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On Campus 2017-2018

A GUIDE TO THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN I L L I N O I S   S TO R I E S

CAMPUS MAP

A R T S   +   C U LT U R E

SHAPING THE FUTURE SINCE 1867

POINTS OF INTEREST


On Campus Contents

Campus Guide

More On Campus

06 06 07 08 10 12

28 32 38 58

Lodging Getting Around Dining Recreation & Activities

Illinois by the Numbers Landmarks Map Our Illinois Family: Josh Whitman

Arts & Culture Libraries

Illinois Stories 16 Siebel Center for Design Learning and innovation hub to open in fall 2019

20

20 Boundary Breakers Stories shared of Illinois innovators throughout history

24 College of Medicine Engineering-based college will revolutionize health care delivery

44 150-Year Milestones Timeline celebrates our sesquicentennial

46 Leaving a Legacy Illinois alumnus and retired professor gives back

48 Atomic Images

44 46

Art professor mines archives for historical photos

50 Honduras Water Project Students design a sustainable, hygienic water system

44 50

52 LabEscape Urbana’s newest escape room focuses on physics

54 Green Street: Then & Now Take a walk down memory lane in the heart of campus

On Campus On Campus, a guide to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is published by Creative Services at Public Affairs, 507 E. Green St., Champaign, IL 61820. The information contained in this guide is collected and managed by Public Affairs and has been reviewed for accuracy. If there is an error or omission, email creativeservices@illinois.edu. For advertising and distribution information, or to submit content for consideration, contact 217.333.9200 or creativeservices@illinois.edu. General information about On Campus is available at go.illinois.edu/campusguide. Volume 7, 2017; ©2017. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced without written consent of the publisher. 17.051 All photos are credited to Public Affairs unless otherwise noted.


4

Welcome

W E LCO M E TO

Illinois Whether you’re here as a student, a new member of the faculty, a parent or just visiting for a few days, you are a part of history. We hope you can take some time to explore the campus – from a legendary cornfield to what we think is the finest public research library in the world to a supercomputer that did 52 quadrillion calculations while you read this sentence, Illinois has 150 years of life-changing discoveries. To learn more about historical events at Illinois, turn to page 44. More than 44,000 students, representing more than half of the nations in the world, call this place home. And while we speak many different languages and come from very different backgrounds, there is one thing we all have in common: We’re always excited to invite someone new to be part of the Illinois family.

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign


Welcome

5

Illinois has been shaping the future since 1867. Here are a just a few of the many events to be held throughout our sesquicentennial year. Please join us in the celebration.

AUGUST 1  Armory Renovations: Home to New Innovation Studio, Innovation Tech Hub, and Oneof-a-Kind Classroom Space AUGUST 25  New Student Convocation SEPTEMBER 12  Spurlock Museum: University of Illinois Sesquicentennial Exhibit S E P T E M B E R 1 4 -1 7  Ellnora: The Guitar Festival at Krannert Center O C TO B E R 2 1  Enduring Legacy of Sol Spiegelman N OV E M B E R 2  Four Color Theorem Festival M AY 1 2  Commencement

For more information about our sesquicentennial, visit 150.illinois.edu.

On Campus | 2017-2018


Guide

6

Getting Around

On Campus Guide

BICYCLING Biking is one of the most convenient ways

DID YO U K NOW

The band REO Speedwagon

to get around campus. Nearly 16 miles of

was formed in the Illinois Street

marked bikeways run through campus

Residence Halls in the 1970s.

and into the surrounding community. In 2011, the University of Illinois at Urbana-

Lodging ILLINI UNION HOTEL Tucked away in the Illini Union on Green Street, the Illini Union Hotel is located at the center of the University of Illinois campus. The hotel has 72 guest rooms and two VIP suites with spacious sitting rooms and expansive views of the Main Quad. Staying at the Illini Union Hotel puts campus attractions right outside your door, including the State Farm Center, Memorial Stadium, Campus Recreation facilities, Green Street restaurants, shops and most major campus buildings.  1401 W. Green St. Urbana  union.illinois.edu/hotel

Champaign was certified as a bronze-level Bicycle Friendly University by the League of American Bicyclists for its commitment to improve active transportation infrastructure and promote bicycling as a preferred means of transportation. The Campus Bike Center, a collaboration between the university and The Bike Project of Urbana-Champaign, offers an educational workspace where visitors can learn to repair, maintain and build bicycles, or purchase refurbished bicycles. All bicycle owners on campus are required to register their bikes online and to learn the rules of the road for safe cycling.  go.illinois.edu/bike

 217.333.3030

PARKING ON CAMPUS Metered parking for university visitors is available on university streets, drives and several lots and parking garages designated by visitor parking signs. Temporary permits also are available from the Parking Department by calling 217.333.3530. The University District comprises three primary parking jurisdictions: the University of Illinois, the city of Champaign and the city of Urbana. Please read all meters and signs, as there are differences between city and university rules and regulations. Many university-owned lots are free to the public in the evenings, but a permit is required during weekdays and no overnight parking is permitted. Housing lots, handicapped spaces and 24-hour spaces are restricted at all times.  parking.illinois.edu/visitors

WILLARD AIRPORT The university’s Willard Airport, named after Arthur Cutts Willard, who served as university president from 1934 to 1946, has been providing airline service to the campus and east central Illinois since 1945. Located in Savoy, Willard Airport offers daily connections to Students at the CUMTD bus stop on Wright Street

I HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER

destinations around the world.

The I Hotel and Conference Center

CHAMPAIGN-URBANA MASS TRANSIT DISTRICT (CUMTD)

 flycmi.com

is located in the University of Illinois

Ride the bus for free at several campus

ZIPCAR

Research Park, a vibrant community of

stops marked with an iStop logo. At all

The Zipcar car-sharing program offers

entrepreneurs, academics and innovators.

other stops, show your i-card or pay $1 per

members the convenience of a vehicle

Minutes from central campus, Illinois

ride. Monthly passes are $20, and annual

when they need one. Rates start at $8.50 per

sports facilities and Willard Airport, the

passes are $84. With CUMTD apps and

hour or $69 per day and include gasoline,

I Hotel features well-appointed rooms,

the website’s Trip Planner, enter your

insurance and up to 180 miles. Located on

Houlihan’s restaurant, workout facilities

location and destination to find a quick

campus and in the two downtowns, Zipcars

and a complimentary shuttle.

and easy route. Get real-time departure

are a great way to explore Champaign-

info using apps and at-the-stop signage.

Urbana or take a weekend getaway.

 cumtd.com

 zipcar.com/universities/university-of-illinois-

 1900 S. First St., Champaign  stayatthei.com

champaign-urbana

 217.819.5000 University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign


Guide

Dining RESIDENCE HALL DINING SERVICES Guests are welcome at any of the six dining halls across campus, where meals are all-you-care-to-eat. For a quick snack or food on the go, visit an A La

7

BECKMAN INSTITUTE CAFÉ

BEVIER CAFÉ

Serving hot breakfast, sandwiches, salad

Staffed and managed by Food Science

bar, fresh fruit and specialty hot food daily.

and Human Nutrition students,

 Beckman Institute Atrium,

Bevier Café is a real-life classroom

405 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana  go.illinois.edu/beckmancafe  217.244.1792

laboratory and full-service cafe.  Open: Monday - Friday 8 to 11:30 a.m. for self-service 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. for lunch

Carte location where items are priced

EINSTEIN BROS BAGELS AT SIEBEL CENTER

individually. On designated days, dining

Serving freshly baked bagels, breakfast

halls offer specialty cuisines such as Asian,

sandwiches, lunch sandwiches,

 beviercafe.illinois.edu

Mexican, Southern-style and vegetarian.

soft drinks and coffee.

 217.333.8469

 go.illinois.edu/dininghalls

 Open: Monday – Friday

SPICE BOX

7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday – Thursday 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Friday

 Siebel Center, first floor,

D ID YO U K N OW

The largest table in the state of Illinois is located in the Alice Campbell Alumni Center. The table was installed before the roof was put on the building.

201 N. Goodwin Ave., Urbana

ARRAY CAFÉ AT THE CARL R. WOESE INSTITUTE FOR GENOMIC BIOLOGY Serving gourmet coffees and pastries, salads, paninis, wraps and soups.  IGB Gatehouse, lower level, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana  go.illinois.edu/arraycafe  217.244.1113

On Campus | 2017-2018

1 to 3 p.m. for self-service  Bevier Hall, second floor, 905 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana

Spice Box is a student-run restaurant associated with Illinois’ hospitality management program. Each Spice Box meal has two menu selections: a prix fixe four-course meal and a special two-course meal. Specialty beverages and wine are available. Meals are served most Wednesdays and Fridays during the semester.  Bevier Hall, second floor, 905 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana  spicebox.illinois.edu  217.333.6520


Guide

8

PALETTE CAFÉ AT KRANNERT ART MUSEUM Serving coffee, espresso, soft drinks, cookies, pastries and sandwiches.  Open: Monday – Saturday, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Thursdays when classes are in session  Krannert Art Museum, first floor, 500 E. Peabody Drive, Champaign  217.344.2791

Recreation & Activities STATE FARM CENTER With recent concerts featuring national touring acts such as Garth Brooks, Green

Serving freshly baked breakfast goods, light lunches and dinners, vegetarian and nonvegetarian fare, sweet treats, yogurt, fruit, juice and Krannert Blends coffee.  Open: Monday – Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Extended hours on performance days  Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, lobby, 500 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana.  217.333.8412

 union.illinois.edu/food

AUNTIE ANNE’S  Main level, southwest

COLONIAL ROOM LUNCH BUFFET Serving daily buffet lunches in a formal dining setting. Open during the school year and closed in the summer.  Open: Monday – Friday, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.  Main level, East Wing

After World War II ended, students requested more social events. The Illini Union started to

Pentatonix, Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers,

host square dancing on Tuesdays.

Lil Wayne and many more, to national touring Broadway shows and family shows and monster trucks, the stars come out at the State Farm Center. Since 1963, the venue has been bringing the best and brightest entertainment to the Midwest. It’s one of the world’s architectural wonders, and only a handful of other arenas can match its size, versatility and dramatic scope. The center is also home of the Fighting Illini men’s and women’s basketball teams. The State Farm Center recently completed a state-of-the-art, $170 million renovation and reopened in October 2016.

ILLINI UNION EATERIES

DID YO U K NOW

Day, Florida Georgia Line, Dierks Bentley,

such as the Harlem Globetrottters, WWE

INTERMEZZO CAFE AT KRANNERT CENTER

 1800 S. First St., Champaign  statefarmcenter.com  866.455.4641

ORANGE AND BLUE GOLF COURSE Built in the 1950s as an 18-hole championship course, the University of Illinois golf course added another 18-hole tract in 1966, resulting in what is now known as the University of Illinois Orange and Blue Golf Course. Home to the men’s and women’s University of Illinois golf teams, the course is open to the public and located in Savoy. Rental clubs and a driving range are available.  800 Hartwell Drive, Savoy  uofigolf.com  217.359.5613

CAMPUS RECREATION

ILLINI UNION REC ROOM Outfitted with 14 bowling lanes, 12 billiards tables, arcade and console games, a TV lounge and snack bar, the Illini Union Rec Room is a great place to relax and unwind with friends. Cosmic Bowl is offered some evenings.  Illini Union, lower level, 1401 W. Green St., Urbana

EINSTEIN BROS BAGELS

 union.illinois.edu/recroom

 Lower level, Food Court

 217.333.2415

Campus Recreation provides a welcoming environment for everyone with sustainable facilities and programs that inspire the university community to engage in recreation and wellness opportunities. With the Activities and Recreation Center, Campus Recreation Center East and the Ice Arena, there are approximately 500,000 square feet of state-of-the-art recreation space available to concentrate on wellness and healthy lifestyles.

JAMBA JUICE  Main level, southwest

QDOBA MEXICAN GRILL  Lower level, Food Court

SBARRO  Lower level, Food Court

STARBUCKS  Main level, Courtyard Cafe

WENDY’S  Lower level, Food Court A marching Illini drum major conducts the band during a football game at Memorial Stadium

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign


Guide Campus Recreation also offers many diverse programs and services, including almost 100 group fitness classes each week, 38 personal trainers, eight intramural sports each semester, rock climbing, aquatic activities, ice skating and hockey programs and more than 40 club sports.  campusrec.illinois.edu

CAMPUS RECREATION CENTER EAST (CRCE) CRCE (pronounced SIR-see) is located in the heart of campus, behind Freer Gym. Its 110,000 square feet includes an aquatic center (featuring a leisure pool, water slide, volcano fountain and 12-person spa), 1/8-mile indoor track, free weights and machines, cardio equipment, a three-court gymnasium, three racquetball courts and an indoor soccer/roller hockey court.  1102 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana  217.333.3806

ACTIVITIES AND RECREATION CENTER (ARC) At 340,000 square feet, the ARC is one of the country’s largest on-campus recreation centers. Hundreds of weight and exercise machines, 1/5-mile indoor track, four gymnasiums, 12 racquetball courts, a 35-foot climbing wall and two 50-meter swimming pools are just some of the amenities at this tremendous facility.  201 E. Peabody Drive, Champaign  217.333.3806

ICE ARENA The University of Illinois Ice Arena offers a variety of skating opportunities for the campus, surrounding communities and visitors. In addition to instructional ice skating programs and public skating sessions, the arena supports intramural sport leagues and club activities including Illini Hockey.  406 E. Armory Ave., Champaign  217.333.2212

D ID YO U K N OW

In 1933, the campus ice rink was used as a dance hall.

On Campus | 2017-2018

9


Guide

10

THE FOUNDATIONS FOR DIVERSITY Cultural houses at Illinois provide dedicated spaces for students to participate in educational programming, cross-cultural engagement and social activities.

Arts & Culture ALLERTON PARK & RETREAT CENTER Built as a private residence in 1900, Allerton Park and Retreat Center is a historical treasure that was donated to the University of Illinois in 1946. Located in Monticello, Ill., about 25 miles from the UrbanaChampaign campus, the property contains

FOUNDED 1 9 69

1,500 acres of woodland and prairie areas, formal sculpture gardens, hiking trails, a Georgian-inspired mansion, a 10-acre meadow and several lodging facilities. Allerton is available to host a wide

BRUCE D. NESBITT AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER  51 E. Gregory Drive, Champaign (temporary location)

range of events including meetings, conferences, weddings, retreats

The mission of Japan House is to bring about cultural understanding and to give a necessary refuge for all to embrace tranquility in an immersive Japanese environment. Through the study of Japanese traditional arts, and particularly the Way of Tea, Japan House provides an opportunity for students and the community to gain a deeper sensitivity toward diverse cultures. The garden is open daily from dawn to dusk. Check the website to make reservations for tea ceremonies.  Open: daily, sunrise until sunset  2000 S. Lincoln Ave., Urbana  japanhouse.art.illinois.edu  217.244.9934

and special events. Overnight accommodations are also available. Visit Central Illinois’ “best-kept secret” and

FOUNDED 1 974

JAPAN HOUSE

DID YO U K NOW

discover why it is considered one of the

The Krannert Art Museum

Seven Wonders of Illinois! Admission is free.

has more than 10,000 pieces

 Open daily, 8 a.m. to sunset

spanning over 3,000 years.

Visitor Center, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m  515 Old Timber Road, Monticello  217.333.3287

LA CASA CULTURAL LATINA  1203 W. Nevada Street, Urbana

 allerton.illinois.edu

ARBORETUM The Arboretum is a living laboratory, including plant collections and facilities that support the teaching, research and FOUNDED 2 0 02

public service programs of several units throughout campus. Located on the southeast corner of campus just south of the intersection of Lincoln and Florida avenues, it was developed from the late 1980s to early 1990s and covers 160 acres.

NATIVE AMERICAN HOUSE  1206 W. Nevada Street, Urbana

Visitors can experience the lush gardens – a series of great outdoor rooms – ask questions about plants and get ideas for designing their own gardens. Admission is free.  Open: daily, sunrise until sunset  1800 S. Lincoln Avenue, Urbana

FOUNDED 2 0 0 5

 arboretum.illinois.edu

ASIAN AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER  1210 W. Nevada Street, Urbana

A student practices calligraphy at Japan House

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign


Guide

On Campus | 2017-2018

11


Guide

12

KRANNERT ART MUSEUM AND KINKEAD PAVILION

SPURLOCK MUSEUM

Krannert Art Museum promotes a

celebrates our shared humanity by

vibrant exchange of ideas in the visual

collecting, preserving, documenting,

arts. KAM’s rich permanent collection

exhibiting and studying objects of cultural

contains over 10,000 works of art from

heritage. The museum features exhibits

the fourth millennium B.C. to the present,

representing ancient Mesopotamia,

representing a broad range of cultures

ancient Egypt and Africa; ancient Greece

and varied modes of artistic expression.

and Rome; East Asia, Southeast Asia and

As the second-largest general fine arts

Oceania; Europe; and native cultures of

museum in Illinois, KAM presents high-

North and South America. Special exhibits,

quality exhibitions, educational programs,

based in the Campbell Gallery, serve

films, concerts and special events to

as a springboard for unique programs,

more than 125,000 visitors each year.

tours and special events. Admission is

KAM is nationally recognized for its

free with a suggested donation of $3.

extensive collections of ancient Andean,

 Open: Tuesday – Sunday

Spurlock Museum of World Cultures

European and American art, including 20th

12 to 5 p.m. on Tuesday

century paintings, photographs and works

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday

on paper. KAM’s award-winning gallery “Encounters: The Arts of Africa” celebrates the contemporary relevance of the arts of Africa and its diasporas. Combined with

10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday  600 S. Gregory St., Urbana  spurlock.illinois.edu  217.333.2360

collections of Asian, ancient Mediterranean

A student studyies at the College of Agricultural, Consumer, and Environmental Sciences Library

and medieval art, these holdings make KAM one of Illinois’ premier cultural destinations. Admission is free and open to the public.  Open: Monday – Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Thurs. when classes in session  500 E. Peabody Drive, Champaign

DID YO U K NOW

The Spurlock Museum holds more than 50,000 artifacts from six continents.

Libraries UNIVERSITY LIBRARY The University Library, open to everyone,

 kam.illinois.edu

is the largest public university library

 217.333.1861

in the nation, with more than 13 million volumes and 20 area studies libraries. It

KRANNERT CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

includes one of the largest engineering libraries in the country, a state-of-the-art

Krannert Center is the country’s premier

agricultural library and an acclaimed rare

university-based performing arts complex.

book and manuscript library. It is renowned

Its roles as classroom, laboratory and public

worldwide for its innovative services,

square enliven world-class artistry and life-

the expertise of librarians and staff, and

affirming public engagement. The facility

extensive and specialized collections –

includes four formal theatres, an outdoor

which include those of John Milton, Marcel

amphitheatre, classrooms, rehearsal halls

Proust, H.G. Wells, Carl Sandburg and

and technical areas, a flexible 1.5-acre lobby,

Gwendolyn Brooks. The Library at Illinois

Intermezzo cafe and Promenade gift shop.

plays a vital role in the teaching, research

Working with faculty, staff and students

and service missions of the university.

from the College of Fine and Applied Arts and across the university, Krannert Center

 The Main Library is open daily. 8:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday – Thursday

serves as a central hub for creativity, the

8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday

discourse surrounding the arts and the

1 to 5 p.m. on Saturday

collective enjoyment of live performance.

1 to 10 p.m. on Sunday  1408 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana

 500 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana

 library.illinois.edu

 krannertcenter.com  217.333.6700

Students tour an exhibit at the Spurlock Museum

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

 217.333.2290


Guide

On Campus | 2017-2018

13


Guide

14

SPRINGFIELD AVE

GREEN ST

GREGORY ST

GOODWIN AVE

MATHEWS AVE

When you set foot on the Illinois campus, you’re walking through history. Don’t miss the bronze markers commemorating world-changing innovations that originated here.

WRIGHT ST

SIXTH ST

MAKING OUR MARK

NEVADA ST ARMORY AVE

For a complete list, please visit: publicaffairs.illinois.edu/markerstour/index

Early Computers

GREGORY DR

Sound on Films Cyclotherms Illini Supersweet Corn

PEABODY DR.

PENNSYLVANIA AVE

Preschool Learning Creation of Research Library

N

EARLY COMPUTERS

ILLINI SUPERSWEET CORN

Illiac I was invented in 1952 as the first digital computer built and owned entirely by a public institution.

John R. Laughnan discovered kernels of a mutant corn were unusually sweet. This led to the Illini Supersweet Corn hybrid (1953).

SOUND ON FILM

PRESCHOOL LEARNING

This is the site of the first public demonstration of sound recorded simultaneously with photographs in 1922.

Joseph M. Hunt convinced the Kennedy and Johnson administrations to extend the national Head Start program for preschool children (1966-1977).

CYCLOTHERMS

CREATION OF A RESEARCH LIBRARY

 Springfield Ave. and Matthews St.

 Green St. and Wright St.

 Natural History Building Harold R. Wanless introduced this term in 1932 to describe the succession of sedimentary rock layers found in coal-bearing formations.

 Davenport Hall

 Gregory St. and Nevada St.

 Sixth St. and Peabody Dr.

Under the administration of Phineas L. Windsor (1909-1940) and Robert B. Downs (1943-1971), the library grew to house over 5 million volumes.

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign


Guide

On Campus | 2017-2018

15


Siebel Center for Design

Superheroic Crown Jewel Siebel Center for Design set to open on campus in fall 2019

W R I T E R Phil Cicora, MS ‘04 Media

Photo: L. Brian Stauffer

16

A model of the Siebel Center for Design on display at the Art and Design Building

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign


Siebel Center for Design

I

f Iron Man’s alter ego – the

force. In October 2016, the Thomas and

brilliant engineer Tony Stark –

Stacey Siebel Foundation established

were to build a lab on a college

the center with a $25 million gift.

campus, what would it look like?

According to Singer, Siebel views the

For starters, it would have to be big: 60,000

namesake center as an opportunity for

square feet, with space for large-scale

Illinois to “really outshine its peers.”

construction and prototyping. It would also include a large workshop for 3-D printing, metal fabrication, laser cutting and computer-controlled machining. Two digital media studios to support video and audio recording as well as immersive technologies for virtual reality applications wouldn’t hurt, either. Nor would public gathering spaces, meeting rooms and galleries to encourage more informal interaction. After all, the rest of the Avengers have to hang out somewhere. In other words, it would look a lot like the new $48 million Siebel Center for Design, a learning and innovation hub that will open in fall 2019 as the next architectural crown jewel of the Urbana campus. Although construction is set to begin this summer, the idea of building a design center has been percolating for at least 10 years, according to U. of I. professor and entrepreneur Andy Singer, who was recently named interim director of the center. “We’ve been thinking about having a space on campus where students who were interested in making things and in collaborating on creating things could go, regardless of whether it was part of a class or their major,” said Singer, the Fox Family Professor in the department of electrical and computer engineering. “It could be an

“His vision was, how can we create a space that’s accessible to every student on campus, how do you make a campus network of facilities with an iconic facility in the center that can really do the design center concept at scale. That’s the challenge we’re rising to,” said Singer, also the director of the Technology Entrepreneur

17

Some of the most compelling challenges our students will face will require them to work with others far outside their field or comfort zone.

Center on the Urbana campus. The next logical question: Where would this “design factory” be located on an already sprawling campus? Too far south of Green

center and reserve a room. And when they’re

Street, and you risk estranging the engineers.

there, they’re also seeing a demonstration

Too far north, and it’s likely to be seen as

on welding, for example. So you’ll have

no-go territory for nonscience majors. Which

people coming in there for very different

places its location between the Business

reasons, all of which reflect the changing

Instructional Facility and the Ikenberry

shape of undergraduate education.”

Commons – two shiny new facilities in their own right – firmly in the Goldilocks zone.

Hamilton imagines the design center as a place where students come for the

“Location is destiny,” said Kevin Hamilton,

afternoon or for a weekend workshop – or

a professor of art and design and the

for a semester or a year for a course.

senior associate dean in the College of Fine and Applied Arts. “Some of the most compelling challenges our students will

“We need that diversity of programming for it to feel like it’s a live space,” he said.

face will require them to work with others

David Weightman, a professor of industrial

far outside their field or comfort zone. If

design in the School of Art and Design and

the design center doesn’t reflect the full

a member of the Siebel Center for Design

diversity of the Urbana campus’s intellectual

working group, said the hypothesis was

interests, it’s not going to be a success.”

that the bulk of the center’s activities would be undergraduate classes working with

idea that they were excited about personally,

When Hamilton looks at the design, he

or passionate about entrepreneurially

likes to think of its orientation to University

or socially. It would be a place where

Housing as symbolically significant,

students could gather and create.”

“because its primary access is east-west, and

“The future of work is going to be groups

you could very easily walk through the center

coalescing around ideas and opportunities,

on your way to and from your residence hall.”

but there will be room for students who

Enter polymath alumnus Thomas Siebel, the founder, chairman and CEO of Siebel Systems, one of the world’s leading

And if you’re creating Tony Stark’s lab on a

software companies that merged with

college campus, you would want to encourage

Oracle Corporation in January 2006. He

students to build their bleeding-edge suit

also earned three degrees from Illinois – a

of armor there instead of their dorm room,

bachelor’s degree in history, an MBA and

where the carpet could easily catch on fire.

a master’s degree in computer science.

“There’s that, but there are also classes that

Siebel’s vision and enthusiasm for the center

are going to group-based project learning,”

quickly became the project’s animating

Hamilton said. “They’ll go to the design On Campus | 2017–2018

faculty from different areas across campus on project-based, interdisciplinary teams.

have an idea and want to independently develop it,” he said. “So there will still be opportunities for lone inventors, but the emphasis will be on putting together teams to tackle an idea.” Students are free do almost anything there, up to and including prototyping a car. “One of the questions we had early on


Siebel Center for Design

18

Design thinking involves thinking about all aspects of the connection between people, products, services and experiences. Architectural rendering of the Siebel Center for Design interior

was what is the biggest project you could

thinking.” As one of the core principles of

envision a student working on,” Singer said

industrial design, design thinking takes

“We came up with building a motorcycle,

a more human-centric approach to the

a guitar, a new type of sofa or even a

creation of products or services for people.

car. If it’s a car, they probably couldn’t build the entire thing there, but they could design pieces of it and assemble it elsewhere on campus at the other nodes.” But the organizers were wary about dictating to the students what they

as well as environmentally responsible. “The intersection of all this is thinking about how you design things that humans can and will use,” Singer said. “Apple is a perfect

“Design thinking is a shorthand for a human-

example of a company that’s really taken

centered design and innovation that uses

industrial design and design thinking as a

a particular set of techniques that involve

core of their business component. As a result,

observation, empathy, ideation, prototyping

they come up with products that people love.”

and communication,” Weightman said.

Singer said part of the challenge in higher

Rather than saying “I’m going to build

education is to continue to innovate

a widget” and defining the specs of the

on what it means to have a residential

“We just want to make it available so they

widget based on a technical analysis, design

campus experience in the 21st century.

could do just about anything,” he said. “It’s

thinking “involves thinking about all

really a place to spark their imagination, so

aspects of the connection between people,

we don’t want to be in the business of putting

products, services and experiences,” he said.

can or can’t design, Singer said.

too many limits on what they can do there.”

“For generations, you’d go off to college to be immersed in an educational environment with your peers, with access to technology

Design thinking is also about how you

and information that you could find nowhere

The guiding principle behind the project is

might be able to manufacture something

else, and to network with like-minded

a trendy pedagogical topic called “design

that’s technically and commercially viable,

individuals,” he said. “In today’s world,

HISTORY OF DESIGN THINKING AT ILLINOIS Design thinking at Illinois didn’t begin

who are now at manufacturing and design

Urbana campus,” said Kevin Hamilton,

with the Siebel Center for Design.

companies all around the world making

senior associate dean in the College of

It’s been part of the campus DNA

iconic products that are great examples

Fine and Applied Arts. “As we celebrate

at least since the PLATO terminals

of ergonomic, human-centric elements.”

our sesquicentennial, that kind of

of the 1960s, if not longer.

For the Urbana campus, past is

“Design thinking has been taught as a

prologue, with design thinking

discipline and fundamental principle of

pointing the way toward the future.

industrial design,” said Andy Singer, the center’s interim director. “The industrial design program has a long history, and many very successful designers have come through the program at Illinois – designers

“Few people are aware that ramps and curb cuts” – pioneered by the late Timothy J. Nugent, a U. of I. professor dubbed the “Father of Accessibility” – “were first invented and tried on the University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

design legacy is something we want to be cognizant of. Those are the kind of stories that should inspire students.” From a curricular standpoint, Hamilton noted that administrators have broadened the scope from simply building a design center to integrating design-thinking principles into the entire campus.


Siebel Center for Design we have access to information just about anywhere you’ve got internet connectivity. There are advocates of forgoing higher ed, and taking courses online or going to a code academy and completely eliminating the residential campus experience. “There is room for that, just like there is room for trade schools. But there is a role for higher education, and we have to define how we’re different. We have to provide a reason for a university like ours to exist – and not only to exist, but to thrive.” One can think of it as no less than redefining the mission of a public land-grant university, Singer said. “One of the missions of the flagship university of the state of Illinois is not only to make sure students get the training they need, but also that they receive exposure to opportunities in our state,” he said. “We are a public good, and we exist so everyone can have an elite experience. The Siebel Center will be a unique draw for our students, making it a very exciting time to be a part of the Urbana campus.” It just so happened that everything came together as the university was about to celebrate its sesquicentennial. “We look at this as being broadly about innovation, enterprise development and entrepreneurship,” Weightman said. “It’s a good way to think about where the university might go in the next 150 years.” 

“What we’re looking to build is a network of opportunities,” he said. “We’re trying to have design learning not only as a part of classes but also as a part of residential life, part of the social connections, part of student organizations. We’d like students to come out of Illinois having some design experience but also being able to articulate what an Illinois way of going about design would be. Our history in interdisciplinary research and collaboration will serve us well in realizing that goal.”

On Campus | 2017–2018

19


Boundary Breakers

20

Boundary Breakers Throughout our 150-year history, Illinois innovators have changed the world with fierce determination

W R I T E R Todd Wilson, MS, ‘03 MEDIA

J O S E P H T Y KO C I N E R electrical engineer pioneered sound on film

Photos courtesy of the University Archives

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign


Boundary Breakers

21

SAM KIRK educator pioneered special education

W

hy have so many breakthrough achievements

would degrade the young university’s reputation. At the

come from the University of Illinois at

same time, powerful rural women’s groups pushed back

Urbana-Champaign? The answer often given

against the idea that everything they had learned from their

cites the long history of cross-disciplinary research and collaboration for which Illinois is famous. But a full answer must acknowledge the determined, resourceful faculty members the campus has attracted. Among those, some stand out for their perseverance – swimming against the stream of history, tradition and prevailing assumptions. These are the stories of a few of those boundary-breakers. Before Isabell Bevier came to Illinois, she was already pushing boundaries. As the first female student at Case School of Applied Sciences in Cleveland, she had been advised to focus primarily on the chemistry of food, since she’d find more opportunities in the “women’s field” of domestic science than if she pursued the

mothers and grandmothers needed any ”academic rigor.” By the time she retired after 21 years as head of the home economics program, Bevier had proved not only the social

I’ll just tell them it’s a great school, and to the highest academic standards. She had established homehopefully economics as a respected they’llacademic field and helped redefine women’s higher education across the nation. choose Illinois. value of applying science to the handling and preparation

of food, but also the capacity of women to excel when held

In 1921, when Joseph Tykociner arrived on campus, motion pictures were silent, or accompanied by a

phonograph recording. It was still six years before the debut of “The Jazz Singer” – the first real “talkie” – but Tykociner had already been working for years on

traditionally “men’s field” of chemistry research.

the problem of recording audio directly to film.

Upon arriving at Illinois in 1900 with a charge from President Andrew Draper to establish a program in domestic science that was academically rigorous, Bevier was met with opposition from several sides. Progressives were agitating for greater access to education for women – Illinois alumnae had petitioned for the new program – but male faculty colleagues warned that the women’s program

A few months after Tykociner’s arrival at Illinois for a professorship in electrical engineering, he proved sound on film was possible in a demonstration for University President David Kinley and the Board of Trustees. On the restored film, one sees Tykociner’s wife, Helena, who stands with a bell. “I will ring,” she says, striking the bell – and sound is perfectly synchronized with motion.

On On Campus Campus || 2017–2018 2017-2018


Boundary Breakers

C A R L R . WO E S E

C I SAARBLE R LL . WO BEV EISEER

microbiologist

micrbiologist home economist

pioneered gene sequencing

pioneered pioneeredgene women sequencing in higher education

Using a photoelectric cell created by a

succeed under specific training regimens.

Archaea, the previously unknown third

faculty colleague, physicist Jakob Kunz,

In 1952, he became founding director

form of life. “Woese is to biology what

Tykociner screened the first “talkie” on

of the widely influential Institute for

Einstein is to physics,” said University of

June 9, 1922. Although patent disputes

Research on Exceptional Children, the

Colorado microbiologist Norman Pace.

delayed commercialization of his

first research center of its kind, pulling

system – and denied him the associated

together the fields of education, linguistics,

financial rewards – Tykociner was,

psychology, sociology and statistics.

indeed, “the father of sound on film.”

When Woese came to Illinois in 1964, biologists were essentially guessing at how organisms were related to each other

Kirk introduced evaluation techniques

based on physical characteristics. In 1962,

Samuel Kirk taught reading to people

such as the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic

James Watson and Francis Crick won the

others had assumed were unteachable.

Abilities. He also created and tested

Nobel Prize for discovering the double-

He did this from boyhood, when he found

specialized curricula. When President John

helix form of DNA, and Woese wrote to

that the hired hands on his father’s farm

F. Kennedy appointed him to director of

Crick to say he believed that by studying

were illiterate. Upon Kirk’s death in 1996,

the Federal Office of Education’s Division

specific genes across many species, the

following a career of innovating the field of

of Handicapped Children, he pushed for

evolution of species could be read.

special education, his brother said simply,

additional resources for students with

“He was patient.” Most of all, Kirk was

special needs – including specialized

passionate about helping people learn.

teacher training – which resulted in

When Kirk began his career in 1929, there were few educational programs for the

the 1969 passage of the Children with Specific Learning Disabilities Act.

At that time, sequencing genes was tremendously time-consuming. It could take months for Woese and his postdoctoral research assistant, George Fox, to sequence a single gene. Woese would need to

intellectually disabled, and most of those

Kirk galvanized both the education

sequence the same gene in hundreds –

were primarily custodial. There was no

profession and national policy to deliver

maybe thousands – of species. And that’s

educational approach – let alone teacher

an education that lifted the self-esteem of

what he did for more than a decade.

training – for those who had difficulties

the learning disabled and offered a chance

short of recognized “mental retardation.”

at more meaningful, productive lives.

Beginning in 1947, Kirk began research at

Perhaps none of Illinois’ innovators faced

He saw something unexpected – and

Illinois that would lead to his discovery

longer odds of success than Carl Woese.

unrelated. “I don’t even think these

that many failing students suffered various

This physicist-turned-microbiologist

are bacteria,” he told a colleague.

neurological disorders – he coined the

wanted to create a family tree of all life

term “learning disabled” to describe

on Earth, and in the process he rewrote

this group – and that they could indeed

every book on biology when he discovered

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

His breakthrough came when he sequenced 16s rRNA, his chosen gene in methanogens.

Fox recalls, “The methanogens didn’t have any of the spots he was expecting to see.

Photos courtesy of the University Archives

22


Boundary Breakers

23

When he realized this wasn’t a mistake, he just went nuts. He ran into my lab and told me we had discovered a new form of life.” In fact, he’d discovered an entirely new major branch on the tree of life. In 1977, Woese’s paper announcing the discovery was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and Woese was on the front page of The New York Times. The problem was, most of the scientific community didn’t believe it. He wasn’t even really a biologist, they said. His Yale Ph.D. was in biophysics. Rather than being feted in the scientific community, Woese was ignored. But as the years went by, sequencing genes became faster and less tedious, and more

ADRIAN BURGOS JR. history professor

researchers around the world found that their findings supported his claims. It took 20 years for Woese to be fully vindicated, but in 2003, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded him the Crafoord Prize in Biosciences, given in fields not covered by their Nobel Prizes.

BREAKING BOUNDARIES—EVEN IN BASEBALL Today, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign continues its tradition of welcoming boundarybreakers, and not only in the sciences.

Woese was the discoverer of Archaea and the first to prove that all life on Earth is related. Perhaps most importantly, he gave biologists a concrete way to understand the relationships between organisms, and he gave the world the keys to understanding the microbiome inside the human body that contribute so much to health and disease The stories of Bevier, Tykociner, Kirk and Woese are a sampling, but Illinois has been home to untold numbers of scholars who forged their own paths, stayed true to their own visions and ultimately proved themselves to the world. Why could they do it at Illinois? Perhaps they found here what Bevier found on her first visit to a flat, muddy central Illinois landscape in April 1900. She wrote: “No trees, no hills, no boundaries of any kind. This lack of boundaries, physical and mental, the open mindedness of the authorities and willingness to try new experiments, indeed their desire to do so, opened up a whole new world to me.”

History professor Adrian Burgos Jr. found Illinois to be the university that would allow him to forge his own path. As part of a baseball-loving Latino family in the Bronx, just blocks from Yankee Stadium, Burgos knew that ”beisbol” was as popular in Latin America as it was in the U.S. “For us – and for many Caribbean and Latino families – baseball was about families,” Burgos said. “It’s about our identity. It’s showing our culture.” To build an academic career on a love of studying baseball, Burgos had to find the right campus. In 2001, he came to Illinois. “The scholars in this fabulous history department understood the seriousness of the topic I was pursuing,” he said. “They understood it was about more than baseball history. Studying Latinos in baseball allows you to understand migration, labor, political economy, social history

On Campus | 2017-2018

and cultural history. It’s a complex set of stories about how Latinos became part of the American social fabric.” Burgos is a leading expert on all aspects of Latinos in baseball. He’s been a consultant on two of Ken Burns’ baseball documentaries, and was named the inaugural editorin-chief to the MLB Hall of Fame’s new La Vida Baseball website. Burgos also loves the classroom – the chance to, as he says, open students’ eyes to the immigration and social sciences stories that are playing out right in front of them, on the baseball diamond. “You can tell when he’s teaching it that he’s so passionate,” says a former student. “He’s not just a historian on the subject of baseball, he’s also a true fan of the game.”


College of Medicine

Creating Synergy Inaugural dean of the Carle Illinois College of Medicine believes merging engineering studies with clinical instruction will revolutionize the delivery of health care

W R I T E R Mary Timmins

Photo: L. Brian Stauffer

24

A researcher works in his lab at Carle Foundation Hospital

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign


College of Medicine

25

AD

W

hen a search committee

practical and what is not. And if it’s a great

composed of University of

idea, it will become a project the students

Illinois faculty and physician

work on while they’re in medical school.

leaders from Carle Foundation Hospital in Urbana chose Dr. King Li as the inaugural dean of the Carle Illinois College of Medicine – an entity so new it doesn’t really exist yet – Li’s reaction was swift. “I would drop anything to do this,” Li said, and he did. The radiologist left a prestigious, challenging post at Wake Forest School of Medicine in North Carolina for the even more prestigious, wildly challenging chance to lead the world’s first engineering-based medical college.

“Think about it – students being inventors and changing lives,” he said. “What medical school curriculum is out there now that allows students to do that?” Effusive in manner, youthful in demeanor – and on this crisp fall afternoon, outfitted in an orange-and-blue striped tie – Li is a juggernaut of enthusiasm for the college he’s bringing into being. His approach is at once visionary and practical. In the breadth and depth of research and learning at the university, Li sees a vast trove of intellectual

“This is the opportunity of a lifetime,” said Li,

resources that can be tapped at a time when

who took on the job Oct. 1. “To have a world-

innovation is already driving change in

class university with really diverse expertise

medicine as never before. His journey as dean

DR. KING LI Dean, Carle Illinois College of Medicine

form a partnership with a top-notch health system that is vertically integrated, with the joint ambition to revolutionize health care delivery – that doesn’t happen very often.” The concept for the new college – which has been in the works for several years and was approved by the U. of I. Board of Trustees in 2015 – is an exciting fit for

Students being inventors and changing lives. What medical school curriculum is out there now that allows students to do that?

Illinois. Engineering faculty and students are already creating medical innovations on a seemingly daily basis, from inexpensive prosthetics distributed to the poor of Latin

has begun with an exploration of the Urbana

And that’s what the brilliant minds of our

campus in quest of strengths and synergies

students can provide. A lot of this won’t

in disciplines across the academic spectrum.

require FDA approval or a lot of investment.”

include a computer-based guidance system

“What we’re doing requires input at all

When the new college welcomes its first

for emergency response teams, a targeted

levels – legal, ethical, design. For example,

cohort – 32 medical students whose arrival

drug-delivery method to treat liver cancer

take sociology. How do you reach out to

is planned for fall 2018 – it will be headed

and an otoscope that employs optical

the underrepresented, those from a lower

into an experience that differs markedly

coherence tomography to look inside the ear.

socioeconomic background and still provide

from traditional medical education. Li

high-value care?” he said. “There’s business,

is an advocate for experiential learning

there’s law, there’s psychology. Almost

– case-based study with lots of clinical

every part of the campus can contribute.”

time. Lecture-format instruction in such

America to wearable electronics that monitor heartbeat, respiration and other vital signs. Ongoing U. of I./Carle collaborations

For Li, the chance to meld technological savvy with medical instruction launches sky-high possibilities for student creativity. “We will have engineering rounds,” he said

That includes the university’s

in an interview conducted soon after his

undergraduates. “Imagine,” Li said,

early-fall arrival on campus. “Students will

“undergraduate students doing projects

present a case (for their designs and the

that have real-life impact, projects that can

problems they solve). There will be input

change people’s lives. The most brilliant

from engineering professors and input

ideas are about linking up what already

from clinical people to (determine) what is

exists in an innovative way to make changes.

On Campus | 2017-2018

disciplines as biology and organic chemistry will take place online, as will more innovative educational experiences. Li envisions simulator-style, 3-D gaming environments. For example, students will work in teams in a virtual emergency room. “If you are training to be a doctor,” he said, “I want you to play


College of Medicine

26

the role of a nurse, so you know what the

translational research and deputy director

which drug will be best for each type of

other team members are encountering.”

of its Comprehensive Cancer Center.

patient. But if there are thousands of doctors

Wake Forest colleague Steve Kritchevsky

seeing patients with hypertension, their

said Li was instrumental in winning $4

collective experience can be collected and

million in NIH funding to establish the

analyzed. When the patient sees a doctor,

medical school’s Clinical and Translational

and he or she has all that analysis and data

PROLIFIC RESEARCHER AND ACCO M P L I S H E D A D M I N I ST R ATO R A native of Hong Kong who moved with his family to Canada at age 17, Li received his medical degree from the University of Toronto in 1981. During his third year of medical school, Li read an article in Nature magazine that changed his life. Written by the late Paul Lauterbur, the piece was about MRI imaging. (Lauterbur, who received the Nobel Prize for his groundbreaking MRI research, would join the faculty at Illinois in

The most brilliant ideas are about linking up what already exists in an innovative way ... And that’s what the brilliant minds of our students can provide.

1985.) “I said, ‘Wow, that is cool. That’s what I’m going to do.’ ” Li decided to specialize in radiology and “never looked back.”

Science Institute, designed to find ways

available, they’ll be a lot more effective.

His career path led to a faculty post at

in which electronic medical records

There will be fewer medical errors.”

Stanford University, then to leadership

can better meet clinicians’ needs and

positions in radiology with the National

provide data for research discoveries.

Institutes of Health, Methodist Hospital in

Such innovations, Li said, form the foundation of a learning health care system, a new model for medicine. “Every

Houston and to Wake Forest, where he was

CO L L E C T I V E L E A R N I N G —A N E W

a Wells Fargo Faculty Scholar. A prolific

MODEL OF MEDICINE

researcher, he holds 16 patents, with six

Information technology is central to Li’s

(It’s) really the future of health care.”

vision, not just for medical education but

Clinical instruction at the new medical

more pending, and is currently the principal investigator on a $1 million NIH grant to study targeted drug delivery to diseased areas of the brain using stem cells and ultrasound.

for the future of medicine itself. “Imagine the day when every interaction becomes a data point in collective learning,” Li said.

Li’s administrative background is similarly

“If, as a doctor, I see only 200 patients with

impressive. At Wake Forest, he served as

hypertension, and there are four different

the senior associate dean for clinical and

drugs to treat hypertension, I may not know

THE ILLINOIS MODEL FOR MEDICAL EDUCATION

encounter is a learning experience,” he said. “The whole system is learning, dynamical.

college will take place at Carle’s awardwinning, 393-bed hospital and health system based in Urbana. Li serves as the system’s chief academic officer and views it as an excellent partner because its vertically integrated structure,

The Carle Illinois College of Medicine has

humanities. Students will interact with

a unique curriculum rooted in case-driven,

patients and will innovate creative

problem-based active learning. Rather

solutions for difficult cases. Each student

than spending their first two years in rote

will be required to develop a new

memorization and basic science, as is

approach, technology or treatment as a

standard in most medical schools, students

capstone project prior to graduation.

will experience day-one immersion in patient care settings and technology.

Built on the four pillars of basic sciences, clinical sciences, engineering and

Early clinical exposure and patient-

innovation and medical humanities, the

centered experiences will integrate

entire curriculum and culture of the

engineering principles and related

college is steeped in four key values:

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign


College of Medicine

Photo: L. Brian Stauffer

27

which includes the Health Alliance health insurance plan, means there are significant data that are easy to share. “Dr. Li speaks about a learning health system and a learning medical school. In just one phrase, (he crystalizes) what we hope to do,” said Carle’s Chief Medical Officer Dr. Matthew Gibb. More efficient health-care delivery and better recruitment and retention of highly qualified staff will be among the College’s benefits, Gibb said. So will the “halo effect” of translational research. “It may attract venture capital funding and help develop the Research Park,” he said. For Li, intensive work in technology means graduates of the new Carle Illinois College of Medicine will be uniquely qualified. Their medical and engineering credentials will allow them to make recommendations to improve health care technology. “Our students, when they graduate, can become catalysts in the health care system,” Li said. “And everyone will come here to learn how to do this.”

Members of the Carle Illinois College of Medicine inaugural faculty: back row, from left: Jeff Woods, professor, College of Applied Health Sciences; Dan Morrow, professor, College of Education; Dr. Priyank Patel, Carle; Wawrzyniec Dobrucki, professor, College of Engineering. Front row, from left: Margarita Teran-Garcia, professor, College of ACES; Susan Martinis, professor, College of LAS; and Janet Liechty, professor, School of Social Work.

picture – the college will use no new state

sweeping as his statement. “There’s

or university money, relying instead on a

no question in my mind.”

That will, of course, be years from now,

$100 million contribution from Carle, as

beginning with the first Carle Illinois

well as research funding, tuition and fees,

College of Medicine cohort to graduate

gifts and endowment income. Beyond such

in 2022, if all goes well. To get there,

heavy startup lifting – responsibilities he

Li faces the immediate challenge of

seems to view with grace and good cheer –

accreditating the new curriculum, a

Li sees a future as big as the world itself.

one-year process set to begin Dec. 1.

Dr. King Li joins the Carle Illinois College of Medicine from Wake Forest School of Medicine in North Carolina, where he served as senior associate dean for clinical and translational research and deputy director of the university’s Comprehensive

“If we do this well, the impact will be

Cancer Center. A distinguished researcher

Fundraising also figures heavily into the

felt globally,” he said, with a smile as

and innovator, he holds 16 patents. 

COMPASSION

CURIOSITY

“When we talk about engineering and

We show compassion for everyone we

Change doesn’t just happen. Through

encounter – for patients, society and the

a unique blend of unwavering curiosity,

world at large.

determination and a giant leap into new ways of thinking, we will challenge the status quo.

COMPETENCE We are confident in our competency to prepare board-certified physicians who are also innovators who will revolutionize the delivery of health care.

CREATIVITY We will develop unprecedented solutions to society’s most challenging health care delivery problems by collectively building on each other’s creative ideas.

On Campus | 2017-2018

technology in medicine, most people think about drugs and devices. Our goal is more than that,” said Dr. King Li, the inaugural dean of the college. “We want to re-engineer the entire health care process alongside medical education. Instead of technology driving up health care costs and de-personalizing care, we will leverage technology to bring better care to more people at lower cost.”


Illinois by the Numbers

28

Illinois by the Numbers C H I C AG O 140 MILES

1867

Longitude and Latitude of Main Quad

Founding Year

C H A M PA I G N - U R B A N A INDIANAPOLIS 125 MILES

40° 06´36.88˝N

S T. L O U I S

88°13´38.13˝W

180 MILES

AC A D E M I C S  15 colleges and units  $640 million spent on research

and development in 2015  24 million items mark the largest public

university library in North America.  100 percent of all classrooms have wireless access. A R T S & C U LT U R E  75 percent of John Philip Sousa’s

original music manuscripts, the world’s largest collection, are housed at the Sousa Archives and Center for American Music.  4 cultural centers: Asian American

S P O R T S & R E C R E AT I O N  10 men’s and 11 women’s NCAA

teams; 15 major sports facilities  470,000 square feet of recreational

space between two campus rec centers  1,000+ registered student

organizations, coalitions, honorary societies and teams

 10,381 international students

from 114 countries in 2015-16  2,422 study abroad students in

2013-14 participated in more than in more than 60 countries.

 647 total buildings, 7.1 square

universities in number of earned doctorates awarded annually PEOPLE  45,842 total students

 4,031 administrative and

Center, La Casa Cultural Latina,

square miles (1,783 acres)

students; among the top 10 U.S.

 3,059 faculty and instructional staff

African American Cultural

 353 main campus buildings, 2.8

 12,474 graduate and professional

& STUDIES

400 programs and affiliations

FAC I L I T I E S

E D U C AT I O N

I N T E R N AT I O N A L P R O G R A M S

Cultural Center, Bruce D. Nesbitt

Native American House

G R A D U AT E & P R O F E S S I O N A L

U N D E R G R A D U AT E E D U C AT I O N  33,368 students from all 50 states  69 of America’s Fortune 100

companies (including seven of the top 10) recruited on campus last year.

miles (4,552 acres)  23 undergrad residence halls

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

academic professional staff  4,349 support staff  450,000+ living alumni, one of the

largest U.S. alumni organizations


More On Campus

29


Landmarks

32

Take a Tour Through Campus What began as one building in 1867 has grown to more than 350, many belonging to the National Register of Historic Places. A full campus map is on page 38, with the featured landmarks called out in orange.

2

called “the farms,” the former private estate

ALICE CAMPBELL ALUMNI CENTER

1

2

Alice Campbell Alumni Center is located at Lincoln Avenue and California Street in

ACES LIBRARY, INFORMATION AND ALUMNI CENTER

1

The ACES Library, Information and Alumni Center stands as an informational and architectural landmark on the University of Illinois campus. Dedicated on Oct. 4, 2001, the $21 million state-of-the-art facility integrates traditional information sources

Urbana, just south of the Hallene Gateway Plaza, the east entryway to the UrbanaChampaign campus. Named by lead benefactors, Robert C., ‘54 BUS, and Alice Curtis Campbell, JD ‘43 LAS, of Los Angeles, this facility is a warm and welcoming haven for alumni and friends on every visit back, be it for business or pleasure.

with new learning and information

ALLERTON PARK AND

technologies. The facility houses four

CONFERENCE CENTER

instructional and multimedia laboratories and studios, as well as an Information and Career Services Office and an Alumni Center.

3

Allerton was deeded to the University of Illinois by Robert Allerton in 1946. Originally

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

in Monticello, Illinois, includes formal gardens, an extensive landscape park dotted with ornaments and fine art, and a manor house modeled after Ham House in England. Allerton House was built in 1900 and now serves as a conference center. In 1971, the lowland and southern forests of 1,000 acres were declared a National Natural Landmark. ALMA MATER

3

Now positioned at the west gateway to the university at Green and Wright streets in Urbana, the Alma Mater sculpture stood until 1962 behind Foellinger Auditorium on the south campus. Designed by university graduate Lorado Taft, the sculpture was unveiled June 12, 1929. The Alma Mater is


Landmarks

33

4

shown “as a benign and majestic woman in scholastic robes, who rises from her throne and advances a step with outstretched arms, a gesture of generously greeting her children,” according to Taft. Learning and Labor flank the main figure. An inscription reads: “To thy happy children of the future those of the past send greetings.” ALTGELD HALL  4 Designed by Nathan C. Ricker and James M.

5

ARMORY

BECKMAN INSTITUTE FOR

The Armory was designed as a military drill

ADVANCED SCIENCE

hall, an athletic facility and an assembly hall.

AND TECHNOLOGY

More than 2,000 soldiers used the Armory as a dormitory during World War I. Constructed in 1912-14 and modified in 1925-27 and 1962, the building is something of an engineering feat: The long span structure was unique in its day. An example of Georgian Revival architecture, the Armory is an anchor point for the south campus.

When first occupied, it had a museum in the basement, the University Library on the first floor, and stacks and offices on the second floor. It then served as the law building (1927 to 1955), and the math building and library (1955 to the present). Named after Illinois Gov. John P. Altgeld, the building is considered one of the finest examples of Richardsonian Romanesque architecture in Illinois. The central room is decorated with murals by Newton A. Wells.

ASTRONOMICAL OBSERVATORY

on campus and anchors the far end of the north campus. It is constructed on the site of the university’s first building, which was demolished in 1881 (also the site of the Illinois Field baseball diamond and the university’s first collegiate homecoming in 1910). Completed in 1989, the institute was

White, Altgeld Hall was completed in 1897, with additions in 1914, 1919, 1926 and 1956.

Beckman is the largest academic building

 13

Constructed in 1896, the Astronomical

made possible by a $40 million gift from alumnus Arnold O. Beckman and his wife, Mabel M. Beckman.

Observatory was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1990, primarily for the advances in astronomy associated with the structure. Under the direction of professor Joel Stebbins from 1907 to 1922, the observatory was the site for developing the selenium cell and the photoelectric cell, which revolutionized the science of photoelectric photometry – the technique used to measure celestial magnitudes. Much of the original equipment is intact, and the 12-inch refracting telescope is still used for classes.

On Campus | 2017-2018

ENGINEERING HALL

5

This example of Renaissance Revival architecture was built in 1894. Architect George Bullard, a student of Nathan C. Ricker, won a design competition open only to university graduates. The interior has oak woodwork, the ceiling is paneled in Washington fir. Engineering Hall underwent an extensive renovation that was completed in 2000.


Landmarks

34

FOELLINGER AUDITORIUM

6

architect Lawrence Booth and completed in

HARKER HALL

1988, greatly expanded the exhibition space.

With its dome, Foellinger (prounounced

Originally the Chemical Laboratory, Harker

with a hard “G”) recalls Thomas Jefferson’s

Hall was until recently the oldest remaining

Rotunda on the University of Virginia

classroom building on the Urbana campus.

campus. The auditorium has a copper roof

Designed by Nathan C. Ricker (with John

and cornice. Considered an example of the

M. Van Odsel) and built in 1878, Harker Hall

One of the pre-eminent performance

Beaux Arts Classical style, it was built in 1907

is considered Second Empire in style. It is

facilities in the nation, Krannert Center is

from a design by Clarence Blackall. In 1984,

named for Oliver A. Harker, the third dean

largely the result of a gift from Herman and

the auditorium was completely renovated

of the law school (1903 to 1916) and the first

Ellnora Krannert. Completed in 1969, the

with funds provided by alumna Helene

university counsel. The University of Illinois

center covers 10 acres and includes four

Foellinger.

Foundation moved to Harker Hall after

theaters and an outdoor amphitheater. The

extensive renovations of the building in 1992.

complex was designed by alumnus and

GRAINGER ENGINEERING LIBRARY INFORMATION CENTER

KRANNERT CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

architect Max Abramovitz, who served on ILLINI UNION

9

the design team for Lincoln Center in New York City. Krannert is home to more than 350

Named in honor of William Wallace Grainger,

At the heart of campus, the Illini Union

the library information center opened in

serves as a community center for students,

1994. The history of the site of the Grainger

alumni, faculty, staff and guests. Constructed

Engineering Library Information Center

in 1939-40 in Colonial Williamsburg style, the

is intertwined with the history of north

Union was conceived by Ernest L. Stouffer,

Lincoln Hall honors the Springfield lawyer

campus, the cradle of the University of

university architect, and Howard Cheney,

who went on to become president of the

Illinois. The facility sits on the spot where

consulting architect. The cupola, clock and

United States. Completed in 1911 with

one of the first campus buildings, Mechanical

bell from University Hall (demolished) are

an addition in 1929, it is an example of

Building and Drill Hall, was erected in 1871,

retained in the Illini Union. It is considered

Renaissance Revival architecture. Terra

and houses more than 300,000 volumes of

one of the most significant buildings on

cotta plaques on the east exterior depict

engineering materials.

campus because of its location, character,

scenes from President Lincoln’s life; those

quality and use.

on the sides display quotations. Lincoln Hall

HALFWAY HOUSE

7

The trolley stand at the north end of the

performances each year. LINCOLN HALL

reopened in fall 2012 after undergoing a $6.4 JAPAN HOUSE

 10

million renovation.

Quad on South Mathews Avenue was

The University of Illinois has a history of

originally located on Green Street. It was

the study of Japanese culture dating back

situated halfway between Champaign and

to 1900. Founded in 1998 as a permanent

Dedicated Oct. 18, 1924, Memorial Stadium

Urbana and served as “University stop” on

home for Japanese culture and initiatives,

is a mixture of Georgian Revival and

the horse-drawn streetcar that ran east-west.

Japan House and its gardens provide an

Neoclassical architecture, and is considered

First erected in 1885, the structure was moved

important academic, cultural and natural

one of the nation’s most distinctive sports

from storage to its present site in 1964.

setting for promoting an understanding

stadiums. More than 20,000 students, alumni

of Japanese culture and of Asia. Funded

and friends of the university contributed

primarily through private contributions,

about $1.7 million to fund the construction.

the 3,120-square-foot facility was designed

The second story is a colonnade of

by Jack Baker, professor emeritus

paired limestone Roman Doric columns,

of architecture, and Isaken Glerum

representing University of Illinois students

PC Architects.

who died in World War I.

HALLENE GATEWAY

8

The east entry to the campus at Lincoln Avenue and Illinois Street in Urbana features the stone portal from the entrance to the first university-built classroom building, University Hall. The portal entrance apparently was kept behind the Architecture Building for a number of years and then

KRANNERT ART MUSEUM AND KINKEAD PAVILION

 11

seemingly disappeared from the campus

Ranked second among public museums in

until it was found at Allerton Park in

Illinois in size and value of the collection, the

Monticello in 1994. Alan and Phyllis Welsh

main museum opened in 1961, funded largely

Hallene donated the funds to construct the

by a generous contribution from alumnus

gateway plaza, which was dedicated in 1998.

Herman Krannert and his wife, Ellnora Krannert. The Kinkead Pavilion, designed by

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

MEMORIAL STADIUM

MORROW PLOTS

 12

 13

Beside the underground Undergraduate Library, the Morrow Plots are the country’s oldest experimental agricultural fields in continuous use. Agriculture professor Manley Miles and George Morrow, the first dean of agriculture, began laying out the plots in 1876. Miles first divided the fields into 10 plots of 1/2 acre each, then later divided


Landmarks

35

11

6

9

12

7

10

13 8

On Campus | 2017-2018


Landmarks

36

14

the area further into plots of 1/20 acre. Morrow modeled the plots after agricultural techniques he had observed in Great Britain (Rothamsted in particular) and France. The plots were designated a National Historic Landmark in 1968. NATURAL HISTORY BUILDING Designed by Nathan C. Ricker, the Natural History Building is an example of the High Victorian Gothic style. The original building was completed in 1892, and the departments of botany, zoology and geology moved in that fall. It is now undergoing a $70 million renovation. ROUND DAIRY BARNS The round barns are the inspiration of Wilbur J. Fraser, the first head of the department of dairy husbandry (1902-13). Fraser was a strong advocate of round barns, which offered the dairy farmer “economy of consideration, low maintenance and labor efficiency.” Fraser and the university’s demonstration barns were apparently instrumental in popularizing the round barn type found throughout Illinois. The first barn was built in 1907-08; the second and third about 1910.

15

SMITH MEMORIAL HALL

 14

An example of the Beaux Arts Classical style and designed by campus architect James M. White, Smith Hall is considered one of the

significant and revolutionary building.

most handsomely detailed classical buildings

Designed by alumnus Max Abramovitz,

on campus. Thomas J. Smith, a member

the reinforced concrete structure cost $8.5

of the Board of Trustees from 1897 to 1903,

million and is one of the world’s largest

gave farmland and money totaling about

edge-supported domes, spanning 400 feet

$480,500 to finance the construction. Details

in diameter and rising 128 feet above the

throughout the building, including the

floor. The building hosts basketball games,

ornate Memorial Room on the second floor,

performances, plays and concerts. It opened

feature intricate friezes and door surrounds.

March 2, 1963. The State Farm Center completed a multimillion-dollar renovation

SPURLOCK MUSEUM

in 2016.

Funded by a gift from William and Clarice Spurlock, the museum opened on Sept.

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

26, 2002. The facility houses about 50,000

This intellectual heart of the campus is part

artifacts from diverse cultures and varied

of the ensemble of fine Georgian Revival

historical time periods, augmented by

buildings designed by Charles Platt that

noteworthy selections from the University

form a strongly unified portion of the south

of Illinois Museum of Natural History and

campus. Initial construction was completed

department of anthropology.

in 1926, with many subsequent additions.

STATE FARM CENTER

 15

Decorative elements include 27 art-glass windows by J. Scott Williams and murals

From a purely structural standpoint,

by Barry Faulkner. It is the largest public

State Farm Center is the university’s most

university library in North America. 

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign


More On Campus

On Campus | 2017-2018

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South campus locations not pictured: • Administrative Information Technology (AITS) Building • Art Studios • Ashton Woods Family and Graduate Housing • Bee Research Facility • Biological Control Laboratory • Children’s Research Center • EnterpriseWorks • Fire Service Institute Building • I Building • iCyt • Illinois Sustainable Technology Center • Illinois Technology Center • Imported Swine Research Laboratory

B On Campus | 2017-2018

• LIttlefuse Research Center • Natural Resources Studies Annex • Physiology Research Laboratory • Remote Library Storage Facility • Robert A. Evers Laboratory • Special Materials Storage Facility • State Regional Office Building • State Universities Retirement System • State Water Survey Research Building • U of I Employees Credit Union • Waste Management Research Center • Wildlife Research Laboratory • Z Building • Z-2 Building

A

1


40 ALPHABETICAL LEGEND 219 Abbott Power Plant (H2) 18 ACES Library, Information and Alumni Center (D4) 209 Activities and Recreation Center/ARC (F2) 19 Admissions and Records (D6) 35 Advanced Computation Bldg. (E7) 266 Aerodynamics Research Lab. (E7) 93 Aeronautical Lab. A (F6) 68 708 South Mathews Avenue (E6) 64 Afro-American Studies and Research Program (D5) 59 Agricultural Bioprocess Lab. (D4) 160 Agriculture Engineering Sciences Bldg. (D4) 238 Agriculture Services Bldg. (C1) 239 Agriculture Services Warehouse (B1) 241 Agronomy/Plant Pathology Farm (B1) 242a Agronomy Seed House (B1) 247 Agronomy Soybean Research Farm (A1) 262 Alice Campbell Alumni Ctr. (D6) 267 Alma Mater (F5) 132 Altgeld Hall (F5) 62 Animal Sciences Lab. (D4) 192 Arcade Bldg. (F5) 61 Architecture Annex (D4) 152 Architecture Bldg. (E4) 169 Armory (F4) 167 Art and Design Bldg. (E3) 256 Asian American Cultural Ctr. (E5) 25 Astronomy Bldg. (E7) 230 Atkins Bldg. (E1) 269 Atkins Tennis Ctr. (C2) 87 Atmospheric Sciences Annex 2 (E6) 29 Atmospheric Sciences Bldg. (E7) 88 Aviation Ground School (E6) 111 Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology (G7) 205 Beckwith Hall (H4) 63 Bevier Hall (D5) 176 Bielfeldt Athletic Administration Bldg (D1) 108 Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Facility (A1) 58 Burnsides Research Lab. (C4) 85 Burrill Hall (E6) 107 Campbell Hall for Public Telecommunication (WILL A M-FM-TV (F7) 5 Campus Recreation Ctr. East/CRCE (D5) 211 Campus Recreation Outdoor Ctr. (H2) 258 Carl R. Woese Inst. for Genomic Biology (D5) 23 Ctr. for Advanced Study (D6) 226 Central Receiving Warehouse (G1) 91 Ceramics Bldg. (F6) 90 Ceramics Kiln House (F6) 81 Chemical and Life Sciences Lab. (E5) 139 Chemistry Annex (E5) 9 Chez Family Center for Wounded Veterans in Higher Education (D6) 15 Child Development Lab. (D5) 70 Children and Family Research Ctr. (E5) 283 Clark Hall (F3) 186 Coble Hall (F5) 271 College of Business Instructional Facility (E4) 203 Colonel Wolfe School (H5) 113b Computer and Systems Research Lab (G7) 199 Computing Applications Bldg. (G6) 188 Credit Union Mini-branch (G5) 246 Dairy Experimental Round Barns (B2) 6 Dance Administration Bldg. (C5) 7 Dance Studio (C5) 140 Davenport Hall (E5) 151 David Kinley Hall (E4) 118 Digital Computer Lab. (F6) 259 Doris Kelley Christopher Hall (C6) 237 Duplicating/Quick Copy Bldg. (C1) 17 Early Child Development Lab. (D5) 257 Gregory Place I (D5) 235b Eichelberger Field (C3) 279 Electrical and Computer Engineering Bldg. (G7) 130 Engineering Hall (F6) 36b Engineering Sciences Bldg. (F7) 37 Engineering Senior Design Studio (E7) 265 Engineering Student Project Lab. (E7) 138 English Bldg. (F5) 30 Environmental Health and Safety Bldg. (E7) 28 Environmental Research Annex (E7) 131 Everitt Lab. (F5) 60 FAA Performing Arts Annex 207 Flagg Hall (F3) 144 Foellinger Auditorium (E5) 249 Food Science Dry Processing Lab. (A1) 142 Foreign Languages Bldg. (E5) 38 Frederick Seitz Materials Research Lab. (E6) 46 Freer Hall (D5)

Map 274 Gable Home (E1) 228 Garage and Car Pool (F1) 217 Geological Survey Lab. (H2) 121 Grainger Engineering Library Information Ctr. (F6) 145 Gregory Hall (E4) 257 Gregory Place I (D5) 268 Hallene Gateway (D6) 170 Harding Band Bldg. (F4) 135 Harker Hall (F5) 136 Henry Admin. Bldg. (F5) 224 Housing Food Stores (H1) 168 Huff Hall (F3) 113a Hydrosystems Lab. (G7) 270 I Hotel and Conference Ctr. (E1) 172 Ice Arena (F4) 16 ICS Oregon Computing Laboratory (C6) 3 Illini Grove (B4) 191 Illini Hall (F5) 173 Illini Tower (F4) 133 Illini Union (F5) 185 Illini Union Bookstore (F5) 235a Illinois Field (D2) 55 Integrated Bioprocessing Lab (D4) 272 Demirjian Golf Practice Facility (C2) 202 Information Kiosk (G1) 14 Inst. of Government and Public Affairs (D5) 66 Intensive English Inst. (D5) 175a International Studies Bldg. (F4) 21 Irwin Academic Services Ctr. (F4) 158 Irwin Indoor Football Practice Facility (E2) 260 Japan House (A3) 116 Kenney Gym. (G6) 117 Kenney Gym. Annex (G6) 166 Krannert Art Museum and Kinkead Pavilion (E3) 42 Krannert Center for the Performing Arts (E6) 65 510 East Chalmers Street (D5) 195 Latina/o Studies (F4) 165 Law Bldg. (E3) 22 Levis Faculty Center/Visitor’s Center (D6) 146 Library (E4) 175b Library and Information Science Bldg (F4) 141 Lincoln Hall (E5) 39 Loomis Lab. (E6) 47 Madigan Lab. (D5) 227 Mailing Ctr. (G1) 179 909 South Sixth Street (F4) 129 Materials Science and Engineering Bldg. (F6) 275 McFarland Carillon (D4) 4 McKinley Health Ctr. (C5) 56 Meat Science Lab. (C4) 86 Mechanical Engineering Bldg. (F6) 125 Mechanical Engineering Lab. (F6) 83 Medical Sciences Bldg. (E5) 210 Memorial Stadium (F2) 177 512 East Chalmers Street (F4) 115 Micro and Nanotechnology Lab. (G6) 84 Morrill Hall (E5) 149 Morrow Plots (E4) 150 Mumford Hall (D4) 157 Mumford House (D4) 12 Music Education Annex (C6) 45 Music Bldg. (D5) 53 National Soybean Research Ctr. (C4) 261 Native American House (E5) 134 Natural History Bldg. (F6) 164 Natural History Survey Greenhouse (D3) 162 Natural Resources Bldg. (D3) 163 Natural Resources Garage (D3) 104 NCSA (F7) 278 NCSA Petascale Computing Facility (F1) 75 1203 1/2 West Nevada Street (D5) 114 Newmark Civil Engineering Lab. (G6) 208 Noble Hall (F3) 112 North Campus Chiller Plant (G7) 254 North Campus Parking Deck (G7) 137 Noyes Lab. (E5) 92 Nuclear Engineering Lab. (F6) 221 Nuclear Physics Lab. (H2) 89 Nuclear Radiations Lab. (F6) 40 School of Nursing (E6) 255 Oak Street Chiller Plant (H2) 148 Observatory (E4) 196 Optical Physics and Engineering Lab (G6) 183 Parking Deck (G5) 128 Parking Deck and Fire Station (C5) 216 Personnel Services Bldg. (H2) 225 Physical Plant Service Bldg. (G1) 263 Physics Research Lab. Storage (H1) 244 Plant Clinic (B2) 52 Plant Sciences Lab. (C4) 31 Plant Services Bldg. NE (E7) 32 Plant Services Building-North (E7) 27 Plant Services Storage Bldg. (E7) 174 Police Training Inst. (G4) 1 President’s House (A4)

206 Printing Services Bldg. (H2) 201 Professional Arts Bldg. (G6) 180 Psychology Bldg. (F5) 36a Public Safety Bldg. (F7) 220 Rehabilitation Education Ctr. (H2) 107a Richmond Studio/Swanson Center (F7) 74 Roger Adams Lab. (E5) 264 Roller Hockey Rink (G2) 171 School of Labor and Employment Relations (F4) 106 R.T. Ubben Basketball Complex (D1) 193 School of Nursing(G5) 281 School of Social Work (Gregory Place II (D6) 197 Shelford Vivarium (G6) 143 Smith Memorial Hall (E5) 236 Soccer and Track Stadium (C2) 242b South Farms Field Lab. (B1) 240 South Farms Warehouses (B1) 181 Speech and Hearing Clinic (F4) 20 Spurlock Museum (D6) 229 State Farm Center (E1) 161 Stock Pavilion (D3) 282 Student Dining and Residential Programs Building (G3) 153 Surveying Bldg. (E4) 187 Swanlund Admin. Bldg. (F5) 57 Taft House (C4) 122 Talbot Lab. (G6) 194 Technology Plaza (G5) 156 Temple Hoyne Buell Hall (D3) 103 Thomas M. Siebel Center for Computer Science (F7) 94 Transportation Bldg. (F6) 204 Tower at Third (H4) 50 Turner Hall (D4) 51 Turner Hall Greenhouse (C4) 190 Turner Student Services Bldg. (F5) 147 Undergraduate Library (E4) 100 University High School Gym. (F7) 102 University High School (F7) 223 University Press Bldg. (H1) 48 Vegetable Crops Bldg. (C4) 251 Veterinary Basic Sciences Bldg. (A2) 248 Veterinary Feed Storage Bldg. (A1) 250 Veterinary Surgery and Obstetrics Lab (A2) 252 Veterinary Teaching Hospital (A2) 222 Volatile Storage Bldg. (H1) 154 Wohlers Hall (E4) 159 Wood Engineering Lab. (D4) 40 408 S. Goodwin, U. (E6) 215 51 E. Armory, C. (H3) 214 55 E. Armory, C. (H3) 213 57 E. Armory, C. (H3) 212 59 E. Armory, C. (H3) 189 505 E. Green, C. (G5) 273 507 E. Green, C. (G5) 177 512 E. Chalmers, (F4) 76 608 S. Mathews, U. (E5) 68 708 S. Mathews, U (E5) 2 805 W. Pennsylvania Avenue (B4) 178 911 S. Sixth, C. (F4) 179 909 S. Sixth , C. (F4) 10 1001 W. Nevada, U. (C5) 11 1003 W. Nevada, U. (D5) 75 1203 1/2 W. Nevada, U. (D5) 71 1205 W. Oregon, U. (E5) 67 1205 1/2 W. Nevada, U. (D5) 72 1207 W. Oregon (E5) 98 1208 W. Springfield, U. (F6) 200 508 S. Sixth, C. (G6) 126 912 S. Fifth, C. (F4) 34 1009 W. Springfield, U. (E7) 253 1208 W. Nevada Street (E5) 104 1208 W. Stoughton, U. (F7) 99 1210 W. Springfield, U. (F7)

UNIVERSITY RESIDENCE HALLS Champaign Residence Halls BR Barton (F3) BF Bousfield Hall (G2) CL Clark Hall (F3) GR Garner (G3) HP Hopkins (G2) LN Lundgren (F3) NG Nugent Hall (G3) SC Scott (F2) SN Snyder (F2) TF Taft (F3) VD Van Doren (F2) WJ Wassaja Hall (G3) WS Weston (F3) Urbana North Residence Halls AL Allen (C5) BS Busey (D5) EV Evans (D5) LA Lincoln Avenue (C5) Illinois Street Residence Halls TW Townsend (D6)

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

WR Wardall (E6) Pennsylvania Avenue Residence Halls BB Babcock (B4) BL Blaisdell (B4) CR Carr (B4) SD Saunders (B4) Florida Avenue Residence Halls OG Oglesby (B4) TR Trelease (B4) Graduate Halls DN Daniels (E6) SM Sherman (G4) Family Housing AW Ashton Woods Family and Graduate Housing (see C1) GG Goodwin/Green Apts. (E6) OD Orchard Downs Apts. (see A4) Privately Owned Residence Halls AH Armory House (G3) BH Bromley Hall (G4) HH Hendrick House (D7) NH Newman Hall (F4)

NUMERICAL LEGEND 1 President’s House (A4) 2 805 West Pennsylvania Avenue (B4) 3 Illini Grove (B4) 4 McKinley Health Ctr. (C5) 5 Campus Recreation Ctr. East/CRCE (D5) 6 Dance Administration Bldg. (C5) 7 Dance Studio (C5) 9 Chez Family Center for Wounded Veterans in Higher Education (D6) 10 1001 W. Nevada, U. (C5) 11 1003 W. Nevada, U. (D5) 12 Music Education Annex (C6) 14 Inst. of Government and Public Affairs (D5) 15 Child Development Lab. (D5) 16 ICS Oregon Computing Laboratory (C6) 17 Child Development Lab. (D5) 18 ACES Library, Information and Alumni Center (D4) 19 Admissions and Records (D6) 20 Spurlock Museum (D6) 21 Irwin Academic Services Ctr. (F4) 22 Levis Faculty Center/Visitor’s Center (D6) 23 Ctr. for Advanced Study (D6) 25 Astronomy Bldg. (E7) 27 Plant Services Storage Bldg. (E7) 28 Environmental Research Annex (E7) 29 Atmospheric Sciences Bldg. (E7) 30 Environmental Health and Safety Bldg (E7) 31 Plant Services Bldg. NE (E7) 32 Plant Services Building-North (E7) 34 1009 W. Springfield, U. (E7) 35 Advanced Computation Bldg. (E7) 36a Public Safety Bldg. (F7) 36b Engineering Sciences Bldg. (F7) 37 Engineering Senior Design Studio (E7) 38 Frederick Seitz Materials Research Lab (E6) 39 Loomis Lab. (E6) 40 408 S. Goodwin, U. (E6) 42 Krannert Ctr. for the Performing Arts (E6) 45 Music Bldg. (D5) 46 Freer Hall (D5) 47 Madigan Lab. (D5) 48 Vegetable Crops Bldg. (C4) 49 Ornamental Horticulture Bldg. (D4) 50 Turner Hall (D4) 51 Turner Hall Greenhouse (C4) 52 Plant Sciences Lab. (C4) 53 National Soybean Research Ctr. (C4) 55 Integrated Bioprocessing Lab (D4) 56 Meat Science Lab. (C4) 57 Taft House (C4) 58 Burnsides Research Lab. (C4) 59 Agricultural Bioprocess Lab. (D4) 60 Architecture Annex (D4) 61 FAA Performing Arts Annex (D4) 62 Animal Sciences Lab. (D4) 63 Bevier Hall (D5) 64 Afro-American Studies and Research Program (D5) 65 1203 W. Nevada, U (D5) 66 Intensive English Institute (D5) 67 1205 1/2 W. Nevada, U. (D5) 68 708 South Mathews, U (E5) 70 Children and Family Research Ctr. (E5) 71 1205 West Oregon Street (E5) 72 1207 W. Oregon (E5) 74 Roger Adams Lab. (E5) 75 1203 1/2 West Nevada Street (D5) 76 608 South Mathews Avenue (E5)


Map 81 Chemical and Life Sciences Lab. (E5) 83 Medical Sciences Bldg. (E5) 84 Morrill Hall (E5) 85 Burrill Hall (E6) 86 Mechanical Engineering Bldg. (F6) 87 Atmospheric Sciences Annex 2 (E6) 88 Aviation Ground School (E6) 89 Nuclear Radiations Lab. (F6) 90 Ceramics Kiln House (F6) 91 Ceramics Bldg. (F6) 92 Nuclear Engineering Lab. (F6) 93 Aeronautical Lab. A (F6) 94 Transportation Bldg. (F6) 98 CSO Systems Consulting Office (F7) 99 1210 W. Springfield, U. (F7) 100 University High School Gym. (F7) 102 University High School (F7) 103 Thomas M. Siebel Center for Computer Science (F7) 104 NCSA (F7) 106 R.T. Ubben Basketball Complex (D1) 107 Campbell Hall for Public Telecommunication (WILL AM-FM-TV) (F7) 107a Richmond Studio/Swanson Center (F7) 108 Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Facility (A1) 111 Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology (G7) 112 North Campus Chiller Plant (G7) 113a Hydrosystems Lab. (G7) 113b Computer and Systems Research Lab. (G7) 114 Newmark Civil Engineering Lab. (G6) 115 Micro and Nanotechnology Lab. (G6) 116 Kenney Gym. (G6) 117 Kenney Gym. Annex (G6) 118 Digital Computer Lab. (G6) 121 Grainger Engineering Library Information Ctr. (F6) 122 Talbot Lab. (G6) 125 Mechanical Engineering Lab. (F6) 126 912 S. Fifth, C. (F4) 128 Parking Deck and Fire Station (C5) 129 Materials Science and Engineering Bldg. (F6) 130 Engineering Hall (F6) 131 Everitt Lab. (F5) 132 Altgeld Hall (F5) 133 Illini Union (F5) 134 Natural History Bldg. (F6) 135 Harker Hall (F5)

136 Henry Admin. Bldg. (F5) 137 Noyes Lab. (E5) 138 English Bldg. (F5) 139 Chemistry Annex (E5) 140 Davenport Hall (E5) 141 Lincoln Hall (E5) 142 Foreign Languages Bldg. (E5) 143 Smith Memorial Hall (E5) 144 Foellinger Auditorium (E5) 145 Gregory Hall (E4) 146 Library (E4) 147 Undergraduate Library (E4) 148 Observatory (E4) 149 Morrow Plots (E4) 150 Mumford Hall (D4) 151 David Kinley Hall (E4) 152 Architecture Bldg. (E4) 153 Surveying Bldg. (E4) 154 Wohlers Hall (E4) 155 Education Bldg. (E3) 156 Temple Hoyne Buell Hall (D3) 157 Mumford House (D4) 158 Irwin Indoor Football Practice Facility (E2) 159 Wood Engineering Lab. (D4) 160 Agriculture Engineering Sciences Bldg (D4) 161 Stock Pavilion (D3) 162 Natural Resources Bldg. (D3) 163 Natural Resources Garage (D3) 164 Natural History Survey Greenhouse (D3) 165 Law Bldg. (E3) 166 Krannert Art Museum and Kinkead Pavilion (E3) 167 Art and Design Bldg. (E3) 168 Huff Hall (F3) 169 Armory (F4) 170 Harding Band Bldg. (F4) 171 School of Labor and Employment Relations (F4) 172 Ice Arena (F4) 173 Illini Tower (F4) 174 Police Training Inst. (G4) 175a International Studies Bldg. (F4) 175b Library and Information Science Bldg. (F4) 176 Bielfeldt Athletic Administration Bldg. (D1) 177 512 East Chalmers Street (F4) 178 911 South Sixth Street (F4)

179 909 South Sixth Street (F4) 180 Psychology Bldg. (F5) 181 Speech and Hearing Clinic (F4) 183 Parking Deck (G5) 185 Illini Union Bookstore (F5) 186 Coble Hall (F5) 187 Swanlund Admin. Bldg. (F5) 188 Credit Union Mini-branch (G5) 189 505 E. Green, C. (G5) 190 Turner Student Services Bldg. (F5) 191 Illini Hall (F5) 192 Arcade Bldg. (F5) 193 School of Nursing (G5) 194 Technology Plaza (G5) 196 Optical Physics and Engineering Lab (G6) 197 Shelford Vivarium (G6) 199 Computing Applications Bldg. (G6) 200 508 S. Sixth, C. (G6) 201 Professional Arts Bldg. (G6) 202 Information Kiosk (G1) 203 Colonel Wolfe School (H5) 204 Tower at Third (H4) 205 Beckwith Hall (H4) 206 Printing Services Bldg. (H2) 207 Flagg Hall (F3) 208 Noble Hall (F3) 209 Activities and Recreation Center/ ARC (F2) 210 Memorial Stadium (F2) 211 Campus Recreation Outdoor Ctr. (H2) 212 59 E. Armory, C. (H3) 213 57 E. Armory, C. (H3) 214 55 E. Armory, C. (H3) 215 51 E. Armory, C. (H3) 216 Personnel Services Bldg. (H2) 217 Geological Survey Lab. (H2) 219 Abbott Power Plant (H2) 220 Rehabilitation Education Ctr. (H2) 221 Nuclear Physics Lab. (H2) 222 Volatile Storage Bldg. (H1) 223 University Press Bldg. (H1) 224 Housing Food Stores (H1) 225 Physical Plant Service Bldg. (G1) 226 Central Receiving Warehouse (G1) 227 Mailing Ctr. (G1) 228 Garage and Car Pool (F1) 229 State Farm Center (E1) 230 Atkins Bldg. (E1) 235a Illinois Field (D2)

On Campus | 2017-2018

41 235b Eichelberger Field (C3) 236 Soccer and Track Stadium (C2) 237 Duplicating/Quick Copy Bldg. (C1) 238 Agriculture Services Bldg. (C1) 239 Agriculture Services Warehouse (B1) 240 South Farms Warehouses (B1) 241 Agronomy/Plant Pathology Farm (B1) 242a Agronomy Seed House (B1) 242b South Farms Field Lab. (B1) 244 Plant Clinic (B2) 246 Dairy Experimental Round Barns (B2) 247 Agronomy Soybean Research Farm (A1) 248 Veterinary Feed Storage Bldg. (A1) 249 Food Science Dry Processing Lab. (A1) 250 Veterinary Surgery and Obstetrics Lab (A2) 251 Veterinary Basic Sciences Bldg. (A2) 252 Veterinary Teaching Hospital (A2) 253 1208 West Nevada Street (E5) 254 North Campus Parking Deck (G7) 255 Oak Street Chiller Plant (H2) 256 Asian American Cultural Ctr. (E5) 257 Gregory Place I (D5) 258 Carl R. Woese Inst. for Genomic Biology (D5) 259 Doris Kelley Christopher Hall (C6) 260 Japan House (A3) 261 Native American House (E5) 262 Alice Campbell Alumni Ctr. (D6) 263 Physics Research Lab. Storage (H1) 264 Roller Hockey Rink (G2) 265 Engineering Student Project Lab. (E7) 266 Aerodynamics Research Lab. (E7) 267 Alma Mater (F5) 268 Hallene Gateway (D6) 269 Atkins Tennis Ctr. (C2) 270 I Hotel and Conference Ctr. (E1) 271 College of Business Instructional Facility (E4) 272 Demirjian Golf Practice Facility (C2) 273 507 E. Green Street (G5) 274 Gable Home (E1) 275 McFarland Carillon (D4) 278 NCSA Petascale Computing Facility (F1) 279 Electrical and Computer Engineering Building G7) 281 School of Social Work (Gregory Place II) (D6) 282 Student Dining and Residential Programs Building (G3)


Sesquicentennial

44

Milestones and Relevant Connections

Photo: L. Brian Stauffer

1941: Illini Union opens on campus

Celebrating our Sesquicentennial W R I T E R Meaghan Downs

Photo: L. Brian Stauffer

1901: Squirrels purchased to bring “influence” Did you know that squirrels were imported to campus in 1901 due to a shortage? Then-university president Andrew S. Draper thought the addition of squirrels, seen scampering on other campuses, would add prestige to the university. The Board of Trustees approved the recommendation on July 6, 1901. In 2017, squirrels are abundant and can be counted on to disturb your noon nap on the Main Quad lawn.

Photo courtesy UI Archives

Photo: L. Brian Stauffer

1876: Morrow Plots established “Don’t throw shade on the corn” is a common saying for those familiar with the Morrow Plots, the oldest continuously used experimental agricultural field in the U.S., second oldest in the world. The Morrow Plots are still used to examine crop rotation, fertilizer effects on crop yield and changes in soil. Widely cited as one reason for building the Undergraduate Library underground, the plots established a legacy of Illinois researchers taking root and innovating agriculture. Today, scientists at Illinois tweak photosynthesis to boost crop yield and address future food insecurity, while entrepreneurs build startups creating sensors for farmers to more easily check their stored grain quality.

Opened on Feb. 8, 1941, the Illini Union welcomed a VIP guest on its first anniversary – first lady Eleanor Roosevelt, who cut the cake. Today, the Illini Union exists as a gathering place for the campus community to grab a bite to eat, caffeinate, meet up for study groups, host academic conferences and concerts and, of course, catch a catnap between classes. Watching snow fall from the parlor facing the Main Quad was a favorite memory of Molly Messner, who attended Illinois 2012-16. “Always so beautiful and peaceful, even better when someone was playing piano,” she said.

Photo courtesy UI Archives

1924: Red Grange scores four touchdowns in first 12 minutes to beat Michigan How a student knows fall has arrived on campus: the changing of leaves, pumpkin spice everything and Illinois football. Memorial Stadium was dedicated on Oct. 18, 1924, in front of 67,886 fans and celebrated with an epic victory over Michigan. Football great Red Grange, whose statue you can visit in front of the stadium, scored four touchdowns in the first 12 minutes, leading the Fighting Illini to a 39-14 victory. He later scored a fifth touchdown and threw for a sixth.

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

1948: Accessibility pioneer creates first rehabilitation center for students Tim Nugent, a former Illinois professor and visionary in accessibility and wheelchair athletics, created one of the first rehabilitation programs for students with disabilities, aimed to address the needs of World War II veterans. Nugent advocated for curb cuts, wheelchair-accessible buses and residence halls, as well as the first service fraternity for individuals with disabilities. Many of his ideas were adopted nationally. He started the first men’s wheelchair basketball team associated with a school, leading to a long legacy of Illinois Paralympians. Illinois is still a leader in accessibility, producing record-breaking wheelchair athletes, innovations for racing gloves and wheelchairs, and related research.


Sesquicentennial

45

Photo: L. Brian Stauffer

1969: Krannert Center for the Performing Arts opens Student Megan Vescio, a junior in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, joined the Krannert Center Student Association as a first-semester freshman. “Volunteering as an usher has given me the opportunity to see dozens of shows per year for free, including many I might not have known about otherwise,” she said. “The meetings and social activities place an emphasis on bringing students together to appreciate all art forms, and this creative community has given me the greatest sense of ‘home’ on campus.” Illinois theater professor Lisa Gaye Dixon said Krannert helps center the arts on campus, bringing together music, art and dance. “I’ve been a part of many projects that started out being a ‘hallway chat’ as folks were passing by each other, and ended up being fully realized productions,” she said. “It is one of the few places in the country where music, dance, theater and opera all not only coexist, but co-create together.”

Photo: L. Brian Stauffer

1986: NCSA opens Answering the need for supercomputing power for researchers, astrophysicist Larry Smarr and seven colleagues proposed a new center at Illinois. The National Science Foundation agreed and the National Center for Supercomputing Applications opened in 1986. NCSA has been not only a hub for research, but also an engine of economic impact for the state and the nation. One of the most powerful supercomputers in the world, Blue Waters can perform more than a quadrillion calculations per second, and has assisted in research on bacteria, HIV and solar superstorms.

Photo courtesy University MakerLab

2013: Illinois creates world’s first 3-D printing lab in a business school Founded in 2013, the Illinois MakerLab provides students with resources to teach them how to design, manufacture and market 3-D products. Courses like “Making Things” join students from business, engineering and design to prototype a new product. MakerLab offers the space for private workshops for student organizations and the Champaign-Urbana community. They’ve even 3-D printed Nutella.

Photo courtesy Public Affairs

Photo courtesy UI Archives

1971: 1st Quad Day – now a campus staple Quad Day serves as a massive information fair for more than 1,400 registered student organization groups to introduce themselves to freshmen and new students at the beginning of the fall semester. The first Quad Day, in 1971, encouraged a sense of community when protests and unrest permeated the campus, featuring a volleyball game, a hot dog stand and a student and faculty talent show. In 2016, Quad Day featured a performance by the Marching Illini and cheerleaders, about a dozen food vendors and hundreds of booths.

2003: Leggett, Lauterbur win Nobel Prize Awards While Illinois is no stranger to its alumni, faculty members and staff earning prestigious awards, two faculty members won the Nobel Prize in the same year. Sir Anthony “Tony” Leggett, left, is a world leader in the theory of low-temperature physics. In 2003, he earned the Nobel Prize in Physics “for pioneering contributions to the theory of superconductors and superfluids.” The late Paul C. Lauterbur, an Illinois chemistry professor and developer of the MRI, shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2003 with Sir Peter Mansfield for “seminal discoveries concerning the use of magnetic resonance to visualize different structures.”

On Campus | 2017-2018

Photo: L. Brian Stauffer

2017: Celebrating 150 years of excellence We’re celebrating our 150th through 2018! To find out more about Illinois’ history, visit our sesquicentennial website at 150.illinois.edu or follow the social media conversation using the hashtag #ILLINOIS150.


Giving

46

Leaving a Legacy at Illinois Photo: Kim Schmidt

Dedicated to the university for 75 years, a professor continues to give back W R I T E R Kim Schmidt Allan Mueller (BS ‘45, MS ‘47, PhD ‘55) in his favorite rocking chair.

A

llan Mueller (BS ’45, MS ’47, PhD

professor, adviser, friend and mentor.

tremendously, and I loved the association

’55) is almost 94 now. You’ll often

Gloria also graduated from Illinois with a

with the students. I still keep in touch

find him in his beloved Kennedy

degree in languages and immersed herself

with some of my advisees; some of them

in the community as an active volunteer.

went on to manage farms professionally,

Rocker, the one he built himself of cherry wood he got from a farm in Rock Island County, Illinois. He sits in the living room of the home he built in 1951, and in front of him on a short table sits a photograph of his beloved Gloria, who passed away just shy of their 65th wedding anniversary. Mueller came to campus as an undergraduate in 1941 and quickly made a home at Illinois. In his 75 years Mueller has been a student,

In an act of paying their love of Illinois forward, the Muellers established the Allan

The Muellers made a point to meet

Management Scholarship Fund to support

each of their scholarship recipients,

students in the department of agricultural

often taking them to dinner or out for

and consumer economics. Over 70 students

coffee. More recently, Allan meets his

have benefited from their generosity since they established the fund in 2006. In addition to forming their named organizations and scholarships on campus,

students over Facetime, his shining smile reaching out over the screen. Charles Mayfield (BS ’17) received the Mueller Scholarship and has returned to his family farm as a grain producer.

including a named library in an agricultural

“It was a neat experience getting to speak

fraternity house and a scholarship

with Dr. Mueller,” Mayfield said. “We found

created in honor of six classmates who

common interests with one another and I

lost their lives in World War II.

could see the wealth of knowledge he has.

Mueller taught courses in agricultural economics, including a very popular advanced farm management

Right: Dr. Mueller, 1968. Photo courtesy of the University Archives.

heads, and worked in banks,” he said.

G. and Gloria F. Mueller Farm Business

scholarship, the Muellers supported other

Above: Dr. Mueller and his late wife, Gloria. Photo courtesy of Dr. Mueller.

some became lawyers, department

course, which he taught both on campus and as part of the university’s extramural teaching program until he retired in 1984. He was awarded the first excellence in teaching award for that program. “I enjoyed my teaching

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

This made the scholarship mean even more to me, getting to know who my donor was.” Recipient Shelby Wendling (BS ’17) agreed. “Receiving this scholarship means a lot to me. I have always worked hard at my studies and to have someone like Dr. Mueller recognize my accomplishments and help me further my education really means a lot. Actually getting to thank Dr. Mueller personally really made this scholarship even more special. Hearing his life journey and why he put together the scholarship gave this award a very personal touch,” she said. 


Arts

48

Art professor mines archives for historical films and photos Liaohan “David” He broadcasting a Fighting Illini football game in Mandarin from the Memorial Stadium press box.

W R I T E R Kevin Hamilton Photographers from the 1352nd Photographic Squandron of the United States Air Force document an atomic test in Nevada in the 1960s.

S

ometime after scanning the 27th issue of a rare trade journal I found in an archive at the Atomic Testing Museum

in Las Vegas, I realize I’ve become a different kind of artist. As a young painting student, I had trained myself to be a patient observer, noting every leaf on every tree for faithful rendering in pencil or paint. During my time as a researcher and professor at Illinois, I have learned to be just as faithful and true to

... I’ve been engaged in a research project I never would have fallen into anywhere but Illinois.

the overlooked pages and artifacts of history. For nearly a decade now, I’ve been engaged in a research project I never would have fallen into anywhere but Illinois. With my colleague Ned O’Gorman in the department of communication, I am working to create the first thorough historical account of a barely known film studio responsible for some of the most famous images of the 20th

media controversies appear in a new light. As an artist working toward creating online interactive archives of the material we’re discovering, and as a scholar working to interpret these materials with an eye toward the ethics of the bomb, I’m increasingly reliant on the unique networks of scholars here at Illinois.

century. We’re reconstructing the history

Pulling my hands from a dusty box in Las

and work of an Air Force outfit known as

Vegas, I can email a colleague in nuclear

Lookout Mountain Laboratory, a secret

physics about the nature of a photograph

Hollywood-based film studio responsible for

I’ve just discovered, consult an article

photographing and filming America’s nuclear

referred to me by an indigenous studies

tests during the height of the Cold War.

scholar about the ways Marshall Islanders

We’ve amassed hundreds of overlooked films and images, and thousands of documents, to create a rare opportunity for understanding how technicians and artists rose to the challenge of representing the unprecedented event of an atomic blast. As an artist, I always knew that images and photographic technology were important to what it meant

experienced the nuclear tests, or chat with a librarian about the best data to record about the objects I want to save and share. Illinois affords me a constellation of colleagues who at another institution not only might not have collaborated with me, but also would probably be surprised to find themselves in the same social network.

to be human in the 20th century. But until

And as we bring this long project ever more

I started sitting down and looking at these

into the public eye through publications and

dramatic images of nuclear tests with a Cold

planned exhibitions, I can also depend on the

War scholar, I hadn’t grasped just how much

special mandate Illinois brings as a land-

images could shape the world.

grant institution to share its knowledge with

When history reveals that a single fearsome film sequence – as in the first document of KEVIN HAMILTON Associate Professor, School of Art and Design

manage the diplomatic fallout, contemporary

a thermonuclear test in the Pacific in 1952 – sends nations scrambling for months to

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

the world. At Illinois, I can not only learn to see the world differently, but also depend on the school’s mandate to justify getting the work engaged with ever-wider audiences far beyond the academy walls. 

Photo courtesy of Kevin Hamilton

Interpreting Atomic Images


Arts

On Campus | 2017-2018

49


Honduras Water Project

50

Photo: Carly Sandin Kijewski

Honduras Water Project Taps Students’ Ingenuity Service work balances engineering design with cultural sensitivity W R I T E R Sharita Forrest, MS, ’01 MEDIA

A

n engineering course would seem to be the least likely class on campus in which the discussion

topics would include superstitions.

Students in the Honduras Water Project course work as consultants for remote villages to design water systems that respect residents’ cultural beliefs.

to design each community’s system. If discussing spiritual beliefs seems like an unusual curriculum for a course in engineering, that’s intentional, said

But when students are designing a water

Ann-Perry Witmer, a civil engineer

system for an indigenous community

who co-teaches the HWP course.

in Central America, having a holistic understanding of the villagers’ cultural beliefs can be critical to the project’s success.

around a spring – or killing snakes

included projects in Africa and Asia. During the fall semester, students in the course self-organize into teams, each focusing on a specific area such as

An agricultural and consumer economics

technical design, cultural issues or political

major, Kumamoto recently visited Honduras

factors within the community that may

through an innovative course at Illinois

influence the system’s design and usage.

its fourth year, HWP is a pipeline for Illinois students of any major who want experience with an international service project.

Alumni mentors – students who took the course previously – as well as practicing engineers and other professionals lend their support and expertise to the teams upon

Based in the College of Engineering,

request as they develop a preliminary design

the yearlong course immerses Illinois

during the fall semester and a final design

students in designing a sustainable,

in the spring for the community’s approval.

hygienic water system for a struggling community in rural Honduras to build.

in Urbana to remote mountaintop communities in Honduras, the transformational learning and

to base the design on what the community said Witmer, whose service work has

called Honduras Water Project. Currently in

From the fields of the historic Morrow Plots on the south campus

University of Illinois offers students

believe that building a concrete catchment

said U. of I. student Maika Kumamoto.

Engrained at Illinois

to consider just technical soundness, but wants, accepts and can operate,”

the water, causing the spring to dry up,

Transformative Learning:

“That’s really the crux of the course – not

For example, Lenca cultures in Honduras

nearby – suffocates the spirits living in

 service opportunities. When the state’s first public university opened its doors in 1867 as Illinois Industrial University, it exceeded expectations of state lawmakers and citizens by offering a holistic curriculum that included liberal arts along with courses in agriculture, science and fine arts. As the U. of I. celebrates its 150th year, this dynamic institution continues its proud tradition of preparing students to transform their world.

During the university’s winter or spring break, some of the students, their alumni

exploring property rights or taxation issues.

Students work collaboratively with a

mentors and the instructors travel to

partnering community’s leaders, residents

Honduras to gather needed information,

During the class’s January 2017 trip,

and the Honduran nongovernmental

which may entail conducting water quality

the technical design team that Illinois

organization Agua y Desarrollo Comunitario

tests and topographical surveys, and

junior Nick Perozzi was on was “thrown Continued on page 56

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign


LabEscape

52

Photo: L. Brian Stauffer

Science Feeds Adventure at LabEscape Escape the room if you can, but physics is inescapable W R I T E R Liz Touchstone

A

Physics professor Paul Kwiat (left) and his team of undergraduate students: Shaurya Anuj Singhal, Ben Fields, Jack Bernard and Julia Spina.

t Urbana’s newest “escape

that people can learn about physics in a

things we say in the story about quantum

room,” a group of people

nonintimidating, hands-on, fun way.”

computing cracking code is true.”

The storyline revolves around the

After finishing, the participants are joined by

disappearance of the fictional Professor

a student employee for a debriefing and to

Alberta Schrodenberg, the name an

ask questions about anything in the room.

is given an hour to solve a

series of puzzles that will unlock the mystery of Professor Schrodenberg’s disappearance and provide an exit from

“I’m a people person, and I want to share

her locked-down office. The twist? The puzzles are based on physics concepts. “We had three main goals in creating a physics-based escape room: To show people that science can be fun, that it is relevant and accessible, and that it can be beautiful,” said physics professor Paul Kwiat, the mastermind behind LabEscape, a new outreach initiative of the University of Illinois department of physics. He also serves as faculty adviser for the undergraduate student workers who built the puzzles and run the escape room. Located in Lincoln Square Mall in Urbana, LabEscape is designed for four to six

my experiences, so working at the escape

... the escape room is a great way for me to help people understand science more and see the really cool connections that science can make ...

complex equations or require a physics background, Kwiat said, but use physics concepts in their design and execution. “There’s this fear that people have when they hear the words physics or math,” said Julia Spina, a senior from Chicago who designed and built many of the puzzles. “This is not something that people should be afraid of. The escape room is one way

understand science more and see the really cool connections that science can make,” said Amelia Launspach, a junior from LaGrange, Illinois, who guides groups through the escape room. “For example, I can tell them that one of the things they’re looking at is called a diffraction gradient, and I can connect it to how we know what the sun is made of. We’re able to look at the sun’s diffraction gradient and see the different elements.” LabEscape has hosted corporate team-

people at a time, recommended ages 12 and older. The puzzles do not involve solving

room is a great way for me to help people

building events, student groups from seventh amalgam of famous physicists Albert Einstein, Erwin Schrodinger and Werner Heisenberg. Played by real-life Illinois physics professor Nadiya Mason,

grade through graduate school, and even a birthday party. Sessions can be booked at www.labescape.org. The admission fees of $15 for students and $20 for nonstudents support

Schrodenberg appears in video messages to

the overhead cost of running LabEscape.

give clues as participants unlock puzzles.

“It’s fun and it’s challenging,” Launspach

“The storyline elements are connected

said, “but in the end, every group that

to real science,” Kwiat said. “I work on quantum computing, and all of the

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

comes through leaves saying, ‘This is so cool, this is so awesome!’” 


53


Green Street: Then & Now

54

Green

STREET

THEN & NOW

Taken circa 1894, this

Taken Oct. 15, 1926, this image

Taken circa 1932, this photograph shows businesses

photograph of a man with

shows spectators lining the

laundry cart shows the Natural

500 block of Green Street to

along Wright Street, south of

History Building to the left and

view the Hobo Parade, an

Green Street. The same corner

University Hall to the right

event that coincided with

is now home to a medical clinic

(where the Illini Union is now).

Homecoming festivities.

and frozen yogurt shop.

I L L I N I U NIO N

FI FTH ST. + GR EEN ST.

Photos: University Archives and Joyce Seay-Knoblauch

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

WR I GHT ST. + G REEN ST.


Green Street: Then & Now

53 55

While many things have changed since the founding of the University of Illinois 150 years ago, much has stayed the same in the heart of Campustown. Here’s a trip down memory lane on our main thoroughfare.

In 1950, Illinois was the first

Taken in August 1964, the

Taken Oct. 15, 1988, this image

postsecondary institution

image shows the Alma Mater

shows the corner of Green Street

to introduce curb cuts to

sculpture by Lorado Taft as

and Sixth Street looking north.

accommodate students with

seen from the corner of Wright

Busey Bank is on the left, then

disabilities. This was taken

and Green streets, between the

Murphy’s Pub, Anderson’s

between 1956 and 1966.

Illini Union and Altgeld Hall.

Sporting Goods and Taco John’s.

A LTG E L D H ALL

A LMA MATER

On Campus | 2017-2018

SI XTH ST. + GR EE N ST.


Honduras Water Project

56

Honduras Water Project, continued from page 50

a curveball – and had to resort to Plan D,” he said, when they discovered that the spring they planned to use in their design had a lower flow rate than expected. Village leaders also informed the team that they preferred to continue using their existing water source. Students’ expectations often are “completely shattered” during the site visits, Witmer said. “That’s very intentional, to teach them that the apparent solution to any engineering problem may not be the actual solution, once you put it in the context of the person using it. They think they know how things are going to work – and realize when they get there that they have to start over.” Learning to anticipate these stumbling blocks is an important lesson, said Perozzi, a civil and environmental engineering major who found the course particularly relevent because he plans to work in the developing world after college graduation. “It’s really important in international development projects such as this to not go in believing that you have all the answers, because you don’t, or to think that you’re helping someone who’s helpless, because that’s not true at all,” Kumamoto said. 

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign


YO U B E L O N G I N HUMAN RESOURCES. YO U B E L O N G AT I L L I NO I S.

1.5 94% $78,000 jobs

YE AR S

PLACEMENT RATE

AVERAGE STARTING SALARY

WITH THE FORTUNE 500

F I N D O U T W H Y AT GO.ILLIN OIS.ED U / H R


Our Illinois Family

58

FA M I LY JOSH WHITMAN Orange or blue?

He can list his first job after graduation as “NFL rookie,” but this Fighting Illini athlete and Bronze Tablet scholar believes coming home to Illinois was his calling.

on one of the big tables near a great

The former athletic director for Washington University in St. Louis, Josh Whitman, BUS ’01, LAW ’08, reflects on how his experiences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign shaped him and influenced his vision for the future of Illinois Athletics.

performance blew me away.

window. The natural light and the space were energizing. OC: What was the best concert you saw on campus? JW: I saw Aerosmith in the old Assembly Hall. Tremendous! I also saw the magician David Copperfield at Assembly Hall. His

ORANGE! We are the only Big Ten school with that color.

OC: What was your first job out of sweat-stained (and my wife would

JW: My first post-college job was

tell you it has a certain scent), but

playing as a rookie in the National

it fits perfectly and I would never

Football League, first with the Buffalo

dare to wash it.

Bills and, later that same season, with

OC: Any advice for current students?

the San Diego Chargers. I learned so

JW: Engage! Illinois can be a big place.

On Campus: What was your

much from it. Mental toughness, humility

Find your passion and identify ways on

favorite local hangout?

and self-confidence were some of the

campus to enjoy that passion.

Josh Whitman: One of my favorite local

biggest lessons.

OC: What role did Illinois play in

spots has always been the Custard Cup. I

OC: NFL player or collegiate AD?

preparing you for your success?

believe that ice cream can solve most of

JW: Illinois AD, hands down. Both

JW: Illinois has been instrumental in

life’s problems.

positions have their pros and cons, but

my life. The education I received, the

OC: What was your favorite

I really feel like I have found my true

people I met and the experiences I had

place to study?

calling. It’s an honor to represent our

have all been hugely important, both as I

JW: ACES Library. When I had serious

great university and our wonderful fans.

started my career and now as I enter this

studying to do, there was nothing better

OC: When you came back to campus

new chapter. Most everything that has

than planning for a full day, arriving when

as director of athletics, what had

happened to me in the 20 years since I

the doors opened, and setting up shop

changed on campus?

first stepped foot on campus has in some

JW: Many buildings have been updated

way been linked to my time at Illinois.

or replaced. (Does anybody remember

OC: What makes you optimistic about

the old Wendy’s on Green Street?

the future for Illinois Athletics?

Garcia’s? White Horse?) But the essence

JW: We have a bold vision. We have

of the place – the values, the people, the

great alignment in pursuit of that

traditions, and the pride – has stayed the

vision – from the Board of Trustees, to

same for generations.

the president and chancellor, to our

OC: What’s your favorite piece

staff and student-athletes, to our fans

of Illini gear?

and alumni. Excellence is the standard.

JW: I have an old Illinois cap that has

Mediocrity is unacceptable. We have

been with me for a really long time –

smart, determined, competitive people

since I was a student. It is faded and

who will propel us forward to a bright,

Photo: L. Brian Stauffer

college and what did you learn from it?

successful future.  University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

Photo: L. Brian Stauffer

Our


On Campus: A guide to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 2017-2018  

On Campus is the official guide to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, featuring the latest people, places, events, discoveries...

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