artist so I can learn as much as possible. My first inspiration came from working closely with Joel Peterson and Pete Whitney, the owners of Magick Outlaw Clothing Company. I also work closely with designer Ron Pichardo. He was first store owner to sell my line. WHO, FROM OUTSIDE THE FASHION WORLD, INSPIRES YOU? I admire anyone who works hard for their family. I want to do the same for mine.

HOW DID YOU LAND ON THE NAME NATURAL FOR YOUR LINE? It took me forever to settle on a name. One morning I woke up with it in my head. Natural is a call for young people to not let the outside world, the media, take over what we should be and what we should do. We need to be reminded to be original and keep it natural. TELL US ABOUT YOUR LATEST COLLECTION FOR NATURAL. My new designs use a large “N” logo. I wrote to my father in prison and asked him if any of his fellow inmates might want to collaborate on a design. Joel Peterson gave me that

idea—to give someone who doesn’t have much freedom a chance to create art that tons of people will see and wear. I worked with their designs to create the final product. The line also features zebras, mohawks and guns with angel wings and halos. Whenever possible, I try to create messages in my work.

WHAT ARE YOUR MOST PRIZED POSSESSIONS? The few pictures I have left of my mother. WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE STORE IN PHILLY? Well, any store that wants to carry my line is pretty cool with me… WHO ARE YOU LISTENING TO RIGHT NOW? ASAP Rocky and Kendrick Lamar. WHAT ADVICE DO YOU HAVE FOR OTHER YOUNG DESIGNERS? Don’t ever give up. Find Natural at Swagga House, 2226 N. Front St.

Photos by Visual House Studios

TELL US ABOUT YOUR ACCESSORY LINE. My accessories are No Ice, Just Art (NIJA). I mainly use fused beads, the kind kids play with. Gold and diamonds are overrated; I’d rather make accessories with crazy colors and characters that are fun to wear. WHAT DO YOU CONSIDER THE EPITOME OF HAPPINESS? Just waking up every morning and knowing that the people I love are safe and taken care of.

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Photos courtesy of Jhamir Brown

KICKPUSH JAHMIR BROWN CARVES HIS SLICE OF PHILLY, THE U.S., AND THE WORLD

By Pricilla Ward Skateboarders: vandals with no respect for property, slackers who fail at school, losers who are going nowhere in life. This age-old stereotype still plagues today’s young men and woman who have a predilection for smooth noseslides, sick half-cabs and a daily dose of eating pavement. West Philly born 15-year-old Jahmir Brown, a skateboarder, honor-roll student, and self-proclaimed math wiz, defies this stereotype and sets a pretty high standard in the young Philly skate scene. His friends call him the “Jahbulbalbtron,” a Transformer-inspired nickname that serves Jhamir well as he is an outlier in West Philly. “I was the first of my friends to start skating. In the beginning, I was really just doin’ it by myself. No one got what I was doing.” I met Jahmir at his home base, a West Philadelphia basketball court where he plays a skateboard version of HORSE. An entourage of seven and eight-year-olds shadow him, awaiting his next cool trick. “I think I’ve influenced a lot of little kids to try skateboarding. They’re always asking me questions and I like helping them out,” Brown said. Brown was introduced to the art of “disrespecting the pavement” when he picked up a Tony Hawk video game at the age of seven. “I really liked the game and didn’t want to do anything else,” he explains. He quickly took the game to the streets. “I would play the video game then try to imitate the things I did in the game on my skateboard.” Though a seasoned skater, Brown is humble about his talent. “Right now I wouldn’t really consider myself a leader in the skateboard scene. Just one of many trying to make the scene bigger in the area and get more people skating,” Brown says. He’s known for always skating with his cap on and pushing the limits of what is sane skateboarding experimentation. He has experienced eight injuries; however, this has not stopped him from consistantly daring to try just a few more kick flips. At the young age of 15, Jahmir has competed across the US and is sponsored by Philly’s Armory East skateboard shop. In the midst of making moves in the industry, Brown chooses to keep a low profile at Cross Roads Accelerated High School where he attends as a freshman. He is an honor roll student and his teachers have high expectations for him. Brown takes it seriously but tries to not to allow the pressure to get to him. “Math is my favorite subject. It kind of runs in the family. Before I started skateboarding seriously I was really into computers. I use to hack computers just to see if I could,” Brown says laughing. In the future, he sees himself studying computer engineering in college—a far cry from the “loser” profile that, to this day, hangs over the heads of skateboarders young and old.


STREETCRED

MADSCIENCE KENNETH MUI MAKES PHYSICS FUN By Heather Jones

I’VE ALWAYS LOVED COMPLEX THINGS.

When you first meet Kenneth Mui, a 22-year-old Drexel Student, you notice his gigantic smile and spiky jet black hair. His voice is boisterous and, when he talks, his hands move quicker than your eye can follow. You strike up a conversation about the weather, or maybe the brand of coffee he’s holding. But in the next thirty seconds, you find yourself learning about fields of electromagnetism and the real possibility of a perpetual motion device. Even the smallest encounter with Kenneth opens the opportunity for him to teach, and most importantly, to learn. To Kenneth, physics is more than a future career or major in college. It’s his life and everything that surrounds him. It’s a vehicle for wonder. To simply call him a physicist would be like calling a painter, a “liquid-color applicator,” or a sculptor, a “clay remodeler.” Kenneth is a teacher, inventor, and a little bit of a clown. And he’s taking his show on the road to ensure that passion and creativity in physics isn’t lost on the next generation. As a freshly appointed “Mad Scientist,” Kenneth works at Mad Science to perform demonstrations for children and spectators at

events, schools and parties. From the colors of the rainbow to components of gravity and force, each demo illustrates the simplicity behind some of the most complex and least understood scientific theories. “I realized from a young age that I loved complex things,” Kenneth recalls with a smile. “Seeing kids understand and learn these things helps me learn too. And seeing wonder in children helps reignite my own curiosity and desire for exploration.” Faced with the challenging task of educating and entertaining young kids, Kenneth shows no sign of worry. He comes equipped to teach with years of tutoring experience and an insatiable child-like wonder. If his younger years of building with Legos and his innate curiosity of how things work have taught him anything, it’s that kids always start out loving science. “Sometimes adults think science is too hard to understand,” he explains. “Mostly because in science, you can’t just complete a task and move on. You have to constantly think and connect things together. Children can’t help but constantly think. They’re not out to just get things done. They always wonder and take in information. They ask why.” Not unlike the crowd of young wonderers he teaches, Kenneth plans on expanding his education by earning his Master’s degree and continuing down his unusual physicistturned-entertainer career path. He dreams of creating a reserach and teaching lab called “The Enterprise,” where he plans to turn science-fiction into science-fact. To Kenneth, nothing is impossible or too complex—just hard to understand. “Sometimes people outgrow simple pleasures, like seeing a balloon pop and thinking it’s funny or surprising—asking what happens when…” He explains. “As we get older, we sometimes see those things as annoying. But in physics, these simple acts are explained by fascinating complex ideas. You just have to be willing to look deep enough.” Photography by Raheem Reeder

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KAPOW! COMIC BOOKS TEACH READING, WRITING AND SAVING THE WORLD By Heather Jones and Kyle Black Everyone knows the story—the one about a boy, brought down by his traumatic past, now a masked hero adored by his city. Or the one about the girl with superhuman strength and bracelets made of bulletproof steel. The great comic book heroes of the past still entertain and capture the imagination of readers young and old alike. These stories, however, are more than entertainment to many kids struggling to read and write. The graphic novel isn’t just a picture book for nerds. Comics inspire the shy first-grader to speak his mind and enable the bullied teenager to express her feelings. Comic books entice kids to read. Every graphic novel needs a story. Every comic needs its hero. For Mukhtar Stones, a sixth grade graphic novelist, cartoonist and self-styled entrepreneur, heroes are never in short supply. Inspired by the works of Pablo Picasso, Stan Lee and Osamu Tezuka, Mukhtar confidently enters every room with an arsenal of self written and drawn comics, and pretending to be the CEO of his own comic book company. Ten-yearold Vanessa Dantzler, a comedian with an open dislike for writing, dives into the blank comic panels to share silly and humorous characters born of her own imagination.

“After I draw my pictures, I like to write what is going on in them,” says Vanessa. “It doesn’t feel like writing. It’s not as hard.” Here in Philadelphia, afterschool programs employ the comic-book-method to promote literacy in their participants. At opposite ends of the city, Spells Writing Lab, in North Philadelphia at The Village of Arts and Humanities, and Mighty Writers, in South Philadelphia, have made great strides in encouraging kids to read and write. Each program is an afterschool destination where students can complete their homework, grab a snack, unwind and write creatively. Both Spells Writing Lab and Mighty Writers have extensive youth libraries, where the students are encouraged to borrow books ranging from the newest graphic novel to more traditional reading. While attending Mighty Writers, Mukhtar got his hands on every single comic book and graphic novel they had in house. “I remember reading my first comic and thinking, I should do something similar… but BETTER,” he explains. “And then BLAMO! My dream came true.” Soon after realizing their students’ attraction to comic books, Mighty Writers launched their full-fledged comic program complete with graphic novels, computers,

and workshops that are held in their brightly painted green superhero room. Similarly, at Spells Writing Lab, Director Liz Encarnacion introduced graphic novels into their weekend workshops. “Blank pages can be intimidating, especially to kids who don’t write much,” explains Liz. “Easing them into it by drawing out the story and then writing it helps them feel confident in their abilities.” In the end, the fight of good versus evil is in the hands of Vanessa and Muhktar. They choose who wins and if the bad guy ever gets his revenge. It’s hard to say whether or not they will outgrow comics. Either way, Vanessa and Muhktar end the story as heroes—reading, writing and then saving the world. Learn more about literacy through comics: www.phillyspells.org www.mightywriters.org

Artwork by Muktar Stones


STREETCRED

PRETTY LIKE PRAGUE Q+A WITH FASHION DESIGNER KAITLYN DOHERTY Up-and-coming Fashion Designer Kaitlyn Doherty sits tall in her studio amongst a multitude of bright handbags, all adorned with metallic zippers, bold colors and sparkly painted leather. Just 22-years-old, she has already had her designs featured in In-Style Magazine and has been selected to participate in the Philadelphia Fashion Incubator as a designer-in-residence. This young and talented artist on the rise sits down with CRED and shares her story. When did you first try your hand at fashion design and sewing? My mom taught me how to sew when I was ten. I would come home from school and go right into the basement to sew for hours on end. I also took sewing courses at my high school, Pepper Horsham. What kind of things did you make back then? A few dresses and basic tops. It wasn’t until I went to college that I started making women and children’s wear… even wedding gowns. What impact do you think your education has had on your work? It’s had a lot of impact. I got to study abroad in Rome while I was a junior in college. Traveling really helped me be more creative. I draw a lot of inspiration

By Rakeem Hardaway

from architecture. When I toured Prague Cathedral, I was immediately drawn to the elaborate ceiling and support beams. They inspired me to design and construct pants using more than two hundred pieces. How do you think Philadelphia compares to other cities whith regard to fashion? I think Philly has a great fashion scene. It was once a textile hub, and it’s on the rise again. There are a lot of independent and boutique designers here, which make it really unique. Philly is really climbing the ladder. How important is good craftsmanship? It is extremely important. You can’t have a garment falling off someone walking down the street, or on the runway for that matter. You can design better when you know how a garment is constructed. You can’t draw this beautiful gown but have no way to make it work. Craftsmanship is what makes the final piece beautiful and it’s what sets good designers apart from the rest. Do you think you can learn fashion without formal schooling? YouTube! I learned how to knit from YouTube videos. You can use a basic home sewing machine and do every lesson

out there. You can even go to a tailor and ask to observe them for a few hours– that can be really helpful. What made you decide to start your own company? I took an accessory design course my senior year in college. We had to enter The Independent Handbag Designers Awards competition. At the last minute, I created a pink leather handbag. I found out that I got selected for the finals and got to go to New York City for a big ceremony. I actually won the student category! This really inspired me to create a full line. Have your handbags been featured anywhere? Yes, all of the winning handbags were featured in the September issue of In Style magazine. I couldn’t believe it! Do you find criticism hard to deal with? Sometimes it makes me really nervous, but I’ve learned that people only want to help me improve. And there’s always room for improvement. What advise can you give a up and coming designer? Find what inspires you and just go for it– keep pushing. Photography courtesy of Kaitlyn Doherty

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THE BAD & THE HEALTHY In much of Philly, it is easier to find

Photos by Nikia Hooks

ORANGE DRINK

WEST PHILADELPHIA YMCA

than an actual orange.

Fitness camps, personal training, nutritional counseling

5129 Chestnut Street, 215-476-1361

Membership-based, open door policy, low-income assistance

51%

of Philly’s lowincome youth are obese

NORTHEAST FAMILY YMCA 11088 Knights Road, 215-632-0100 Fitness camps, wellness consultations Membership-based, open door policy, low-income assistance

THE FAMILY PRACTICE AND COUNSELING NETWORK 4700 Wissahickon Avenue Ste. 119, 215-843-9720 Diabetes screenings, mental health services, nutrition and cooking classes Discounted rates for uninsured

GREATER PHILADELPHIA HEALTH ACTION, INC. 1999 W. Hunting Park Ave, 215-228-9300 Primary medical,dental, behavioral health, child development services, nutritional counseling

The obesity rate among Philly’s high school students is

FIVE POINTS higher than the national average

Open door policy, low-income assistance

THE FOOD TRUST INITIATIVE 1617 John F. Kennedy Blvd. Ste. 900, 215-575-0444 Nutritional education, farm share availabity Call for cost information


_FABRIC

_METALS

WHERE

WHERE

5300 Whitaker Avenue

709 Sansom Street

WHAT

WHAT

inexpensive fabric for clothing design second-hand clothing and accessories

PROJECT IDEA make a fabric chandelier

various metals + tools to make 3D art, interior design, and jewelry

PROJECT IDEA make a ring with sheet metal

STREETCRED

T.B. HAGSTOZ & SON, INC.

CHEAP ART STUFF

JOMAR

By Rebecca Blessing

REVOLUTION RECOVERY

ALBERT ZOLL, INC.

ALLEGHENY ART CO.

_RECYCLED SCRAPS

_SEWING, TRIM, + FABRIC

_ART SUPPLIES + FRAMING

WHERE

WHERE

WHERE

7333 Milnor Street

744 South 4th Street

22 South State Street #1, Newtown

WHAT

WHAT

WHAT

wood and scrap metal for 3D art, interior design and furniture design

sewing supplies, notions, buttons, buckles, fabric, beads, etc.

general art supplies

PROJECT IDEA

PROJECT IDEA

make a salvaged wood headboard

make a bath mat or tote bag

PROJECT IDEA make and etch your own rubber stamps

For directions on how to make projects visit credmagazine-philly.com

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THEMIXTAPE Philly’s got no shortage of young and talented musicians. And with the help of Junior Music Executives and Philly Music Magazine, CRED created a spot just for them. So read on, listen up and keep it loud—it’s time to show Philly’s young musicians some love.

Left: Kite Party, Hip-hop Artist - Aime


PUT YOUR KITES UP SPEND LEAP DAY WITH THE BAND, KITE PARTY By Spenser Hogan

IT’S NOT ABOUT ‘MAKING IT’, IT’S ABOUT MAKING MUSIC.

February 24, 2012. For many it was a day spent preparing for the upcoming Leap Day festivities. You know: candy, crying babies, blue and yellow jumpsuits, the whole get-up. But for Philly-based band Kite Party this day marked a huge milestone in their musical endeavors: a show celebrating the release of their brilliantly orchestrated full-length album, Baseball Season. Cut to The Emoda Gallery, a discreet gem located on the fringes of South Philly, hidden behind unassuming whitewashed walls. I walk into this dimly-lit building, past Tony the Doorman, through a hazy hallway that might as well have a fog machine pumping out smoke non-stop, and arrive at the makeshift stage: a platform of plywood and two by fours, supported by old salvaged tires. Tim “Machete” Jordan, Kite Party bassist and vocalist, hops up and down across the semi-buoyant platform wielding a plastic sword as he battles front man Russell Edling and his prop wizard scepter. Kite Party is making this gallery their own before the audience has even showed up. Kite Party hits the stage amidst the swirling energy generated by four opening acts and performs their first song, “Runner.” The crowd’s lull turns into a roar. The set is electrifying. Guitarist Andre Pagani uses an assortment of pedals to create an ambient background that flows through cracks in the set while drummer Pat Conaboy (clearly a punk-rooted musician) plays with such

Photos by Gabby Smarr

intensity and succinct timing that it’s as if I can only feel the percussion rather than hear it. Throughout the set, guitarist and keyboardist Justin Fox switches back and forth between his instruments, creating waves and riffs that either blend into the overall tone of the song or tactfully pierce through when deemed necessary. As they near the end of the show, the crowd at the front of the stage becomes tightly packed. People sweating, singing, and hugging jump all over each other like animals—very happy animals. I watch a small girl to my left disappear under a sea of arms and shoulders only to be immediately scooped up onto her feet where she continues to shake and dance to the music. All the while, Russell and Tim croon out lyrics in a way that makes me want to visit my parents’ house and call my girlfriend from high school so she knows I’m doing great. After the show, a bit sticky but smiling, I grab coffee with the band at Grindcore House. The band members are now more reserved in their actions, as if they hadn’t just rocked a room of Philadelphians who loved their jams. I ask if they think their recent release on Animal Style Records is a step towards “making it” as a band. “What the hell kind of question is that?” Tim responds, joking with a faux-flabbergasted look on his face. “I don’t know man, it’s about making music and it’s about friends.” Adding quickly: “It’s mostly about friends.” So here is this band who’s just played an amazing show, who has an album released on a major label, and they’re not even thinking about the prospect of “making it” as musicians. Some would say that they already have. But Kite Party isn’t attempting to create marketable music or to win an undignified Battle of The Bands. They are creating music in the best way they know how—by playing shows surrounded by friends and enjoying the ride wherever their music takes them. And things are going well. This writer thinks there’s a sort of profound life lesson in there somewhere. www.kitepartyparty.com/ kiteparty.tumblr.com/


CREDMIXTAPE sit for a while. I play the beat three or four times without saying anything. I just sit and think, I can do this flow, say this, say it this way… Then I think about what’s going on at this time in my life. If nothing relates to the particular track then I’ll dig back into my past, or I’ll think about what might be in the future.

Photo courtesy of Khemist

PERFECT

KHEMISTRY BUSTIN’ IT UP WITH EMCEE, KHEMIST By Cannon of coupdela.com When Philly born and raised Terence Oliver steps onto the stage he’s no longer a timid 20-year-old. He’s quickly transformed into the artist known as Khemist—a unique, well-spoken emcee bursting with energy and cadence. Since the release of “Puzzle Pieces,” he has been popping up all over the local music scene. Khemist sits down with Philly Music Executives and CRED to share his inspiration and even reveal a few embarrassing secrets. WHAT MADE YOU WHO YOU ARE TODAY? I spent a lot of time wandering around the streets. So I learned that mentality, but, fortunately, I stayed in school. I guess I played both sides of the field. I’ve always been a creative person. I was taught to creative in whatever you do. So… even if you’re just making a bowl of cereal, you better be adding strawberries, peaches, all that.

SO HOW DID YOU COME UP WITH THE NAME KHEMIST? YOU REALLY DON’T SEEM LIKE A SCIENCE GEEK. In the beginning, I was rapping with my cousin. He would make the beats and I would write the verses. We would experiment with all different sounds and instruments. That chemistry we had together became “Local Khemistry”. Since I was the one putting the words to the instrumentation, I became Khemist.

ANY EMBARRASSING MOMENTS ON STAGE? This past summer, I forgot my words when I was on NBC’s “The 10 Show.” I was performing a song I made with my friend Tyler James. We had just recorded the song two days prior so my verse was fresh. I came into the song late and forgot my words so I was basically free styling. In my head I’m like, “What are you talking about right now?” But people seemed to think it was hot so I was cool with it. Look out for Khemist’s Mixtape #D2WR www.localkhemistry.com

HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN RAPPING? WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO START? I’ve been writing since I was 12 years old. I first started writing when I heard Nas’, “I Gave You Power.” It was the way he described himself and personified the gun. After that, you couldn’t tell me nothin’. It made me realize that you can do anything with rap. You can create a whole other universe with words. WHAT WAS THE FIRST ALBUM YOU EVER PURCHASED? Oh, snap. I’m embarrassed. It was Murphy Lee. My brother broke the CD right in front of my face too. After that, I bought “Street Dreams” by Fabolous… YOUR MUSIC GIVES OFF A PERSONAL VIBE. DO YOU FEEL LIKE YOU HAVE TO WRITE TO PLEASE YOUR AUDIENCE? I write to make myself feel good. It’s a blessing to have an audience that appreciates my music because they can relate to me. So in a way, writing for me is writing for them. WHO’S THE BEST RAPPER TO COME OUT OF PHILLY? Black Thought. The soul he has, the aggression and the pain in his voice just sounds like Philly. You can hear it. He’s on Jimmy Fallon every night representing “Philly.” I feel that he’s always been true to himself. WHAT GOES THROUGH YOUR MIND WHEN PUTTING A TRACK TOGETHER? Before I write, I let my thoughts

21


THEY GOT

NEXT YOUNG PHILLY HIP-HOP IS COMIN’ UP. GET READY. Story by Philly Music Magazine

MAZON

RAPPER/PRODUCER

AGE: 22 INSPIRATION: Nas, Jay-Z, Kanye West, Andre 3000 GOAL: A hallway of Grammy’s QUOTE: “Your life begins where your comfort zone ends.” – Unknown WEBSITE: mazonmusic.com SOCIAL MEDIA: @mazon717, facebook.com/likemazonmusic CHECK OUT: Mazon’s album “Maintaining”

LEE MAZIN

RAPPER/R&B

AGE: 19 INSPIRATION: My Mom, family, and every new experience. GOAL: To create a powerful female movement that will go down in history.

QUOTE: What you do today defines your tomorrows. SOCIAL MEDIA: @LeeMazin, facebook.com/amazinsmith CHECK OUT: Lee’s debut mixtape “simpLEEaMAZIN”

Photography by Chris White and Jon Kaufman


CREDMIXTAPE

AIME

RAPPER

J. COFIELD

RAPPER / PRODUCER

AGE: 23 INSPIRATION: Everyday life. My culture. Women. Everything I’ve been through until now, inside and outside of school.

THE WURXS RAP GROUP / PRODUCERS

GOAL: To go on both national and international tours, perform around the world. And to have at least one verse in my catalogue where I don’t have to rap because the entire audience is reciting it word for word.

QUOTE: “It’s a dog-eat-dog world where dogs are all visceral... Intelligent cats are gettin’ stacks be sensible. Tails through ya legs mean nails through ya head, or hands - they crucify you even if you’re makin’ miracles.” - Aime WEBSITE: perfectaime.com SOCIAL MEDIA: @AimeToThe CHECK OUT: DJ Damage and AIME Present: Perfect Aime

AGE: 20

AGES: 25 / 26

INSPIRATION: I’m inspired by the possibility of

MEMBERS: G. Moolah & Trons

improvement, of bettering myself and other people bettering themselves—in their life and in their music.

GOAL: To be both a rapper and an actor. QUOTE: “If you always do what you’ve always

GOALS: Keep getting better at what we do, and to make a living from our talents and investments. QUOTE: “The Wurxs makes dope music.” - The Wurxs WEBSITE: thewurxs.com

done, you’ll always get what you’ve always got.”

SOCIAL MEDIA: @thewurxs, facebook.com/The-Wurxs

SOCIAL MEDIA: facebook.com/jevancofield

CHECK OUT: Uptown Nights Pt. 1

CHECK OUT: Newest track titled “Bars.”

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By Typhanie Jones and Suzann Christine

SIX PLACES TO MAKE SOME NOISE

PHOOD COURT STUDIO

MILK BOY STUDIO

SIGMA SOUND

WHO RECORDS THERE?

WHO RECORDS THERE?

WHO RECORDS THERE?

Mazon

Chill Moody

Khemist

STUDIO CONTACT:

STUDIO CONTACT:

STUDIO CONTACT:

thephoodcourt@gmail.com, 610-357-3183

info@milkboyrecording.com, 215-629-5557

sessions@sigmasound.com, 215-988-1222

STUDIO PRICE: Call for request

STUDIO PRICE: Call for request

STUDIO PRICE: $100 +

STUDIO 1715

MIKE JERZ STUDIO

WHO RECORDS THERE?

WHO RECORDS THERE?

Young Savage, Cody Kahmar, Team Retro, DJ Diamond Kutz

Freeway, Young Chris, Tone Trump, Beanie Sigel, Daddy O, Ground Up

STUDIO CONTACT

STUDIO CONTACT

610-357-3183

twitter: @mikejerz, 856-371-2497

STUDIO PRICE: $30 to $64

STUDIO PRICE:

Call for request

LIL’ DRUMMABOY RECORDINGS WHO RECORDS THERE? Dymez, Cindy Cooper, Brittany and Cheryl

STUDIO CONTACT ldb@lildrummaboy.com, 215-574-1400

STUDIO PRICE: $30 to $64


SET UP YOUR OWN STUDIO Computer Audio/sound card Recording software: Adobe Audition or Protools Midi keyboard Good quality microphones and audio cables Studio monitors (speakers) and headphones Keep in mind that it’s more important to have the basics than to have tons of expensive gear. Check pawn shops to save on equipment.

JUST DO IT YOURSELF THE BASICS FOR GETTING STARTED IN MUSIC PRODUCTION By Typhanie Jones and Lildrummaboy Recordings

STUDY. STUDY. STUDY. LILDRUMMABOY RECORDINGS 818 South Street, Ste. B Audio engineering, music production classes and 18 week certificate program www.lildrummaboy.com

SEAMAAC 1711 South Broad Street After-school program with emceeing, digital recording, and DJing 215-467-0690

H.Y.P.E. TEEN PROGRAM 1515 Fairmount Avenue After-school program with digital music, vocal training, and entrepreneurship 215-235-2900


THE PORTFOLIO Young artists and writers spanning the Philadelphia region submitted more than 480 works to this issue of CRED. In an online poll, they voted for their favorite pieces. Here are their top picks.

Caitlin McCormack, 24 Mixed media


Becky Bailey, 21 Oil on canvas Ceaphas Stubbs, 23 Digital C-Print

29


Quinn Donover Grade 12 Oil pastel on paper Fresh Artists Collection Andrea Thomas, 25 Digital photograph


THEPORTFOLIO

Ryan Powell, 23 Digital photograph

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THEPORTFOLIO

Allison Zuckerman, 21 Oil Joshua Brown Grade 4 Oil pastel on paper Fresh Artists

33


Tali Purkerson, 25 Paper collage


THEPORTFOLIO

CRAYOLA Derrick Toler, 22 my cousin told me I should join the military and I looked at him like nigga please my uncle went to Vietnam and all he got in return was nightmares and some type of orange disease and because his skin was brown his country tis’ of thee greeted him with misery and a lifetime full of blues so that’s why I’ve got a fuck this country attitude and on top of that all that green they’re pumping out for their armies and war could be better spent helping the poor so you can save your be all you can be speech cause I see everything in color the world is not black and white anymore

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THEPORTFOLIO

Jesse Rappaport, 22 Pen, digital Tali Purkerson, 25 Paper collage

37


Sarah Tortora, 24 Mixed media installation Denyal Devecchio, 21 Digital rendering


THEPORTFOLIO

39


THEPORTFOLIO

Paula Searing, 22 Digital photograph, ink on paper Tom McQuaid, 21 Digital rendering

41


Brian Ledder, 22 Photograph, collage, pencil Johnny Plastini, 25 Lithograph

43


Kyle Kogut, 21 Gouache and mixed media on paper

45


Becky Bailey, 21 Oil on canvas Ally Brosnan, 19 Mixed media


THEPORTFOLIO

47


Nate Harris, 20 Pen and ink Shalah Roby Grade 8 Glue, sand, acrylic paint Fresh Artists Collection


Elise Wrabetz, 22 Digital photograph


THEPORTFOLIO

Ceaphas Stubbs, 23 Digital C-Print Adam Peditto, 24, Polaroid

51


Kristin Noell, 22 3D printed sculpture Shakirah S. Grade 11 Oil pastel on paper Fresh Artists Collection


THEPORTFOLIO

ATHENA’S CHILDREN Brandon Dixon, 14 Bards sing of the anomalous, and the dastardly deeds they’ve wrought. And indeed it’s a general consensus, that the weirdest beings are spawned from thought. Athena’s own birthrights, cast from the shield of her brain, live lives that reflect the darkest of sorrow, and mimic the hues of teardrop reminiscent rain. For the intelligent and the wise, teeter not upon the difference between evil and good; no, they trace comprehension and bellow sighs, for, in coherency, they become the misunderstood. And the common and the righteous, glare at difference with stark fear, shunning those who can help them, and thus, losing those who are dear. But the tides of the world, and the cogs of the sky, reach the end of their lives and become unfurled, and drop into the dry. Dry because of absence of that brilliant spark, dry because of presence of that monotonous grey, lacking the light that fights against the dark the intelligence that lengthens the day.

53


Allison Zuckerman, 21 Oil on canvas Lynne Filion, 20 Pen and xerox

55


Group Project, Hancock Elementary School Grade 4 Acrylic paint on paper Fresh Artists Collection David Morton, 24 Typewriter on paper


THEPORTFOLIO

57


Nate Harris, 20 Pen and ink

59


THEPORTFOLIO

Tali Purkerson, 25 Collage Andrew Zwarych, 22 Digita lphotograph

60


THEPORTFOLIO

61


Kyle Earl, 24 Digital photography Jordan Kocak, 25 Mixed media


THEPORTFOLIO

Tali Purkerson, 25 Paper collage

63


Caitlin McCormack, 24 Cotton thread, glue Morgan Dummitt, 21 Plaster, clay, steel, concrete


Caitlin McCormack, 24 Costume design, digital photograph


Jacob Greenberg, 21 Linoleum print on wood veneer Caitlin McCormack, 24 Mixed media


THEPORTFOLIO

67


Ceaphas Stubbs, 23 Digital C-Print Katherine O’Hara, 20 Pencil


THEPORTFOLIO

69


Katherine O'Hara, 20, Ink Elise Wrabetz, 22, Digital photograph


THEPORTFOLIO

71


Katherine O'Hara, 20 Colored pencil, water color Lianna Dunsing, 21 Digital photographs


THEPORTFOLIO

73


Jaclyn L. Spokojny, 24 Computer rendering from a digital model Courtney Hicks, 21 Digital design Nikia Hooks, 17 Digital photograph


THEPORTFOLIO

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Ariel Breton, 20, Mixed Media


Tali Purkerson, 25 Collage on paper


THEPORTFOLIO

HIPS Victoria Marchiony, 19 Dear bodyI love you, dearly, But, The extra muscle or bone or skin or Whatever combination that is Resting between my ribs and my jeans boils down to a Waste. Of space. If the fire in my belly, womanly heat between my legs Could incinerate what makes me More rectangle than triangle More boardroom than bedroom Then bring on the sirens. Ignite me. Make some hips bloom Because my man is coming home soon and I Know he needs a little reassurance that He’s the one wearing the pants because My language Is foul And my bathroom Is foul And my cooking Is foul So the least I can do is carve out a space Define some sort of waist To give him Something Feminine to hold on to.

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THEPORTFOLIO

Allison Zuckerman, 21 Oil on canvas Kristin Noell, 22 3D printed sculptures

81


Lauren Miller, 19 Charcoal on paper Adam Peditto, 24 Polaroid


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Ashley Marcovitz, 22 Laser-cut fused plastic grocery bags Katherine O’Hara, 20 Pen and Ink Tali Purkerson, 25 Collage

85


Veronica Brown after Gauguin Grade 12 Oil pastel on paper Fresh Artists Collection Katherine O’Hara, 20 Pen Ceaphas Stubbs, 23 Digital C-Print


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THEPORTFOLIO

Keshawna Clarke, 8 Marker on paper Katie Kalupson, 19 Graphite, ink, watercolor

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THEPORTFOLIO

Kyle Kogut, 21 Gouache, serigraphy on paper Andrew Lapatina, 22 Watercolor

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ARTSRISING functions as a builder, broker and bridge of arts education opportunities. For more information, visit www.myartsrising.org or facebook.com/artsrising


THEPORTFOLIO

ARTSRISING BUILDS: • Capacity in our schools to provide high quality arts instruction and activities • Connections to meaningful artistic and cultural experiences for children, youth and families •

The environment for a thriving creative economy

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SIGN THE ARTS EDUCATION PETITION

SIGN THE ECONOMIC JUSTICE PETITION

SUPPORT OUR CHILDREN BY SUPPORTING PHILADELPHIA’S PUBLIC SCHOOLS PCCY.ORG


Support CRED by buying John & Kira’s Chocolate Bees specially packaged for The Village 20% of sales go directly to The Village of Arts and Humanities www.johnandkiras.com/product/ Chocolate_Bees_Village

EVERY FLAVOR CHOCOLATES

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johnandkiras.com 1.800.747.4808


COMING JULY 2012 PHILLYEARTH.ORG

GET REAL‌ GET RAW!

(215) 913-3262 info@getrealgetraw.org

A quick and delicious way to nourish yourself in the most effective way possible.


GET INVOLVED | GET TRAINED

RAINBOW DE COLORES

ENVUÉLVETE | ENTRÉNATE

The newly revitalized playground is looking for volunteers to help with maintaining it clean and landscaped, also to help plan activities and programs. The group meets monthly. 3rd Wednesdays, on-going 6-7 PM 2344 N 5th St. (Church) El parque recien remodelado busca voluntarios que ayuden a mantener los jardines y el área limpia. También buscan ayuda en la planificación de actividades. El grupo se reúne mensualmente.

HALL OF DREAMS GARDENING CLUB

Interested in maintaining Eastern North Philadelphia beautiful? Join this group and become trained as a certified Tree-Tender, help plant trees and gardens throughout! The group meets monthly: 1st Wednesdays 6– 7 PM APM- 6th & Diamond Street Interesado en mantener Eastern North Philadelphia embellecido? Unete a este grupo y recibe certificación de Guardador de Arboles, ayuda a sembrar árboles y jardines a travéz del area. El grupo se reúne mensualmente.

www.sciphilly.org/sci-north sci.info@apmphila.org

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in partnership with Bryn Mawr College

You’ll sweat. You’ll think. You’ll make wild, impassioned work. The faculty will push you and you’ll push back.

For more info visit: headlongperformanceinstitute.org


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Calling all youth musicians,

artists, dancers, and scholars: Join PCAT this Spring and Summer! Spring Offerings include:  PCAT Scholars: Apply for this high-level arts and technology enrichment program for students with a 2.5 grade point average or above.  Afterschool Enrichment: Develop your skills and interests with fun, timely, and challenging classes. All students participating in enrichments will also receive academic support. Choose from Creative Arts, Music Production, Science Exploration, or Dance Crew.

Conveniently located in the heart of Northwest Philadelphia! Call us, visit our website, or stop by TODAY!

2111 Eastburn Ave. Philadelphia, PA 19138 267-297-6231 www.pcatphilly.org

 SAT Prep: Let us help you prepare for the SAT! Participants will get their own practice book, timed practice tests, and instructor expertise to help them succeed.

Summer Offerings include:  School’s Out for Summer: Celebrate the end of the school year with a week of fun and games at PCAT!  Camp PCAT: Spend your summer growing and learning with a wide variety of fun, engaging, and educational activities. PCAT staff members and camp counselors will help all children explore their interests, enhance their creativity, and achieve academic growth.  Camp PCAT Enrichment Program: Participate in a variety of enrichment activities including dance, art, music, technology, and science! Enroll students in PCAT Camp and the enrichments for a full day’s worth of activities!

www.facebook.com/pcatphilly

Space is limited so sign up now! Go to www.pcatphilly.org to register.


THE VILLAGE OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES

THE VILLAGE OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES

THE VILLAGE OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES

THE VILLAGE OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES Join The Village’s 2012 Spring/Summer Youth Arts Program with courses in fashion design,clay arts, THE VILLAGE OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES

animation, jewelry design, agriculture, photography, painting & graffiti, and hip-hop dance. THE VILLAGE OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES

THE VILLAGE OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES

For more info visit/call: villagearts.org, 215-225-7830

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OPEN CALL FOR ENTRIES CRED 3 AGES 25 AND UNDER SHOULD SUBMIT FINE ART CREATIVE WRITING POETRY FASHION DESIGN PHOTOGRAPHY INDUSTRIAL DESIGN GRAPHIC DESIGN ILLUSTRATION JOURNALISTIC STORIES CREDMAGAZINE-PHILLY.COM $$ HONORARIA FOR PUBLISHED WORK


INDEX Adam Peditto 51, 82

Kyle Kogut 44, 45, 90

Aime 23

Lauren Miller 82

Alex Marasigam 09

Lee Mazin 22

Allison Zuckerman 32, 54

Liz Encarnacion 14

Andre Pagani 20

Lianna Dunsing 73

Andrea Thomas 30

Lynn Filion 55

Andrew Lapatina 90

Mark Boston aka “Smart Mark” 08, 09

Andrew Zwarych 61

Mazon 22, 24

Angelo Saunders aka “Lo Smooth” 08, 09

Morgan Dummitt 64

Ariel Breton 76, 77

Mukhtar Stones 14

Ashley Marcovitz 85

Nate Harris 48, 58, 59

Becky Bailey 29, 46

Nikia Hooks 16, 75

Brian Ledder 42

Pat Conaboy 20

Caitlin McCormack 24, 64, 65, 67

Paula Searing 41

Cannon 21

Pricilla Ward 08, 09, 12

Ceaphas Stubbs 28, 50, 68, 87

Raheem Reeder 13

Courtney Hicks 74

Rebecca Blessing 04, 17

Daniel “Ski” Sevitski 08, 09

Rakeem Hardaway 15

Denyal Devecchio 39

Russell Edling 20

Elise Wrabetz 49, 71

Ryan Powell 31

Gabby Smarr 20

Sarah Tortora 38

Gerald Steward 08

Saul Zayas 10, 11

Heather Jones 10,11, 13, 14

Sherrieff McCrae 04, 09

J. Cofield 23

Spenser Hogan 20

Jaclyn L. Spokojny 74

Suzann Christine 24

Jacob Greenberg 66

Tali Purkerson 34, 37, 60

Jahmir Brown 12

Terrence Oliver aka “Khemist” 21, 24

Jesse Rappaport 36

Tim “Machete” Jordan 20

Johnny Plastini 43

Tom McQuaid 4, 40, Cover

Jon Kauffman

Typhanie Jones 24, 25

Jordan Kocak 62

Vanessa Dantzler 14

Justin Fox 20 Kaitlyn Doherty 15 Katherine O’Hara 84, 69, 87 Katie Kalupson 88

To contact an artist or writer who is

Kenneth Mui 13

featured in CRED, please email

Keshawna Clarke 89

cred@villagearts.org

Kristin Noell 52, 80 Kyle Black 14 Kyle Earl 62

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Tell your story! Are you and your friends making moves around the city using your creative passions? We’ll help you promote your work and you’ll help us show the world how awesome young people in Philly are. We are looking for young people who do music, videos, art, parties, dance fashion etc.

That means young, creative, entrepreneurial people like YOU and organizations who support them.


THINK YOU’VE GOT MOVES ON THE COURT?

PROVE IT

TRY OUT FOR PHILLY 80 BASKETBALL PROGRAM WWW.KMCHOOPS.COM

_ COMPETE AGAINST TOP PHILLY TALENT _ IMPROVE YOUR GAME _ EARN INCOME _ PARTICIPATE IN EDUCATIONAL AND ENTREPRENEURIAL PROGRAMS

PRESENTED BY

KMC HOOPS

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BACK COVER


CRED Philly : Issue 2