Page 1

CREATIVE SUGAR S E P T E M B E R 2013 - A N E M E R G I N G A R T I S T M A G A Z I N E

THE FALL ISSUE


COVER Sayonara by Paul Bennett Interview by Kenneth Lundquist, Jr. Story on page 26

2

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR


Creative Sugar Issue 6 Editor-in-Chief Sabrina Scott Copy Editor Marilyn Recht Style Editor Sherah Jones Photographers Akiko Higuchi Joseph Gallo Lindsey Mak Ryan West Writers Jason Stoneking Joseph Gallo Kellyn Lappinga Kenneth Lundquist, Jr. Maggie Buchmann Marilyn Recht

FROM THE EDITOR Welcome to the autumn issue number six. The start of this season also brings the beginning of the art season and also for seven days, the magical events behind fashion week here in NYC. For this we welcome September. We’ve had a great summer but now it ’s back to business. This issue brings together artists

Makeup & Hair Dori Sligh Talysha Monee

such as an Icelandic artist otherwise known as

Graphic Design Sabrina Scott

music songstress, Bjork. This issue also introduces

Shoplifter, whom I’ve admired for her work with our cover artist--painter Paul Bennett, in an interesting interview by Kenneth Lundquist, Jr. We’ve included a new feature in this issue, the start of a regular department called “Show Dates,” also known as a calendar of gallery openings for some incredible contemporary artists on the scene. Be sure to make a date to attend a show. It ’s a great opportunity to learn, become inspired and see creative forces at work. Take the time to

Contact: info@creativesugarmagazine.net phone: 1-888-669-5513 web: creativesugarmagazine.net facebook.com/creativesugarmagazine © 2013 Creative Sugar Magazine

support local art.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

All rights to art, words, photos, design and copyrights are the property of the Artist. All work in this publication may not be used without the Artist’s consent. New York, New York

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

3


ART

IT’S FUN TO BE VAIN BY MAGGIE BUCHMANN

6

UNAUTHORIZED: THE TERRITORY 14 BY JASON STONEKING THE ARTIST AT WORK 16 BY MARILYN RECHT MINIMALISTIC FUTURISM 18

A K I KO H U G U C H I , P H O T O G R A P H E R SHERAH JONES, STYLE EDITOR DORI SLIGH, MAKE UP & HAIR CLAIRE WITH BOSS MODELS

4

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR


ULTUR

ILLUSIONARY INTIMACY 26 BY KENNETH LUNDQUIST, JR.

TAKE ON FILM 32 BY JOSEPH GALLO

STREET CHIC 36

PHOTOGRAPHER: LINDSEY MAK STYLE EDITOR: SHERAH JONES M A K E U P A R T I S T: TA LY S H A M O N E E MODELS: GENESIS & ALEXA WITH TRUMP MODELS

FA S H I O N W E E K S E P T E M B E R 2013

42

S H O W D AT E S 50

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

5


6

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR


IT’S FUN TO BE VAIN by MAGGIE BUCHMANN There’s some ridiculous study out there claiming people with easy to pronounce names are more likely to succeed. Evidently, the likability of something is in direct correlation to its comprehensibility. Wait…whut. No comprendo. If there is any truth to these scientifically based findings, then there’s no hope for mixed media artist Hranfnildur Arnardottir. With a name like that, Arnardottir will be voted least likely to succeed in just about everything. But in the world of art, where success is an exception and not the rule, she’s mostly been the exception. So how does Arnardottir do it? “I don’t limit myself.” The artist/performer/mom simultaneously breaks all the rules while replacing them with her own. She is the exception to the rule. RULE #1: ASSUME AN ALTER EGO REPLACE IT WITH: FIND THE HUMOR IN AN ALTER EGO

Arnardottir is more publicly known as Shoplifter—a comical yet somehow appropriate mispronunciation of the artist’s first name, Hrafnhildur (APN-vilder). “I saw the humor in (the mispronunciation of my name) and how people remember my real name,” Shoplifter admits with a slight Nordic accent. I can hear the smile over the phone. And although I’ve never met her in person, she gives me the impression she would be the really, really cool aunt you tell your secrets to. “I just learned not to take myself too seriously. My pseudoname [sic] allowed myself to free up a little bit and be more experimental. It’s almost an alter ego.” RULE #2: MOVE TO NEW YORK CITY REPLACE IT WITH: MOVE TO A CITY THAT INSPIRES YOU Born in Reykjavik, Iceland in 1969 (which explains why her name ties one’s tongue in knots), Shoplifter moved to New York, where everyone is continually moving, creating, living, and breathing, and she’s been doing all of those things for nearly twenty years from her Brooklyn apartment in Greenpoint.

HRAFNHILDUR ARNARDOT TIR AKA SHOPLIFTER K N I T T E D A U R A 2002 PERFORMANCE PHOTO BY SPRAGUE HOLLANDER

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

7


“I always felt that in New York, there was a possibility for more freedom. I envisioned myself in black and white in Europe. But when I imagined living in New York, I saw myself in color. It just makes sense for me to live here.” RULE #3: CREATE A PERSONAL BRAND REPLACE IT WITH: ASSOCIATE YOUR PERSONAL BRAND WITH YOUR ROOTS It just makes sense, because as an artist, designer, and performer, where else would she be, really, other than the City of Dreams? And in the City of Dreams, where everyone thinks their dream is the dream, Shoplifter found a niche that would make her dream a reality. “It’s tough,” “Shoppy” divulges. “You have to be a little stubborn to do what you want to do. You get the wind in your face; you’ve got to keep at it to make it work.” And after making it through the wind tunnel, she emerged somewhat notorious among the hair fetishists of the world. Just kidding. Sort of. A trichophiliac would certainly get err…titillated from perusing her work. The artist is most famous for her work with hair, both the synthetic and human varieties. “I’m not only working with hair, but it has become popular,” Shoplifter admits. “It’s a fascinating medium for me.” And it’s easy to see why. Sculptures and haute couture gowns knitted, woven, or braided (almost) entirely of hair is different, avant-garde. Each of her pieces is like falling down the rabbit hole into an alternate universe of…well, hair: fluffy cotton candy hills and feathered stalagmites reaching for a braided sky. It’s dreamy and hallucinatory—a phantasmagorical eruption of self-discovery and self-absorption. “A lot of my work is about humanity and fantasy,” Shoplifter explains after I mention that there seem to be common cultural themes in her pieces: a mixture of ethereal beauty, high fashion, and vanity. Shoplifter’s work forces the viewer to confront one’s ego, for buried deep within the ruff are questions dealing with personal identity and hypocrisy. Each piece subtly critiques a world consumed with narcissism—which isn’t necessarily a bad thing because self-love is love nonetheless and we could all use a little more love…right? It may be naïve, but that’s what makes

8

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR


HRAFNHILDUR ARNARDOT TIR AKA SHOPLIFTER N E R V E S C A P E AT C L O C K T O W E R G A L L E R Y 2012 S Y N T H E T I C H A I R I N S TA L L AT I O N PHOTO BY MICHAL JUREWICZ

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

9


HRAFNHILDUR ARNARDOT TIR AKA SHOPLIFTER H A I R S C U L P T U R E W I T H B J O R K 2005 SYNTHETIC AND HUMAN HAIR MAKE UP BY ANDREA HELGADOT TIR STYLING BY EDDA GUDMUNDSDOT TIR PHOTO BY EREZ SABAG

10

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR


Shoppy’s work so charming. She’s playful and silly, yet somehow weaves the simple desire for beauty throughout her handicraft. “We all have to deal with our hair and we are constantly trying to contain it. My work is an ode to Scandinavian textiles and working with the threads and fiber to create necessary things and beautiful things. [Scandinavians] have been known to use hair for survival when nothing else was available. I was intrigued by that because when hair is detached from the body it’s disgusting.” I’m thinking about cleaning the hair out of my shower drain, and I’m gagging over my morning coffee. But taking a look at the artist’s most recent installation, displayed at the Summer Solstice Reyka event on the rooftop of King & Grove in Williamsburg, hair is the most beautiful thing on earth. I want to eat it and roll around and play in it. The installation was an homage to the foundation of all life, both beautiful and ugly: the sun. Celebrated on June 21st, the holiday Reyka marks the beginning of summer and the longest day of the year. It has a rich history rooted in Scandinavian culture, which is another reason why Shoplifter was drawn to working on the project. That and the vodka. Again, kidding. Sort of. “I wanted to recreate something intrinsic with Iceland and its culture,” Shoppy explains. “The sun became the focal point of the entire event. It just makes sense to have the presence of the sculpture made out of neon hair; there’s a presence and energy in a ball of fire. It’s euphoric and there’s just so much energy from having the sun out all

the time. People coming together and drinking and partying into the night.” RULE #4: KNOW SOMEONE FAMOUS REPLACE IT WITH: COLLABORATE WITH SOMEONE Shoplifter has had installations all around the world (“I’ve lived in a trailer for a PS1 MOMA colony project and I’ve had a solo exhibition in a gallery in London”) and she’s collaborated with a number of famous artists and designers, the most notable of which include Victoria Bartlett’s fashion label, VPL, and Shoppy’s singer/songwriter counterpart, Björk, on multiple occasions. Confession: I listened to Björk while flipping through an archive of Shoppy’s past work before sitting down to encapsulate her life and soul. The combination of my three cups of iced coffee, neoncolored and pastel-tinted hair, and Björk’s surrealist notes wafting in the background made for the most beautiful alien abduction scene. It was kind of like reading a Jane Austen novel from the future where cyborgs fall in and out of love and Sigmund Freud psychoanalyzes the blend of conscious, unconscious, and self-conscious love-making. “It’s very high profile,” Shoppy says about joining forces with a musician with a Twitter following of 458,348. “It’s fascinating because I’m inspired by identity and vanity and pop culture.” Which makes sense because our hair is a large part of our individuality and pride. We have the option to tame it, grow it, dye it, brush it, tease it. It’s an extension of our identity that allows us to distinguish ourselves from one another.

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

11


HRAFNHILDUR ARNARDOT TIR AKA SHOPLIFTER I M A G I N A R Y F R I E N D ( B O M B A ) 2008 SYNTHETIC HAIR AND WOOD P H O T O B Y S VAVA R T R A U S T I

12

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR


Her art, her livelihood, her collaborations—whether in fashion, music, or with other visual artists—feed Shoppy’s inner animal. They may satiate her appetite for a while, but she will always be on the hunt for more. “A collaboration is about finding new ways to do something creative in the collective and I like that—to get into another’s head.” It’s a classic case of putting things into perspective. Shoplifter is continually experiencing identity growth, whether it be through her original pieces, or teaming up with other artists. She thrives on creating and sharing the beautiful with the ugly—a sweet juxtaposition she can achieve only by working with an ugly medium to make a beautiful piece of art. Her work has collided with reality to form a personal concept of opposites, extremes, and exploring other worlds, even if it’s just the one in her own head.

you want to call her (Hair Girl? Trich Bitch?) is a success no matter what her name is. Because sometimes, you can’t always believe everything you read on the Internet. (Oh the irony!) But just in case you don’t believe me, do a bit of your own digging.

(ABOVE) PHOTO OF SUMMER S O L S T I C E E V E N T I N S TA L L AT I O N , 2013 (LEFT) ART BY HRAFNHILDUR A R N A R D O T T I R A K A S H O L I F T E R , 2013

So sure, maybe John will get promoted before Caoimhe (KEE-Vah), merely because his supervisor can pronounce his name without looking up the pronunciation. But Hrafnihildur Arnadottier, or Shoplifter, or whatever

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

13


Unauthorized: The Territory by Jason Stoneking

S

eptember in Paris brings what we call “La Rentrée” (the re-entry). This is when the tides of foggy Parisians, sunshine still in their eyes, come rolling slowly back into town from their summertime exodus, and get ready to go back to work. It’s when the students return from vacation, and thousands of new ones join them, full of romantic dreams, looking for a place to call their own in the City of Lights. For some, that will mean taking up residency at The Territory, a mythic illegal art colony squat in the 14th arrondissement. The Territory, which officially masquerades as an art school, is actually just a large unofficial apartment building full of young people living in chic intentional squalor. For the last fifteen years, it has been growing, in both size and reputation, under the watchful if somewhat maniacal eye of a painter known interchangeably as Sergio, Sergei, Serge and, on some special occasions, Dan Burke. “Sergio” is a bit of a mad hatter with a murky Eastern European background, who is working endlessly on his chef d’oeuvre, a photo-realist painting that depicts Hillary Clinton reclining in holy sexual rapture as the subject of Bernini’s Ecstasy of Saint Teresa. He is also the Machiavellian landlord who admits or dismisses potential candidates for residency in the Territory when the new crop of applicants arrives each autumn. He insists, for the record, that it is not strictly he who does the choosing, but the “vibe” of the place, which naturally attracts the tenants it requires. Fortunately, an audition before the “vibe” is much easier than the usual process for apartment seekers in Paris, who are generally required to produce years worth of pay stubs, co-signers, letters of recommendation, and yards of other hoop-jumping documents to prove they will make reliable drones. So Sergio and his squat have a knack for reeling in the kids who are already teetering on the fringes

14

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR

of society. On my last visit, I met tortured poets, visionary filmmakers, and a few other dignitaries of the underground art world. But I also encountered a baker, a business student and even an aspiring physicist, reminding me that all kinds of young people have their reasons for letting go of the common thread. And on the surface, at least, it appears that Sergio is heroically providing a more-or-less safe place for them to do that. Perhaps the most unusual thing about the “squat,” however, is that Sergio seems to be the only one truly squatting. He charges a rent of several hundred Euros for each of the makeshift “rooms” that the other inhabitants occupy. Some of the intense secrecy and paranoia surrounding the space may be because the man running the show is not within his legal rights to rent any of it out for actual money. The building is constantly under some form of amateur construction. Sheets of plastic roofing material are added over exterior garden areas to comprise new rooms. Lengths of PVC pipe spread over the walls like vines, linking networks of slapdash sinks and toilets with the great beyond. Um… building codes? Fire codes? Tenants’ rights? Shhh. Forget all that. Even more fun than the architectural free-for-all is the minefield of outlandish rules and regulations that each resident is expected to memorize and adhere to, in order to guard the confidentiality of what transpires within. I can’t do justice to the long and often incomprehensible list, but highlights include the stipulation that residents coming and going from the site must do so at specific times of day, and carry an artist’s portfolio at all times (to maintain the illusion that art school is in session). Also, that no one may leave the building with wet hair, lest neighbors question why an art school would contain showers. The narrative is that they must protect their treasured underground way of life from the authorities.


The Territory, which officially masquerades as an art school, is actually just a large unofficial apartment building full of young people living in chic intentional squalor. But more truthful, perhaps, is that the authorities must not discover the unlicensed exploitation of these tenants, who are supposed to be paying their exorbitant Parisian rent checks to the official, recognized, above-board French slumlords. At least, in all this chaos, the residents are getting what they ironically pay for: the authentic experience of a squat. They are sneaking in and out, partying all night, writing and painting on the walls. They are learning how to rig impromptu plumbing with unlikely objects found in the street, how to divert and channel electricity while minimizing electrocutions, how to hijack things like wifi and cable, and most importantly, how to live with each other in a large, diverse group. They are forming a sense of family and community, working together to solve problems. And many of them are making interesting art. It reminds me of Amsterdam, where I lived in a condemned building with an international crew of gutter punks.

Or Prague, where a group of us took over a youth hostel dorm for the summer and nobody paid for the beds. The difference is that these kids (or their parents, anyway, depending) do have to pay. And it looks like the price has gone up considerably since I was their age. To his credit, Sergio’s wacky, paranoid delusions do give this place an air of dark and magical mystery, but part of me wonders if by charging these inordinate rents, he is just cynically robbing these kids of the very experience he advertises: a sense of freedom from mainstream financial responsibility. Then again, another part of me wonders if this type of living has become so rare anymore that it’s actually worth the money, just to be introduced to a group of other people who are into it. In any case, The Territory never seems to have any trouble filling up. Let’s just hope that this crop of young artists gets as much out of the place as they put in.

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

15


W

hether you are a consistent artist or you feel too thwarted/discouraged/ exhausted to indulge in regular creative expression, you’re probably intrinsically repulsed by the 9 to 5 routine. And for good reason: being a cog in the corporate wheel is bound to deplete anyone of imaginative energy. It starts in the morning when the alarm goes off (or the spouse wakes you) and you are jerked out of the timeless land of dreams, unable to loll and drift in the alternative universe of your mind. Reflexively you pee, shower, get dressed, down your coffee and/or breakfast, and join the throngs trudging to the office. If you’re lucky your co-workers are of a similar sensibility and you can inject some irony into the proceedings. But there’s no way around the fact that time is not yours, your energy is expended for the benefit of powerful people you will never meet, and your paycheck can never reflect the soul sucking you signed onto. Of course a jobless person would kill for this numbing mindlessness, and I’m sure I would be one of the them, longing for the cushy desk chair and the freedom to surf the internet for hours at a time. Sadly, most people are afraid to pursue the life of the artist: to put money worries aside and pursue full gratification on every level. It requires an extraordinary thick skin and self confidence. The old saw “do what you love and the money will follow” applies to the very brave individualist, not the typical citizen afraid of living hand to mouth, deprived of access to the comforting luxuries of life.

16

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR

I have known people who used marginal, noncareer, evening jobs (eg, proofreader, graphic designer) merely to focus on their acting, painting, or writing careers. They did not lose sight of the fact that the job was for money only, and not self-identity. But if you’re a person who likes status and worries what other people think of you, you want to be proud of your work and feel you’ve earned the right to unwind at night. I am one of the restless ones, always conscious of failing to realize my potential. I’ve chosen a comfortable job thereby avoiding the lonely bohemian struggle. Sure I use my skills to a certain extent, and I’m lucky not to be under the thumb of my boss, and there’s a decent amount of socializing. I mean, I’m not a factory worker, highway toll operator, or toilet cleaner, and for that I am grateful. But when I leave work, that little voice pipes up, “so, now what are you going to do?” In truth, as John and Yoko pointed out, life IS art, and one should never despair that time’s a-wasting. Part of the secret is experiencing, recording, and cherishing everything, from the rip of a stocking to a funny dialogue overheard on the bus. I try to remind myself of this because it’s also key to restoring my failing memory! There was a popular book in 1971, Be Here Now, written at a time when people actually explored consciousness. Fifty-odd years later, the web has insidiously caught us. Our internet culture spawns and cycles hyperactivity and boredom. Even worse, the mainstream culture has no interest in rebelling. The “establishment” is just fine and the people want a piece of it.


ARTIST

THE

AT WORK by Marilyn Recht I live in the East Village, which is a perfect barometer of fashion. In the ‘60s it drew poor hippies and artists. The ‘70s was punk, glam rock, disco. The ‘80s was a crossover from the old subversive generation to the yuppy me-generation. In the ‘90s we saw the beginning of gentrification and the takeover of the republican megaculture: high-cost housing, chain stores, trendy restaurants. Things have pretty much continued in that vein into the 21st century. My tenement building used to be inhabited by artists and old Ukrainians. Now the elderly have all died off and their apartments divided into overpriced studios. The new tenants are mostly transient students and young account execs.

is mere humdrum to another. After all, it’s as mindless to drop out when you’re 18 as it is to sell out when you’re 40. I applaud those who take risks and go out on a limb, driven by conviction and vision. While social networks and blogging have enabled everyone to express themselves, it doesn’t mean that everyone has something to say. I think Yeats’ lines will always hold true: “The best lack all conviction/While the worst are full of passionate intensity.”

There’s no point rose-tinting the past, because it’s always a challenge to buck the trend to comfortable conformity. The new crop of young white dirty homeless in my neighborhood, unaware of generations of their predecessors, is a reminder that what seems rebellious to one

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

17


MINIMALISTI FUTURISM

AKIKO HUGUCHI, PHOTOGRAPHER SHERAH JONES, STYLE EDITOR DORI SLIGH, HAIR & MAKE UP CLAIRE WITH BOSS MODELS

Good Game. Two-hour looped performance of a post baseball game hand slap, 2010. Photo provided by Artists.

20 18 18

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR


IC

VEST: CRES E. DIEM DRESS: KOTOBA

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

19


20 20

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR


DRESS: HANDKERCHIEF BOOTS: ANDREW KAYLA

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

21


JACKET: HANDKERCHIEF TOP: DANIELL A K ALLMEYER PANT: CRES E. DIEM

22

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR


CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

23 23


photo by richard kern

24

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR


TOP: STRESIS SKIRT: DANIELL A K ALLMEYER

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

25 25


LO S T T H E H I G H , B Y PA U L B E N N E T T

26

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR


Illusionary Intimacy BY KENNETH LUNDQUIST, JR.

D

awn. The wondrous vibrancy of the Atlantic coast. Colors abound. Isolated, wandering in the rich wilderness, Paul Bennett stops to bear witness. In a moment, the sun breaks through a castle of clouds, creating a magnanimous display that is imprinted on his painter’s mind. He has ventured here to discover all this – sheer beauty, nature’s landlord.

couple of years I signed up to a part-time college course in Art and Design. I had some great tutors and everything just clicked into place. The most important thing that really got me going was the freedom involved and the chance to explore and break boundaries. Art school was a bit stricter and the main focus was more centered on conceptualism, which is not really my thing. I had no ambition to try and be the smartest guy in the room or to give the super rich something to talk about while stuffing swan down their throats.

In a rare opportunity, I catch Paul in between canvases. He is currently working on a new figurative piece – a stark departure from his abstract seascapes. I ask the most obvious question that comes to mind:

“After leaving education I fell into graphic design for a while and it took seven years for me to get back in the painting studio. I’ve never looked back. But why painting? Why not? We’ve all got to make decisions, at points in time, and painting just happened to be mine. The key is to keep at it if you love it.”

Why art, painting? “I’ve always been creative, whether that was with words, music or visually. Street art was my first encounter with the visual arts. That and album covers. “I had no direction once I left school. After a

It’s quite evident that creativity resides well in Paul. I inquire about his particular style. “I work in two or three different styles – figurative, semi-abstract seascape, and abstract. The figurative is the one I find the most challenging, but the

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

27


most rewarding. It’s also the subject that is seen (from the outside) as being more contemporary and provocative. The audience and response to the portraits is a lot different to that of my other styles. “The abstract paintings offer their own set of challenges and I was attracted to this style because it is more approachable. The abstract work is also more focused and suitable for a more corporate market as well as the home. It also offers more diversity with scale. The best thing is having a variety and being able to jump from one the other. It keeps it all fresh.” I’m always interested in how artists work, what makes their process special… “The tools I use are pretty standard. Brush, canvas, knife and oil, and occasionally gloss resin. I like to

28

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR

create a lot of texture but balance that out with calmer and flatter space. The most important thing is to just get stuck into the canvas. Just create. The rest will follow. Plenty of tea and the radio switched on is also a must.” What is your inspiration? I ask, and without skipping a beat his response is as brilliant as his work. “Inspiration is not really part of how I work. I will go and visit locations to get a feel for a place, but the work produced is a product of the process. I think Chuck Close sums it up better than I ever could: ‘The advice I like to give young artists, or really anybody who’ll listen to me, is not to wait around for inspiration. Inspiration is for amateurs; the rest of us just show up and get to work. If you


wait around for the clouds to part and a bolt of lightning to strike you in the brain, you are not going to make an awful lot of work. All the best ideas come out of the process; they come out of the work itself. Things occur to you. If you’re sitting around trying to dream up a great art idea, you can sit there a long time before anything happens. But if you just get to work, something will occur to you and something else will occur to you and something else that you reject will push you in another direction. Inspiration is absolutely unnecessary and somehow deceptive. You feel like you need this great idea before you can get down to work, and I find that’s almost never the case.

O P P O S I T E PA G E : E N D O F S T O R Y, B Y PA U L B E N N E T T A B O V E : T H E S E C R E T, B Y PA U L BENNETT

Naturally, I wonder how he sees how his work differs from his contemporaries. “It’s important for the work to be unique, but

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

29


where the uniqueness comes from, well I’m not sure. I try to get a result that comes direct from myself rather than external influences. The journey I take when painting is to get Informed and motivated from what I have previously created. A single mark might be all it takes to dictate a whole piece of work or even a series. However, I am beginning to notice that I might be inspiring other artists a little too much, as I am beginning to [see?] work that is very similar to my own. Probably unavoidable in this day and age, unfortunately.” Such an aware artist, surely Paul has some advice to extend to emerging artists worldwide… “Just keep at it and get the work in front of as many people as possible. Marketing is a very important part of the job. Just like any other carrier or industry, you have to get out of your comfort zone and put yourself in situations and places that are not quite natural to you. Also, create something that is yours. It’s important for the artist as well as the audience to know that they are looking at something that only you would have created.” …And the future? “To be honest, I have no idea. I think that’s up to other people to decide. I just have to keep on doing what I’m doing until I do something else.” For more about Paul, visit his website: paul-bennett.co.uk

LO S T A N D F O U N D , B Y PA U L B E N N E T T

30

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR


CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

31


TAKE ON FILM BY JOSEPH GALLO

32

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR

CONTRAST


CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

33


Photo 1

Photo 3

I love fireworks. I love being as close as possible to them and feeling the shockwave from the bursts. Visiting Coney Island is a fun time to take photographs of fireworks. I set up my tripod with a wide-angle 19MM lens and ISO100 color film with the aperture wide open. For this photo, did I think to cast Bruce Willis to stand in the foreground as a beach cotton candy vendor? NO I didn’t. Actually I was saying to myself, “Why did this guy decide to stand in front of a person with a tripod?” When getting the film back from the developer, I found him to be a complementary addition to the composition of the image.

The extended time shot of the Brooklyn Museum was a 30-minute exposure of ISO 50 at 22f stop. I stood by my tripod in the middle of the nigshielding glare from the occasional headlights of cars and hoping no pedestrians would pass through and show up as ghost-like blurs in the final image.

Photo 2

Photo 4 The next image of the statue makes me realize that sometimes finding a model is easier than one may think. This gorgeous statue was willing to pose for me for this shot taken at the rose garden at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden.

The candid photo shot of fellow artist Lucy Wang was taken before we were profiled as a professional photographer and a model on a commercial photo shoot without a permit. No attempt was made to argue with representatives of authority. We were shortly asked to vacate the premises.

3 W O N D E R W H E E L AT N I G H T

34

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR


2

4

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

35


G E N E S I S ( L ): H AT - D I M E P I E C E L A S H AW L - V I N TA G E JACKET- CAROLINA SARRIA DRESS- H&M A L E X I A ( R ): TOP- MANDARIN & GENERAL

36

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR

BRACELETS- HEIDI GARDNER


PHOTOGRAPHER: LINDSEY MAK

STYLE EDITOR: SHERAH JONES

M A K E U P A R T I S T: TA LY S H A M O N E E

MODELS: GENESIS & ALEXA WITH TRUMP MODELS

STREET CHIC CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

3739


TOP- DIMEPIECE LA JACKET- ZARA PA N T - V I N TA G E B E LT - L I F E T I M E GLASSES- STYLIST’S OWN J E W E L R Y - M O D E L’ S O W N SHOES - H&M

4038

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR


TOP- MANDARIN & GENERAL

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

3941


J A C K E T: C A R O L I N A S A R R I A DRESS: H&M TIGHTS: STYLISTS OWN BOOTS: VOLCOM

42 40

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR


TOP- H&M JACKET- ZARA H AT - S T Y L I S T ’ S O W N

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

4143


NEW YORK FASHION WEEK SEPTEMBER 2013 W O R D S BY K E L LY N L A P P I N G A P H O T O G R A P H Y BY R YA N W E S T

Harbison at Wave Atelier malt + mash Charles Harbison made his name in fashion working with the likes of Michael Kors, Billy Reid, Luca Luca and Jack Spade. Born in North Carolina, Harbison studied at North Carolina State University and Parsons, The New School. With a background rooted in architecture, Harbison clearly has an impeccably artful eye. His Spring/Summer 2014 collection was presented cohesively – right down to the music – displaying seemingly eclectic influences. “Aaliyah, Klein, Diaspora, Prep” are perfect words to describe this line which perfectly embraced hard and soft dichotomies and a vulnerable masculinity. These cohesive looks, separated and named charmingly (“Colonial Sunset” and “Island Minimalism,” to name two), were mainly differentiated by print and material and united by similar draping patterns and structure. From gingham and plaid to silk and dyed fox fur, to metallics to florals, Harbison brings the power.

42

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR


CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

43


NEW YORK FASHION WEEK SEPTEMBER 2013

Tia Cibani, Paul Kasmin Gallery North Africa. China. Canada. Hailing from all three places, Tia Cibani is certainly worldly, and it shows in her Spring/Summer 2014 collection. Cibani has worked with Ports 1961 as Creative Director and, after leading the label to success, debuted her own brand during NYFW September 2012. Peculiar mixes into surprising cohesion seem to be the expected theme for Spring/ Summer 2014. Her collection embraces looks, which are culturally eclectic while following silhouettes popular on the runway this season, structure and geometry. Assertive color palettes, moments of black and white, and influences drawn from Frida Kalho’s Mexico and 1950s Havana, gracefully exude modernity, a soft festive and playful vibe, and a balance between the masculine and feminine.

44

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR


CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

45


NEW YORK FASHION WEEK SEPTEMBER

Et Al

2013 Fashion Palette Pier 59 Studios The Fashion Palette presentation at Pier 59 came in the form of a runway and embodied a fantastic whimsy of dark and light looks that proved what clothes can do to decorate the body. We choose three collections that really pushed boundaries for the Spring/Summer 2014 season. Et Al Founded in 1987 by Christine and Les Doughty, Et Al has a relaxed tailored look and soft drapery. The use of chiffon, linen and lace embrace their reputation with unique cuts that (again) break gender barriers and restore faith in individuality and creativity.

Mossée

Mossée Mossée gave a bold presentation this season with clothes that define the term “edge.” Sticking with classic forms such as the peplum, sweetheart cut necklines, casual trousers and simply shaped dresses, Mossée let the material speak for itself. We were wowed with all the street sass, bold color palettes and killer prints coming from this line. Steven Khalil Spring and Summer 2014 means classic beauty and elegance for Australian-based couture designer Steven Khalil. His eveningwear collection is full of exquisite detail by way of opulent beading and material. The patterns of his lacing and use of lace and sheer chiffons hint old world royalty, making this collection a perfectly classic choice for elegance.

46

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR

Steven Khalil


Et Al

Mossée

Steven Khalil

Et Al

Mossée

Steven Khalil

Et Al

Mossée

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

47


SUBMIT YOUR ART!

I N F O @ C R E AT I V E S U G A R M A G A Z I N E . N E T

S E E K I N G S U B M I S S I O N S F O R T H E N E X T I S S U E ! 48

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR


SHOW DATES THE NEXT PA G E S A R E A N ART CALENDAR F EAT U R I N G SHOWS AND E V E N T S AT N YC GALLERIES. SUPPORT LOCAL ART!

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

49


SHOW DATES

A FA G A L L E R Y - A N N E B A C H E L I E R

3rd Streaming Gallery 10 Greene Street, second floor, New York, NY 10013, thirdstreaminggallery.com “Victoria Cohen, Hotel Chelsea” Exhibition Dates: September 17 - October 25, 2013  Opening Reception: September 17, 6:00 - 8:00 pm  Notorious as a refuge for the eccentric, the eclectic, and the creative, the Hotel Chelsea has been home to some of the great and unconventional writers, musicians, artists, and actors of the past century, including Bob Dylan, Janis Joplin, Charles Bukowski, and Allen Ginsburg, to name just a few. When the hotel was sold and closed for full renovations in August 2011, American photographer Victoria Cohen was invited to capture and document the essence of the building’s original interior before its imminent demise. Cohen’s photographs of these hallways, lobbies, and rooms, once beaming with life and vision, now bare and aged, illuminate a bohemian era that once was, speaking untold truths of a lost time. Fascinating and bittersweet, Hotel Chelsea casts the historic landmark through the lens of the

50

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR

A FA G A L L E R Y - B A N N E B A C H E L I E R

twenty-first century, exhibiting it as it has never been seen before, and will never be seen again. Victoria Cohen is a New York-based photographer. Self taught, Victoria shoots mostly in the large format 4 × 5 medium. Her work ranges from landscapes to portraiture, with an emphasis on the connection between the human condition and environments. 532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel 532 West 25th St., New York, NY 10001 www.532gallery.com Diane Copperwhite “Loose Ends” September 10 - October 8, 2013 AFA Gallery 54 Greene St, New York, NY 10013 AFANYC.COM  Anne Bachelier  September 21, 2013  Anne Bachelier was born in Louvigne du Desert, France. She studied at the Ecole des Beaux Arts, La Seyne-Sur-Mer between 1966 and 1970.  Her


BARRY FRIEDMAN GALLERY TA K A H I R O KO N D O

work has been exhibited in museums and galleries throughout Europe and North America, and a fine art monograph, with over 400 full-color reproductions, was released in 2001. Widely accepted as a master of line and detail, Bachelier draws the viewer into beautifully rendered narratives that are at once challenging, vivid, playful and light. Easy to live with but never boring, her paintings are enthusiastically sought out by collectors worldwide. Anne Bachelier lives and works in Allevard, France. This is the artist’s first solo exhibition with AFA. Jenny Bird Alcantara October 19, 2013   Daniel Merriam November 16, 2013  Collector’s Event / Bill Carman December 7, 2013  Artists Space 38 Greene St, New York, NY 10013 artistsspace.org

Aaron Flint Jamison September 15 - November 10, 2013 Opening: Saturday, September 14, 6:00 - 8:00 pm Artists Space: Exhibitions 38 Greene Street, 3rd Floor Richard Hollis September 21 - November 10, 2013 Opening: Friday, September 20, 6-8pm Artists Space : Books & Talks 55 Walker Street Barry Friedman, Ltd 515 West 26th St., New York, NY 10001 Barryfriedmanltd.com “Clay Bodies” September 19 - October 30, 2013 Public reception - Thursday, September 19, from 6-8pm Barry Friedman Ltd. is pleased to present “Clay Bodies” featuring the figurative sculpture of nine artists from five different countries, running in tan-

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

51


SHOW DATES

BERTRAND DELACROIX GALLERY H O R S E F E AT H E R S B Y J A S O N B A R D YA R M O S K Y

dem with the Museum of Arts and Design’s opening fall exhibition “Body & Soul, New International Ceramics” (9/17/13 - 3/2/14). One of the artists in the show is Takahiro Kondo. Kondo’s figurative sculptures are porcelain life-casts of the artist seated in a lotus Buddha-like position. By incorporating himself into the works they become deeply personal. The water-like glazes that have washed over his slab constructions in the past now wash over his head and body. The nature of man’s relationship to water has been a recurrent theme throughout the artist’s career. Bertrand Delacroix Gallery 535 W. 25th Street, New York, NY 10012 bdgny.com Jason Bard Yarmosky “Dream of the Soft Look” October 3- October 31, 2013 Opening Reception on Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013. RSVP Required. Maurice Renoma “MODOGRAPHE” November 14- December 14, 2013 - 

52

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR

Opening Reception on Thursday, November 14, 2013. RSVP Required. Betty Cuningham Gallery 541 W 25th St., New York, NY 10001 Bettycuninghamgallery.com Chuck Webster                                            September 5 - October 12, 2013 Jake Berthot                                                October 17 - November 30, 2013 Gordon Moore                                            December 5, 2013- February 1, 2014 Causey Contemporary 111 Front St. Suite 208 D.U.M.B.O., Brooklyn, NY 11201 Causeycontemporary.com Steven Dobbin “A Lot of Art is Boring” September 5 - October 6 Opening Reception: Sept. 5 6:00 - 9:00 pm New Sculptural works by Md. Artist, Steven Dob-


BETTY CUNINGHAM GALLERY NOT YET TITLED BY CHUCK WEBSTER

bin in his 5 solo exhibition with the gallery.

www.chambersfineart.com

Carri Skoczek “Fallen Women” October 10 - November 3, 2013 Opening Reception: Sept. 10, 6-9 p.m. New paintings and linocuts by the artist based on historical and art historical “fallen women”

Zhao Zhao September 12 – October 25, 2013 Gu Wenda November 7 – December 20, 2013

Lauren Dreier “Paintings and Other Works” November 7 - December 1, 2013 Opening Reception: Nov. 7. 6:00 -9:00 pm The first New York solo exhibition by the artist featuring her mixed media works on paper, paintings and sculptures. Michel Demanche “Tom and Betty Connect the Dots” December 3 - January 1, 2014 Opening Reception: December 12, 6:00 -9:00 pm This 10th solo exhibition by the artist features new mixed media works from the ongoing Tom and Betty series Chambers Fine Art 522 West 19th St, New York, NY 10011

Christopher Henry Gallery 127 Elizabeth St New York, NY 10013 christopherhenrygallery.com “Present Memory “ September 5 - October 6, 2013 Featuring Alvarez, Bradley, Elkins, Jigarjian, Miller, Paumier, Raman, Sira, Temkin, Ugarte-Bedwell Dev Harlan October 9 - December 8, 2013 Clifton Benevento 515 Broadway (Between Spring/Broome), New York, NY 10012 www.cliftonbenevento.com Jeanette Mundt

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

53


SHOW DATES

CLIFTON BENEVENTO GALLERY M A K E M E T H AT J U N G F R AU, 2013 B Y J E A N E T T E M U N D T

September 7 – October 19, 2013 Michael E. Smith November 2 - end of the year David Nolan Gallery 527 West 29th St New York NY 10001 davidnolangallery.com “Sculpture after Artschwager” September 12 - October 26, 2013 “Sculpture after Artschwager”– an exhibition which examines the diverse legacy of American artist, Richard Artschwager (1923-2013). On view from September 12 through October 26, the show brings together 10 artists whose work testifies a relationship to his highly original output. EFA Project Space A Program of The Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts (EFA) 323 W. 39th St, 2nd Floor, New York, NY 10018 “Marienbad redux” September 12 - October 26, 2013

54

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR

Opening Reception: Thursday, September 12, 6:00 - 8:00 pm Curated by James Voorhies of the Bureau for Open Culture Artists / participants: Jennifer Allen, Keren Cytter, Tacita Dean, Jessamyn Fiore, Dan Fox, Jens Hoffmann, Iman Issa, David Maljkovic, Ján Mančuśka, Gordon Matta-Clark, Josh Tonsfeldt, Allan Sekula & Noël Burch, and Maya Schweizer Last Year at Marienbad redux is an exhibition, public program and publication that explores the way fact and fiction merge to form accepted knowledge about people, places, events and politics. Drawing on the use of elliptical conversations in the 1961 film Last Year at Marienbad by Alain Resnais as a point of departure, the exhibition features works of art that utilize various cinematic conventions, such as editing, character development, narrative, mise-en-scène and montage, to reveal how our understanding of reality is often mediated by those very cinematic techniques. For more information, please visit www.efanyc.


FLOWERS GALLERY BANKER II, 2009, EDITION 3, BRONZE, B Y NICOLA HICKS

org/last-year-at-marienbad-redux/ Flowers Gallery 529 West 20th St, New York, NY 10011 flowersgalleries.com Rachel Heller & John Kirby September 12 - October 12, 2013 Opening reception: September 12 from 6:00 -8:00 pm A joint exhibition of works by friends, and fellow artists, John Kirby and Rachel Heller. Kirby grew up Irish Catholic in Liverpool and came to his artistic career relatively late when he was already in his mid-thirties, while Heller, who was born with Down Syndrome, began making art at an early age. Both have built impressive bodies of work and continue to influence and inspire each other. Glen Baxter October 15 - November 9, 2013 Opening reception: October 19 from 6:00 -8:00 pm An exhibition of new works by beloved British car-

toonist, Glen Baxter. Known for his absurdist style and baffling interplay between word and image “Colonel Baxter” gently mocks high culture through his cartoons. Baxter’s work has been exhibited internationally and he is a longtime contributor to The New Yorker. Nicola Hicks November 16, 2013 - January 18, 2014 Opening reception: November 16 from 6:00 -8:00 pm Flowers Gallery is pleased to present the works of renowned British sculptor, Nicola Hicks, in conjunction with an exhibition at the Yale Center for British Art. Known for her striking animalistic forms constructed in straw and plaster, Hicks conveys both the physicality and psychology of the creatures she creates. Her work has been exhibited internationally and she has been honored with an MBE for her contribution to the visual arts.  Gagosian Gallery 980 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10075 gagosian.com for other location listings

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

55


SHOW DATES

GALLERY HENOCH K I M O N O F LO W E R B Y S H A R O N S P R I N G

New York Edmund de Waal: Atemwende, Madison Avenue September 12–October 19 Richard Serra, West 24th Street and West 21st Street  October 25- December 21 William Eggelston: Zenith, Madison Avenue October 26–December 21 Beverly Hills Cecily Brown September 6–October 12 Avedon: Women  November 1–December 21 London Avedon: Women, Davies Street September 6–October 26 Frank Gehry: Fish Lamps, Davies Street November 7–December 21

56

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR

Paris Roy Lichtenstein: Expressionism, Rue de Ponthieu July 1–October 12 Calder | Prouvé, Le Bourget June 8–November 2 Rome Urs Fischer September 19- October 26 Hong Kong Florian Maier-Aichen September Gallery Henoch 555 W. 25th St., New York, NY 10001 galleryhenoch.com Sharon Spring “FLESH” September 12 - October 5, 2013   Recent paintings exploring the elegance of the female form by Brookyn-based painter.  John Evans “Botanics & Big Sky Paintings”


G E M I N I G . E . L . AT J O N I M O I S A N T W E Y L G A L L E R Y R I F T 1, 2012 B Y R I C H A R D S E R R A

October 10 – November 2, 2013 Exploring color and perspectives of space through images of densely foliaged botanic gardens and deep horizoned landscapes. “THE CITY” November 7 – December 11, 2013 An exhibition of five painters and their differing visual and poetic paintings of Manhattan. Garvey|Simon ART ACCESS 547 W 27th St, Suite 207, New York, NY  10001 www.gsartaccess.com Susan Schwalb “Spacial Polyphonies: New Metalpoint Drawings” October 1 - November 2, 2013, Opening Reception: October 3, 2013, 6:00-8:00 pm “Fragments: Works by J Ivcevich, Ray Kass and Sandy Litchfield” December 10 - January 11, 2014, Opening Reception: December 12, 2013, 6:00-8:00 pm

Gemini G.E.L. at Joni Moisant Weyl 535 West 24th St, 3rd Floor, New York, New York 10011 geminigel.com “Exuberance Unbound: Elizabeth Murray at Gemini G.E.L. 1993-2006” September 12 – October 19, 2013 Presenting a survey of works created by Elizabeth Murray in collaboration with Gemini G.E.L., the Los Angeles-based artists’ workshop from 1993 to 2006. “Richard Serra at Gemini 2008-2013: Levels, Weights & Rifts” October 24 – December 7, 2013 Exhibiting large-scale etchings created by Richard Serra in collaboration with Gemini G.E.L., the Los Angeles-based artists’ workshop.   Half Gallery 43 East 78th Street, New York, NY 10075 www.halfgallery.com

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

57


SHOW DATES

HALF GALLERY R O B E R T D AV I S

Robert Davis “EVERGREEN” September 9 - October 5, 2013 Artist reception September 9 6:00 - 8:00 pm “EVERGREEN” marks Robert Davis solo debut in New York. Last March, he exhibited paintings for the first time in Turin, Italy at Luce Gallery with WINE, CIGARETTES, SONGS AND SUCH and then again at NADA New York this past May. Davis was also included in recent group shows at Brand New Gallery in Milan, Italy alongside Oscar Tuazon, David Ostrowski and Virginia Overton as well as this summer here in New York at Loretta Howard Gallery with N. Dash, Helen Frankenthaler and Franz Kline. His enigmatic approach to materials (bleach, bourbon, coffee, red wine, burlap) echo Ed Ruscha’s fascination with painting alternatives while stylistically he runs closer to that of the Arte Informale movement, which stressed individual freedom over traditional protocol.   Hasted Kraeutler 537 West 24th St. New York, NY 10011 hastedkraeutler.com

58

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR

Nick Brandt ”Across the Ravaged Land” September 5 - October 19, 2013 Marc Dennis October 24 - December 7, 2013 Jack Hanley Gallery 327 Broome Street New York, NY 10002 jackhanley.com Bjorn Copeland September 5 - October 6, 2013 Opening Reception Thursday, September 5th 6:008:00 pm Jeff Williams November 14- December 15, 2013 Opening Reception Thursday, November 14th, 6:00-8:00 pm Jack Shainman Gallery 513 West 20th Street 524 West 24th Street New York, NY 10011 Jackshainman.com


Hayv Kahraman “Let the Guest Be the Master” September 10 - October 12, 2013 513 West 20th Street Kerry James Marshall “DOLLAR FOR DOLLAR” September 10 - October 12, 2013 524 West 24th Street Odili Donald Odita October 18 - November 16, 2013 513 West 20th Street Brad Kahlhamer October 18 - November 16, 2013 524 West 24th Street   Susana Solano November 22 - January 11, 2014 both locations Kim Foster Gallery 529 West 20th St., New York, NY 10011 kimfostergallery.com Jacques Roch “The Kiss and The Castle” recent paintings

September 5 - October 5, 2013 Moon Beom “Secret Garden” paintings October 10 - November 16, 2013 Koenig & Clinton Gallery 459 West 19th St., New York, NY 10011 leokoenig.com   “Spectators, Rendered and Regulated” September 12 - October 12, 2013 “Paul Ramírez Jonas | Aggregate” October 17 - December 7, 2013 “House of Vettii” December 12, 2013 - January 4, 2014 Littlejohn Contemporary 547 West 27 St., New York, NY 10001 littlejohncontemporary.com Phyllis Bramson “Small Personal Dilemmas” September 3 – 28, 2013

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

59


SHOW DATES LITTLEJOHN CONTEMPORARY F E R N B Y VA L E R I E H A M M O N D

HALF GALLERY B Y R O B E R T D AV I S

LITTLEJOHN CONTEMPORARY PHYLLIS BRAMSON

Valerie Hammond “Blue Rainbow” November 7 – December 7, 2013 Leslie Heller Gallery 54 Orchard St, New York, NY 10002 leslieheller.com Gallery 1: Ron Gorchov “Watercolors” Gallery 2: ”Into the Vortex” September 8 - October 13, 2013 Tom Bogaert, Megan Burns, Graham Day Guerra, John Jacobsmeyer, Jean-Pierre Roy, Joseph Ventura, Oliver Warden, Doug Young, Aaron Zimmerman Gallery 1: Fran Siegel October 18 - December 1, 2013 Gallery 2: “The Language of Painting” Martha Clippinger, Katherine Daniels, Vivki DaSilva, Anne Ferrer, Joan Grubin, Lynne Harlow, Doreen McCarthy, Gelah Penn, Carol Salmanson    Gallery 1: Ted Larsen Gallery 2: “Clouds”

60

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR

December 15 – January 26, 2014 Luhring Augustine Gallery Chelsea: 531 West 24th Street, New York, NY 10011. Bushwick: 25 Knickerbocker Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11237 luhringaugustine.com Josh Smith Luhring Augustine Chelsea September 13 - October 19, 2014 Josh Smith Luhring Augustine Bushwick September 12 - October 26, 2013 Reinhard Mucha Luhring Augustine Chelsea November 2, 2013 - January 11, 2014 Lyons Wier Gallery 542 West 24th St, New York, NY 10011 LyonsWierGallery.com Greg Haberny, “Burn All Crayons” (gallery installation, mixed media) September 6 - October 5, 2013


NANCY MARGOIS GALLERY LO B S T E R M E N B Y A N D R E A DEZSÖ

Cobi Moules, “Bois Just Wanna Have Fun” (painting) October 10 - November 9, 2013 Stephanie Hirsch, “I’d Rather Die on My Feet Than Live On My Knees”, (beaded & embroidered portraits) November 14 - December 14, 2013 Mike Weiss Gallery 520 West 24th St, New York, NY 10011 www.mikeweissgallery.com Michael Brown Schematics and Silhouettes September 7 - October 12, 2013 Opening Reception Saturday September 7, 6-8 pm Kaoruko Enn October 17- November 16, 2013 Opening Reception Thursday October 17, 6-8pm Jan De Vliegher “New Works” November 21- January 11, 2014 Opening Reception Thursday November 21, 6-8pm Nancy Margolis Gallery 523 West 25th St. New York NY 10001 nancymargolisgallery.com

Andrea Dezsö “Without Myself” Paintings Drawings and Tunnel Books September 12 – October 19, 2013 Opening Reception Thursday September 12, 6:008:00 pm A multi-talented artist exceptional for her ability to move between mediums, New York-based Dezsö relies on traditional media to express the nontraditional. Without Myself will feature a range of handcrafted works, notable for their extraordinary detail and enigmatic narratives, including ink brush marker paintings; graphite pencil drawings on hand-made Japanese papers; paper collage, acrylic and ink paintings on canvas; and Dezsö’s remarkable tunnel books. Beautiful and outlandish, mystical and absurd, Dezsö’s intricate organic designs and unusual nature-inspired landscapes tell stories that weave together psychological, historical and ornamental themes. While the works’ ambiguities leave viewers to figure out Dezsö’s stories for themselves, the palette, restricted to black, white and silver, is intentionally subversive, subtly revealing the story of an artist caught between worlds.

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

61


SHOW DATES

NANCY HOFFMAN GALLERY HUNG LIU

Jeff Depner “Abstract Painting” October24 - December 7, 2013 Opening Reception Thursday, Oct 24, 6:00-8:00 pm Artist Statement: Constructed to pit architectonic organization against the organic, my paintings explore compositional structure through the relationship between colors. Forms are created through cause and effect, wherein each layer interacts with its predecessor creating a functioning system of parts. As a whole, these units combine to create a sort of ‘abstract sign’ operating separately from speech and writing patterns, with the intention of seizing the viewer on an unconscious or automatic level. Nancy Hoffman Gallery 520 West 27th St., New York, NY 10001 Nancyhoffmangallery.com Hung Liu: Qian Shan: Grandfather’s Mountain September 12 - October 26, 2013 The Wall Street Journal recently called Hung Liu “the greatest Chinese painter in the U.S.,” because of the depth of her connection with the culture and history of China. That connection runs not only through her

62

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR

own life, but through the lives and experiences of her mother and grandfather (who was born during the Qing Dynasty). As an artist, Liu has always tried to turn old photographs into new paintings, adding a certain “mineral” urgency to a decaying “chemical” surface. With “Qianshan: Grandfather’s Mountain,” she makes clear the depth of her family’s memory of the old, literati traditions of China with paintings that reawaken her grandfather’s dream of being what the Chinese called “Jushi” (lay Buddhist), or a monk with a family. Her paintings are steeped in Chinese culture, contemporary and ancient. While she has a foot in both cultures—China and the United States—her art is born of a traditional Chinese art education. She fuses images from 7th Century Tang tomb mural paintings of princes and princesses with Western imagery such as St. Christopher carrying a baby across the river, surrounded by her signature circles of color, an abstract pattern which dances energetically across the surface. NOoSPHERE Arts               251 East Houston St. New York NY 10002 www.no-sphere.org


NOoSPHERE ARTS V I K I N G PA P P E R S

VIKING RAPPERS: from New York to the North Pole Martin Rustad Johansen and Simen Braathen. September 8 - 29, 2013 “The Unbearable Richness of Gray” Group Show October 4 - 27, 2013 “Japanese Arts Selection: Color” Group Show. October 30 - November 10, 2013 “Japanese Arts Selection: Culture” Group Show November 12 - 24, 2013 “Norwegian Sculpture Now” Group Show. November 29-December 29, 2013 On Stellar Rays 1 Rivington St, New York, NY 10002 Onstellarrays.com John Houck “A History of Graph Paper” September 8 - October 27, 2013 Opening reception: Sunday, September 8, 6:00 – 8:00 pm On Stellar Rays is pleased to announce a new exhi-

bition of photographs by John Houck. The exhibition celebrates a number of exciting developments at On Stellar Rays, including the gallery’s first solo exhibition with Houck, the gallery’s five year anniversary and the inaugural exhibition in the gallery’s new location at 1 Rivington Street at Bowery on the Lower East Side. The show’s title, “A History of Graph Paper,” alludes to the work of 19th century scientist Luke Howard, who pioneered the classification systems of cloud types, and who was also among the first to use coordinate paper in the sciences as a tool to measure and quantify. A History of Graph Paper addresses how we make models of our world to better understand it, and how those models become and then alter our perceptions of the world — how the tools we create in turn create us. Pace/Macgill Gallery 32 East 57th Street, 9th Floor, New York, NY 10022 pacemacgill.com Robert Rauschenberg and Photography September 5 - November 2, 2013

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

63


SHOW DATES

PA U L K A S M I N G A L L E R Y C O LO R FA L L . S P E C T R O S C O P I C , 2013 B Y I A N D AV E N P O R T

Opening reception, Thursday, September 5, 5:307:30 p.m. Pace/MacGill Gallery 32 East 57th Street Irving Penn “On Assignment” September 13 - October 26, 2013 Opening reception, Thursday, September 12, 6:00 8:00 p.m. Pace & Pace/MacGill Gallery 510 West 25th Street Paul Kasmin Gallery 515 West 27th Street, New York, NY, 10001 293 Tenth Ave, New York, NY, 10001 paulkasmingallery.com Ian Davenport “Colorfall” September 12 - October 19, 2013 293 Tenth Ave Opening Reception: 12 September 2013, 6:00 - 8:00 pm “Colorfall” comprises of a selection of new and recent paintings epitomizing Davenport’s unique

64

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR

approach and artistic vision - one that he has developed to investigate color, movement, light, and surface. The former Turner Prize nominee explains his new body of work was inspired by placing historical masterpieces in conversation with modern technology, such as Photoshop. Davenport says, “By following the color sequences from another artist’s palette, I am able to explore and question my own choices of line and hue. Photoshop is also used to establish a framework, from which I introduce an element of chance.” Taner Ceylan “The Lost Paintings Series” September 18 – October 26, 2013 515 West 27th St Opening Reception: Wednesday, September 18, 2013, 6:00 - 8:00 pm Well-known for his provocative, emotional realism paintings, Ceylan began “The Lost Paintings Series” as a contemporary exploration of the Orientalist gaze in all its facets. Upsetting both Western and Eastern master narratives, “The Lost Paintings Series” presents Eastern figures in a fascinating navigation of history, power and narrative.


PA U L K A S M I N G A L L E R Y PA I N T I N G 1881 B Y TA N E R C E Y L A N

Paula Cooper Gallery 534 W 21st St, New York 10011 Paulacoopergallery.com

PIEROGI 177 N. 9th St, Brooklyn, NY 11211 www.pierogi2000.com

534 W 21st Street Sol LeWitt   September 3 - October 10, 2013

BOILER 191 N. 14th St, Brooklyn, NY 11211 www.pierogi2000.com

Sophie Calle Absence   October 18 - November 16, 2013

Ati Maier “The Map is Not the Territory” At Pierogi and The Boiler September 6 - October 6, 2013 Opening reception Friday, September 6, 7:00-9:00 pm

Christian Marclay November 21 - January 2014 521 W 21st Street Charles Gaines, Notes on Social Justice  September 7 - October 5, 2013 Dan Walsh    October 12 - November 16, 2013 Bing Wright films  December 14 - February 8, 2014

The Apollo 11 space mission to the moon is today the stuff of legend. For German-born artist Ati Maier, the first Moon Walk serves as both metaphor and unifying theme to her latest exhibition, “The Map Is Not the Territory”. With a series of new abstract paintings, four looped videos, and a floor sculpture, Maier will transform Pierogi and second exhibition space, The Boiler, into an immersive environment within which to meditate upon the essence of that “giant leap for mankind.”

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

65


P I E R O G I G A L L E R Y AT I M A I E R

P I E R O G I G A L L E R Y V S E X A N D V I O L E N C E I B Y J O H N O ’C O N N O R

SHOW DATES

The Boiler show features Maier’s live action film, The Map Is Not the Territory, from which the show takes its name. Herein the artist plays her alter-ego: A helmeted space-rider mounted on a horse walking languidly across two unknown planets following a series of blinking lights that mimic the outline of the first Moon Walk. (The path is mirrored in the sky as a star constellation.) This strange juxtaposition of scientific and quasi-religious imagery becomes then an emotional vehicle for us to consider our own place in the cosmos. Ati Maier currently lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. A previous 3D video animation was included in the Fokus Bienial in Lódz, Poland. Her work is part of the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art (NYC), the Museum der bildenden Kuenste Leipzig (Germany), among others, and has been included in exhibitions at the Städtische Galerie Wolfsburg (Germany) and the Whitney Museum of American Art (NYC). This will be Maier’s fourth oneperson exhibition at Pierogi. John O’Connor Gallery 1 + 2

66

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR

October 11– November 10, 2013 Opening Reception Fri, October 11, 7:00-9:00 pm Recess 41 Grand St, New York, NY 10013 recessart.org Recess in Red Hook 159 Pioneer St Brooklyn, NY 11231 Jacolby Satterwhite “Grey Lines” Recess 41 Grand August 17 - October 12, 2013 Middling Reception- September 26, 6:00-8:00 pm Closing Reception- October 10, 6:00-8:00 pm Elizabeth Orr “Circular Track” Recess in Red Hook August 7 - October 6, 2013 Middling Reception- September 12, 6:00-8:00 pm Closing Reception- October 3, 6:00-8:00 pm Robert Mann Gallery 525 West 26th St, New York NY 10001


RECESS GALLERY J A C O L B Y S AT T E R W H I T E

www.robertmann.com Mary Mattingly “House and Universe” September 6 - October 19, 2013 Color photographs and sculptures Jennifer Williams “The High Line Effect” October 24 - December 7, 2013 Site-specific photographic installation Robin Rice Gallery 325 West 11th St, New York, NY 10014 Robinricegallery.com Greg Lotus Exhibition September 18 - October 27, 2013 We are pleased to present Greg Lotus’ first photographic exhibition at the Robin Rice Gallery. The opening reception will be held Wednesday, September 18th, from 5:30 - 8:30 pm.   Inside the gallery, the viewer is surrounded by an arresting display of glamour in the wild. Drawing inspiration from classical paintings and geomet

ric forms, Greg Lotus’ work has been compared to Herb Ritts, Man Ray and Richard Avedon, and his exhibition fuses his high fashion background with the rural environment of his youth. Yet Lotus admits to no formal training throughout his career, “I’m completely self-taught, lots of trial and error over the years.” “Swimmer Cap,” is an example of Lotus’ signature pop of color. Here, a cast of sinewy models convene in a locker room; their candy-colored swim caps give the piece its surreal, dreamlike quality. Lotus is currently focused on his fine art photography and recently exhibited at Art Basel in Miami Beach. Today he splits his time between Manhattan, Paris and Miami, travelling frequently on assignment to Europe. Jefferson Hayman “The Heart Has Its Reasons” November 6 – December 22, 2013 Sikkema Jenkins & Co. 530 W 22nd St, New York, NY 10011

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

67


SHOW DATES

S I K K E M A J E N K I N S & C O. LESLIE HEWITT

www.sikkemajenkinsco.com Leslie Hewitt September 3 - October 5, 2013 Leslie Hewitt’s installations call attention to the way we see and experience photography. Her framed photographs lean against the wall, drawing attention to the physical presence of the work, and suggesting a sculptural object and site–specific installation. The images themselves utilize the classical still life motif. Her compositions incorporate material selections imbued with historical, political, social, and personal affect. The current exhibition includes two photographic series: Riffs On Real Time (2013) and Still Life (2013). Continuing a body of work begun in 2002, the works in Riffs On Real Time share a formal compositional structure – layered constructions of collaged elements are arranged on her studio floor, which Hewitt has photographed from above. Within that set structure and perspective, Hewitt creates visual syncopation and variation using patterns, breaks, or points of rest between the elements within each frame, and within the series as a whole.

68

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR

The use of repetition and seriality in the series Still Life enables Hewitt to forge a connection between carefully selected disparate elements as well as to underscore the fact that the works exist over time across the span of a continuing project. Her engagement with time and the representation of silence is motivated by the desire to explore how Americans have engaged or disengaged with both the literary references to and the historical language of the civil rights era narrative (on a micro and macro scale). The constant refrain throughout the series is provided by James Baldwin’s 1963 book, The Fire Next Time, seen in each photograph alternating in visibility. Positioned with found photographs, other books, a maple wood board, and a perfectly sliced lemon (a nod toward the symbolism of citrus fruit in 17th century still life painting), the composition represents a deconstructed yet reassembled contemporary still life. The photographic series are shown with two wall interventions, which lean against the wall and mirror the dimensions of the gallery doorways. Borrowing the language of the gallery’s architecture, the presence of the interventions creates new


S O H O 20 C H E L S E A G A L L E R Y (LEFT) MORE THAN LIFE STILL, ELIZABETH BISBING ( A B O V E ) C O LO R F E LT T R A N S L AT I O N MARIANGELES SOTO-DIAZ

relationships between the works on view, shifting attention back and forth between the visual, pictorial images in the photographs and the physical elements that are experienced in real time. Soho20 Chelsea Gallery 547 West 27th St., Suite 301, New york, NY 10001 www.soho20gallery.com Elizabeth Bisbing “More Life Than Still” September 3 -September 28, 2013 Opening Reception: Friday September 6th, 6:008:00 pm Elizabeth Bisbing explores plant life in relation to botanical study and artistic observation. Among the native regional plants, Bisbing included medicinal flowers, exotic intruders and weeds, labeling and categorizing her findings with the assistance of Greene and Columbia County Master Gardener Bonnie Blader. Also on view are two stop motion animations by Bisbing, “Metamorphosis” and “The Swamp”, which are based on the paper cut works.

Mariangeles Soto-Diaz “Color Felt” Savoir-Faire 2013 featuring performances by Caitlin Baucom, Sophia Peer and The Dirty Churches. Check gallery website for dates and times of performances. Color Felt builds on the artist’s long-standing engagement with the language of North and South American traditions of abstraction. A former painting student of the late Karl Benjamin while completing her MFA at Claremont Graduate University, Soto-Díaz here challenges the cool tradition of classical hard-edge abstraction by linking color to emotion and social media. She also holds an MA from CalArts from the School of Critical Studies, where her studies of aesthetics and politics solidified her unique form of conceptual abstraction. Steven Harvey Fine Art Projects 208 Forsyth St, New York, NY 10002 shfap.com Katherine Bradford September 8 - October 13, 2013

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

69


SHOW DATES

S T U D I O 10 S K E L E TA L PA N TA LO O N S B Y T I M S P E L I O S

Lester Johnson October 16 - November 17, 2013 Sangram Majumdar November 20- December 22, 2013

scures the content, resulting in irreverent dislocations of meaning between the disparate elements in the collage. Spelios leads the viewer to question if they perceive a real or crafted memory or perhaps a biographical reference in the work at hand.

STUDIO10 56 Bogart St., Brooklyn, NY 11206 www.studio10bogart.com

Susan Inglett Gallery 522 West 24 St, New York, NY 10011 Inglettgallery.com

“Do Not Blow Horn Use Bell” is Tim Spelios’ second solo show with Studio10. Spelios constructs intricate photo collages from books and found printed matter, creating irrational and irreverent associations through juxtapositions of image fragments. Baroque exuberance and a quiet, lyrical reductivism coexist in a field of obliteration and transformation.

Allison Miller’s paintings ask viewers to be active participants. Visibly constructed and deconstructed, layer-by-layer, the resulting works are palpable sites of activity. Causing forms, space and priorities to shift and evolve, Miller links viewer to maker by maintaining a constant state of flux. A sense of paradox and simultaneity extends to every facet of Miller’s work, from color palette to materials, mark-making to composition. Transparent sky blues and peachy-pinks are both highlighted and negated by expanses of thick, black impasto. Crusty surfaces of a muddy, dirt and paint mixture abut wispy, hair-like lines of saturated color. Flecks and drips of paint belie the fact that, often, the canvases are worked in multiple

Spelios retrieves his materials from the streets, flea markets and finds books left in piles by anonymous Brooklynites. Obsolete manuals, out of date magazines with the pages torn or removed, or forgotten photographs are all favored. He chooses unconventional subject matter, and disassembles and ob-

70

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR


STEVEN HARVEY FINE ART PROJECTS SANGRAM MAJUMDAR

orientations before coming to rest. Compositionally, Miller’s paintings hover; grazing everything from landscape to portraiture, collage to cartoons. They are at once agile and ham-fisted in their approach to abstraction. This mutability makes for a kind of freedom, as Miller’s paintings choose to prioritize experience over certainty. Throckmorton Fine Art 145 East 57th St. 3rd fl. New York, NY 10022 www.throckmorton-nyc.com Aldo Sessa - Reflections of New York City September 19 - November 9, 2013 Throckmorton Fine Art is pleased to present an exhibit of photographs of New York City by the notable and acclaimed photographer in Argentina, Aldo Sessa. Now in his seventies, Sessa is widely hailed in his native Argentina and in neighboring South American countries. His work has been shown throughout the region, in both museums and galleries. In a bid to introduce Sessa’s work to a wider audience, Throckmorton is showing 25 of Sessa’s photographs of New York City. The images

are all black-and-white, beautifully developed gelatin silver prints. Sessa’s work is comprised of images from Argentina, from Buenos Aires prominently, but also from isolated rural areas of the expansive country (which has just 15 percent less territory than India, yet a population of only 40 million). For the last four decades, though, Sessa has regularly traveled to another “port” facing the Atlantic Ocean: New York. Here he has labored, producing images of New York that are creative and innovative. He sees the city from “another angle,” noticeable, for example, in his unique photograph of the Statue of Liberty. Sessa’s images of New York are, despite his “maturity,” fresh and youthful. Sessa succeeds in making us look again—and more appreciatively at familiar icons of New York. Woodward Gallery 133 Eldridge St, New York, NY 10002 www.WoodwardGallery.net Robert Indiana - A to Z September 7 - October 26, 2013

CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

71


SHOW DATES

W O O D WA R D G A L L E R Y S T U D Y F O R A L P H A B E T WA L L ( R E D & G O L D ), 2010, B Y R O B E R T I N D I A N A

This Season, Robert Indiana will be concurrently featured with traveling exhibitions opening at The Whitney Museum of American Art (Retrospective), The Munson Proctor Arts Institute, and The Indianapolis Museum (Print Retrospective). Woodward Gallery is delighted to be among these prestigious institutions to unveil Robert Indiana’s current series, “The Alphabet A - Z,” in September - October 2013. The A - Z Exhibition boasts the artist’s brilliant graphic style devoted now to the entire American alphabet. The new work, presented on paper and canvas, is bold in color and assumes a striking complex simplicity. Robert Indiana is among the world’s most revered living artists with works in the permanent collections of more than 100 museums including: the MOMA, the Whitney, and the MET in New York; Shanghai Art Museum, China; Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Israel; Museum Ludwig, Germany and the Louvre Museum, France. Robert Indiana is best known for his iconic 1960’s LOVE series as well as his message of HOPE since 2008.

72

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR


Issues so sweet they will give you a cavity.

creative sugar magazine.net CREATIVE SUGAR Fall 2013

73


74

Fall 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR

Creative Sugar - September 2013  

September issue includes show dates and a review of Fashion Week. Also Icelandic artist, Shoplifter.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you