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CREATIVE SUGAR J U N E 2013 - A N E M E R G I N G A R T I S T M A G A Z I N E

ART OF SUMMER

THE FALL ISSUE


COVER STORY ON PAGE 16 Photography by: Jodi Jones Style Editor: Sherah Jones MUA : J e s si c a Ro s s Hai r: L az ar u s D o u vo s M o d e l s: Mi k a Fur u y a (L) A ge n c y M o d e l Mana ge m e nt Fr an c i nn e Ta c c a (R) at Mu s e M o d e l s Mi k a D r es s: I s s a L o n d o n H ea db an d: St y li s t s ow n Ri n g: Ve r am eat Fr an c i nn e Ves t: V i nt a ge To p: 4 L ove & L i b e r t y Pant: Te r Et B anti n e J ewe lr y: Ve r am eat S an d al s: Ha c h e Tur b an an d Gl as s es: St y li s t s ow n

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Creative Sugar Issue NO. 5 Editor-in-Chief Sabrina Scott Copy Editor Marilyn Recht Photographers Joseph Gallo Jodi Jones Writers Jen Pitt Joseph Gallo Kenneth Lundquist, Jr. Style Editor Sherah Jones Hair Lazarus Douvos Makeup Jessica Ross

FROM THE EDITOR Welcome to the Art of Summer issue. As you enjoy fun, relaxing days spent at a local street or music festival, the beach, or an art studio event, think of us. This issue was inspired by our favorite moods and events for summer.

Social Media Marketing Manager Kyle Hockaday Graphic Design Sabrina Scott

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Contact: info@creativesugarmagazine.net phone: 1-888-669-5513 web: creativesugarmagazine.net facebook.com/creativesugarmagazine Š 2013 Creative Sugar Magazine All rights to art, words, photos, design and copyrights are the property of the Artist. All work in this publication may not be used without the Artist’s consent. New York, New York

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ART

QUANTUM RADIANCE: ARTIST ANDREW SALGADO

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BY KENNETH LUNDQUIST, JR.

LOOKING AT THE SKY IN PARIS

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BY JASON STONEKING

SUMMER FEST - FASHION EDITORIAL PHOTOGRAPHER: JODI JONES STYLE EDITOR: SHERAH JONES HAIR: LAZARUS DOUVOS MAKEUP: JESSICA ROSS

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ULTUR

MUSIC WAGON 22 BY JEN PITT

ARTIST HYUN: ROCKING ON EMPTY SERIES

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BY SABRINA SCOTT

CUTLOG ART FAIR NY 2013 28 BY JEN PITT

TAKE ON FILM 34 BY JOSEPH GALLO

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q

uantum radiance: Artist andrew salgado by Kenneth Lundquist, Jr.

London. It’s a dark, moist evening with an above average amount of bustle in the city. Andrew Salgado peers down from his studio window onto the streets below. His eyes focus not on the honeybee activity, but on the rain smearing down the window and how the faces of those hurrying by are altered. Andrew’s astounding perception is directly expressed in his paintings. He captures an essence of his subjects, a vulnerability that is today rarely seen in abstract expressionism. His quintessential accent streams across the choppy Atlantic as he explains why art is simply his Universe. “Art finds the avenue to articulate the things I can’t adequately express in any other way. I have realized recently that I define myself first and foremost as an artist: this is the formative aspect of my person; all other things are tangential to that aspect as my core. It’s how I know where I am in the world, how I understand stimulus and how I relate to others.” I ask Andrew what attracted him to his current style and how his work stands out among other artists. “I think this was a long process of understanding how to respond to the imagery I was drawn to, historically and contemporarily. I think style is an open-ended question, and not something (continued on page 10)

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U N D E R S T U D Y, 2013, O I L O N C A N VA S W I T H S P R AY PA I N T, 125 X 105 C M

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T O M , 2013, O I L O N C A N VA S , 194 X 135 C M

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A C T O R , 2013, O I L O N C A N VA S W I T H S P R AY PA I N T, 160 X 120 C M

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that ever needs to be understood fully...I like to think of it as a porous entity, and I would assume that how I work in 1, 2, 5 or 10 years should change quite radically. For instance, I’ve taken some large departures recently with the works for my most recent solo show but these might be minute occurrences, or subtle changes that only I’m really aware (or not so aware) of. I think that’s what keeps studio-work exciting - the notion that nothing is set in stone. It’s all about a large process of exploration.   “My work was once criticized as being schizophrenic, which I thereafter adopted as one of my strengths because I think that even within the confines of what I do, and how I paint, I tend to be something of a chameleon. I’m always looking to change, challenge, and work outside of my comfort zone, so involving newness and experimentation in the studio is key to me. I really have no specific process; everything changes from painting to painting. I recently moved into a new studio which allows me to work on a body of work concurrently, as opposed to consecutively, and this is doing interesting things to the formation of the paintings and how I am beginning to create cohesive bodies of works, as opposed to just ‘individual paintings’. The rest is up to happy accidents and an attempt to continually push myself into new territory. I will say that my work comes from a very personal, passionate, and highly motivated source. I’m extremely involved in what I do and have genuine belief that what I’m doing might invoke some sort of positive change.” Truly interested, I ask Andrew what his favorite color is. He snickers and elaborates. “Ah, the most simple questions are still the most exciting. I love Prussian Blue. Burnt Umber. Naples Yellow Light. Those are my top 3. However, for my last show I made an arbitrary rule: no blue. I played with purple, which I hate, just to see what came of it.” Wondering what or who would inspire Andrew, he explains that rather than people or parts, it’s a principle that sustains him. “Bjork once said that it was her ultimate desire

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as an artist to create the perfect piece of music; that she was aware that this is an impossible feat, but that she’d keep on trying, over and over… It’s the obsession that pushes one into the studio to do the same thing over and over with the hope that some beautiful flourishes might occur along the way.”  Being so eloquent, I’m sure Andrew has some advice for the emerging artists of today. “I see a lot of younger artists who are too hard on themselves. I know; I’ve been there. But when you’re 24 and you expect everything to happen to you in an instant, you’ll burn out. It’s a marathon, not a sprint, and artists need to focus on their own individual careers and the trajectory that will allow them to accomplish their own career at their own pace. You are not in a race against your peers. Your colleagues are not your enemies. I had a miserable time in my MFA because it felt like everyone was hoarding resentment toward everyone else. Fred Tomaselli has a brilliant quote about his career being something of ‘slow drips and long burns’ while others around him have flashed up and fizzled out. Now that I’m a little older, and experienced some modest successes, I’ve gotten a bit of clarity on the subject. I don’t want too much too soon. I want to control my career and the pace that I reach certain goals because I want to mature gracefully into the career I’ve chosen. Young artists worry too much. Chill out and work hard - harder than everyone else - and things will happen.”  The painter’s painter- Andrew Salgado. Visit his website for more: andrewsalgado.com “Like” him on Facebook: facebook.com/andrew. salgado.artist


P E R F O R M A N C E I I , 2013, O I L O N C A N VA S W I T H S P R AY PA I N T, 70 X 55 C M

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REGARDE LE CIEL IS EVERYWHERE

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LOOKING AT THE SKY IN PARIS BY JASON STONEKING It’s summertime in Paris, which means, among other things, that the street artists are out on the town. Of late, Paris has become quite a respectable city for street art. We get the occasional visit from the likes of Banksy and Shepard Fairey, and we have our own bona fide international star, Invader, whose cousin Mr. Brainwash was made famous in Banksy’s documentary Exit Through the Gift Shop. Paris also has its prolific locally known street heroes (shout out to Miss-Tic), as well as a sea of new taggers, wheatpasters and flat-out vandals competing to decorate the City of Lights as we sleep. Recently, there’s been a new player, whose signature piece has sprouted up everywhere in the city over the last year or two. And there’s been a certain amount of disagreement about how this work should be viewed. The piece consists simply of the words “regarde le ciel…” (French for “look at the sky…”), written in lowercase cursive, always with the ellipsis on the end. The debate is about whether this is street art, graffiti writing, or just the tag of an amateur prankster, unversed in the ways of the outsider (outdoor) art world. Some say that it lacks the graphic elements on which street art depends, and others say it lacks the individual style and reference that a seasoned graffiti writer would bring. But I, your humble reporter, disagree on both counts. Firstly, I think the consistency of the lower-case cursive, childish and dreamlike, reminiscent of fourth-grade chalkboard writing, is graphic in its own right. Its visual style is not only highly intentional, but evocative of innocence. It poses

questions to the compromises of adult society before one even begins to consider the words. Then there’s the ellipsis at the end, which indicates that the thought is unfinished, that the words lead to something. And what they lead to is the mother of all graphic elements… The sky itself is the visual companion piece to the text. When I stop to follow the directions, and look up at the sky, I understand why people do it so rarely. It’s bloody terrifying (also, astoundingly beautiful and tear-jerkingly immense). It makes everything so small: your life, your death, time itself. The universe is the actual creator, and this wall-writer is simply the messenger. It’s like found art on a cosmic scale. I’ve met street artists who reject such pieces because they (the artists) are invested in elevating street art beyond mere words, to earn technical respect from the mainstream (indoor) art community. I’ve also known graffiti writers who are skeptical of conceptual street artists as neophytes who don’t respect the time-honored rules of the street. I even know guys in hard-core defacement crews who view any discernible meaning in a piece as a sellout concession that violates their core value of revolutionary vandalism. And there really isn’t that much wall space on which these ideological disagreements are playing out. Most taggers, artists, and crews, however they label their work, have rules about where they will and won’t tag. The nuances that separate these sets of rules become evident when different groups compete on a common tagging site. But “regarde le ciel…” is everywhere. Not playing by anyone’s rules. Appearing boldly

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at common graffiti sites and also a growing assortment of other venues. It is seemingly the spontaneous product of one person, wandering the city with a spray can, pissing on whatever territory they’re in when they happen to notice the sky.

neighbor that I was writing about it for Creative Sugar, he offered up his own pet theory: the artist is actually a killer, and the truck that runs me over when I’m standing in the street, looking at the sky, will be part of the piece as well!

Can it really be called a “tag”? There’s no signature, no ego, no discernible reaction to other local taggers. “regarde le ciel…” doesn’t seem to be a clique, a crew, or a band — there doesn’t seem to be a product. There is a Facebook page* for the piece, which doubles as the page for “priveste cerul” (Romanian for “watch the sky”); perhaps the artist has some tie to Romania, but there’s no clear indication of other related works, allied taggers, or any kind of beef or vendetta. The author could be a child or an army. The piece doesn’t conform to typical Parisian “street art”: it’s not a stencil or a wheatpaste poster, a decal or a skewed corporate/municipal logo.

pages/Regarde-le-ciel-privestecerul/141651332569318?fref=ts

* https://www.facebook.com/#!/

ALL PHOTOS BY LESLIE MCALLISTER

Yet despite the difficulty in classifying it, I don’t think this work can fairly be called vandalism either. I’ve heard people say that these words deface the buildings, including some buildings that most taggers would consider off-limits. (In Paris, some buildings have walls that stand prettily on their own). But when I do as the piece suggests, and look at the sky for a moment, it suddenly seems clear to me that, if anything, the buildings are the defacers— large manmade ego constructions, spoiling the pristine skyscape, lashing out in fear of their own impermanence. Whatever your attitude about the boundaries and definitions of street art and graffiti, “regarde le ciel…” continues to pop up all over the city, challenging more and more of us to think about its meaning. As Oscar Wilde once wrote, “Diversity of opinion about a work of art shows that the work is new, complex, and vital. When critics disagree the artist is in accord with himself.” And whether you love it (as I have come to) or hate it, there’s certainly no shortage of opinion on “regarde le ciel…” —so perhaps the artist has put his or her finger on something big. When I told my

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T H E B U I L D I N G S D O T H E D E FA C I N G


L O O K I N G AT T H E S K Y I N T H E S T R E E T

C O M P E T I T I O N F O R WA L L S PA C E photo by melissa robin photography

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SUMMER

FEST PHOTOGRAPHER: JODI JONES

STYLE EDITOR: SHERAH JONES HAIR: LAZARUS DOUVOS MAKEUP: JESSICA ROSS

MODELS: MIKA FURUYA AT AGENCY MODEL MANAGEMENT, MARIAH MORRISON AND FRANCINNE TACCA AT MUSE MODELS

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Cape and bodysuit: Nadia Tarr Scarf: Issa London Glasses: Stylist ’s own

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Top: Stylist ’s own Pant: Lindsay Degen Vest and Hat: Vintage

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Mariah (L) Dress: Issa London Bag: Johnny Was Rings: Verameat Glasses: Stylist ’s own Francinne (R) Top: Charlotte Ronson Skirt: Ter Et Bantine Bracelet: Verameat Glasses: Stylist ’s own

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Top: JW Los Angeles Bloomers: Lindsay Degen Earrings: Verameat Bracelet: Giuliana and Verameat Boots: H by Hudson

Good Game. Two-hour looped performance of a post baseball game hand slap, 2010. Photo provided by Artists.

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Michelotti


“sands of time” by melissa robin photography

Francinne (R): Jacket: Vintage Top: Saunders Bloomers: Lindsay Degen Mariah (L): Dress: Issa London Hat: Lindsay Degen Necklace: Verameat

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Brent Wellington Barker III and Ariel De Lion met years ago when they worked together at LES.FM—a Lower East Side Radio station. Brent sprouted from theater and Ariel has been focusing on music for over twenty-five years. One day a few years back, they were going to interview an artist but wanted to conduct the interview in his space instead of bringing him to the studio—they wished they could record it with their phones, but as it turns out phones only have a line out and no line in and that’s when it occurred to them that a dream device and technology should be made to facilitate high quality phone capturing and broadcasting. Ariel flew to Israel to meet with some developers and pitch his idea. Soon the MUSIC WAGON app—a relative of the Flix Wagon app made by the same developers--was created, with no competitors and no boundaries. They make it clear that anyone can and should use it. When asked if they think this invention could further lead to the demise of their beloved radio

station, their response is hopeful: “The way I see it… We are standing next to a tombstone that reads LIVE MUSIC, and we pick up our shovels and begin to exhume the grave”, Brent excitedly describes. Their headquarters moved from the Lower East Side to Bushwick, where they formed a larger than life collective of twelve people, still under the name MUSIC WAGON. All twelve live in this shared Bushwick space replete with psychedelically painted walls, lofted beds and a tip jar in the bathroom reading, “you shit in our toilet, chip in for T.P”. Brent found the space a little less than a year ago, right when the app was being developed. What was initially supposed to be eight of his friends moving in turned into twelve, most of whom he knows through his past experience as associate manager at the Living Theater—a Lower East Side gem of revolutionary theater

MUSIC WAGON MADE IN NEW YORK

B Y JEN PITT

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performances. The house consists of dancers, models, painters, bands and event promoters including Jay Rogovian from Mr. Bugsley Presents—a major events company and force behind the local and broader music scenes. The two house bands, Plutonian Ode and De Lion are a driving force behind the whole operation. Together they promote the Music Wagon app by using it to broadcast live and in turn the app, enables them to gain further reach, creating a symbiotic relationship between artist and label.

consider it an invitation to start a project that can reach your neighborhood or beyond. Whether you are an artist, a music lover, a journalist or techie, Music Wagon can get you what you need and fast—but the guys do have one caveat: “No kittens and no babies.”

Pat Demayo is a drummer for both bands and stresses the importance of collaboration in their work. He finds that their space is a perfect hub for other musicians to come and rehearse or record. Not only is the space an astounding rabbit hole of color and talent but an integral character to Music Wagons developing story is the BUS. The bus is an old school bus Brent found in Philadelphia where he spent the summer of 2012 gutting and painting it—transforming it into a throwback sixties van with a vinyl lined ceiling. Admittedly the bus is just straight up cool and practical but it adds an essential layer to what Music Wagon wants to achieve—a democratization and universal spreading of high quality artistic content. As Pat says, “If a band is at a festival but isn’t on the line up, they can play a show on top of the bus and we can stream it live with the app—it’s a type of guerilla theater approach to live music”. Indeed that is exactly what they plan to do this summer as they tour all of the Unites States in July, including MazFest, Mountain Jam, Camp Bisco and many more music festivals. After that Brent wishes to use the bus in order to pick up artists at the airport and interview them live en route to the venues. This way fans can feel more connected to their favorite artists and artists can have greater ownership over their broadcasted content. Ariel brought up an appalling statistic—that there are only 900 start ups in the entire state of New York although Bloomberg is encouraging small business to thrive in New York. If there are any graves to be exhumed along with live music,

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(TOP) ARIEL DE LION - MW FOUNDER AND C E O, V O C A L I S T I N D E L I O N ( A B O V E R I G H T ) B R E N T WELLINGTON BARKER I I I - M U S I C WA G O N ’ S N YC O P E R AT I O N S DIREC TOR, AC TOR ( B O T T O M R I G H T ) T H E B U S AT F R I E Z E A R T FA I R


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photo by richard kern

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ARTIST HYUN:ROCKING ON EMPTY SERIES BY SABRINA SCOTT Artist Hyun describes her work as “Hunky Funky Junky.” Her most current collection, entitled Rocking on Empty, is a collection of images and sculptural assemblages inscribed with her text. “I take guitar pics, broken records, chains, and rock ‘n’ roll memorabilia and combine them with automotive objects (tires, panels, assorted parts) to make pieces that are a little outside of time,” she says. Her heroes are the Ramones and Mad Max, and graffiti has been an influence. She’s interested in the living city streets where she finds discarded elements for her artwork. She enjoys trucks, skateboarders, signs and logos, which translate into the light mood that imbues her sculpture. Hyun has a natural spirit about her, and she enjoys nostalgia for things that she didn’t experience—such as cultural aspects of the ‘70s and ‘80s. We talked lightly about then and now, as well as her art, during a studio visit. Hyun is from South Korea, and attended college in Sydney, Australia. Now living in New York, she is enthusiastic and inquisitive about NYC culture. She says that the Korean culture is very competitive and therefore an art school degree is important. However, after getting her Master’s at Parsons, she questioned that ethic. Although school was a relevant experience for Hyun, she was made to feel that her artwork had to be socially or politically based. Not wanting to be categorized that way, she emphasizes that her work is purely for entertainment and meant to be enjoyed that way.

of text; it’s something she’s always been attracted to. However, she describes having worked in a lot of different mediums. “An early favorite work of mine was a drawing of a hamburger and a nude man. I basically played off a Duchamp idea I saw in a magazine. Early on, during my training as a figurative painter (which I hated so much!), I started using images from more famous masterpieces so that people would know I was appropriating. One of my worst works was a projection of one of my animations over huge ice blocks. I wasn’t happy with such a huge serious monumental ‘impressive’ work,” she said. Today, she feels she’s evolved as an artist. “I am better now at tying the concept and visuals of my work together. I know what I want now. I know what I love. I’m better now at putting that into my work,” she said. These days Hyun is into denim: the actual texture of the fabric and the idea of it. “Everyone has an idea of what this fabric represents. I want to bring this into my work,” she said. There’s a bright future ahead for Hyun as she prepares for new studio space and creating more work. You can check her out at: hunkyjunkyfunky.com

ALL IMAGES FOR ARTWORK ARE UNTITLED AND PROVIDED BY ARTIST

One thing that ties her work together is the use

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BETWEEN THE LINES

CUTLOG ART FAIR NEW YORK 2013 BY JEN PITT

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C

to New York that utlog, a Parisian import eze, was part of New acts as an offshoot of Fri 8th to May 13th. It York Art week from May d, due to sustained started in Paris in 2009 an case its best on New success, decided to show to Velez Center in the York at the Clemente So Lower East Side. ment dedicated to a There is always a short mo ing one of these fairs. deep breath before enter sily consumable, eye Many tend to display ea eptual art—sort of like catching visual and conc and flat. I expected visual jingles—annoying ee floors filled with this of Cutlog, after all, thr d art seemed too good meaningful, well execute l those adjectives to be true these days—(al rks around them, as could have quotations ma into a discussion on this piece will not delve validity). Fortunately the definition of art or its d that assumption, though this fair challenge and predictability. On that feeling of weariness were large, powerful, a general scale the works ired with thought and demonstrations of skill pa work featured an exemotion. A majority of the l to an almost obsessive treme attention to detai ed on infinitesimally level. Many works focus wings so fine and intridetailed patterns or dra the tiny lines meeting cate one got baffled by all ger world of shadow side by side to create a lar . Drawings and photoan light that bursts to life or landscapes and all graphs revealed objects and crannies. Cutlog their small nuanced lines lens being literally serves as a microscope or make-believe in order put upon objects—real or d them deeply, almost to explore and understan scientifically. s was gallery House A striking example of thi it, Paper Vernacular, of the Nobleman’s exhib mporary interpreta“which is themed on conte ng mediums which are tions of paper and drawi oking the tradition of strikingly new, while inv ”, as Julia Sinelnikova, fine craftsmanship in art ors, describes. The one of the assistant curat nd expanses of paper walls were lined with gra ately perfect lines were on which worlds of intric drawn to

I M A G E S O N T H E S E PA G E S A R E C O U R T E S Y O F C U T L O G A R T FA I R 2013

(continued on page 33)

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U N T I T L E D. A C R Y L I C P LY W O O D, H O LT O N R O W E R , T H E H O L E

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CUTLOG PERFORMERS

M A R N I KO TA K , C A L O R I E C O U N T D O W N

JAEEUN LEE, COURTESY OF REBECCA HEIDENBERG

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B E O B L I V I O N I N D I S C O N N E C T, 2011. N E O N , C A R D B O A R D B OX E S , PA L L E T S , VA R I A B L E . N ATA S H A W H E AT, T H E A PA R T M E N T.

COURTESY OF CUTLOG

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(continued from page 29)

create dizzying patterns like Ivan Yazykov’s Book of Letters—a series of black and white drawings of an ethereal other world that engulfs the eye in its web of detail. Given all this, it was extremely startling to find Tillamook “Tillie” Cheddar the fourteen year old Jack Russell Terrier from Brooklyn, “widely regarded as the world’s preeminent canine artist” as the program describes, with “20 solo exhibitions world wide”. How to approach this; there are just an infinite amount of angles in which to discuss this. Is it animal abuse? Is it artistic extortion—who is receiving the dog’s earned money? What genre does it constitute, or better, is it finally a ground breaking new genre, and if so, will it be quickly destroyed if others start to emulate it? We can’t ignore that it is a commentary on art itself and whether or not one needs “human” attributes to produce it, it also fuels the notion of art as a sentient experience over a rational one. Artists are bound to feel dismayed at the pomp and attention this painting dog receives, and buying one of the works might have the thrill of novelty if nothing else, but although I do not wish a future in which humans are using animals to create lucrative works of art, the event is monumentally interesting in terms of the discussions it triggers about what is necessary to create, which includes the realms of disability, sensibility, and cognizance. Tillie has her own trailer which remained in the parking lot turned courtyard of the Clemente Soto Velez center. Beautiful, fit, naked women are often found in exhibits either as subjects of pictures or as performance art. The act of undressing will forever retain a level of untapped mystique, fear and wonder, but its numerous displays run the risk of turning it into a tired trope. Marni Kotak subverts this trope with her piece “Calorie Countdown”, where she spends all of the festival’s four days morning to night on the elliptical, listening to her ipod (I had the delight of watching her sing along to Bohemian Rhapsody) while the calorie counter app on her phone was projected onto the wall

behind, next to a “before” picture of her. Marni wears a bikini on her slightly overweight and flabby body—her before picture shows off an even fuller figure, and she is sweatily rocking out on her elliptical surrounded by gawkers and cameras. Maybe Marni was pontificating on this city’s obsession with exercise or how the unfit body looks like exercising. By the time I saw Marni at around 7 pm, she had already burned over 4,000 calories and was probably no thinner than the day before—this breeds a sense of desperation—to be fit must one literally or metaphorically become chained to exercise and diet? An ideal body is certainly sacrifice, and Marni’s performance showed this sacrifice in a refreshingly non indulgent tone. Of course there are thousands more pieces to be mulled over but these are some gems that stood out. As a fair, it was widely successful bringing a wide array of viewers to the Lower East Side and connecting artists from all over the globe. Hopefully Cutlog has found itself a home here in New York and will be returning next year. It is definitely worth checking out.

AN ART DISCUSSION, COURTESY OF CUTLOG

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TAKE ON FILM BY JOSEPH GALLO Having Fun With Film Many of you may not know or remember that the latest film cameras came with features that digital cameras have, such as vibration reduction, auto focus, power advancing the film, and modes for the camera to automatically calculate the best settings for the shot. One difference was having a strip of photographic film instead of an electronic sensor in the camera. One other difference with digital is instant gratification in seeing the results of your photo on the back of the camera. I use earlier manual cameras, which requires me to turn the focus ring by hand until the image is clear. The viewfinder uses a mirror to see out the front lens of the camera, and the mirror flips out of the way when the shutter is tripped—this is the same with my digital SLR. I find a much lower risk of failure using my digital SLR, but sometimes the predictability can be boring. I then appreciate that every shot counts when using film. With a digital camera, one can shoot until the battery dies or the memory card is full, which in comparison seems limitless. With my film camera, I need to think carefully about framing the shot, calculating the lighting, and whether the subject and my camera are in focus. Color film can be even more challenging than black and white film because when framing an image for a shot there is more going on. But of course some subjects like fireworks call for color. Removing the color from a digital image is not the same as taking a black and white film photo. It does not have the same look and feel. Color film has subtle differences in the shades of color compared to images captured on a digital sensor. There is a slight distortion with film. The grain of film is different than the grain of digital images. Instead of square pixels, a film image has a grain of tiny random-shaped crystals due to the chemical salts that record the image. The payoff of film is more anticipated. Waiting to get the film developed: how will the photos look? Seeing the fruit of all your labor finally placed before you. Some images may come out as expected, some may not. Sometimes you may be pleasantly surprised.

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CONTRAST


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Technology continues to advance and with it the tools of photography. For now I’m enjoying rediscovering film and what my film cameras can do. A great website for more about film photography is: http://japancamerahunter.com Joseph Gallo studied film B&W film photography and darkroom under Michael Silverwise and color film photography under Christine Callahan at the International Center of Photography.

W O N D E R W H E E L AT N I G H T

STILET TO SILHOUET TES

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GREEN LAGOON WITH HOLGA

CROCUS

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ART + FA S H I O N + LIFE C R E AT I V E S U G A R M A G A Z I N E SEEKING WRITERS + PHOTOGRAPHERS I N F O @ C R E AT I V E S U G A R M A G A Z I N E . N E T

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HAPPY SUMMER

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Summer 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR


Creative Sugar - Art of Summer issue