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Editor-in-Chief & Publisher Darlene C. Deever Business Development Director Marion Berdoati Sauzedde Marketing & Art Director Chris Barnes Creative Director Emilie Flory Editor-at-large David Dubrow Editor-at-large Laura MacLeod Editor-at-large Kelly B Editor Roy Bheer COVER: LIFEFORCE by ASTYANAX Special Thanks to Eric Alfonsi & Nicole Brezzo

Contributing Writers Cara Clark The Clown Todd Rigney Mike Blehar Christopher Zisi Sooz Webb Tony Newton Richard Rowntree Richard M. Martin Kriss Pickering Anne Bonnier Contributing Artists PRAIA 4 - - 4 Kirsty Rice Greg Palko Chantal Handley Dub Meter Stephen Harper For General & Advertising Inquiries CONTACT US


EDITOR’S LETTER

D-NG-TR-N-QU-C-345523-UNSPLASH

Dear readers, Our first year of publication comes to an end with a retro futuristic issue focused on the power of the Spirit. Highly creative and bright, the 80s profoundly affected our psyche: you will find that most of the works presented in this issue rehabilitate them and are their standard bearer. Beyond nostalgia stated by Tony Newton’s VHS Lives, Christopher Zisi’s complete guide to Slasher Movies and our Retro Horror exhibition dedicated to Marc Schoenbach’s brilliant Posters, the 80s continue to infuse their unusual creative spirit that never ceases to renew itself. Because it acts in harmony with our spirit, music is the subject of many articles in this summer edition and you will have the freedom to dive into Synthwave, Heavy Metal or Techno. By clicking on the icons and posters you will have access to great titles presented by Todd Rigney and also by Sooz Webb in her striking Jukebox! Paranormal and poltergeists are also an important part of this fourth issue thanks to Mike Blehar and his interview of Luci Leibfried, Laura MacLeod, The Clown and Kirsty Rice. The issue’s major innovation is embedded videos you will be able to watch while you flip through the magazine; this will give you access to an introduction of Popcorn Horror’s Bitesize Festival and to impressive music videos and trailers. For the first time we also chose to present you a hair fashion show in our Vault of Creation dedicated to hair designer Christophe Ortega, the darling of the Parisian hairdressers. Also, for our greatest pleasure, the Creators Unite Shop that has opened on spreadshirt.co.uk presents its first collection of T-shirts and accessories designed just for you. We wish you all a magical summer. May your spirit shine brighter than ever!

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

P. 002 Masthead P. 003 Editor’s Letter P. 004 Table of Contents P. 005 Creators Corner: Popcorn Horror : The Success Cards! P. 012 The Real Thrill: Bedtime Horror Story From The Clown P. 014 Passion Story: Synthwave: the music of retrofuturism by Todd Rigney P. 032 Le Boudoir: Interview with Paranormal Researcher Luci Leibfried by Mike Blehar P. 034 Identikit: Marc Schoenbach Interview by Chris Barnes

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Retro Horror An exhibition of Marc Schoenbach’s work

P. 066 Inception: The complete guide to Slasher Movies by Christopher Zisi P. 082 Vault of Creation: Fashion Show dedicated to Hair Designer Christophe Ortega P. 102 Tribute: Poltergeist by Laura MacLeod

P. 110 Showroom: Sooz’ Jukebox: Crossing Eternity | Dying Awkward Angel P. 118

Tony Newton’s Video Shop: VHS Lives, a Schlokumentary

P. 126 Inspiration Box: teamLab | PRAIA | Daniel Avery | OMNIKID | Valy Mo | Golden Bug P. 145 Stimulus: Haunted Doll by Kirsty Rice Creators Unite 04 Spirit Issue

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CREATORS CORNER

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CREATORS CORNER

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CREATORS CORNER

POPCORN HORROR: THE SUCCESS CARDS! In our feature for our Creator’s Corner, we ask a creator to present their work and define the key to their success. For this new issue, we asked our partner Cara Clark, owner and manager of Popcorn Horror to tell us more about her stunning achievement. Hello Creators Unite readers! Here with a little introduction to the recently announced partner Popcorn Horror, from owner/manager/fiend Cara Clark. Popcorn Horror is an independent horror project based in Scotland. We run a newsfeed for the latest indie horror content, reviews, artwork and articles (think Buzzfeed managed by Wednesday Addams!). Two years ago we launched our digital magazine, to provide fans with more in-depth coverage and exclusives from the independent horror scene. We also run events in our home city of Glasgow showcasing indie horror films, theater, art, drag, music and more. Our latest venture has been introducing a mid-year horror festival to Glasgow horror fans. We’ve run Halloween events for several years, but once a year is not nearly enough to showcase the wealth of indie talent on offer. Plus, we’re very much believers in ‘Horror is for Life, Not Just For Halloween’. Without a background in events, we threw ourselves in the deep end back in 2015 when we launched Glasgow Horror Festival. Now...we’re still working out some of the kinks (printers are the enemy!) - but are proud to offer our local horror community an alternative to the major cinema releases from large distributors and studios. We screen films dealing with political subjects, offbeat humor, dark fantasy, UK folk tales, and other subjects that otherwise might not find a voice among the increasing wave of sequels and remakes in cinemas.

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CREATORS CORNER

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CREATORS CORNER

Past winners at our festivals have included Burn from Chris Barnes, student film Goodnight by Cole Thompson Lynch and Dogged by Richard Rowntree. So aside from showcasing awesome indie horror creators, what else is Popcorn Horror all about? We want to make horror a fairer, more accessible space for everyone in its diverse fanbase. We are big supporters of the Women in Horror Month campaign which takes place every February and aims to challenge the traditional stereotypes of female horror characters - as well as promote the work of talented female filmmakers. Through the campaign, we have been lucky enough to meet extremely creative, innovating women who are making ground-breaking horror films. We also launched our own campaign in 2017 to raise awareness of the stereotypes disabled horror characters often appear in within our favourite genre. With our Disability in Horror Month campaign, we also aimed to spotlight disabled actors, filmmakers, writers and other creators who have faced barriers in the horror industry. Several member of the core Popcorn Horror team are disabled, and this is a cause that is very personal to us. So looking ahead, what can you expect coming to your magazine? We hope to bring even more awesome horror content from independent creators to the pages of Creators Unite! The team has made us feel very welcome, and we’re excited to be working with them in the coming months to share guest articles, collaborations and more. Look out for more heart-stopping horror coming your way in 2018! #SupportIndieHorror

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POPCORN HORROR ADVERT

Horror Reviewer and Author Rebecca Kolodziej is looking for films to review!

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BRUTAL POSTERS ADVERT

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THE REAL THRILL

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THE REAL THRILL

When watching my YouTube videos, don’t panic if your screen starts to bleed. Before you experience my bedtime horror stories you must always check that your doors are locked. Then turn off the lights… Maybe it’s a good idea to sit with a wall behind you, so if anything runs at you… You’ll see them coming. Then get comfortable for me to scuttle along your ear canal… Once I’m inside your skull I’ll never leave. THE CLOWN

You’ll Never Enter A Swimming Pool Again

Bedtime Horror Story From The Clown

This disturbing pool story is not for you if you have aquaphobia or a fear of drowning. This is a terrifying story about swimming in a creepy pool. If you happen to be scared of empty swimming pools, then you'll find this haunted story far more frightening. And If you think creepy abandoned swimming pools are a good idea for YouTube horror videos, then this scary story set in a public pool will haunt you to the point that you'll never enter a swimming pool again. NEW horror stories/lists every Thursday and Saturday. You can have The Clown scuttling around inside your skull by subscribing to his Youtube channel down below. Click the bell notification and you won't miss anything.

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PASSION STORY

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PASSION STORY

THE MUSIC OF RETROFUTURISM by Todd Rigney

Bonus Tracks : PRAIA | Visual Conception: Emilie Flory As far back as I can remember, music has played an incredibly crucial role in my life. A lot of my favorite memories have very distinct soundtracks (ranging from Rap to Bluegrass), so much so that I once dreamed of hitting the road with musicians as a sound engineer. It didn't matter what type of music I mixed, really, as long as I found myself in the thick of it on a daily basis. Some might call that obsession, though I prefer the term "passion." In fact, once upon a time, I even released an instrumental industrial album on a now-defunct internet label. And if anyone's at all curious, my old COMPORT 4 MYSPACE and BANDCAMP pages still linger on the web, dusty and neglected. Needless to say, my professional music career didn't make it very far. Sadly, as my career shifted focus and my life gradually became more complicated (for both the better and the worse), my taste in music -- more specifically, my desire to seek out something different and engaging -- began to stagnate. As my 30s started coming to a close, I found myself becoming what I dreaded the most: a guy who doesn't like discovering new music. Instead, I blissfully surrounded myself with stuff that was very familiar to me and stepping outside of that boring little box sounded like an incredible amount of time and effort. Teenage Todd would definitely hate middle-age Todd, no doubt. But then I discovered Synthwave.

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PASSION STORY

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PASSION STORY

I'm not sure how I stumbled across the genre (though I'm pretty sure I was looking for the Far Cry 3: Blood Dragon soundtrack), but I found myself digging through playlists on SPOTIFY that featured the likes of Dance with the Dead, Makeup and Vanity Set, Com Truise, Perturbator, and Absolute Valentine. This led me straight into the arms of Protector 101, Mega Drive, Cluster Buster, Jupiter-8, and a host of other marvelous musicians who seem to have the same idea: create fun, energetic tunes that could easily serve as the soundtrack to a horror or action flick from the 80s. Some of them even included the sound of VHS tapes as introductions for their songs. For the first time in a while, I felt like I'd found my tribe. Before long, I turned my attention toward the world of BANDCAMP, where the Synthwave scene seemed to live and breathe. I couldn't get enough. I soon discovered that this genre didn't begin and end with Synthwave alone -- there were subgenres and offshoots that I'd yet to fully explore. Darksynth, for instance, seems geared toward the unmistakable feel of old-school 80s horror soundtracks (think John Carpenter), while retrowave seems more upbeat and fueled by an endless supply of adrenaline. Honestly, it didn't matter which genre or subgenre or offshoot I listened to -- it all began to have a noticeable influence on my work as a writer. My fiction suddenly became sharper, clearer, and more precise, evoking the movies and televisions series I remember watching as a kid. I wanted these tales to feel like a Synthwave album from start to finish, and to do so, I began using the likes of Jordan F, Street Cleaner, and Judge Bitch (just to name a few) as the unofficial soundtracks for my deranged tales. Can you tell I'm a fan?

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PASSION STORY

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And don't get me started on the artwork. While some of it is a little derivative -- vibrant grids can only offer so many thrills -- most of these album covers are the stuff of neon-soaked fever dreams. Many of them depict horrible scenes from dystopian worlds ripped from the pages of William Gibson novels. And because some of these albums serve as soundtracks for movies that don't exist, many musicians choose to use artwork that resembles theatrical movie posters from the 70s and 80s, which instantly creates a razor-sharp image of its accompanying sonic landscape. Dance with the Dead, for one, always has remarkable album covers, as does Meteor and Dan Terminus. The old adage suggests you shouldn't judge a book by its cover, but I think there's an exception for Synthwave albums. When I have limited funds to spend on a new album or EP by an artist I'm getting to know, I tend to gravitate toward those with phenomenal covers. I can't help myself. One of the best aspects of the Synthwave scene is the community that has grown up around it. Subreddits devoted to the genre teem with enthusiastic fans who are quick to recommend songs by up-and-coming musicians who are finding their footing in the world of internet-released music. YOUTUBE channels, meanwhile, devote time and energy to releasing and promoting work from new and established artists. NewRetroWave, for example, serves as a wonderful jumping-off point for newcomers to the genre who want to discover the latest and greatest tunes, including songs from musicians who have helped pioneer Synthwave, Outrun, and Retrowave over the past several years. The channel also has curated playlists that can serve as the perfect soundtrack to workouts, the nineto-five grin, or when you're itching to create but need some wonderful music to get you inspired.

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PASSION STORY

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PASSION STORY

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PASSION STORY If you know where to look, there's certainly no shortage of places to find Synthwave music, as well as people to help spread the good word. Reading what I've written so far, you might think that Synthwave can cure cancer or put another human being on the moon -- maybe even Jupiter. Well, it can't -- I apologize if I built up your expectations to an utterly unachievable level. I have a tendency to get that way about the things I love. That said, I firmly believe the genre can ignite the creative spark that escapes some of us as life, work, and all that other stuff begins to take its toll on us. I'm of the belief that you should take inspiration from wherever you can find it, and for me, Synthwave is the elixir of my wavering (and some might say questionable) creative output. I'm not joking or exaggerating when I say there's almost always a Synthwave, Darksynth, Outrun, or Retrowave song playing when I'm writing, editing, or working out. It's infested my life in more ways than one, and I'm pretty thankful for it. All shall worship the synth. Before I wrap this up, I need to thank a few people, including Dance with the Dead, Midday Static, Protector 101, Makeup and Vanity Set, Jupiter-8, Mega Drive, Judge Bitch, Absolute Valentine, Carpenter Brut, Daniel Deluxe, and Cluster Buster for helping me claw my way out of a fairly substantial writer's block. I'd almost turned my back on writing when I stumbled across Dance with the Dead's Into the Abyss on SPOTIFY nearly four years ago. Without it, I doubt my novella M'rth and my short story collection Taste Level Zero, as well as a few scripts, would have ever seen the light of day. I can't thank you all enough. Seriously. Now, where did I put that Perturbator cassette...

Todd Rigney

Todd Rigney was born and raised in Lexington, Kentucky. He published the book Found in 2004 and followed up the acclaimed novel with a series of short stories entitled Twelve (Stories Concerning Love and Death) in 2011.

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PASSION STORY

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PASSION STORY

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PASSION STORY

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ADVERT OR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

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LE BOUDOIR

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LE BOUDOIR

INTERVIEW WITH MS. LUCI LEIBFRIED

by Mike Blehar

Photo: Sharon McCutcheon UNSPLASH Luci Leibfried is a tarot reader and empath. She has over twenty years of experience reading the cards. She is a member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and have traced four generations of her family on the tribal rolls. Her style of reading is different from that of others. She doesn’t ask any questions when she reads for a client. She prefers to see what the cards tell her. Luci Leibfried is also a paranormal investigator and radio host. Both are passions that have helped her to find her connection to the other side. That connection has made her a better person. It has helped her to find her own path on her life's journey in this world and it prepares her for the next. Her path has led her to the knowledge that she is here to help, to bring others into their own sense of themselves and to help them connect with the universe. About Tarot Reading, Luci says it is a look into your own personal world. It is confirmation of the messages and feelings you have regarding your life. You are in control of your path; a reading can only give you the map of the choices you have. A Tarot reading can offer a reflection on your present, your past, your future and bring clarity to your thoughts that will empower and relax you. A Reading can help you focus and enhance love, career or relationships, give solace and comfort during difficult emotional times and also provide insights that broaden your choices and help you make better life decisions. A Reading can help you get in touch with your own intuition and use your untapped spiritual power. A reading is simply a tool for you to make sense of your own personal journey.

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IDENTIKIT

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IDENTIKIT

MARC SCHOENBACH Exclusive Interview by Chris Barnes

Visual Conception: Roy Bheer | Photos Courtesy Sadist Art Designs This summer in our feature for our Identikit we decided to offer you a spectacular exhibition with another Web Talk. We had the chance to meet the talented Marc Schoenbach who accepted this interview with our Art Director Chris Barnes. Here is for you the exchange between two artists who are passionate about cinema and graphic design. Enjoy! Thank you for sparing the time to speak to us here at Creators Unite Magazine, Marc. For those that don't know, can you tell us a little about yourself and your work? Well, for the past five years or so I run Sadist Art Designs, my very own design company that specializes in retro horror art, specifically focusing on the magical “VHS era� from the 80s. I love to do neon and vibrant pieces as well as more subdued pieces shrouded in darkness. My clients span from independent film makers to T-shirt companies like Fright Rags and Gutter Garbs, as well as doing work for cover art for Waxwork Records and Arrow Video.

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IDENTIKIT

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IDENTIKIT I've been a huge fan of your work for a while from afar, but it was only when I tentatively began creating posters for my own projects and various indie films that I really started to appreciate how good your stuff is! How long have you been honing your skills? Were you trained? I obtained my first illegal copy of Photoshop back in 2004. At the time, I really just wanted to fuck around, like cutting people’s head out and pasting them on other bodies. Then I saw the poster art for Tarantino’s Death Proof and I was like, “Ohm, wow! How’d they do that?!” I figured it was with the same program I used, so I basically became obsessed at learning. I would just use whatever images I could find online and mess with them. I am self-taught, both from books and YouTube, relying mostly on the latter. That whole retro 70's/80's style is back in fashion at the moment and has been for a little while now (for some of us it's never been out of fashion! :-P) -- why do you think it's popular again? Why are people taking brand-spanking, glossy, new images and creasing, tearing, and destroying them?! Nostalgia! The people creating stuff now and sorta in charge are at the age where they are showcasing what inspired them when they were kids. We’re all just a sum of our influences and now we’re seeing this influx of 80s inspired films and even reboots. The people in charge are creating what inspired them all those years included… Both you and me. What inspired you to initially start creating in such a style? Like I mentioned before, I was just messing around. I actually wanted to maybe design album art for indie rock bands. But once I saw that Death Proof poster, my brain was flooded with nostalgia. I wanted to recreate that vibe with my work—not just for the look of it, but also how it made you feel.

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IDENTIKIT

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IDENTIKIT Are you able to tell us a little about your creative process? I do what’s called photo manipulation, where I use photos and manipulate them as necessary, and then digitally paint over them. When possible, which is pretty often these days, I hold my own photo shoots where I take my own reference photos. This allows me so much creative control and gives my work a unique touch. As we've discussed in the past I use a free software called Paint.Net, which took me an age to get to grips with, whereas you use Photoshop -- arguably the most popular software out there. Did it take you a while to master? Yeah, and I’m still learning. When I started Photoshop back in 2004, I realized how huge of a fucking program it was. And I realized it would take me years to master it. But I take it one day at a time. When I’m not watching cat videos on YouTube or viewing porn, I like to watch tutorial videos. PHLEARN offers some great tutorials on YouTube. I try to watch tuts at least once a week. How have people learned of your work and services? Did it take a while to be recognised and in demand? Myspace originally, then Facebook and Instagram. Early on in my career, I learned the importance of working my ass off for the right people. I didn’t charge but knew I eventually would. I discovered this kickass production known as Bloody Cuts… they were these aspiring filmmakers and I contacted them and told them I’d like to volunteer my services. I knew I would get a lot of exposure that way. What are some of your favourite horror films and why? The Halloween series, the Friday series, Return of the Living Dead (1 and 2), Creepshow, Texas Chain Saw… you know, all the classics!

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IDENTIKIT

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IDENTIKIT Like a lot of horror fans, I saw these at an early age and loved the way they made me feel. Some people get that same thrill with participating in sports or riding rollercoasters. If you could have free rein on a poster for any horror film of the past, what film would you love to get stuck into? Texas Chain Saw Part 2 and Return of the Living Dead.

And your favourite posters of all time are...? Ft13th Part IV, Halloween 2, Creepshow 2, Leatherface, Fright Night, Chopping Mall, Mausoleum, Ghoulies, Halloween 4. I love all of your designs but if I had to choose a favourite it'd probably be your one-sheet for Jeff Monahan's Corpsing -- created as part of a Fangoria competition no less. How did that come about? Thanks! When I got into the good graces of Fangoria, I spoke with the president on the phone and we discussed some stuff, one of which was whether or not I would want to participate in this competition. I didn’t turn down anything! At the time, I was a psychologist that wanted to switch careers. Any work I could do that would help that happen, I welcomed! You were also featured in issue #322 of the great magazine, which I've revisited since arranging our chat -- how was that whole process?! It's fuckin' Fangoria, man! It was some time back in 2010 when I was watching the Spike Scream Awards. It was this horror award show. When the show was over, I began to cry. Literally, with tears and everything. I just felt like I was missing out on life‌ like, I should be up there accepting an award or something. At least, I should have been in attendance!

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IDENTIKIT

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IDENTIKIT Frustrated, I went on Facebook and reached out to my only horror friend at the time, Ted Geoghagan (director of We Are Still Here, and Mohawk) who was pretty active in the local horror community. I actually didn’t even know him really. He was a Facebook friend. He invited me to this Horror Festival in NYC. I went. Then soon after, he gave me a contact for Fangoria and the rest was history. So, what's next for Marc Schoenbach? Are you working on anything at the moment? Yeah! No shortage of work here, which is great. I can’t say what I’m working on, but I am working on some designs for Fright Rags, Waxwork Records and Gutter Garbs to name a few. Fancy running a workshop for lowly poster-creating amateurs from Liverpool, England? I might! I really can’t commit to anything in stone, but when my schedule clears up, I’d love to help out if I can. Where can people find you, sir? I gotta get better at this online awareness thing. Having a website would be smart! Until then, check out Sadist Art Designs on instagram or just google Sadist Art Designs. Haha. You're a gentleman, mate! Thank you for your time and the advice you've given me lately. There's always a place for you and your fantastic work here at Creators Unite. Rock on! Thanks for your interest!

Chris Barnes Founder and owner of SLAUGHTERED BIRD FILMS and BRUTAL POSTERS, Chris Barnes wrote and produced the award winning short psychological horror Burn, Best Short Film at Popcorn Horror Festival and Shriekfest 2017.

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IDENTIKIT

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IDENTIKIT

MARC SCHOENBACH Creators Unite Gallery welcomes RETRO HORROR An exhibition of Marc Schoenbach’s work

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IDENTIKIT

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IDENTIKIT

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IDENTIKIT

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IDENTIKIT

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IDENTIKIT

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IDENTIKIT

Sadist Art Designs creates custom poster art for media design. With a special love for retro horror and art-house stylization, Sadist Art Designs is your one way stop in creating unique and iconic imagery that's sure to make you proud of your project.

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CREATORS UNITE ADVERT

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INCEPTION

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INCEPTION

MACHETE & AXE CINEMA The complete guide to Slasher Movies by Christopher Zisi Book Cover: Dub Meter

Machete and Axe Cinema marks the fifth book of retired FBI Agent Christopher Zisi. America’s most

beloved horror writer has done it again! This tome strikes at the heart of what horror has become over the past 40 years. Though many are uncomfortable about admitting their admiration for slasher films, Mr. Zisi is bold about this. Forget about Romantic Comedies and Docu-dramas, read a book about the movies that you have always loved. Whether it be The Burning or Motor Home Massacre, all your favorite slasher films [and many you have never heard of] can be found here. So enjoy and allow this book to construct your “Movies to See” list.

INTERVIEW WITH CHRISTOPHER ZISI 25 years in the FBI, what was that like? What did you do for the FBI? A lot of fun. I had a badge, a gun and a car. They recruited me in law school found something in me they liked. I wasn’t the typical law student and the thought of going to work in a law firm…well…let’s just say I would have rather swallowed razor blades.

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INCEPTION

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INCEPTION So, when the FBI came calling I was excited‌and I got a badge, gun and car. For the majority of my career I conducted drug and organized crime investigations in the Baltimore Division. Then I was promoted and sent to the Bureau’s training academy in Quantico. There I instructed new agent trainees in interviewing and interrogation. I then was tasked to teach law enforcement personnel from all around the world interrogation, detection of deception, and issues relating to police shootings. Did you see the world? I was sent all over the world to instruct interrogation and detection of deception. Poland, Greece, The Netherlands, Georgia, and other European countries, but most of my travel was to Asia. I taught and got to know a lot of cops in Vietnam, Cambodia, Singapore, Indonesia, The Philippines, India, The Maldives, and Korea, to name just a few of the countries. From FBI to slasher films, where did that transition come from? There never was a transition. My love for slasher films came first. I was hired by the FBI in 1990, but the 1980s was a formative decade for me. During the 80s I graduated high school, graduated college (Boston College) and then graduated law school (Tulane Law School in New Orleans, Louisiana). Now I write exclusively about horror, exploitation, and other B type films. Slasher films have been criticized for promoting misogyny and other violent tendencies to impressionable youth. You have written a celebration of your favorite slasher films, many from the 1980s in Machete and Axe Cinema. How did you end up a lawyer and an FBI agent instead of a serial killer? I remember that criticism. In the 1980s Siskel and Ebert were major critics of slasher films.

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INCEPTION

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INCEPTION Those two critics and Tipper Gore (the wife of Al Gore) were on an endless campaign to get rid of these films as they believed the children of America would all turn into homicidal rapists. Imagine my surprise when I earned a degree in English from college and then a law degree…and then being accepted into the FBI. As the decades have passed, violent video games now draw that same criticism. The science supporting those theories is suspect at best, and probably non-existent. In a very general sense the 1980s slasher craze (which really began with John Carpenter’s Halloween in the late 1970s) was an Americanized reaction to Giallo (Italian horror) of the 1970s. In fact, if anything, our slasher movement in America was a more cleaner version of Giallo. For the most part, many of the taboo subjects delved into in Giallo were scrubbed from the slasher subgenre. Incest, pedophilia, and deviant sexual practices never made it into American (and let us also include Canada) slasher movies. Sure, pre-marital sex ruled the day, but I still maintain that slasher films were the only medium to extoll against this great sin. After all, when a hunk and babe engaged in passionate sexual intercourse, without the benefit of clergy, they got hacked to pieces. Other misbehaviors were also discouraged…trespassing into cemeteries or mausoleums for instance. So, you do not see the portrayal of women in these films as exploitive or tending to objectify them? This occurs in almost every major Hollywood production, let us not pick on slasher films. Many characters, male and female, in slasher films are put forth as mindless, hormonal, jerks. These jerks, whether it be a sex-crazed slut or a hunk football player, usually get killed. Their lack of intelligence and superficial existences don’t serve them well and usually gets them cut up into several pieces. High schools and colleges (especially fraternities and sororities) have a large number of these dolts. In real life they don’t get murdered, but graduate, get jobs, get elected to office, and ruin the world.

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INCEPTION Looking back at women in slasher films from the 1980s, I remember strong and independent gals who eschewed pre-marital sex (for the most part) and many times defeating evil. I can tell you these heroines who survive the evil menace probably benefit the world when they grow up. Okay, like who? Who were your favorite strong women characters in these films? So many, but I did have my favorites. Leah Ayres as Michelle the camp counselor in The Burning. Brave, heroic, with a very smart sex-appeal to her. She was a camp counselor who helped defeat Cropsy and save, at least, some of the teen-aged campers. Then Rebecca Balding was also a favorite scream queen of mine. She played Scotty, a very perky and cute college coed, in The Silent Scream and Trish, an assertive reporter, in The Boogens. In both films, she emerged victorious against both a psycho killer and a nest of slimy creatures. Okay, I know, Michelle, Scotty, and Trish had pre-marital sex in these films. But hey! I was a geeky teenager then, so I could forgive their transgressions. Many kids didn’t have enough guts to approach attractive girls in schools, but these characters, in some imaginary world, were our girlfriends. In addition to being horror films, were these slasher films also serving as erotica for teenagers coming of age in the 1980s? Yes. I argue it was a more pure introduction into erotica than PENTHOUSE and PLAYBOY. The women in these films had brains and initiative. In the girly magazines, the girls are photos and objects. Whether it be the aforementioned Scotty or Michelle, these women fought evil and could defend themselves even when their boyfriends assumed room temperature. Is erotica bad for a 16 or 17year-old? I guess that is debatable, but I figure it can be very healthy and mold us into rationale adults. Denying any part of the id (Sigmund Freud invented this word to describe the seedier parts of our subconscious, Ed) won’t serve anyone well.

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INCEPTION I think Sigmund Freud would have agreed with me. Anything suppressed will eventually explode in a messy manner. A teenager’s ability to watch pre-marital sex was not limited to slasher films. Most films winning Oscars in the 80s had this stuff, as well. With increasing hormones in slasher film fans, makers of these movies knew the wants and desires of their audiences. Perhaps we wanted sex as high school nerds but knew it wasn’t in the cards. The good-looking babe or hunk would never give us the time of day. Even if they did, we were too nervous and insecure to approach them, knowing nervousness would defeat our efforts. This fear of intimacy with the opposite sex probably saved us from all sorts of heartaches and mistakes. But in slasher films we could escape to a fantasy world, where evil was defeated and on occasion us geeks ended up with the babe (after her boyfriend was axed, of course). You’re not a teenager anymore, but you are still a slasher film fan. Are you weird, or does the slasher film have many fans who are in their 50s? Yes and yes. I am weird. I am a retired FBI agent who writes about horror instead of doing government contract work in Washington, DC. But weird can be good. I implore my kids, “always be interesting.” Whenever I tell people I am writing books, they always assume I am putting out crime or espionage novels. Boring! Many slasher fans are over 50 years old. Without mentioning names I can tell you that once a week I have lunch with a high official in the FBI. Our topic for discussion? Slasher films and other horror… he also likes zombie films. When I go to church and mention my reviews or love for slasher films the reaction is surprising. Never do I get a judgmental look, but people’s eyes light up and typically name their favorite slasher film. Did the slasher film survive the 1980s? Though most of the films included in Machete and Axe Cinema are from the 1980s, there is a significant chunk of titles from post 2000. Creators Unite 04 Spirit Issue

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INCEPTION To go a step further, many of these newer films keep the same themes and plot elements of their predecessors. The temptation of the modern film-maker would be to adjust the plots and character portrayals to include some modern themes or sensitivities. Not so, though! 2005’s Motor Home Massacre or 2009’s Sorority Row typify these new slasher films. To my happiness, no hard-hitting examinations of where we have come as a collective people in the past 20 years. Still nubile chicks and hunk brutes looking for pre-marital sex and getting hacked up. There is something so pristine about that. Even those taboo elements of Giallo, which we discussed earlier, haven’t crept into the plots. Your book suggests that in the 1990s the slasher film disappeared but re-emerged over the past 15 years. Why did this sub-genre disappear for ten years and what brought it back? Anything positive regarding film disappeared in the 1990s. The 1990s saw the beginning of the end to a lot when it came to movie watching. Going to the theater to watch a movie once a week also began to disappear. Movies got expensive. No more three-dollar matinees, instead we were forking out over ten dollars to enter a movie theater. With popcorn and a soda… add another ten dollars per person. Boutique cinema and draft houses were popping up where you could be served dinner and wine during the film. As real people who have to work for a living were being squeezed out of the movie theater, slasher films went away. Not to fear, nothing in horror stays dead. The SYFY Channel began making their own films and straight to DVD releases flooded the market as the 21st Century hit. The technology also became cheaper as even amateur film makers could utilize CGI. I already mentioned 2005’s Motor Home Massacre, but a lot of really good slasher films hit the straight to DVD and cable movie channels. One advantage to these new mediums is that the MPAA rating system could be bypassed. Cutting material, usually gore and nudity, to attain a PG-13 rating was no longer a requirement to have a film released.

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INCEPTION John Carpenter, Wes Craven and a host of ‘scream queens’ helped define 1980s slasher films. Who is emerging in the 21st Century as pioneers in these new horror films? Still to be determined. There is some very exciting young talent out there, and even more encouraging is a lot of it are females. Perhaps that is the ultimate irony to the predominant 1980s criticism of slasher films. Jessica Cameron is doing great work, her Truth or Dare film was sensational. Actresses like Danielle Harris and Debbie Rochon are admired and respected for their roles in horror, call them the neo-scream-queens. Boys born in this century can now fantasize that these neo-scream-queens are their girlfriends. The opportunities are great for this new talent hitting the slasher and horror genre. Straight to DVD, NETFLIX, a plethora of cable and satellite movie channels, and an eager talent pool are returning us to the day when we can see a new slasher film every week, albeit not in a movie theater. Costs are way down with new technology and a rise in independent indie film makers can avoid much of the union and labor costs. As Hollywood continues to get boring and preachy with their adherence to weird political causes, and mistreats its female talent, indie films will explode. Actually, they are in the process of exploding and the slasher film is seeing the benefit. As the world’s most beloved horror aficionado, what is next for Christopher Zisi? I’ll keep writing. I do have to say as I get older, I am getting a lot better looking and talented. Everyone in my family is talented, either with music or acting, but not me. Overcoming my shortcomings, which includes talent, I think I need to actually act in a slasher film…

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INCEPTION I’d even be satisfied cast as that schmuck that goes down into the dark basement to check the fuse box. If the acting thing doesn’t work out, which it probably won’t, I have some more books in the pipeline. Hopefully by the end of the year we will chat about a future tome of mine on exploitation and drive-in cinema. In addition to the films, the talent (actors and film makers) have always interested me. Perhaps I can write a book on some of the more intriguing personalities in horror.

Interview & Visual conception by Dub Meter

About Christopher Zisi

Christopher Zisi is an American horror writer from Fredericksburg, Virginia. In 2013 he created the blog Zisi Emporium for B Movies which showcases his thoughts and witticisms of horror, exploitation, and science fiction films. To date, over 900 films have been reviewed on this blog. Mr. Zisi has published four books which include compilations of his reviews and one of his own horror poetry. Before writing about horror full time, Christopher Zisi was a Special Agent for the Federal Bureau of Investigation. During his 25-year career with the Bureau, Zisi conducted drug and organized crime investigations in the Baltimore Field Office and eventually moved to the FBI’s training academy in Quantico, Virginia. At Quantico, he taught interviewing and interrogation, detection of deception, and also issues relating to police shootings. The FBI sent Zisi to 25 countries (including Vietnam, Cambodia, Poland, and Indonesia) to teach interrogation and detection of deception. Christopher Zisi is married to a musician and has two children in college. In 2018, he will publish another book focusing on exploitation films.

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FEATURE BY ROY BHEER & DUB METER Photos Courtesy: Nicolas Demare, Dimitri Coste, Creators Unite 04 SpiritVerlant, Issue David Sarfati, David Andreas Licht &82ILP


VAULT OF CREATION

Fashion Show dedicated to Hair Designer

CHRISTOPHE ORTEGA

“The importance of style while maintaining the personality of everyone” is probably what best defines Christophe Ortega’s work. An ambassador of Mod’s Hair Style and Guillaume Bérard’s work, renowned French Hair Designer Christophe Ortega is one of the favorite hair designers of French stars and artists. He worked in some of the most famous salons of Paris before joining the team at Ken Club – the great sport and beauty club of stars! Hair Stylist of Roberto Alagna, Jude Law, Ludivine Sagnier, Cécile de France, Alain Bashung, Mika, Zazie, Linda Hardy, Clara Morgan amongst others, he also participated in fabulous fashion shows for Franck Sorbier, Altuzarra, Tony Ward and Sophie Hong. Christophe Ortega is not only a creator, he is a performer and the brain behind the PERFORM HAIR & UNDHAIRGROUND fashion performances concepts. This summer, Creators Unite brings you some of his best creations with a special Vault of Creation dedicated to his very stylish personality.

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ADVERT CHANTAL HANDLEY

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ADVERT TONY NEWTON

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POLTERGEIST Special Tribute by Laura MacLeod

Photo courtesy of MGM

Directed by Tobe Hooper Written by Steven Spielberg, Michael Grais, Mark Victor Starring JoBeth Williams, Heather O'Rourke, Craig T. Nelson Original Score from Jerry Goldsmith Plot: A family's home is haunted by a host of ghosts. "They're here." It was a meme almost before there were memes, two simple, unsettling words spoken by a small girl who was by turns angelic and creepy. Poltergeist, directed by the late, great Tobe Hooper and written by Steven Spielberg, Michael Grais, and Mark Victor, was hardly the first movie to bring the supernatural into an ordinary home to threaten an ordinary family, but something about this movie resonated with its viewers, taking it seamlessly from surprise box office success to a cult classic that's still popular thirty-six years later and counting. People who would never normally have gone to a theatre to see a horror film went to see Poltergeist. There was just enough of the Freeling family's regular world in the film to keep it grounded, not to mention just enough of the sentimental family side -- even more on display in Spielberg's E.T., released just a week after Poltergeist -- to lure in the viewers.

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Today the film can sometimes seem like a collection of standard scary movie tropes. Even in its initial release it wasn't all that groundbreaking. But it's a classic example of a film transcending the sum of its parts and becoming something greater than anyone involved could have expected. The cast and crew managed to catch lightning in a bottle, and decades later the movie's effects are still felt far and wide. According to the creators of Stranger Things, season two was heavily influenced by Poltergeist as well as other 80's movies. The Conjuring series of films draws on Poltergeist ’s central theme of evil invading the homes and lives of average people, never to be quite shaken off. And the number of more subtle, almost subconscious impacts on horror films and television cannot be counted. One of its strangest offspring is Ghostbusters. Released two years after Poltergeist, almost to the day, Ghostbusters borrows heavily from its predecessor, most notably in the team of ragtag, underfunded and unappreciated paranormal investigators who arrive to help the Freelings cope with their bizarre situation. Led by Dr. Lesh as played by Academy Award-winning actress Beatrice Straight, the investigators are immediately out of their depth, facing phenomena far beyond anything they've previously encountered. Ryan (Richard Lawson) speaks of observing a toy car taking many hours to travel by itself over several feet -- much like Ray Stantz's mass sponge migration -- only to immediately face a room full of objects flying through the air without any human help. Diane Freeling jokes about looking in the yellow pages under "Strange Phenomena" and not finding anything, and it takes Ghostbusters to make that listing happen. The Insidious series is a virtual remake of the Poltergeist series, with families struggling to reclaim loved ones lost to the shadow world.

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The character of Elise takes the place of Dr. Lesh -- and to an extent also that of the more showy medium, Tangina, who uses clairvoyance instead of the technology Dr. Lesh's team has put together. In many ways, Poltergeist created the vocabulary of ghost-hunting, their gadgets and terms inspiring legions of ghostbusters, both real and fictional. Though Dr. Lesh's group never aspires to capture a roaming spirit, they use physical means to help counter their adversaries, and succeed, even though it can seem as though sheer luck was the main factor in that success. While Tangina is protective, even motherly, she also has more than a hint of the otherworldly about her, and it's left to Diane Freeling and Dr. Lesh to take the responsibility of humanizing the group and their situation. This is still an area where many horror films fall short -- they're so busy establishing their supernatural elements and rules they forget that they should also be making sure the audience has someone to identify with. There's infinitely less terror in seeing a virtual stranger fall prey to monsters than in watching the demise of a character you've gotten to like. The acting in Poltergeist is generally solid, and the characters certainly aren't afterthoughts. In scenes such as the one where the older members of the Freeling family are frantically searching the house for the missing Carol Anne, you feel every bit of the tension and panic, pulling you into the film as inexorably as Carol Anne herself was pulled into the portal in the closet. And that's another area where Poltergeist helped mainstream trends that continue to this day -- their use of traditional childhood fears to foreshadow the real horrors that await. From the evil clown doll (what parent would ever give their kids such a toy?) to the gnarled old tree outside Robbie's window to Carol Anne's insistence that the closet light MUST be on at night, the movie contains something that made you shiver when you were a child, left alone in the dark.

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Tangina -- in another inspiration for Ghostbusters -- says in so many words that the Beast in the closet can pull the darkest, most terrible fears from anyone's mind, creating and amplifying whatever will terrify them the most. Even in your room, even in your own bed under the covers, you can't really be safe. Now I have a confession to make -- like a lot of today's horror fans, I hadn't seen Poltergeist until I sought it out so I could write this, so in some ways I've approached this backwards, encountering the effects rippling out through the world of film before discovering the cause. I often had to remind myself that what I was watching hadn't really been such a trope at the time the film was being made, that what I was seeing was really the beginning of modern horror. It may not seem quite so modern these days -- if nothing else, I doubt it's still possible to get static on a TV screen -- but I have no doubt it will continue to fuel children's nightmares, directly or otherwise, for many generations to come.

Laura MacLeod Laura MacLeod is a self-taught critic who's loved movies of all kinds since the Night on Bald Mountain scene from Fantasia scared her half to death at the age of four. She's been sharing that love (along with the occasional healthy dose of sarcasm) online since 2006 as the Movie Critic Next Door.

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Sooz’Jukebox Albums Reviews by Sooz Webb Photo courtesy of DYING AWKWARD ANGEL, CROSSING ETERNITY EXTREME METAL MUSIC & ROCKSHOTS RECORDS

CROSSING ETERNITY RISING WORLD VOCAL/PERCUSSION INSTRUMENTS: BERTI BARBERA | GUITAR/ BASS/ KEYBOARDS: MANU SAVU | DRUMS: UFFE TILMAN RECORD LABEL: ROCKSHOTS RECORDS

ABOUT: Crossing Eternity is a Romanian - Swedish Metal/Rock band founded in 2017 by experienced musicians who are truly passionate in the way they approach music.

Bursting forth with an intensity and devotion to craft designed to ensnare melodic metal sensibilities,The Rising World is the soon-to-be-released debut from euphonious powerhouse Crossing Eternity.

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SHOWROOM Like a psychedelic maverick thundering across a breathtaking panorama, the album takes us on a journey over 13 musical epics, exploring the various aspects of human nature, fantastical characters and the gossamer barrier that divides them all. Blending elements of 1970’s heavy Rock with honesty and brutality, the result is an impassioned soundscape, full of cosmic beauty. With almost 3 decades worth of experience between them, the trio have made their mission statement clear: to blow our minds and ear holes with sincere, harmonious compositions that don’t rely on excessive overproduction. And man, oh man, do they deliver! Captivating a taste for the transcendental via irresistible tones and powerful licks, with an opener that shares the bands name, a track it’s impossible NOT to sing along to, the scene is set for a melodious odyssey. We’re invited on a lyrical journey, spiritually and tunefully, to explore the poetry of dulcet inflection, an alluring summons to ignite the sparkle in our soul. A majestic call to arms which is explored across a baker's dozens of heavy hitting, hook filled tracks, each demonstrating the multifaceted nature of power Metal, with a distinct flourish and timbre. Numbers such as Angels Cry, Rainbows Hide bring a folksy Funk with heart on sleeve, whilst Kingdom Come is spellbinding ditty, luring us Pied Piper style deeper into the enchanting musicality of seasoned virtuosos. Each melody is as distinct as it is mellifluous, a sonorous adventure through emotion, punctuated frequently by blistering riffs. Bringing the noise with a savage elegance, The Rising World is a dynamic prelude, heralding the inception of an enduring pilgrimage, through the vast megacosm of symphonic metal. Wistful, intoxicating and eloquent, it’s a pleasing introduction to a band whose star is undoubtedly on the rise.

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DYING AWKWARD ANGEL ABSENCE OF LIGHT VOCALS: MICHELE SPALLIERI | GUITARS: EDOARDO DEMURO, LORENZO ASSELLI | BASS GUITAR: DAVIDE ONIDA | DRUMS: Luca Pellegrino | RECORD LABEL: EXTREME METAL MUSIC / ROCKSHOTS RECORDS

ABOUT: Keepers of Death Metal Arts.

Blistering, melodic and freewheeling into your shell-like at breakneck speed, Absence of Light is the first official release from Italian death metallers Dying Awkward Angel. Drawing influence from the melodic Scandinavian Metal arena of the 1990’s, the band have been a mainstay of underground venues, working tirelessly to develop their own unique sound and methodology. Encapsulating an essence of old school aesthetics with a postmodern twist, the hardcore quintet has undergone several line-up changes throughout the years, enabling them to evolve and perfect their signature style, with a distinct phraseology. How a band can seamlessly blend melodic, euphoric harmonies with deliciously dissonant teeth rattling licks? Well, I suppose that’s why they’re leading the charge, and I’m merely writing about it! A landscape for brutality is established from the off with opener Blood of your blood, barraging the ears with rapid militia fire, before the thundering hallmarks of meticulously complex riffs get to work on melting your face off. This band have come to rock you. And they've come to rock you hard baby! The pace is remorseless in its savagery, evoking an atmosphere of ferocity that never lets up throughout the entire record.

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SHOWROOM Even in the most quiet, reflective moments, and believe me beauty lies within this record, there’s unabashed and unsparing savagery. A heavy, hypnotic mantra, which captivates and makes sure that while listening, you’re always fairly reminiscent of a heavy rocking nodding dog. Instrumental tunes such as Absence of Light, from which the album derives its name, showcase the bands technical dexterity. The complexity of orchestration a rough and ready respite, from the ferocity infused emotiveness of Michele Spallieri’s vocalisation. Throughout we’re treated to the bands bestial elegance. Their originality and personality shines through the insanity, with numbers such as The Dust Devil, which capitalizes on our desire to hear it hard and heavy, yet impossible not to groove to, while the doom-laden Sancta Sanctorum is an ambiguous descent into melancholy. Each track is emblazoned with the same spark of violence, yet distinct enough so as not to bleed into a rapaciously cacophonous proggy muddle. A sound that’s matured throughout years of hard graft has been honed to perfection by Turin's finest. Absence of Light proves that a lil’ bloody-mindedness, in terms of tenacity and style, goes a long way to evince that the long game is worth the tribulations. A sure-fire benchmark on the bands continued path to success, this record is a stunning introduction to an ensemble who are sure to set the world ablaze. As Stephen King once said: It was the possibility of darkness that made the day seem so bright.

Sooz Webb A contributor to Creators Unite, Sooz Webb chats her love for all things loud and scary in podcast Heavy Metal Horror Cast. The show looks at horror from a female perspective, and seeks to promote new music, featuring tracks from heavy rocking or horror themed bands… Follow her and get in touch with her by clicking on the icons below.

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Visual Conception: Dub Meter | Images Courtesy of Vestra Pictures & Jörg Buttgereit

by Tony Newton This new VHS documentary brought to you by VESTRA PICTURES is directed and produced by Tony Newton, producer of Grindsploitation 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 666, 60 Seconds to Die, Virus of the Dead andTrashsploitation. Stars include TROMA’s own Lloyd Kaufman plus David DeCoteau, James Cullen Bressack, Jörg Buttgereit, Mark Polonia, Phil Anselmo, Tim Ritter, Dustin Ferguson, Billy “Bloody Bill” Pon, David “The Rock” Nelson, Shawn Burkett and more! This new VHS documentary goes deep into the psyche of VHS fans and collectors, SOV (shot on video, Ed) filmmakers and shows just why the old VHS tapes you have rotting away in your loft are becoming antique collectors pieces! The documentary shows just why VHS is coming back into the public eye and why VHS is the hottest thing in 2018 since the full beard and the boom in vinyl record sales. You may think you’re hip but unless you own cult horror big box video nasty with the faint whiff of mould and the smell of old video stores you are very wrong! People love nostalgia and VHS is a big part of that, we may have access 24/7 to unlimited movies at the click of a button, but nothing replaces that feeling of going into your local Mom and Pop video store and holding that huge big box VHS tape, anticipating the movie and all the horrors it held!

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SHOWROOM VHS Lives! It's pretty cool to be saying that in 2018, VHS is having a resurgence in a big way, there have always been collectors of VHS since the early days, there have been collectors that got rid of VHS when DVD and Blu-Ray hit and then went back to collecting most of the films they once owned on VHS. People are starting to collect VHS cassettes now due to nostalgia. People collect because VHS is a part of our childhood and these are like antiques. They are not only holding their money but they are growing in value by the day as there are a limited amount of these VHS tapes in circulation. Most charity/op shops stopped taking VHS tapes around ten years ago here in the UK, and most of the VHS cassettes end up in the skip. There are people collecting VHS in 2018 and why the hell not! VHS is so damn cool, these new collectors (even teenagers and kids) are collecting to build their own VHS memories and experiencing films on VHS for the first time, collecting the awesome cover art, the big boxes, the ex-rental tapes. VHS are a thing of beauty much like vinyl records, they are having a comeback. Over the last year the prices for second hand VHS tapes have skyrocketed with more and more collectors trying to build their dream VHS collection, having to pay the extra dollar‌ Well, a bit more than a dollar! I'm in ore at the prices VHS tapes are commanding! I really need to get me one of those time machines! I would go straight back to the early 80's and buy up copies of the original video nasties and cult horror VHS tapes that's for sure! The number of VHS collectors are growing by the day, which is great as more and more people discover and re-discover this amazing format which is VHS! If you are new to collecting VHS tapes try to sear clear of standard sell thru titles as these tapes won't hold their value, and basically any sell thru VHS is worth around 50p - £1 maximum. Sell thru VHS tapes were the tapes that places like WOOLWORTHS and VIRGIN would stock on sale to the general public, the smaller box tapes.

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SHOWROOM If you are collecting VHS and want on top of it to make an investment, buy ex-rental video shop cassette tapes (the big box rental VHS tapes). Also any pre-cert VHS tapes are well worth owning. Some of the pre-cert* tapes are small boxed, these are also worth buying. *A Pre-Certification video is any videotape or laserdisc/CED issued in the UK before the introduction

of the 1984 Video Recordings Act, Ed.

So, try to track down VHS tapes without a rating from the BBFC or MPA and ex-rental. Video Nasties are the most sought after VHS tapes in the UK, having a complete set of these is the holy grail for collectors and you would pay thousands of pounds for a complete set. It is worth looking out for rare and promotional releases, any VHS tape that came housed in a bizarre cover/box like a coffin box or limited-edition release. It's a buyer's market! VHS collecting is personal as these tapes evoke memories and feelings. A VHS tape is worth what someone is willing to pay for it! People are paying for nostalgia and some people are just getting into VHS collecting for the first time. I've paid well over the odds for an ex-rental tape just to have it in my collection and it was a kids cartoon movie with no real value to anyone else but me; so I paid some chancer on an online auction 50 times the value that the tape was worth, just to own an original British ex - rental copy of the tape (which I ironically bought from Australia). You will see trends in certain types of VHS tapes and as soon as someone picks up that X VHS tape it becomes rare. Soon everyone knows or wants that title in their collection. If you are investing for the future, I mean these are our generations version of antiques and collectibles now along with other cool things like GARBAGE PAIL KIDS trading cards and retro games and consoles!

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SHOWROOM I would buy Pre-cert and Ex-rental tapes. Video nasties are also worth hunting down, as is video store memorabilia; things like posters and standees, porn VHS tapes seem to be a little niche that is picking up and these are starting to go for a lot of money. I've seen tapes even common ones like Electric Blue going for over £100 per tape this week alone. I think in the future we will see a steady rise in value for all Wizard VHS releases, Media, VIPCO etc. becoming highly collectible. Now I would buy SOV releases on VHS and distributors like TROMA. Having a full set of TROMA VHS is definitely a future collectible that will go up in value as their tapes are on the rise in value. Cover art is also a big factor, the more bloody and gory and outrageous the better! Holding a big box ex-rental VHS tape is pure heaven, it sends you back to the VHS heyday, when you would walk around the mom and pop video store and stand for hours just looking at the cover art full of blood, babes, chainsaws and serial killers! VHS is the best format there ever was for watching old horror movies. When you play a cult horror movie you get crackles, tracking issues, flickering‌ It's like you are watching a film in a drive-in theatre in the comfort of your own home! VHS LIVES! Long live VHS!

Tony Newton

Tony Newton is the CEO of Vestra Pictures LTD and the co-owner of Body Bag Films. Writer/Director/Producer/Actor and all-round fan of the macabre, Tony Newton has always been obsessed with films. Most well known for Grindsploitation, Virus of the Dead and Grindsploitation 2: The Lost Reels, Tony is the producer of the Horror anthology 60 Seconds to Die. In addition, he is the author of many books including The Zombie Rule Book: A Zombie Apocalypse Survival Guide and the upcoming novel I'm Zombie published by Cosmic Egg Books.

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Inspiration Box TEAMLAB | PRAIA | DANIEL AVERY | OMNIKID | VALY MO | GOLDEN BUG Selection by Roy Bheer & Emilie Flory | Visual Conception: Dub Meter

teamLab

TeamLab is an art collective, interdisciplinary group of ultratechnologists whose collaborative practice seeks to navigate the confluence of art, science, technology, design and the natural world. Various specialists such as artists, programmers, engineers, CG animators, mathematicians and architects form teamLab. TeamLab aims to explore a new relationship between humans and nature, and between oneself and the world through art. Digital technology has allowed art to liberate itself from the physical and transcend boundaries. TeamLab sees no boundary between humans and nature, and between oneself and the world; one is in the other and the other in one. Everything exists in a long, fragile yet miraculous, borderless continuity of life. TeamLab believes that the digital domain can expand the capacities of art, and that digital art can create new relationships between people. Digital technology releases expression from substance and creates an existence with the possibility for transformation. Creative expression has existed through static media for most of human history, often using physical objects such as canvas and paint. The advent of digital technology allows human expression to become free from these physical constraints, enabling it to exist independently and evolve freely‌ For more information visit teamLab’s website by clicking on the website Icon below.

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Photos : Frankie Cordoba & Hao Wang UNSPLASH COVER: ASTYANAX

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French Composer & DJ PRAIA Renowned British Producer & DJ Daniel Avery German DJ Duo OMNIKID French Bass & House Artist Valy Mo DJ & Groove Sculptor Golden Bug With the electronic music scene being one of the most creative at the moment, it was Creators Unite’s duty to highlight five of the best Electro music producers in the industry. We present you here, for the pleasure of your spirit, their new albums and music videos, bringing remarkable visual concepts combined with innovative sounds. Click on the icons and pictures and enjoy! Creators Unite 04 Spirit Issue

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Daniel Avery Daniel Avery is a renowned British producer and DJ whose music is equally suitable for club and home listening, encompassing abstract Techno, House, IDM (Intelligent dance music, Ed) and Shoegaze. Avery began DJ'ing indie music as an 18-year-old in his native Bournemouth, England. It wasn't until a trip to Ibiza that he was inspired to spin House and Techno, after seeing crowds open to dancing to new and unfamiliar tracks. As a producer and remixer, he developed a raw, robust sound that incorporated his love for odd, alien elements. Daniel Avery’s highly anticipated new album Song For Alpha is released 6th April 2018. To coincide with the release of his second long player, Avery has unveiled immersive album visuals from London design studio Flat-e, who have crafted stunning digitally manipulated videos for each track on the record… Song For Alpha is Avery’s exploration of the space in which home listening and club music intersect. “I’ve become increasingly interested in those moments in a club when the outside world becomes little more than an inconsequential thought at the back of your head,” he said when the album was announced at the start of this year. “Eyes closed as opposed to hands in the air. A light emerging from the darkness - this is the idea I repeatedly returned to in the studio. The more time you spend with it the deeper you fall.” Avery is currently on tour in the US in support of the album, having already completed rapturouslyreceived all night long sets in London, New York, Los Angeles and more. Song For Alpha is out now on Phantasy worldwide and Phantasy/Mute in the US & Canada.

For more information visit RESIDENT ADVISOR & Itunes by clicking on the Icons below.

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Just who is Omnikid? German based Omnikid, with little info on any of his profile pages, flashes his talents as a producer with the incredibly powerful melody in St. Anne that is driven by the melancholic tune and the soft, whispering vocal bit. The bass line is powerful, the song is catchy, and the vocal cut is encapsulating as Omnikid does an incredible job of drawing from all aspects of Dance Music for this one. The deep melodic sounds of what seems to be a church organ along with the vocals give an eerie sound to the track that are the perfect accent to the breakdown and memorable tune followed in the rest of the song. After the darkness breaks, the track turns into an upbeat flowing house sound that grooves through your body all the way to the end. Certainly a producer we want to keep an eye on, we look forward to hearing more from this kid in the future.

Joe Hoffman [danceandrave]

NEW SINGLE BY GERMAN DJ DUO OMNIKID AVAILABLE ON HAPPY MUSIC

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Valy Mo French Bass and House artist Valy Mo who has taken a liking for Japanese culture has shown his fondness to it through his new original Shibuya. Shibuya is a special ward of Tokyo and attracts many young people due to its extravagant nightlife and major shopping area. The song is a blend of House and Bass. A funky and soulful build-up extends into a rhythmic and thumping drop. Clubs will heat up when the beat is played. Dancing will commence and sweat will be dropped. As the vocal sample proclaims, let the music take control and lose yourself to the music. Shibuya is out now via GOLD DiGGER, which has been a big proponent of the French Bass movement. The genre is in a strong position right now and the artists who have been close to the genre from the beginning are finally getting some much-needed recognition. The movement has been sweeping the globe and is becoming the ‘next big thing’ in the States. Valy Mo is oscillating between House and Bass-Music, his sets have for watchword rhythm and dynamism, in the style of AC-Slater or Malaa. First, he was noticed by Crystal Castles and Etienne de Crécy, he released his first EP on Nest HQ (division of OWSLA, label founded by Skrillex) then followed singles on Owsla, UKF, Ultra Music and Universal… Now his tracks easily hit a million plays on streaming platforms. Applauded by the media (Radio BBC, Vice, Complex UK) and play-listed by headliners (Tchami, A-trak, Diplo) he tours through France, and from Europe to Japan.

For More Information, click on the TSS Icon to read Brian Poles’s Article on THIS SONG SLAPS or Visit Valy Mo’s FB Page.

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Golden Bug Essential record producer, label owner, DJ, Groove sculptor, Metal sculptor: Golden Bug (also known as Antoine Harispuru) is nothing short of a true, incredibly multi-talented artist. Details about his early years are scant but really interesting: born in Paris in his mother's toy shop (“La Maison du Robot”) he apparently got his early education by... Well… A robot named V.I.C.T.O.R., a sentient Japanese prototype of AI-based bot who took care of him from the cradle to the sampler. What we also know is that as Antoine turned 14, V.I.C.T.O.R. got him a Roland TR808, an EMU sampler and some Disco records. Jumpcut to 2007 – little Antoine is now Golden Bug and his first solo EP, Barbie's Back, is out on German label Gomma. It's a huge success for the ghetto-Disco wizkid as everyone starts falling in love for his sound, one that is redefining club vibes: his first album, Hot Robot, is released in 2008 and Erol Alkan, Jori Hulkonnen, PrinsThomas, Digitalism, Shit Robot play his tracks all around the world.. A ghetto-inspired forward-thinking mix of booming basses, crispy synths and never-heard-before cut up voices, Hot Robot is an unforgivable groovathon. A groovathon earning him calls from pretty much everyone: he remixes Who Made Who, Bot’Ox, In Flagranti, Two Door Cinema Club, Clap Rules. Everybody wants a Golden Bug remix. Next in the pipeline, 3 Eps. His sound is even punchier now and at the same time more 'out there' and visionary. His tracks are played by people like Andrew Weatherall, Tiga, Chloé, Boris Duglosh, Ivan Smagghe, Justin Robertson.

For more information visit RESIDENT ADVISOR by clicking on the Icon below.

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Creators Unite Magazine Issue 04 THE SPIRIT ISSUE  

Creators Unite is a quarterly digital magazine, a Creative “Art-Horror” Publication bringing you the best of underground culture. [WARNING:...

Creators Unite Magazine Issue 04 THE SPIRIT ISSUE  

Creators Unite is a quarterly digital magazine, a Creative “Art-Horror” Publication bringing you the best of underground culture. [WARNING:...