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A G U I D E T O T H E U N I V E R S I T Y O F I L L I N O I S AT U R B A N A - C H A M PA I G N

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• FEATURE ARTICLESS • CAMPUS MAP

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• ARTS & CULTURE • POINTS OF INTEREST [

ILLINOIS.EDU

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WELCOME TO ILLINOIS

CONTENTS

hard it is to believe that this is a place

Welcome...................................................................4 Lodging.....................................................................6 Getting Around.......................................................7 Dining........................................................................8 Arts & Culture ........................................................10 Libraries ..................................................................13

that began with a single building

Recreation & Activities .........................................14

On behalf of all of us at the University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign, welcome to our campus. I know looking around today how

and 77 students back in 1867. Today, as we are nearing the 150th anniversary of our founding, the campus is home to more than 42,000 students who come to us from more than 120 nations. This is literally and figuratively a global crossroads of cultures, languages and ideas. From art to science and from faith to food, I hope you will find your visit here to be engaging and exciting, with the occasional discovery of something you didn’t expect. This is a place where conversations in a coffee shop several years ago have taken us to human trials of a promising cancer agent this fall. This is a place where our supercomputing center and our performing arts center come together to create new definitions of art. The same university that drew national headlines celebrating the 50th anniversary of the invention of the LED by one of our own faculty in the fall is in the national spotlight each spring with the film festival founded by Pulitzer Prize winning film critic Roger Ebert. This same university that revolutionized the world of information with the creation of a graphical Internet browser is the one that revolutionized the American educational system with the premise that every child has a right to an education. A premise that led to what we today know as Special Education. There is history around every corner and a story behind every brick you’ll touch. This is a living and working engine of discovery and innovation for this new century. The University of Illinois is a pre-eminent public research university with a land-grant mission and a global impact. Just as members of that first class came here with the expectation that their Illinois experience would help them face the grand challenges of their generation, our faculty, students and staff today are pioneering the great discoveries of the next 20-50 years. I hope your Illinois experience is memorable and that you leave here already making plans for your next visit.

If These Walls Could Talk .......................16 The President’s House – more than just a home – has built a historic campus legacy. Let what’s inside tell the story.

How Did We Get Here? ......................... 20 A university, once planted, can never be removed. And so it’s been Champaign-Urbana for almost 150 years.

Walk This Way ........................................ 22 To experience the university’s great history, one need only take a walk.

Rock ‘n’ Roll Revolution ........................ 28 Illinois roared with some of the biggest names in music. In the 1970s, music was all they needed.

The Marketplace Literacy Project ........ 34 Madhubalan Viswanathan’s Marketplace Literacy Project has been helping people thrive for the past 10 years.

Illinois Innovations................................. 40 The Illinois family is responsible for some of the world’s most innovative creations.

Industrial Design .................................... 42 Illinois’ long history with the art of the inevitable. Campus Landmarks ............................................. 46 Illinois by the Numbers ........................................51 Academic Calendar...............................................53

Phyllis M. Wise Chancellor

facebook.com/illinois.edu twitter.com/illinois_alma

On Campus, a guide to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is published by Creative Services at Public Affairs, 507 E. Green St., Champaign, IL, 61820. The information contained in this guide is collected and managed by Public Affairs and has been reviewed for accuracy. If there is an error or omission, or if you would like information about On Campus, email creativeservices@illinois.edu. Volume 3, 2013; ©2013. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced without written consent of the publisher. For advertising and distribution information, or to submit content for consideration, please contact us at 217.333.9200, or creativeservices@illinois.edu. General information about On Campus is available at go.illinois.edu/campusguide.

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Welcome T H E U N I V E RS I T Y OF ILLINOIS AT U RB AN A - CH A MPA IG N

At the crossroads between Chicago, St. Louis, and Indianapolis, the University of Illinois welcomes thousands of visitors each year. You will find the campus community welcoming and eager to make your visit worthwhile. Founded as the Illinois Industrial University in 1867, the University of Illinois is a world-class research university that was one of the original 37 public land grant institutions. It now consists of nearly 300 main campus buildings situated on 1,400 acres. Today the University of Illinois, with its history and prestige, stands as the state’s flagship public university. Our high-quality academic programs, outstanding facilities and resources have earned Illinois its reputation as an institution of international stature. Scholars and educators consistently rank it among a select group of the world’s great universities. Urbana-Champaign is more than just the home to the University of Illinois. Home to myriad businesses and entertainment venues, the twin cities are two of the most cosmopolitan in the state. With a combined population of about 180,000, the cities feature top-notch restaurants, concert arenas, and parks and recreation facilities. There are many interesting features of the campus including major university landmarks such as the Illini Union, the Quad, State Farm Center, Foellinger Auditorium, the Morrow Plots, Memorial Stadium and Krannert Center for the Performing Arts. Find more information on campus landmarks on page 46. As you explore our campus, we hope this guide makes your visit both more enjoyable and navigable. 4

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CAMPUS VISITS, TOURS, AND INFORMATION The OďŹƒce of Undergraduate Admissions oers informa on sessions and campus tours throughout the year to prospec ve students and their families. For reserva ons, call 217.333.0824. A campus map appears in the center spread of this magazine (pages 24-25). For addi onal informa on, including an online directory, visit illinois.edu.

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LODG I N G Illini Union Hotel Tucked away in the Illini Union on Green Street, the Illini Union Hotel is located at the center of the thriving University of Illinois campus. The hotel boasts 72 guest rooms and two VIP suites with spacious sitting rooms and expansive views of the main Quad. Staying at the Illini Union Hotel puts virtually all of the campus attractions right outside your door, including the State Farm Center, Memorial Stadium, Campus Recreation facilities, Green Street restaurants, shops and most major campus buildings. 1401 W. Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 217.333.1241, union.illinois.edu/hotel

I Hotel and Conference Center The I Hotel and Conference Center is located in the University of Illinois Research Park, a vibrant community of entrepreneurs, academics, and innovators. Minutes from central campus, UI sports facilities, and Willard Airport, the I Hotel includes well-appointed rooms, Houlihan’s restaurant, workout facilities and a complimentary shuttle. 1900 S. First Street, Champaign, IL 61820 217.819.5000, stayatthei.com Paul Jenkins, Phenomena Point Swing and Flank (detail), 1964. Acrylic on canvas Festival of Arts Purchase Fund 1965-10-1 Š Paul Jenkins

Illini Union Hotel guest room

I Hotel and Conference Center lobby

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For more information, visit: paymybill.uillinois.edu

UNIVER SIT Y OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA- CHAMPAIGN | ON C AM PUS


G E T T I N G A ROU N D

Parking on Campus

Champaign-Urbana Mass Transit District (MTD)

University of Illinois, the city of Champaign, and the city of Urbana. Please

The University District comprises three primary parking jurisdictions: the

The Champaign-Urbana Mass Transit District offers visitors free bus rides on campus. An iStop logo (stop-sign shaped orange logo with an “i” in the middle) on the bus signs and maps represents bus stops that allow visitors to board free. Otherwise, the cost is $1 per ride in the Champaign-Urbana community, or you can get an annual pass for $60 per year. Visit cumtd.com for more information. With the website’s Trip Planner service, visitors can enter their location and destination to find the quickest route.

read all meters and signs as there are differences between city and university rules and regulations. Many university-owned lots are open to the public in the evenings for free, but a permit is required during weekdays, and no parking is permitted overnight. Housing lots, handicapped spaces, and 24-hour spaces are restricted at all times. Metered parking for university visitors is available on university streets and drives and in several lots and parking garages around the campus. The lots are marked by entrance signs designating visitor parking. Visitors must pay the established parking fee as designated on the meter or entrance

Cycling In 2011, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign was named a Bronzelevel Bicycle Friendly University by the League of American Bicyclists. Nearly 16 miles of marked bikeways run through campus and into the surrounding community. Six bicycle repair stations are located throughout ChampaignUrbana, complete with tools and air pumps. The Campus Bicycle Shop, a collaboration between the university and The Bike Project of Urbana-Champaign, offers an educational workspace where visitors can learn to repair, maintain, and build bicycles, or purchase refurbished bicycles. All bicycle owners on campus are strongly encouraged to register their bikes online and to learn the rules of the road for safe cycling. Visit go.illinois.edu/bike for more information.

signs. Temporary permits are also available from the Parking Department. Please visit parking.illinois.edu/visitors to decide which parking option is the best for your visit, or call the Parking Department at 217.333.3530.

Willard Airport The university’s Willard Airport, named after Arthur Cutts Willard, who served as University President from 1934 to 1946, has been providing airline service to the campus and East Central Illinois since 1945. Located in Savoy, it is one of the largest and finest university-owned and-operated airports in the country. Willard Airport offers daily connections to destinations around the world. Visit flycmi.com for more information.

Zipcar Leave your car at home and utilize the Zipcar program for your travel while visiting campus. Starting at $8.50 per hour or $69 per day, Zipcar offers members the convenience of a vehicle when they need one. The cost includes gasoline, insurance, and up to 180 miles, so only parking meters cost extra. University of Illinois students only have to be 18 years of age to sign up, and it’s a great way to explore the Champaign-Urbana community or take a weekend getaway. A dozen Zipcars are conveniently located on campus and in the two downtowns. Please visit zipcar.com/uillinois for more details and to register.

SEARCHING FOR AN

APARTMENT? LEASE REVIEWS | LANDLORD COMPLAINT RECORDS

TENANT UNION

RM 326 Illini Union | TenantUnion.illinois.edu $SURJUDPRIWKH2I¿FHRIWKH'HDQRI6WXGHQWV

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DINING For more information or hours, please contact the individual establishment.

Beckman Institute Café

Derald’s Café at the College of Law

Pecan-crusted tilapia with long-grain wild rice,

Serving a wide selection of items for breakfast,

tomato basil bisque, and comfort foods such as

lunch and dinner. Voted “best fish sandwich in

biscuits and gravy and homestyle pot roast are

C-U” (Fridays).

just a few of the items you might find on the

Law Building, first floor northeast corner

Residence Hall Dining Services

menu. The Beckman Café also features flavored

504 E. Pennsylvania Avenue, Champaign

Guests are welcome at any of the six dining

coffees, espresso, cappuccino, mocha, Italian

217.244.6017

hall locations across campus, where meals

and French sodas, and various pastries.

are all-you-care-to-eat. If you want a quick snack or need to eat on the go, you can visit an à la carte location where items are priced

Beckman Institute Atrium, west end 405 S. Mathews Avenue, Urbana 217.244.1792

individually. On designated days, our dining

Bevande Café at Siebel Center

halls offer specialty cuisines such as Asian,

Coffees, soft drinks, smoothies, paninis, cold

Mexican, southern-style and vegetarian.

sandwiches, pastries and healthy snacks.

For locations, hours and menus, visit

Siebel Center, first floor east end

go.illinois.edu/dininghalls.

201 N. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana 217.344.3296

Array Café at the Institute for Genomic Biology

Bevier Café

Gourmet salads and sandwiches, coffees,

Staffed and managed by Food Science and

smoothies and soft drinks. Daily lunch specials.

Human Nutrition students, Bevier Café offers

Lower level, IGB Gatehouse

students the opportunity to study and experi-

1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana

ence the issues related to managing food

217.244.1113

service operations. Bevier Hall, second floor northwest corner 905 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana 217.333.8469

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Intermezzo Café at Krannert Center

Illini Union Eateries

Intermezzo serves freshly baked breakfast

union.illinois.edu/food

goods, light lunches and dinners, vegetarian and non-vegetarian fare, delectable treats,

Crepe De Licious

yogurt, fruit, juice, and Krannert Blends coffee.

Location: Lower level, Food Court

500 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana Lobby, northwest corner Extended hours on performance days. 217.333.8412

Breakfast, lunch and dessert crepes, burgers, Nathan’s hot dogs, fries, coffee, tea and fountain drinks.

Einstein Bros Bagels Location: Lower level, Food Court

Palette Café at Krannert Art Museum

Offers gourmet bagel sandwiches, wraps

Serving coffees, espresso, soft drinks, cookies,

for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Fresh-

pastries and sandwiches.

brewed coffee and hand-made smoothies.

Krannert Art Museum, first floor south 500 E. Peabody Drive, Champaign 217.344.2791

and salads, as well as healthy dining options

Espresso Royale Location: Main level, Courtyard Café Specialty coffees, pastries, bagels, soups

Spice Box

and sandwiches.

The Spice Box is a student-run restaurant

Illini Union Ballroom

associated with the university’s hospitality

Location: Second level, northeast

management program. Each Spice Box meal

With daily buffet lunches, the Ballroom serves as a

has two menu selections: a prix fixe four-course

more formal alternative to the fast-food vendors.

meal option and a special two-course meal

Hours: Monday–Friday, 11:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m.

option. Specialty wine and beverages are

Jamba Juice

available. Meals are offered Wednesday and

Quad Cones Location: Main Level, southwest entry Quad Cones a la Mode serves ice cream scoops, pre-packaged frozen treats and refreshments.

Rice Garden Location: Lower level, Food Court Master Fung’s pork and chicken BBQ is the specialty along with tasty Chinese delights.

Location: Main level, southwest

Sbarro

Healthy smoothies made with natural ingre-

Location: Lower level, Food Court

dients, fresh-squeezed juices, baked goods

Sbarro offers fresh and delicious hand-tossed

and yogurt blends.

pizza, homemade breadsticks, fresh salads and

Quad Shop

much more! It’s an authentic taste of Italy,

217.333.6520 spicebox.illinois.edu

Location: Main level, southwest

Friday evenings throughout the fall and spring semesters. Reservations are required. Bevier Hall, second floor 905 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana

cooked to perfection.

This “general store” offers everything from

Sushi San

fountain and bottled drinks, candy, sandwiches

Location: Lower level, Food Court

and snacks, to newspapers, magazines, greeting

Prepared fresh each day, sushi rolls are the menu

cards, and Illini merchandise.

highlight, plus beef bowls and noodles.

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A R T S & CULT U RE

University of Illinois Arboretum

Allerton Park & Retreat Center

including plant collections and facilities that

This 1,500-acre woodland, garden, meadow, and prairie landscape that surrounds the Allerton Mansion was once the private estate of Robert Henry Allerton. Located in Monticello, Illinois, about 25 miles from campus, it was named one of the Seven Wonders of Illinois

The UI Arboretum is a living laboratory, support the teaching, research, and public service programs of several units throughout campus. Located on the southeast corner of campus, it was developed from the late 1980s to early 1990s, and covers 57 acres. Visitors can experience the lush gardens—a series of great

by the Illinois Office of Tourism. Stroll through the extensive formal gardens, study more than 100 outdoor sculptures and garden ornaments, or raise your heart rate on the 14 miles of interpretive hiking trails. Natural areas include the Sangamon River, floodplains, lowland and upland forests, a meadow, and a 30-acre demonstration prairie. The original Allerton home, a century-old, Georgian-style mansion with reflecting pond, accommodates conferences and special events. There is no admission fee to the park; open daily 8 a.m. to sunset. Visitor Center open daily, 9 a.m.– 5 p.m. 515 Old Timber Road, Monticello 217.333.3287 allerton.illinois.edu

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outdoor rooms—ask questions about plants and get ideas for designing their own gardens. The Arboretum is open daily, sunrise until sunset, and admission is free. arboretum.illinois.edu

Japan House Japan House at the University of Illinois provides an academic, cultural, and natural


setting that promotes an appreciation of Japanese culture and related Asian cultural concepts. Visitors are welcome to walk through the gardens from dawn to dusk, spring through fall. For safety reasons, the tea garden is closed during the winter. Guided tours for groups can be arranged for a $50 donation. Japan House is open to the public for tea ceremonies and tours on Thursdays and during special events. 2000 S. Lincoln Avenue, Urbana 217.244.9934 go.illinois.edu/japan

Krannert Art Museum and Kinkead Pavilion The second largest general fine arts museum in Illinois, Krannert Art Museum and Kinkead Pavilion offers visitors a rich and comprehensive collection of fine art spanning 6,000 years of world culture. The museum’s collection of more than 10,000 works of art represents the cultures of Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Europe. In addition to its permanent collection, the museum organizes outstanding temporary exhibitions throughout the year, as well as artists’ lectures, music and dance performances, film screenings, and activities for visitors of all ages. Admission is free with a suggested donation of $3. Hours: Tuesday–Saturday, 9 a.m.– 5 p.m. Thursday, 9 a.m.–9 p.m. Sunday, 2–5 p.m. Closed Monday 500 E. Peabody Drive, Champaign 217.333.1861

Museum

The Spurlock Museum celebrates the people and places of the world...our heritage as members of individual cultures and as the community of humanity.

wo rld !

SPURLOCK

Ex pl or e th e

kam.illinois.edu

hours T noon–5 W–F 9–5 Sa 10–4 Su noon–4 free admission www.spurlock.illinois.edu

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Krannert Center for the Performing Arts Krannert Center is the country’s premier university-based performing arts complex where internationally acclaimed artists from around the world are constantly blurring the lines between the expected and the unexpected. With four main theatres, an outdoor amphitheatre, flexible lobby space, Intermezzo Café, and the Promenade gift shop, you’ll want to stay a while and take in all this arts and culture hub has to offer. 500 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana 217.333.6700 krannertcenter.com

Spurlock Museum The Spurlock Museum, a repository of world history and culture, features five galleries housing exhibits representing peoples and geographic areas of Ancient Mesopotamia, Ancient Egypt, and Africa; Ancient Greece and Rome; East Asia, Southeast Asia, and Oceania; Europe; and American Indian Cultures of North and South America. Special exhibits, based in the Campbell Gallery, serve as a springboard for unique programs, tours, and special events. Admission is free, with a suggested donation of $3. Hours: Closed Monday Tuesday, 12–5 p.m. Wednesday–Friday, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Sunday, 12–4 p.m. 600 S. Gregory Street, Urbana 217.333.2360 spurlock.illinois.edu

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY A VAST RESOURCE The Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is the country’s largest public university library.  Many people are surprised to learn that our facilities are available not only to the campus community, but to campus visitors and members of the general public as well. With more than 13 million volumes, unique and diverse special collections, and a wide array of other media, the Library supports teaching, learning, research, and study on the Urbana campus. Find out more go.library.illinois.edu/visitors

Connect with the University Library library.illinois.edu | (217) 333-2290

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L I B R A R I ES University Library The University Library, open to everyone, is the largest public university library in the nation with more than 25 departmental libraries and 13 million volumes. It is renowned worldwide for its innovative services, the expertise of its librarians and staff, and its extensive and specialized collections—which include those of John Milton, Marcel Proust, H.G. Wells, and Carl Sandburg. The Library at Illinois plays a vital role in the teaching, research, and service missions of the university. Main Library Hours: Monday–Thursday, 8:30 a.m.–11 p.m. Friday, 8:30 a.m.–6 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Sunday, 1–11 p.m. 1408 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana 217.333.2290 library.illinois.edu

The Rare Book & Manuscript Library The Rare Book & Manuscript Library is the principal repository at Illinois for early manuscripts and rare books and for literary manuscripts in the broad fields of literature, history, art, theology, technology, and the natural sciences. It began with the collections of Shakespeare and John Milton’s own personal library and holds many important collections today. The Gutenberg Bible and a Shakespeare first folio are just a few of the many treasures found here. The Library also plays host to numerous exhibitions and events throughout the year. Hours: Monday–Friday, 8:30 a.m.–5 p.m. 1408 W. Gregory Drive, Room 346, Urbana 217.333.3777 library.illinois.edu/rbx/

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RECREATION & ACTIVITIES Campus Recreation Campus Recreation offers active learning and self-discovery opportunities to the campus community. With the Activities and Recreation (ARC), Campus Recreation Center East (CRCE), the Ice Arena, and Freer Hall Pool, there is approximately 500,000 square feet of state-of-the-art recreation space available to concentrate on wellness and healthy lifestyles. Campus Recreation also offers many diverse programs and services, including almost 70 group fitness classes each week, 38 available personal trainers, eight intramural sports each semester, rock climbing, aquatic activities, ice skating and hockey programs, and more than 40 club sports. campusrec.illinois.edu

Visitor Passes Campus Recreation members are eligible to sponsor up to five guests at the daily guest fee. In addition, faculty, staff and students who are not Campus Recreation members may sponsor themselves and up to five guests per day. Guests of the Illini Union Hotel and I Hotel may obtain a voucher from their hotel validating the dates of their stay. This voucher may be presented at Campus Rec Member Services (ARC or CRCE), allowing the guest to purchase a daily guest pass. Visitors with official appointments with a university department may purchase either memberships or daily guest passes for the appropriate fee, depending on the length of their appointment.

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Campus Recreation Center East (CRCE)

Activities and Recreation Center (ARC)

Illini Union Rec Room

CRCE (pronounced sir-see) is located in the

The ARC—at a sparkling 340,000 square feet—is

Outfitted with 14 bowling lanes, 12 billiards tables,

heart of campus, behind Freer Gym. Close to

one of the country’s largest on-campus recre-

arcade games, a TV lounge and snack bar, the

Krannert Center for the Performing Arts and

ation centers. Hundreds of weight and exercise

Illini Union Rec Room is a great place to relax and

two blocks from Foellinger Auditorium, it is

machines, 1/5-mile indoor track, four gymnasi-

unwind. X-Box and Wii game consoles are avail-

within walking distance of the Quad. Its 110,000

ums, 12 racquetball courts, a 35-foot climbing

able for a fee, and Cosmic Bowl is offered some

square feet include an aquatic center (featuring

wall and two 50-meter swimming pools are just

evenings.

a leisure pool, water slide, volcano fountain,

some of the amenities at this tremendous facility.

and 12-person spa), 1/8-mile indoor track, free

201 E. Peabody Drive, Champaign

weights and machines, an array of cardio equip-

217.333.3806

ment and a three-court gymnasium.

Lower level, Illini Union 1401 W. Green Street, Urbana 217.333.2415 go.illinois.edu/recroom

1102 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana

State Farm Center

217.333.3806

From Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey, Harlem

Orange and Blue Golf Course

Globetrotters, WWE and Monster Trucks to

Built in the 1950s as an 18-hole championship

national touring Broadway shows, rock concerts

golf course, the University of Illinois golf course

The University of Illinois Ice Arena offers a

and the hottest names in show business, the

added another 18-hole tract in 1966, resulting in

variety of skating opportunities for the campus,

stars come out at the State Farm Center. Since

what is now known as the University of Illinois

surrounding communities, and visitors. In

1963, the venue has been bringing the best and

Orange and Blue Golf Course. You can book tee

addition to instructional ice skating programs

brightest entertainment to the Midwest. It’s one

times online for no fee. Home to the men’s and

and public skating sessions, the arena supports

of the world’s architectural wonders, and only a

women’s University of Illinois golf teams, the

intramural sport leagues and club activities

small handful of other arenas can match its size,

course is open to the public and located just south

including Illini Hockey. The arena was also home

versatility and dramatic scope. Affectionately

of the Champaign-Urbana city limits in Savoy.

to world and Olympic speedskating champion

known as the “Flying Saucer,” the center is also

Rental clubs and a driving range are available.

Bonnie Blair.

home to the Fighting Illini men’s and women’s

Ice Arena

406 E. Armory Avenue, Champaign 217.333.2212

Champaign-Urbana Mass Transit District

basketball teams. 1800 S. First Street, Champaign 866-ILLINI-1 uofiassemblyhall.com

800 Hartwell Drive, Savoy 217.359.5613 uofigolf.com

WELCOME!

Gotta Get There? Let MTD Do the Driving. frequent service $1 fare/free transfers $2 Sat. or Sun. all day passes great University access get to shopping & fun user-friendly trip tools lots of easy-to-use apps

cumtd.com

217.384.8188 2013 | 2014

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if these WALLS could On the southeast end of campus, just past the corner of Florida and Lincoln Avenues is a university structure that sets itself apart from the rest. A large circle driveway paves the way to a brick 14,000 square foot Georgian Revival mansion that for more than 80 years has been known as the President’s House.

photo phot o by Ka Kar y Wackerlin Photography Karyl Kar

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UNIVER SIT Y OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA- CHAMPAIGN | ON C AM PUS


d TALK Alliso All Alliso ison n Copenbarge ger Vance, BS, ‘1 11 MEDI MEDIA A

Originally constructed as a residence for the president of the University of Illinois, through the years the building has come to represent much more than one family’s home. Through hard economic times, social change and generations of students, the house shows the historic legacy of the University of Illinois. It is a piece of living university history. Walking through the house is like reading a novel—each piece of furniture and art tells a story. The house has hosted Amelia Earhart, former first lady Eleanor Roosevelt, Supreme Court justices, and international ambassadors. If the walls could talk, there’s no doubt they would have great stories to tell.

phot p hoto by b Hed Hedrich rric ich c Ble Ble Blessin essin ssssi g Photog Pho otog to raphers raph ap phers errs r

Many people familiar with Illinois may not know much about the story of the President’s House and may be surprised to know that it is just one of the buildings that has historically housed the university leader. Since the university’s beginnings, the president or regent has lived in a campus-owned building. The current house is the fourth structure intended for this purpose and was built in 1931. The first-known house at 709 S. Fourth St, in Champaign, is now a parking lot. The first regent of the university, John Milton Gregory, lived there in a 2.5 story brick Italianate-style house. The second residence, the first built exclusively for the president, was built at 1312 W. Green St. in Urbana in 1895. Edmund James, the fifth president of the university, became the first person to live there in 1904. The building stood within the university’s original arboretum. He lived there until 1914, and then he moved to another university-owned building to make way for housing soldiers during World War I. For its last 28 years, the structure housed the university’s Health Services Center. Today, the location hosts the Everitt Electrical and Computer Engineering Laboratory. 2013 | 2014

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by collectors. Dozens of gifts from visitors have also helped to fill the President’s House throughout its history. The three-story building opens with a grand foyer with high ceilings and beautifully ornate woodwork. The main floor is the primary entertaining space where receptions, lunches and dinners and special programs are held. There is a kitchen area on the main floor, used mainly for catering events. An additional, adjoining kitchen is for the President and his wife’s personal use. There is also a small private quarters upstairs that includes a bedroom, a sitting room and bathrooms for the exclusive use of the family. The rest of the upstairs is mainly used to house guests and dignitaries, with several bedrooms, each with a decorative theme. The third floor is also used on occasion for overnight guests. Usually, if the presidents had young children, the families would utilize both the second and third floor bedrooms. The basement is more contemporary with a large sofa, big-screen TV and pool table. After an Illini football or basketball game, the President often entertains guests on the lower level, which has a more casual feel. In 2001, an outdoor patio was built to accommodate more guests on the main floor. The outdoor space hosts bigger events, often

The Chippendale dining table

In 1918, James moved into a structure at 1203

held in tents in the back yard. Many of the details remain the same even

While the current rooms themselves are

W. Nevada Ave. in Urbana that served as his

today. The crown moldings through the house

beautiful, the items that are housed within the

house for almost 10 years. The shuffling finally

are all original. Many pieces of furniture still in

walls are where much of the home’s value lies.

came to an end when on January 4, 1928, the

the home were created by Chicago’s famous

The Drawing Room, the most formal room on

Board of Trustees declared that a “suitable presi-

(and now defunct) Watson & Boaler Co. Today,

the main floor, displays original chandeliers

dent’s home should be provided…adequate for

pieces made by the company are highly sought

and antique furniture that has been reup-

the probable needs and duties of the president of the university.” The October 1929 stock market plunged the United States into the Great Depression. The crash signaled the beginning of 10 years of hardship for Americans. Meanwhile, the university had already set up various committees for the President’s House. The university came under harsh criticism for going forward with such an elaborate house under such dire circumstances. But the university had set aside funds years in advance, and the job would help employ local people to build the structure. One of the committees, the “Committee on Furnishings for the President’s House,” was set up to choose the interior details such as art and furniture that contribute to the splendor of the house. Construction began in the fall of 1930 and about a year later it was completed at a cost of almost $225,000. President Harry Woodburn Chase was the first president to live with his family in the house.

18

The Gregory Desk, originally belonging to the university’s first regent, John Milton Gregory

UNIVER SIT Y OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA- CHAMPAIGN | ON C AM PUS


holstered. The Dining Room has the most

each chair names the artist responsible for the

look of the house has varied greatly from quite

impressive piece of furniture in the house,

needlepoint of a native Illinois flower or bird.

contemporary to traditional.

an original Chippendale dining table with 24

Judy Ikenberry also has another legacy at

Gifts that have been given to the university

chairs and a companion piece. In 1986, when

the President’s House. Later in life, she began

over time by donors or visiting dignitaries are on

the seats of the chairs were showing wear,

learning to paint watercolor landscapes. The

display at the house. Gifts have ranged from sets

Judy Ikenberry, wife of 14th president Stanley

President’s House displays several of her prints,

of silver, exotic dining sets from overseas, vintage

Ikenberry, commissioned the Illini Stitchers to

which primarily have agricultural themes. They

rugs and precious works of art.

needlepoint seats for the chairs. A plaque on

were purchased through The Illinois Club, which

Close to 5,000 guests cross the threshold

used the proceeds

of the President’s House each year. President

for the Judith Life

Bob Easter and his wife serve as the official

Ikenberry Fine

hosts at any event that takes place at the

Arts Award.

house and they will hold from 30 to 50 events

Most of the

at the house every year. These encompass

other art on the

small to medium-sized meetings, receptions,

walls belongs to

lunches and dinners to large-scale affairs

the Krannert Art

such as football pre-game parties, the annual

Museum and is

commencement receptions for all graduates

on loan to the

and their families, and the opening night gala

house. Art is the

for the Roger Ebert Film Festival.

primary way each

A tradition has started at the President’s House

president can

beginning with the past several presidents. Each

personalize the

recent president has created a leather-bound

house by making

volume - a personalized photo album of his

selections from

tenure. The albums are displayed on a table in

the Krannert

the library, forever sealing each president’s legacy

collection. Over

and adding to the story of one of the university’s

the years, the

most remarkable historic buildings.

Commencement 2013 | photo by Karyl Wackerlin Photography

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2013 | 2014

19


DID THE

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS END UP IN

URBANACHAMPAIGN

Melissa Gildner, BS, ‘13 LAS

It was a battle until the end among a number of Illinois cities on which location would be selected for the second oldest public university in the state. By 1865, it was clear that Illinois would establish a university on the proceeds of the land grant and contending cities mobilized their forces. Illinois House representatives from Chicago and many locations in the central part of the state were up to the challenge. Determined to be the location of the

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university, Champaign County intensified its plans. To get the ball rolling, Clark Robinson Griggs was elected to the Illinois House of Representatives to present the county’s proposal. Soon after, Griggs became the executive agent to carry out the local campaign. To turn lawmakers’ eyes towards Champaign County, Griggs spent a generous

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amount providing drinks, light refreshments, and theatre tickets for members of the General Assembly and their constituents. On the day when the Illinois House of Representatives was deciding the location of the

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university, a member suggested Bloomington and the House vetoed that proposal. Another member suggested Lincoln and again the proposal was vetoed. Jacksonville also made a play for the location. But finally, the House agreed to locate the institution in Champaign-Urbana, and passed something called the Organic Act establishing Illinois Industrial University by a vote of 67 to 10. Many of the other nominated cities were

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furious. They pointed fingers of accusation at Griggs and complained of bribery. The charges of corruption laid against Champaign County have never been proven, and information was later made public that perhaps other competitors dirtied their hands as well. But as Ohio Governor

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Washington Bushnell said, “a university, once

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planted, can never be removed, and if a mistake

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is made, that mistake rests on the institution as a burden to the end of time.” 20

UNIVER SIT Y OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA- CHAMPAIGN | ON C AM PUS


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2013 | 2014

21


On campus between First and Wright streets stand buildings representing hard work and dedication. Our buildings, and even a few of our streets, have a story to tell. From the university’s first regent, John Milton Gregory as the namesake of Gregory Hall, to our newest residence facility, Bousfield Hall, honoring the first African-American woman to graduate from Illinois, you don’t have to open a textbook or stake out a seat in the Library to experience some of the history of this great university.

The Quad Natural History Building

Henry Administration Building In 1914, this building was representative of the College of Commerce and Business Administration. It was originally named the Administration Building, until university regulations changed regarding the naming of campus buildings after living persons who were not private donors. As a result, in 1987 the building was named in honor of former president David Dodds Henry.

Noyes Lab

Gregory Hall Gregory Hall honors the first regent of the Illinois Industrial University from 1867-1880. John Milton Gregory set the stage for the institution that has thrived for almost 150 years.

By 1901, the university’s Chemistry Department was too large for one building. An addition was built, and was later named Noyes Lab after Professor W.A. Noyes.

Other Landmarks

Davenport Hall The old Agriculture Building was renamed to Davenport Hall in 1946. The building serves as a memorial to Eugene Davenport who was Dean of the College of Agriculture, a university faculty member from 1895-1922, and he served as the university’s Vice President from 1920-1922.

Huff Hall

Chemistry Annex Designed by James White, the Chemistry Annex was built directly south of Noyes Lab, connecting to it via an underground tunnel. On March 31, 1951, the building was officially dedicated, and the Department of Chemistry was given its third major building.

You just have to 22

The Natural History Building is one of five buildings designed by architect Nathan Ricker on the university’s campus. This Victorian Gothic-inspired style building was dedicated on November 16, 1892.

Huff Hall is known for its role in coining the term “March Madness,” which originally was known as the IHSA (Illinois State High School Association) state basketball tournament. The facility is currently used for multiple purposes including the home to the university’s men’s and women’s gymnastics, volleyball, and wrestling teams. The facility is named after longtime athletic director and coach, George Huff. Today, the University continues to honor his success with the George Huff Award that is given to student-athletes who earn a 3.0 GPA for an academic year.

take a w

UNIVER SIT Y OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA- CHAMPAIGN | ON C AM PUS


A DAY IN THE LIFE Residence Halls

of an Illinois student

Melissa a Gild G ldner n , BA, ‘13 13 LA LASS

Nugent Hall Nugent Hall represents achievement for the Disability Resources and Educational Services program at the University of Illinois. Timothy J. Nugent was an influential factor in the development of the university’s disabilities program and established the first wheelchair basketball tournament. Nugent Residence Hall is the most accessible in the country for students with severe disabilities.

Known then

The admission process was a lot simpler during its

as the Illinois

early years than what students face today. Students were required to score a 70% or higher on a

Bousfield Hall

Industrial

Bousfield is the newest addition to the residence halls on campus. It is named in honor of Maudelle Tanner Brown Bousfield. She was the first African-American woman to graduate from the university. From 1903-1905 she was the only black woman on campus.

University,

the entry exam, students might be asked questions

the campus

such as, “Through what waters will a vessel pass,

welcomed its

and in what direction sail, in going from Glasgow

first class of

65-question test, and had to be 15 years of age. On

to Adrianople?” or “Describe the Leyden jar and explain its theory.” Many applicants today wouldn’t

77 students in

know the answers to these questions. Annual

1868. During

tuition was $15 per year for in-state students and

the early

$20 per year for out-of-state students. The campus was a single building. The Old

years of the

University Building, nicknamed “The Elephant” by

university, it

the students, included classrooms, a chapel, club-

was common

rooms and a power plant, with the top two floors

for cattle to

serving as a dormitory. Years later, a windstorm ripped through Urbana-Champaign and damaged

outnumber

part of the building. Because of a lack of funding,

students.

the building was never repaired and the university demolished it in 1881. Hands-on education had a different meaning for students in the early years. Each student spent two hours per day engaging in manual labor such as building fences or constructing a driveway. In addition to these tasks, students were in enrolled in several classes, including astronomy, Butler’s analogy, elocution, evidences of Christianity, history

walk.

Melissa Gildner, BA, ‘13 LAS

of inductive sciences, mental philosophy, and penmanship. Each day, students were required to wear cadet gray and a single-breasted coat or vest buttoned to the chin. Today, Illinois’ beautiful, sprawling campus has more than 350 buildings, more than 40,000 students and a worldwide reputation.

2013 | 2014

23


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2013 | 2014

25


Alphabetical Legend 273 219 18 209 19 35 266 93 68 64 59 160 238 239 241 242a 247 262 267 132 234 233 62 192 152 169 167 61 60 256 253 25 269 32 87 29 88 111

505 E. Green Street Abbott Power Plant (H2) ACES Library & Information Ctr. (D4) Activities and Recreation Complex/ARC (F2) Admissions and Records Bldg. (D6) Advanced Computation Bldg. (E7) Aerodynamics Research Lab. (E7) Aeronautical Lab. A (F6) African American Cultural Programs Bldg. (E6) Afro-American Studies and Research Program (D5) Agricultural Bioprocess Lab. (D4) Agriculture Engineering Sciences Bldg. (D4) Agriculture Services Bldg. (C1) Agriculture Services Warehouse (B1) Agronomy/Plant Pathology Farm (B1) Agronomy Seed House (B1) Agronomy Soybean Research Farm (A1) Alice Campbell Alumni Ctr. (D6) Alma Mater (F5) Altgeld Hall (F5) Animal Science Horse Barn (C1) Animal Science Shop (D1) Animal Sciences Lab. (D4) Arcade Bldg. (F5) Architecture Bldg. (E4) Armory (F4) Art and Design Bldg. (E3) Art East Annex Studio I Art East Annex Studio II Asian American Cultural Ctr. (E5) Asian American Studies Program Bldg. (E5) Astronomy Bldg. (E7) Atkins Tennis Ctr. (C2) Atmospheric Sciences Annex 1 (E7) Atmospheric Sciences Annex 2 (E6) Atmospheric Sciences Bldg. (E7) Aviation Ground School (E6) Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology (G7) 205 Beckwith Hall (H4) 232 Beef Barns (D1) 63 Bevier Hall (D5) 176 Bielfeldt Athletic Administration Bldg. (D1) 108 Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Facility (A1) 58 Burnsides Research Lab. (C4) 85 Burrill Hall (E6) 271 Business Instructional Facility (E4) 182 CNI/Prairienet Bldg. (F5) 98 CSO Systems Consulting Office (F7) 107 Campbell Hall for Public Telecommunication (WILL AM-FM-TV) (F7) 5 Campus Recreation Ctr. East/CRCE (D5) 211 Campus Recreation Outdoor Ctr. (H2) 23 Ctr. for Advanced Study (D6) 260 Ctr. on Democracy in a Multiracial Society (F7) 226 Central Receiving Warehouse (G1) 91 Ceramics Bldg. (F6) 90 Ceramics Kiln House (F6) 81 Chemical and Life Sciences Lab. (E5) 139 Chemistry Annex (E5) 15 Child Development Lab. (D5) 70 Children and Family Research Ctr. (E5) 186 Coble Hall (F5) 204 College Park – The Tower at Third 203 Colonel Wolfe School (H5) 113b Computer and Systems Research Lab. (G7) 199 Computing Applications Bldg. (G6) 246 Dairy Experimental Round Barns (B2) 6 Dance Administration Bldg. (C5) 7 Dance Studio (C5) 140 Davenport Hall (E5) 151 David Kinley Hall (E4) 118 Digital Computer Lab. (F6) 259 Doris Kelley Christopher Hall (C6) 237 Duplicating/Quick Copy Bldg. (C1) 17 Early Child Development Lab. (D5) 76 East Asian Languages and Cultures Bldg. (E5) 257 East Campus Commercialization Ctr. (D5) 235b Eichelberger Field (C3) 130 Engineering Hall (F6) 36b Engineering Sciences Bldg. (F7) 37 Engineering Senior Design Studio (E7) 265 Engineering Student Project Lab. (E7) 138 English Bldg. (F5) 30 Environmental Health and Safety Bldg. (E7) 28 Environmental Research Annex (E7) 131 Everitt Lab. (F5) 207 Flagg Hall (F3) 144 Foellinger Auditorium (E5) 249 Food Science Dry Process Lab. (A1) 142 Foreign Languages Bldg. (E5) 38 Frederick Seitz Materials Research Lab. (E6) 46 Freer Hall (D5) 274 Gable Home 228 Garage and Car Pool (F1) 217 Geological Survey Lab. (H2) 121 Grainger Engineering Library Information Ctr. (F6) 145 Gregory Hall (E4) 268 Hallene Gateway (D6) 170 Harding Band Bldg. (F4) 135 Harker Hall (F5) 136 Henry Admin. Bldg. (F5) 71 Honors Program (E5) 224 Housing Food Stores (H1) 168 Huff Hall (F3) 113a Hydrosystems Lab. (G7) 270 I Hotel and Conference Ctr. (E1) 172 Ice Arena (F4) 276 Ikenberry Commons 3 Illini Grove (B4) 191 Illini Hall (F5) 173 Illini Tower (F4)

26

133 185 235a 2 (B4) 272 202 258 14 66 175a 21 158 188 116 117 166 (E3) 42 65 195 165 22 146 175b 141 39 47 227 179 129 275 4 56 86 125 83 210 177

Illini Union (F5) Illini Union Bookstore (F5) Illinois Field (D2) Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities Indoor Golf Facility (C2) Information Kiosk (G1) Inst. for Genomic Biology (D5) Inst. of Government and Public Affairs (D5) Intensive English Inst. (D5) International Studies Bldg. (F4) Irwin Academic Services Ctr. (F4) Irwin Indoor Football Practice Facility (E2) Johnstowne Ctr., 502 E. John, C. (G5) Kenney Gym. (G6) Kenney Gym. Annex (G6) Krannert Art Museum and Kinkead Pavilion

Krannert Center for the Performing Arts (E6) La Casa Cultural Latina (D5) Latina/o Studies (F4) Law Bldg. (E3) Levis Faculty Ctr. (D6) Library (E4) Library and Information Science Bldg. (F4) Lincoln Hall (E5) Loomis Lab. (E6) Madigan Lab. (D5) Mailing Ctr. (G1) Management Information Division (F4) Materials Science and Engineering Bldg. (F6) McFarland Carillon McKinley Health Ctr. (C5) Meat Science Lab. (C4) Mechanical Engineering Bldg. (F6) Mechanical Engineering Lab. (F6) Medical Sciences Bldg. (E5) Memorial Stadium (F2) Merriam Laboratory for Analytic Political Research (F4) 69 Minority Student Affairs Academic Services Ctr. (D5) 115 Micro and Nanotechnology Lab. (G6) 84 Morrill Hall (E5) 149 Morrow Plots (E4) 230 Atkins Bldg. (E1) 150 Mumford Hall (D4) 157 Mumford House (D4) 12 Music Education Annex (C6) 45 Music Bldg. (D5) 53 National Soybean Research Ctr. (C4) 261 Native American House (E5) 134 Natural History Bldg. (F6) 164 Natural History Survey Greenhouse (D3) 162 Natural Resources Bldg. (D3) 163 Natural Resources Garage (D3) 104 NCSA (F7) 278 NCSA Petascale Computing Facility 75 Nevada Street Computing Services (D5) 114 Newmark Civil Engineering Lab. (G6) 208 Noble Hall (F3) 112 North Campus Chiller Plant (G7) 254 North Campus Parking Deck (G7) 137 Noyes Lab. (E5) 92 Nuclear Engineering Lab. (F6) 221 Nuclear Physics Lab. (H2) 89 Nuclear Radiations Lab. (F6) 277 Nugent Hall 40 Nursing Bldg. (E6) 255 Oak Street Chiller Plant (H2) 148 Observatory (E4) 196 Optical Physics and Engineering Lab. (G6) 16 Oregon Street Computing Services (C6) 183 Parking Deck (G5) 128 Parking Deck and Fire Station (C5) 216 Personnel Services Bldg. (H2) 225 Physical Plant Service Bldg. (G1) 263 Physics Research Lab. Storage (H1) 244 Plant Clinic (B2) 52 Plant Sciences Lab. (C4) 31 Plant Services Bldg. NE (E7) 27 Plant Services Storage Bldg. (E7) 174 Police Training Inst. (G4) 245 Poultry Farm (C2) 1 President’s House (A4) 206 Printing Services Bldg. (H2) 201 Professional Arts Bldg. (G6) 180 Psychology Bldg. (F5) 36a Public Safety Bldg. (F7) 220 Rehabilitation Education Ctr. (H2) 107a Richmond Studio/Swanson Center (F7) 74 Roger Adams Lab. (E5) 264 Roller Hockey Rink (G2) 171 School of Labor and Employment Relations (F4) 281 School of Social Work (D6) 197 Shelford Vivarium (G6) 103 Siebel Center for Computer Science (F7) 143 Smith Memorial Hall (E5) 242b South Farms Field Lab. (B1) 240 South Farms Warehouses (B1) 181 Speech and Hearing Clinic (F4) 20 Spurlock Museum (D6) 229 State Farm Center (E1) 161 Stock Pavilion (D3) 153 Surveying Bldg. (E4) 187 Swanlund Admin. Bldg. (F5) 57 Taft House (C4) 122 Talbot Lab. (G6) 156 Temple Hoyne Buell Hall (D3) 236 Track and Soccer Stadium (C2) 94 Transportation Bldg. (F6) 50 Turner Hall (D4) 51 Turner Hall Greenhouse (C4)

190 106 147 100 102 223 48 251 248 250 252 222 154 178 159 215 214 213 212 189 10 11 67 72 200 194 126 34 99 104 103 193

Turner Student Services Bldg. (F5) R.T. Ubben Basketball Complex (D1) Undergraduate Library (E4) University High School Gym. (F7) University High School (F7) University Press Bldg. (H1) Vegetable Crops Bldg. (C4) Veterinary Basic Sciences Bldg. (A2) Veterinary Feed Storage Bldg. (A1) Veterinary Surgery and Obstetrics Lab. (A2) Veterinary Teaching Hospital (A2) Volatile Storage Bldg. (H1) Wohlers Hall (E4) Women’s Studies Program Bldg. (F4) Wood Engineering Lab. (D4) 51 E. Armory, C. (H3) 55 E. Armory, C. (H3) 57 E. Armory, C. (H3) 59 E. Armory, C. (H3) 505 E. Green, C. (G5) 1001 W. Nevada, U. (C5) 1003 W. Nevada, U. (D5) 1205 1/2 W. Nevada, U. (D5) 1207 W. Oregon (E5) 508 S. Sixth, C. (G6) 610 S. Sixth, C. (G5) 912 S. Fifth, C. (F4) 1009 W. Springfield, U. (E7) 1210 W. Springfield, U. (F7) 1208 W. Stoughton, U. (F7) 1212 W. Stoughton, U. (F7) 627 1/2 S. Wright, C. (G5)

University Residence Halls Champaign Residence Halls BR Barton (F3) CL Clark (F3) GR Garner (G3) HP Hopkins (G2) LN Lundgren (F3) SC Scott (F2) SN Snyder (F2) TF Taft (F3) VD Van Doren (F2) WS Weston (F3) Urbana North Residence Halls AL Allen (C5) BS Busey (D5) EV Evans (D5) LA Lincoln Avenue (C5) Illinois Street Residence Halls TW Townsend (D6) WR Wardall (E6) Pennsylvania Avenue Residence Halls BB Babcock (B4) BL Blaisdell (B4) CR Carr (B4) SD Saunders (B4) Florida Avenue Residence Halls OG Oglesby (B4) TR Trelease (B4) Graduate Halls DN Daniels (E6) SM Sherman (G4) Family Housing AW Ashton Woods Family and Graduate Housing (see C1) GG Goodwin/Green Apts. (E6) OD Orchard Downs Apts. (see A4) Privately Owned Residence Halls AH Armory House (G3) BH Bromley Hall (G4) HH Hendrick House (D7) NH Newman Hall (F4)

Numerical Legend 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 10 11 12 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 25 27 28 29 30 31 32 34 35 36a 36b 37 38 39

UNIVER SIT Y OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA- CHAMPAIGN | ON C AM PUS

President’s House (A4) Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities (B4) Illini Grove (B4) McKinley Health Ctr. (C5) Campus Recreation Ctr. East/CRCE (D5) Dance Administration Bldg. (C5) Dance Studio (C5) 1001 W. Nevada, U. (C5) 1003 W. Nevada, U. (D5) Music Education Annex (C6) Inst. of Government and Public Affairs (D5) Child Development Lab. (D5) Oregon Street Computing Services (C6) Child Development Lab. (D5) ACES Library & Information Ctr. (D4) Admissions and Records Bldg. (D6) Spurlock Museum (D6) Irwin Academic Services Ctr. (F4) Levis Faculty Ctr. (D6) Ctr. for Advanced Study (D6) Astronomy Bldg. (E7) Plant Services Storage Bldg. (E7) Environmental Research Annex (E7) Atmospheric Sciences Bldg. (E7) Environmental Health and Safety Bldg. (E7) Plant Services Bldg. NE (E7) Atmospheric Sciences Annex 1 (E7) 1009 W. Springfield, U. (E7) Advanced Computation Bldg. (E7) Public Safety Bldg. (F7) Engineering Sciences Bldg. (F7) Engineering Senior Design Studio (E7) Frederick Seitz Materials Research Lab. (E6) Loomis Lab. (E6)

40 42 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64

Nursing Bldg. (E6) Krannert Ctr. for the Performing Arts (E6) Music Bldg. (D5) Freer Hall (D5) Madigan Lab. (D5) Vegetable Crops Bldg. (C4) Ornamental Horticulture Bldg. (D4) Turner Hall (D4) Turner Hall Greenhouse (C4) Plant Sciences Lab. (C4) National Soybean Research Ctr. (C4) Meat Science Lab. (C4) Taft House (C4) Burnsides Research Lab. (C4) Agricultural Bioprocess Lab. (D4) Art East Annex Studio II (D4) Art East Annex Studio I (D4) Animal Sciences Lab. (D4) Bevier Hall (D5) Afro-American Studies and Research Program (D5) 65 La Casa Cultural Latina (D5) 66 Intensive English Institute (D5) 67 1205 1/2 W. Nevada, U. (D5) 68 African American Cultural Programs Bldg. (E5) 69 Minority Student Affairs Academic Services Ctr. (D5) 70 Children and Family Research Ctr. (E5) 71 Honors Program (E5) 72 1207 W. Oregon (E5) 74 Roger Adams Lab. (E5) 75 Nevada Street Computing Services (D5) 76 East Asian Languages and Cultures Bldg. (E5) 81 Chemical and Life Sciences Lab. (E5) 83 Medical Sciences Bldg. (E5) 84 Morrill Hall (E5) 85 Burrill Hall (E6) 86 Mechanical Engineering Bldg. (F6) 87 Atmospheric Sciences Annex 2 (E6) 88 Aviation Ground School (E6) 89 Nuclear Radiations Lab. (F6) 90 Ceramics Kiln House (F6) 91 Ceramics Bldg. (F6) 92 Nuclear Engineering Lab. (F6) 93 Aeronautical Lab. A (F6) 94 Transportation Bldg. (F6) 98 CSO Systems Consulting Office (F7) 99 1210 W. Springfield, U. (F7) 100 University High School Gym. (F7) 102 University High School (F7) 103 Siebel Center for Computer Science (F7) 104 NCSA (F7) 106 R.T. Ubben Basketball Complex (D1) 107 Campbell Hall for Public Telecommunication (WILL AM-FM-TV) (F7) 107a Richmond Studio/Swanson Center (F7) 108 Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Facility (A1) 111 Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology (G7) 112 North Campus Chiller Plant (G7) 113a Hydrosystems Lab. (G7) 113b Computer and Systems Research Lab. (G7) 114 Newmark Civil Engineering Lab. (G6) 115 Micro and Nanotechnology Lab. (G6) 116 Kenney Gym. (G6) 117 Kenney Gym. Annex (G6) 118 Digital Computer Lab. (G6) 121 Grainger Engineering Library Information Ctr. (F6) 122 Talbot Lab. (G6) 125 Mechanical Engineering Lab. (F6) 126 912 S. Fifth, C. (F4) 128 Parking Deck and Fire Station (C5) 129 Materials Science and Engineering Bldg. (F6) 130 Engineering Hall (F6) 131 Everitt Lab. (F5) 132 Altgeld Hall (F5) 133 Illini Union (F5) 134 Natural History Bldg. (F6) 135 Harker Hall (F5) 136 Henry Admin. Bldg. (F5) 137 Noyes Lab. (E5) 138 English Bldg. (F5) 139 Chemistry Annex (E5) 140 Davenport Hall (E5) 141 Lincoln Hall (E5) 142 Foreign Languages Bldg. (E5) 143 Smith Memorial Hall (E5) 144 Foellinger Auditorium (E5) 145 Gregory Hall (E4) 146 Library (E4) 147 Undergraduate Library (E4) 148 Observatory (E4) 149 Morrow Plots (E4) 150 Mumford Hall (D4) 151 David Kinley Hall (E4) 152 Architecture Bldg. (E4) 153 Surveying Bldg. (E4) 154 Wohlers Hall (E4) 155 Education Bldg. (E3) 156 Temple Hoyne Buell Hall (D3) 157 Mumford House (D4) 158 Irwin Indoor Football Practice Facility (E2) 159 Wood Engineering Lab. (D4) 160 Agriculture Engineering Sciences Bldg. (D4) 161 Stock Pavilion (D3) 162 Natural Resources Bldg. (D3) 163 Natural Resources Garage (D3) 164 Natural History Survey Greenhouse (D3) 165 Law Bldg. (E3) 166 Krannert Art Museum and Kinkead Pavilion (E3)


167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175a 175b 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 232 233 234 235a 235b 236 237 238 239 240 241 242a 242b 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281

Art and Design Bldg. (E3) Huff Hall (F3) Armory (F4) Harding Band Bldg. (F4) School of Labor and Employment Relations (F4) Ice Arena (F4) Illini Tower (F4) Police Training Inst. (G4) International Studies Bldg. (F4) Library and Information Science Bldg. (F4) Bielfeldt Athletic Administration Bldg. (D1) Merriam Laboratory for Analytic Political Research (F4) Women’s Studies Program Bldg. (F4) Management Information Division Bldg. (F4) Psychology Bldg. (F5) Speech and Hearing Clinic (F4) CNI/Prairienet Bldg. (F5) Parking Deck (G5) Illini Union Bookstore (F5) Coble Hall (F5) Swanlund Admin. Bldg. (F5) Johnstowne Ctr., 502 E. John, C. (G5) 505 E. Green, C. (G5) Turner Student Services Bldg. (F5) Illini Hall (F5) Arcade Bldg. (F5) 627 1/2 S. Wright, C. (G5) 610 S. Sixth, C. (G5) Latina/o Studies (F4) Optical Physics and Engineering Lab. (G6) Shelford Vivarium (G6) Computing Applications Bldg. (G6) 508 S. Sixth, C. (G6) Professional Arts Bldg. (G6) Information Kiosk (G1) Colonel Wolfe School (H5) College Park ‚Äì The Tower at Third (H4) Beckwith Hall (H4) Printing Services Bldg. (H2) Flagg Hall (F3) Noble Hall (F3) Activities and Recreation Complex/ARC (F2) Memorial Stadium (F2) Campus Recreation Outdoor Ctr. (H2) 59 E. Armory, C. (H3) 57 E. Armory, C. (H3) 55 E. Armory, C. (H3) 51 E. Armory, C. (H3) Personnel Services Bldg. (H2) Geological Survey Lab. (H2) Abbott Power Plant (H2) Rehabilitation Education Ctr. (H2) Nuclear Physics Lab. (H2) Volatile Storage Bldg. (H1) University Press Bldg. (H1) Housing Food Stores (H1) Physical Plant Service Bldg. (G1) Central Receiving Warehouse (G1) Mailing Ctr. (G1) Garage and Car Pool (F1) State Farm Center (E1) Atkins Bldg. (E1) Beef Barns (D1) Animal Science Shop (D1) Animal Science Horse Barn (C1) Illinois Field (D2) Eichelberger Field (C3) Track and Soccer Stadium (C2) Duplicating/Quick Copy Bldg. (C1) Agriculture Services Bldg. (C1) Agriculture Services Warehouse (B1) South Farms Warehouses (B1) Agronomy/Plant Pathology Farm (B1) Agronomy Seed House (B1) South Farms Field Lab. (B1) Plant Clinic (B2) Poultry Farm (C2) Dairy Experimental Round Barns (B2) Agronomy Soybean Research Farm (A1) Veterinary Feed Storage Bldg. (A1) Food Science Dry Process Lab. (A1) Veterinary Surgery and Obstetrics Lab. (A2) Veterinary Basic Sciences Bldg. (A2) Veterinary Teaching Hospital (A2) Asian American Studies Program Bldg. (E5) North Campus Parking Deck (G7) Oak Street Chiller Plant (H2) Asian American Cultural Ctr. (E5) East Campus Commercialization Ctr. (D5) Inst. for Genomic Biology (D5) Doris Kelley Christopher Hall (C6) Native American House (E5) Alice Campbell Alumni Ctr. (D6) Physics Research Lab. Storage (H1) Roller Hockey Rink (G2) Engineering Student Project Lab. (E7) Aerodynamics Research Lab. (E7) Alma Mater (F5) Hallene Gateway (D6) Atkins Tennis Ctr. (C2) I Hotel and Conference Ctr. (E1) Business Instructional Facility (E4) Indoor Golf Facility (C2) 507 E. Green Street Gable Home McFarland Carillon Ikenberry Commons Nugent Hall NCSA Petascale Computing Facility Electrical and Computer Engineering Building Residence Hall #2 School of Social Work (D6)

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From Chances R to REO, the Red Lion Inn to All-Star Frogs, Foellinger to the Finchley Boys, Illinois Roared with the

Rock ’n’ Roll

Revolution Doug Dou g Pete Peterso rson, n, ‘7 77 Medi Media a

Rep R epri ep rinte rin te ted ed with e witth wi h per per pe e mis missio sion sio ion fro rom om Il Il ino Ill noiss Alu no Alumni nii ma magaz azine ziine e / Fa alll 20 201 012 0

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UNIVER SIT Y OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA- CHAMPAIGN | ON C AM PUS


CHANCES R WAS PACKED

with smoke hanging low

over the raucous crowd, as the band Cheap Trick prepared to begin its set. It was the early 1970s, and looking down on the stage from one of the club’s multilevel balconies were Geoff Poor ’71 LAS, from the group Feather Train, and George Faber, the shaggy-haired lead singer of The Finchley Boys. As Cheap Trick began to play the power chords of its first song, a member of the band glanced up, spotted Faber and motioned for him to join them on stage. Over 6 feet tall and thin as a rail (“rock weight,” they called it), Faber was also one of the most electrifying showmen in the area, so he didn’t walk down—he leaped from the balcony, harmonica in hand, just as Cheap Trick launched into “Train Kept A-Rollin’.” He landed on the stage like a bolt from the blue and hurled himself into the music as the crowd erupted. “That was the most magical rock ’n’ roll thing I had ever seen,” says Poor. That is saying a lot because the 1960s and ’70s were a magical time for rock ’n’ roll on the University of Illinois campus. It was a heady time across the nation, but for a community the size of ChampaignUrbana, the ’60s and ’70s were unique,

Below left, Feather Train plays for a Quad crowd in 1970. Above, the All-Star Frogs.

producing an astounding variety of music and bands. Major acts, such as The Eagles, played the UI campus bar scene, but the heart and soul of C-U music were the local bands that toured throughout the Midwest—The Regiment, Head East, The One-Eyed Jacks, Duke Tumatoe and The All-Star Frogs, Starcastle, Ginger, Feather Train, The Ship, The Rave, The Finchley Boys and so many more. Out of this mix, some would go on to make their mark on a national stage, most notably rockers REO Speedwagon and the late folksinger Dan Fogelberg ’71. “The thing that always amazed our whole band was how competitive and how good the music was in Champaign,” says Gregg Philbin ’69 MEDIA, who played bass guitar for REO Speedwagon from 1968 to 1977. “I have been all

‘Music was all we had’ The influence of this singular time in Champaign-Urbana continues today, for the man who sits atop Billboard magazine’s 2012 list of the most powerful people in music is Irving Azoff ’70, HON ’03, who emerged from the UI scene. He was the driving force at campus-based Blytham Ltd., the most important booking agency for bands in the Midwest in the ’60s and ’70s. Blytham was “incredibly aggressive and used a ‘take-no-prisoners’ approach to [signing bands]

over the country, and perhaps the only music scenes that were on a level or

on their roster,” Philbin recalls. “They changed the

higher were, of course, Nashville, and Austin, Texas.

Champaign music scene forever by getting the Big

“Champaign has always produced incredible musicians.” Chances R was the first important club to get it rolling, says Larry Fredrickson ’73, a music education major with the group Ginger. Chances R opened in

Three clubs into bidding wars, driving prices up. “The bands began to make a lot of money.” In fact, the ’60s and ’70s acts had a much better

downtown Champaign in 1966; shortly thereafter, the area’s second iconic

shot at making a living from their music than

club—the Red Lion—arrived at Third and Green streets. With the Brown Jug on

today’s groups. The Regiment, for example, made

Sixth Street rounding out the Big Three, the community had a continuous stream

$69,000 in its second year—almost a half million in

of sound seven nights a week.

today’s dollars, says Ralph Senn ’69 MEDIA, who

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played rhythm guitar for the

Captain Rat, the Shirley Sisters and Led Zeppelin

band, the first one that Azoff represented.

In the Champaign-Urbana of the 1960s and

After leaving the area, Azoff

’70s, “each bar had its own scene,” says Mark

went on to represent a long

Rubel ’79 LAS, who has run Champaign’s Pogo

list of top-tier performers,

recording studio since 1980. “There were the

including The Eagles, Van

regulars and the weirdos and the beautiful girls

Halen, REO Speedwagon,

and strange people and the shady characters and

Steely Dan, Jewel, Journey and

the out-and-out criminals. It was like a cartoon.”

Christina Aguilera. He now

 Among these “cartoon characters” was the

serves as executive chairman

very group that Rubel has played for since the

of Live Nation Entertainment,

’70s—Captain Rat and the Blind Rivets. At the

which was created with the

grand finale of a 1980 gig at the Intramural

merger of Ticketmaster and

Physical Education Building, electric guitarist

Live Nation.

Tim Vear ’72 ENG, using a wireless system,

“But the key to everything, honestly, was an Illinois graduate—Bob Nutt ’66,” says Poor. “Bob Nutt formed Blytham Ltd., and Irving [Azoff] was his second lieutenant. Bob Nutt created the rock ’n’ roll scene [on campus].” Their super-agency made ChampaignUrbana stand out among campus music scenes, Fredrickson observes, along with booming local venues and the Chicago talent who came to attend Illinois and perform. Lawrence Grossberg, PHD ’76 MEDIA, a cultural studies scholar known nationwide for his work on popular music, says that rock through

the ’70s was shaped by the civil rights, antiwar

skateboarded off the pool’s diving board and

and counterculture movements and emerged as

remained underwater for optimum effect.

something that youth culture claimed as all its

Uninformed of the stunt, the team of life-

own. “It was important that your parents didn’t

guards leaped in to save him; the group

like rock ’n’ roll,” he says. “It was important that

was subsequently banned from performing

kind of music pissed people off.”

at the complex.

Television and film at that time were not aimed

University’s psychedelic scene were the Shirley

Illinois until 1994 and is on the faculty of the

sisters—Jane Shirley Hoch ’70, Mary Genevra

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. “We

Shirley ’76 FAA and Anne Shirley Faber ’77 ACES.

didn’t have the Internet. Music was all we had,

The siblings started In Stitches, a Champaign-

and that’s why it mattered so much.”

based business that made outfits for local and national rock musicians. Mary, who passed away

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Three other colorful characters in the

at adolescents, says Grossberg, who taught at

Undergraduate Programs p. | (217) 244.5246 e. | undergradsocialwork@illinois.edu

Graduate Programs p. | (217) 333.2261 e. | socialwork@illinois.edu

UNIVER SIT Y OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA- CHAMPAIGN | ON C AM PUS


in 2000, and Jimmy

But the music of the

Speedwagon “blowing the doors off” of the Red

Page, the Led Zeppelin

’60s and ’70s, at its root

Lion (for a 50-cent cover), as Carl Palczewski ’75

lead guitarist, “had a

level, was not really

ENG put it, the U of I rocked, and it continued to

thing for each other,”

about politics and ideolo-

do so in the 1980s and beyond.

recalls Faber: She

gy, says Grossberg. “Rock

In fact, the band named Champaign hit the

confirms the legend

’n’ roll was about how it

national charts with its 1981 rhythm-and-blues

that Mary, a violinist

made you feel,” he points

smash, “How ’Bout Us.” The group was even

with The Finchley

out. “The music was a

bigger in Europe, says Rena Day, one of the

Boys, helped Page as

celebration of not being

band’s singers, who recalls being mobbed by

he struggled with the

bored. It was a rejection

screaming fans in Amsterdam.

opening of one of the

of a lifestyle, of not

most iconic rock songs

wanting to spend your

Champaign bluegrass-country sensation Alison

of all time.

life in a boring, terrible

Krauss, who went on to win 27 Grammys, the most

job making money.”

of any living performer. But the ’60s and ’70s still

“He couldn’t get it right,” Faber says.

Growing talent at home

“Mary showed him what the right chords

Which brings us back

were.” Those chords

The 1980s also introduced the music world to

stand out as a unique time for music on campus. “It was thriving,” says folksinger Lems. “We were definitely a center, and we grew our own talent, and then we sent it out into the world to sing.”

became the intro for

to one of the least

“Stairway to Heaven.”

boring people on the

Chicoine ’72 LAS. “Good enough to walk a mile

Champaign-Urbana

in subzero weather to pick up a date, then walk

scene—George Faber of

another mile to the club, then dance and stay late,

In Stitches was

George Faber at Foellinger Auditorium, 1970

one of several dozen “alternative” businesses that sprouted up

The Finchley Boys. In the late ’60s, Faber began

around the wild music scene. Included were

performing with a live boa constrictor in his

the Metamorphosis restaurant, Good Vibes

hands, long before the rock band Alice Cooper

stereo shop and organic grocery stores such as

made the stunt famous. (Some even claim that

Strawberry Fields. At the center of this alternative

they got the idea when they saw The Finchley

universe was Record Service, founded in 1969 by

Boys perform.)

Phil Strang ’72 MEDIA and his friends.

Whether it was snakes on a stage or REO

“How good was the music scene?” asks Stephen

then repeat the long walk home. Worth it? “Oh yeah.” Peterson (’77 MEDIA) has authored 59 books, including the historical novels The Disappearing Man and The Puzzle People. Photos: University of Illinois Archive and Arnie White, www.arniewhite.com

When regional and national bands hit town, they would inevitably hang out at the store. Record Service aimed to “serve people and not just make money,” Strang says, and it maintained its campus presence on Green Street until the “not just making money” philosophy

($73/$<6+2367$<

transformed into a “losing money” one, due to the changing nature of the music biz. The iconic store closed its doors in 2004, leaving Strang to search for just the second job he had had in his adult life.

Boring? No way In addition to the original Big Three clubs, Champaign-Urbana boasted many other musical landmarks, such as Panama Red’s, Ruby Gulch, Nature’s Table, The Alley Cat, Treno’s, Mabel’s and The Red Herring coffeehouse at the Channing-Murray Foundation, where Fogelberg got his start before going national. Politics also played a role in local music, particularly in the folk scene. Kristin Lems, MA ’75 LAS, MA ’83 LAS, regularly drove her orange pickup truck right onto the Quad, where she would launch into songs about the Vietnam War and the Equal Rights Amendment for women. The war galvanized the campus, culminating

&KHFNRXWWKH)5((

85%$1$$SS

in protests and riots in 1970, which drew the National Guard and shut down Green Street.

Brought to you by the Urbana Business Association in partnership with the City of Urbana.

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ELLNORA | THE GUITAR FESTIVAL SEPTEMBER

FALL2013

5

6

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UNIVER SIT Y OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA- CHAMPAIGN | ON C AM PUS

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FEBRUARY

Ticket Office 217.333.6280 | 800.KCPATIX 500 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana | KrannertCenter.com

21

1

MARCH

Krannert Center presents 300 diverse performances (about 100 of them free) each season, including the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Pygmalion Music Festival, ELLNORA | The Guitar Festival, Audra McDonald, dozens of other international visiting artists, and performances by U of I students and faculty.

SPRING2014

Welcome to Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, a world-class cultural crossroads just steps from the University’s main quad. This vibrant facility—the nation’s leading university-based performing arts center—combines five indoor stages, an outdoor amphitheatre, a spacious lobby (great study spot!), Intermezzo cafe featuring both decadent desserts and sustainable specials, and Promenade—the exceptionally eclectic, artfully affordable store.

JANUARY

7

1

ELLNORA | The Guitar Festival artist-in-residence, Cindy Cashdollar Th 6pm | Opening Night Party 6:30pm | Fiona Boyes Trio 7pm & 9pm | Stephane Wrembel and His Band 7:30pm | The Lee Boys 8:30pm | Sam Bush/Del McCoury Duo 9:45pm | Jonny Lang Fr Noon | Andreas Aase/Derek Gripper 3pm | Keynote: A Conversation with Paco Peña 4pm | Luther Dickinson & The Wandering 5pm | Del Castillo 6:15pm | J. Spaceman 7:30pm | The John Scofield Überjam Band featuring Andy Hess, Avi Bortnick, and Tony Mason 9pm | Buddy Guy about 10:45pm | Buke and Gase about 10:45pm | El Ten Eleven Sa 10am | Morning Raga: Pandit Debashish Bhattacharya 10am | Dan Zanes and Friends 11am | Ana Vidovic/Jason Vieaux 1pm | Paco Peña 2:30pm | Dan Zanes: Buster Keaton’s Steamboat Bill Jr. 4pm | Don Ross/Kaki King

Tu 7pm | Moscow Festival Ballet: Swan Lake We 7pm | Moscow Festival Ballet: Giselle Th 7pm | Moscow Festival Ballet: Cinderella Th 7:30pm | Jupiter String Quartet

Sa 7:30pm | Champaign-Urbana Symphony Orchestra: Classic Gems 1 Sa 7:30pm | Labyrinth 5-7 We-Fr 7:30pm | The Sullivan Project 6-8 Th-Sa 7:30pm | February Dance: Hybridity 7 Fr 6:30pm | Dessert and Conversation: February Dance 8-9 Sa-Su 2pm & 7:30pm | The Sullivan Project 9 Su 3pm | Young Concert Artists Winner: Julia Bullock, soprano 14 Fr 7:30pm | Sinfonia da Camera: From Russia with Love 20-22 Th-Sa 7:30pm | Vijay Iyer Trio 22 Sa 7:30pm | Haifa Symphony Orchestra of Israel 28 Fr 7:30pm | The Demo

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Sa 7:30pm | Venice Baroque Orchestra Th 7:30pm | Meredith Monk: On Behalf of Nature


Th-Sa 7:30pm | 9 Parts of Desire Fr 7pm | MU Sa 7:30pm | Champaign-Urbana Symphony Orchestra: A World of Color 9-12 We-Sa 7:30pm | 9 Parts of Desire 12 Sa 7:30pm | Chicago Symphony Orchestra 13 Su 3pm | 9 Parts of Desire 23 We 7pm | Hungarian State Folk Ensemble: Gypsy Romance 24-26 Th-Sa 7:30pm | The Tempest 26 Sa 6:30pm | Dessert and Conversation: The Tempest 30 We 7:30pm | Apollo’s Fire Baroque Orchestra 31 Th 7:30pm | The Tempest

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1

Th 7:30pm | Nathan and Julie Gunn and Friends Sa 7:30pm | David Roussève/REALITY: Stardust Sa 7:30pm | Sinfonia da Camera: Three’s a Charm Su 3pm | Krannert Center Debut Artist

3 3 4

F U O I

S

CAMPAIGN FOR YOUNG AUDIENCE SPONSORS: JSM APARTMENTS, PHYLLIS + KYLE ROBESON, SUSAN + MICHAEL HANEY, AND ANONYMOUS

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Krannert Center’s Campaign for Young audiences offers $10 or less U of I student and youth tickets for all performances!

X

Th 7:30pm | Pinchas Zukerman, violin and viola, and Yefim Bronfman, piano 3-5 Th-Sa 7:30pm | O Beautiful 6 Su 3pm | Van Cliburn Competition Winner 9-12 We-Sa 7:30pm | O Beautiful

Th 7:30pm | Takács Quartet Th-Fr 7:30pm | The Nutcracker Sa 2pm & 7:30pm | The Nutcracker Su 2pm & 6pm | The Nutcracker Th 7:30pm | Champaign-Urbana Symphony Orchestra: A Season of Joy

TI

3

10-12 Th-Sa 7:30pm | Much Ado About Nothing 12 Sa 7:30pm | Peter Nero 13 Su 2pm | Dessert and Conversation: Much Ado About Nothing 13 Su 3pm | Much Ado About Nothing 13 Su 3pm | O Beautiful 15 Tu 7:30pm | Much Ado About Nothing 17-19 Th-Sa 7:30pm | Much Ado About Nothing 19 Sa 6:30pm | Dessert and Conversation: Much Ado About Nothing 24-26 Th-Sa 7pm & 9pm | Studiodance II 25 Fr 7pm | Compagnia T.P.O.: Bleu! The Mediterranean Sea 25 Fr 7:30pm | Champaign-Urbana Symphony Orchestra: A Russian Festival 26 Sa 11am & 3pm | Compagnia T.P.O.: Bleu! The Mediterranean Sea 30 We 7pm | Diavolo

5 5-6 7 8 12

UD

Th-Sa 7pm & 9pm | Studiodance I: Nico Johanna Niall 6-8 Th-Sa 7:30pm | Orpheus in the Underworld 8 Sa 6:30pm | Libretto: Orpheus in the Underworld 8 Sa 7:30pm | Champaign-Urbana Symphony Orchestra: Inextinguishable 9 Su 2pm | Libretto: Orpheus in the Underworld 9 Su 3pm | Orpheus in the Underworld 14 Fr 7:30pm | Sinfonia da Camera: The Mikado 14-15 Fr-Sa 7:30pm | Mark Morris Dance Group 15 Sa 10am | Jupiter String Quartet: Bagels and Beethoven 19 We 7:30pm | Kronos Quartet

APRIL

6-8

21 21

T

APRIL

MARCH

3

15 16 17 17 17 20-21

DECEMBER

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Fr-Sa 7:30pm | The Tempest Sa 7:30pm | Sinfonia da Camera: Opening Night Romance Su 2pm | Dessert and Conversation: The Tempest Su 3pm | Concert Artists Guild First Prize Winner: Jay Campbell, cello Su 3pm | The Tempest

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Th 7:30pm | Irish Chamber Orchestra featuring JoAnn Falletta, conductor; Sir James Galway, flute; and Lady Jeanne Galway, flute Th-Sa 7:30pm | Clybourne Park We-Sa 7:30pm | Clybourne Park Th-Sa 7:30pm | Falstaff Th-Sa 7:30pm | November Dance: Big Tiny Little Dance Fr 6:30pm | Dessert and Conversation: November Dance Fr 7:30pm | San Francisco Symphony Sa 6:30pm | Libretto: Falstaff Su 2pm | Libretto: Falstaff Su 3pm | Clybourne Park Su 3pm | Falstaff We-Th 7:30pm | Chocolate Woman Dreams the Milky Way Th 7:30pm | Joshua Redman Quartet Th 7:30pm | Sinfonia da Camera: Verdi’s Requiem

MAY

1-2 2

7

7-9 13-16 14-16 14-16

0

12

NOVEMBER

SEP

3-5 4 5

Sa 7:30pm | Orquesta Buena Vista Social Club® with Roberto Fonseca

$1

Th 7:30pm | Jupiter String Quartet with the Jasper String Quartet 14 Sa 7:30pm | Dr. Lonnie Smith’s “In the Beginning” Octet 15 Su 6pm | Sinfonia 30th Season Gala 19-20 Th-Fr 7:30pm | Not What Happened 21 Sa 7:30pm | An Evening with Audra McDonald 24 Tu 7:30pm | Armitage Gone! Dance: Fables on Global Warming 26 Th 7:30pm | Pygmalion Music Festival

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OCTOBER

Sa 5:30pm | Electric Ladyland Project, featuring Sheryl Bailey and Vic Juris 6:30pm | Gyan Riley 7:30pm | Zappa Plays Zappa Roxy & Elsewhere 40th Anniversary Tour 9:30pm | Lucinda Williams about 11pm | Kevin Breit’s Sisters Euclid about 11pm | Evening Raga: Pandit Debasish Bhattacharya

NOVEMBER

ELLNORA SEPTEMBER

7

2013 | 2014

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Marketplace Literacy Project

The

Allison Copenbarger Vance, BS, ‘11 MEDIA

At 5:30 a.m. Madhubalan Viswanathan, a business administration professor, rose early and logged into Skype. From his computer at home, he communicated with a group of entrepreneurial women in India.

marketplace—whether it was a farmer’s market or a Walmart. In 2001, he headed to India to see how his research could be applied overseas. For four months, he and his team interviewed people in urban and rural communities. After that trip, he realized what people needed

The women took turns answering, saying things such as, “We no longer

in addition to access to markets and

buy expired medicine” and “I learned to sell mango pickles instead of just

financial resources was marketplace

mangoes.”

literacy, which he describes as an

It seems like a simple discussion, but to him each is a success story and

awareness of rights, skills and self-

he can’t help but be proud. For more than 15 years, Viswanathan has researched marketplaces in areas where people are low-literate and poverty-stricken. In that time he has produced videos, made several learning modules, written two books, been published in numerous journals, started a conference, created a range of courses and a web portal for educators, and helped put the term “marketplace literacy” on the map. But even with all his success, his personal victory lies in the early morning Skype calls. It is here that Viswanathan sees clear proof of what he set out to accomplish so many years ago—helping individuals. In 1997, after seven years as an Illinois faculty member, Viswanathan began to think more deeply about what he wanted to accomplish as a scholar. He began to think about the problems that low-income, lowliterate people face when they are buying and selling goods. He began to think about literacy, the issue in question, with the hope that he could conduct research that would be beneficial to such people. He didn’t know then that he was embarking on the beginning of his life’s work. Viswanathan started his research locally by going to adult education centers and asking people questions. He would listen, take notes and

confidence in the marketplace. In India, many of the women do the trading and purchasing for their families. But they lacked knowledge on how smart shopping worked—the ideas of getting the best price, return policies or comparing goods was not on their minds. Many of them had also started enterprises to raise money, but their practices were not always efficient or effective. Viswanathan realized that the women not only needed the capital to create a business, but also the knowledge of how to use that capital effectively through marketplace literacy. He knew educating the women about business practices—what he calls “know how” and “know why”—would be the key to their success; education could transform their lives. Viswanathan realized that if he could reach and educate the women, he would effectively bolster the livelihood of the entire community. His team then began running a marketplace literacy educational program in India. On the first day the participants, entirely women, learned basic knowledge about exchanges, goods, services, psychological and physical needs and customers from simple illustrations and exercises.

occasionally take them shopping to see how they interacted in the 34

UNIVER SIT Y OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA- CHAMPAIGN | ON C AM PUS

continues, page 36


University

Housing Your home for the Illinois experience

Residence Halls r Apartments r Dining Halls r University Catering Illini Union Colonial Room Lunch r Conferences & Camps XXXIPVTJOHJMMJOPJTFEVr'BDFCPPLDPNJMMJOPJTIPVTJOH  rIPVTJOH!JMMJOPJTFEV

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2013 | 2014

35


Marketplace Literacy continued

with goals to reach tens of thousands of

On the second day, they focused on consumer literacy setting up mock marketplaces and purposely cheating the students. The issues they chose to then discuss came from interviews they collected during their hours of

women in the coming year and hundreds of thousands in the medium term. In July 2011, his team formed nearly 100 self-help groups of 15-20 women in a

listening to individuals. On the third, fourth and fifth days, they focused on entrepreneurial

city in India. The field workers helped the

literacy. Many of the participants were already running businesses, but

groups keep accounts, start savings plans,

didn’t understand the best way to make a profit. In this section, the

and provide each other low-interest loans

researchers taught about being fair, assessing needs and strengths in

and begin income-generating activities.

choosing a business, and understanding customers. The entrepreneurs

Then they use video-based modules to provide marketplace literacy

needed capital, but Viswanathan said more importantly they needed to

education. The educational program was also initiated for women in a

understand what to do with the capital.

Viswanathan realized that if he could reach and educate the women, he would effectively help the livelihood of the entire community.

“If we can get low-literate, low-income people understanding why the market-

cluster of villages. “I believe anyone who’s ever taken the training immediately benefits as a consumer,” Viswanathan said. “And that’s a huge claim to make.”

place operates the way it does,” he said,

After each program, Viswanathan checks in to see what the partici-

“then they will make better decisions as

pants have learned. This is how he gauges success and opportunities to

entrepreneurs and customers.”

make the program better.

Since that first class model,

After seeing so much success in India, he recently began to seek out appli-

Viswanathan and his team have created

cation in other parts of the world. He recently made two trips to Tanzania to

one and two-day programs, worked with

study the Maasai people, who are semi-nomadic. He was stunned to see the

partner organizations to make a movie or video episodes, created an interac-

level of poverty among people there, and immediately he began to brain-

tive learning module with videos and created online teaching tools. Through

storm ways to educate them. He dreams about a day when he can provide

these means, the goal is to use technology to reach more people.

marketplace literacy on a large scale to the Maasai tribe.

In 2007, they switched from face-to-face classes to making video modules.

For Viswanathan, it will always be about the people.

They combined the new modules, caricatures, clips from a movie or video

* Viswanathan and his team are currently conducting research and provid-

episodes and groups presenting to one another. There is usually one facilitator

ing marketplace literacy education in India, conducting research and piloting

who plays a DVD, run exercises, and gives assignments. Through initiatives

marketplace literacy education in Tanzania and investigating starting a

with various partners, 3000 women have been trained in the last few months

program on the Chile-Argentinian border.

‡ Walk to U of I Campus! ‡ All apartments only 1 to 4 blocks away ‡ Laundry in apartment, furnished, internet ‡ 1,2,3,4 bedroom apartments and houses ADVANTAGE PROPERTIES 36

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WE ARE

PLACE MAKERS

+

ART MAKERS

VISUAL ARTS Art + Design, Japan House, Krannert Art Museum PERFORMING ARTS Dance, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Music, Theatre ENVIRONMENTAL ARTS Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Urban + Regional Planning

2013 | 2014

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/ChampaignCenterPartnership

38

@DTChampaign @go_midtown @Campustown

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Champaign’s Center City DOWNTOWN

CAPTIVATES

Downtown Champaign’s locally owned businesses offer an amazing array of merchandise not available anywhere else. Antiques, vintage furniture and architectural salvage are at home nestled among the new work of local designers and imported fair trade choices. Clothing for men and women ranges from designer lines to outdoor gear; there’s also a great assortment of vintage clothing at Carrie’s and Dandelion. Complement your outfit with gorgeous jewelry from one of the many local jewelers. Christopher’s Fine Jewelry Design and Robert’s feature custom designs. Caffeine lovers will want to visit Walnut Street Tea Co. as well as Columbia Street Roastery, which features locally roasted coffees and unique tea blends. Book lovers will be drawn to Jane Addams, a three-story independent book shop. Tattoo enthusiasts may want to visit the award winning No Regrets, offering 100% custom artwork. And if pop culture is your thing, Exile on Main Street is for you. As you walk the landscaped sidewalks, take time to enjoy the sculptures. The art scene is alive in Downtown both inside and out. Art galleries, theaters and live performances enhance the quality of life in Champaign. The upper stories of the beautiful historic brick buildings boast renovated lofts and apartments that are home to the growing number of residents who enjoy Downtown’s vibrant night life. With more than 35 restaurants, cafes, bakeries, micro-breweries and pubs, Downtown Champaign has something for every taste. Many local restaurants

Unique shops and cafes with a happening night life.

feature locally sourced, fresh ingredients. Café seating is available weather permitting, and live entertainment is featured in many venues.

MIDTOWN When treasure hunting in Midtown, prepare yourself for anything—including the kitchen sink. Beginning your journey on University Ave., you can choose from the funky finds at LeShoppe, Dallas & Co. and Peckham’s. Furniture Warehouse offers new pieces at reasonable prices while Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore hosts three floors of donated home-related products including housewares, furniture and building supplies. When it’s time for a break, visit one of the fine ethnic restaurants—choices include Indian, Mexican, Italian, BBQ and American food. The beautiful Boneyard Creek is a perfect venue for a picnic. This three-mile landscaped water area connects Campustown to Downtown for walkers and cyclists. After a delicious meal, it’s time for antiquing, art glass and pottery. On weekends visit the County Historical Museum in the beautifully restored 1857 Cattle Bank. If you’re the creative type, let your imagination run wild at the I.D.E.A. Store. Foodies will enjoy the First Street Farmer’s Market, held on Thursday afternoons during the summer. Any time of the year, the ethnic grocers will welcome you. You might choose to end your day with cocktails at Emerald City or dancing at Chester Street. Such a full day and you’ve only

Eclectic and funky with a water feature.

visited one of the three neighborhoods making up the Center City District.

CAMPUSTOWN Experience the cultures of the world while celebrating the orange and blue of the University of Illinois. The energy is palpable as students, entrepreneurs, faculty, alumni, and locals learn and explore together. Fans stocking up on Illini apparel have the choice between preprinted and custom printing. Campus bookstores also offer an array of memorabilia. On Thursdays during the summer months, members of the Sustainable Student Farm set up a farmstand and sell fresh produce from 11-5 p.m. on the Quad. There are services galore including hair, nails, massage, tanning and airbrush tanning. If tattoos are more your thing, no problem. Campustown has several accomplished tattoo artists. When it’s time for a snack or a meal, the Campustown menu consists of more than 60 unique choices. Yes, there’s pizza—thick, thin, hand-tossed—local, chains and gourmet. Tacos are offered Mexican style and Korean style. Stir fry, cajun, sushi, creole, pub food, smoothies, and deserts are plentiful. Sandwiches are offered on pita, buns, and subs. After all, Jimmy John’s is headquartered in Champaign. Content provided by Champaign Center Partnership

A crossroad of cultures and ages. 2013 | 2014

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INNOVATIO

ILLINOIS

1 DISABILITY INNOVATIONS

Illinois was the first

post-secondary institution to introduce curb cuts to accommodate students with disabilities. Illinois is also home of the first wheelchair-accessible fixed route bus system, the first accessible university residence halls, and the first collegiate adapted sports and recreation program for students with disabilities.

2 MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING (MRI) Illinois professor Paul Lauterbur, who died in 2007, conducted research that led

1

to the development of the MRI, and his work was honored with a Nobel Prize in 2003. Today, the MRI scan is still the primary way to see inside the human body, especially to examine the brain and spinal cord.

3 BCS THEORY OF SUPERCONDUCTIVITY In 1972 physicist John Bardeen won his second Nobel Prize for his

explanation of superconductivityâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a state of matter in which materials lose their electrical resistance at very low temperatures. Bardeen was also the first person to win two Nobel prizes in the same field. The first was for his work on the invention of the transistor.

4

MOSAIC

In 1993, NCSA developers Eric Bina and Marc Andreessen

created a Web browser, Mosaic v 1.0, that included such new features as icons,

3

bookmarks, a more attractive interface and pictures that made the software easier to understand and more appealing. It was the first Internet browser to be widely used, and it paved the way for the World Wide Web.

5 PAYPAL In 1998, a team led by Illinois alumnus Max Levchin started a new type of payment company. The global e-commerce business provided payments and money transfers to be made through the Internet.

6 YOUTUBE In 2005, Chad Hurley and Illinois alumni Steve Chen and

5

Jawed Karim created the popular video-sharing website on which users can upload, view and share videos.

7 CUTTING-EDGE ELECTRONICS Illinois materials science and engineering professor John Rogers and his team of researchers have developed bendable, soluble, stretchable electronics. The biocompatible silicon devices could mark the beginning of a new wave of surgical electronics.

7 40

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ONS BEYOND THE TEXTBOOK Each year, faculty and more than 250 students work with Prairie Research Institute scientists and our clients across the state, region, and world on projects in archaeology, biology, geology, energy, water, climate, and sustainable technology.

2

With 1,000 researchers and staff and a budget of $80 million, we apply cutting-edge science to grow the economy, promote public health and safety, and steward the vast resources of Illinois.

prairie.illinois.edu

4

years at the University of Illinois. 162 years for the state of Illinois.

6

HOME OF THE ILLINOIS STATE SCIENTIFIC SURVEYS Illinois Natural History Survey • Illinois State Archaeological Survey • Illinois State Geological Survey • Illinois State Water Survey • Illinois Sustainable Technology Center

7 2013 | 2014

41


ILLINOIS’ LONG HISTORY WITH

THE ART OF THE INEVITABLE

Toward the end of her freshman year at the University of Illinois,

wave because the buttons don’t make sense; if you’ve ever thrown

Michelle Kwak found herself floundering. Having aced all her

away a travel mug because it dribbled coffee down your shirt—you

advanced placement classes at Lemont High School (in suburban

have some understanding of industrial design.

Chicago), she was caught off-guard by the rigors of her engineering

successful industrial design as design that’s so logical, so intuitive, it

Kwak considered art her main hobby, and suggested that she check

seems “inevitable.” Apple products have raised the profile of indus-

out industrial design—a program she had never heard of.

trial design in recent years, but they echo an aesthetic established

“I looked at it online, and the light bulb went huzzah!” Kwak says.

in the 1950s by Dieter Rams, chief design officer at Braun, where

“I had no idea there could be a major that takes engineering and art

he had a hand in shaping everything from shavers to shelving units.

and combines them into one. It was like the heavens opened up. It

Manufacturers have long used designers to develop their products,

was everything I wanted.”

and the U. of I. has been training industrial designers longer than

Most people, like Kwak, are not necessarily aware of industrial

design as a discipline. Yet we all experience industrial design—good and bad—every day. If you’ve ever said you have a “favorite” office chair, paring knife, or writing utensil; if you’ve ever paid extra for a can opener because it has beefy handles or cursed your new micro-

42

Jonathan Ive, vice-president of design for Apple, has defined

courses, and turned to one of her deans for guidance. He knew that

Professor Nan Goggin (center), director of the School of Art and Design, says industrial design is the school’s largest major. Professor Cliff Shin (left) designed an award-winning washer and dryer for LG; Professor David Weightman (right) has worked for Massey Ferguson and Yamaha, and helps students design UI’s entry for the biennial Solar Decathlon House competition.

UNIVER SIT Y OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA- CHAMPAIGN | ON C AM PUS

ph ho oto to b by y L. L Bri Briian an SSta Sttta auff ufffer uf e

DESIGN

INDUSTRIAL

Dusty Rhodes, MS, ‘10 MEDIA


any other public university. Established in 1937, Illinoisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; four-year industrial design program has consistently ranked among the top 10 in the U.S. Its noted alumni include Ralph LaZar and Walter Herbst, who earned BFAs in 1951 and 1959, respectively, founded the international design and development ďŹ rm Herbst, LaZar, Bell Inc., whose clients included Sunbeam, GE, Whirlpool, Brunswick Bowling and Billiards, and Sears. LaZar now works as a visual artist, and Herbst, chairman emeritus of the ďŹ rm, is on the faculty of Northwestern Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science. Bill Stumpf, who earned a BFA in 1959, designed Herman Millerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s earliest ergonomic ofďŹ ce chair, the Ergon, as well as (with Don Chadwick) the Equa chair and the iconic mesh-surfaced Aeron chair, which is part of the permanent design collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Jerome Caruso, another 1959 graduate, has designed everything from Motorola LCD watch modules to the ďŹ rst mass-produced stacking chairs made in the U.S. as well as the Herman Miller Reaction and Celle chairs. He is best known as the ďŹ rst and only designer for appliance manufacturer Sub-Zero, which transformed refrigerators into luxury â&#x20AC;&#x153;kitchen furniture.â&#x20AC;? Craig Vetter, who earned his BFA in 1965, used his student work as the basis for his own successful line of motorcycle fairings, called Windjammer. These days, his focus has shifted to sustainability, and he sponsors motorcycle fuel-efďŹ ciency races. Bryce Rutter, who earned his MFA in 1981 (and Ph.D. in kinesiology in 1987), is the founder and CEO of Metaphase Design Group, specializing in ergonomic design of consumer and medical devices. The ďŹ rm has designed Oral B toothbrushes, Gatorade bottles, Allegro cookware, Microsoftâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Intellimouse, and the Bayer microletâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; a lancing device that enables diabetics to check their blood glucose levels easilyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;which received a Design of the Decade award from Businessweek. Many of these designers were taught by Edward Zagorski, who earned his BFA at the U. of I. in 1949 and returned to teach, leading the program from 1951 through 1988. Zagorski devoted his genius to hatching novel challenges to spark his studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; creativity. They designed shoes for walking on water, a machine that would strike and light a

+2!..%24#%.4%2#/-s

match in exactly 10 seconds, and packaging in which to mail a hand-decorated blown-egg to Poland using minimal postage. His most famous challenge was inspired by astronaut John Glennâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1962 trip into orbit: Zagorski asked Vetter, a student at the time, to create a way

2013 | 2014

43


to launch a raw egg 200 feet and then splash down into the Krannert Art Museum’s reflecting pool. Students had to design their protective capsules. The winning entry featured a timed firecracker attached to a missile that blew apart in midair, emitting a shower of tiny American flags and a parachute that lowered the capsule into the water, which dissolved an aspirin tablet that had been holding apart electrical contacts, sparking a miniature motor to propel the capsule to shore. The spectacle was featured in a three-page spread in the April 12, 1963, edition of Life magazine, and the “egg drop” quickly became a staple teaching tool of engineering schools and even elementary schools worldwide. Zagorski, now 91, described his method for

UI alum Craig Vetter turned motorcycle fairings designs he drew as a student into a successful company that produced Windjammer fairings.

teaching industrial design in his memoir, titled “Get Ten Eagles” (the first step in a proposed design for a flying machine): “Good designers never grow up; they always seem to think like children,” he wrote. “That’s because the child in us makes us creative, allows us to see things with a sense of wonder.” Industrial design has evolved over the decades, expanding from its original role as a cosmetic touch that gets applied to an existing contraption into a more holistic involvement in the early stages of product development, according to Deana McDonagh, the chair of the program. “Traditionally, an engineer would hand over a ‘proof of concept,’ like a Wallace and Gromit device, and then the designer would say, ‘OK, I can make this look good.’ ” McDonagh said. Now, designers are included earlier in the process to provide insights that might not occur to the engineers. “Their creativity is dampened because they’ve got this weight of knowledge, and we come in and look at it from another angle.

44

Industrial designers ask some very fundamental

promises students that if they ride a bus, drive

questions that design engineers and other

a car, or spend a night in a motel, they will

experts may not think to ask.”

discover 20 products that need to be designed

Even the humblest, most straightforward product may be used differently by different consumers, McDonagh said. She proves her

or redesigned—“if they’re curious. And developing that curiosity is really important,” he said. “I just bought a dishwasher that beeps four

point with an ongoing informal survey in which

times when it finishes the rinse cycle, and four

she probes new acquaintances (“usually after

times when it finishes drying. And I actually

a glass of wine”) with questions about their

don’t need to know either of those things,”

preferred techniques for using toilet paper.

Weightman said.

“Toilet paper is a simple object and we all think:

Nan Goggin, the director of the School of Art

‘The way I use it is the way everybody uses it.’

and Design, said industrial design is now the

But I have found that there are folders, scrunch-

school’s largest major. Students admitted to the

ers and wrappers,” she said.

program typically spend their sophomore year

Industrial design students are encouraged to cultivate this kind of unrelenting, omnivorous, aggressive curiosity. Professor David Weightman

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mastering basic forms and creating models, their junior year producing projects and entering continues, page 54


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CAMPUS LANDMARKS

ornaments and fine art, and a manor house modeled after Ham House in England. Allerton House was built in 1900 and now serves as a confer-

The campus boasts two National Historic Landmarks: the Astronomical

ence center. In 1971 the lowland and southern forests of 1,000 acres were

Observatory and the Morrow Plots. A number of buildings have been

declared a National Natural Landmark.

placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

ACES Library, Information and Alumni Center The ACES Library, Information and Alumni Center stands as an informational and architectural landmark on the University of Illinois campus. Dedicated on October 4, 2001, the $21 million state-of-the-art facility integrates traditional information sources with new learning and information technologies. The facility houses four instructional and multimedia laboratories and studios, as well as an Information and Career Services Office and an Alumni Center.

Alma Mater Alice Campbell Alumni Center

Alma Mater

Alice Campbell Alumni Center

Now positioned at the west gateway to the university at Green and Wright

Alice Campbell Alumni Center is located at Lincoln Avenue and California Street in Urbana, just south of the Hallene Gateway Plaza, the east entryway to the Urbana-Champaign campus. Named by lead benefactors, Robert C. ‘54 BUS and Alice Curtis Campbell, JD ‘43 LAS, of Los Angeles, this facility is a warm and welcoming haven for both UI alumni and friends on every visit back, be it for business or pleasure.

Allerton Park and Conference Center Allerton was deeded to the University of Illinois by Robert Allerton in 1946. Originally called “the farms,” the former private estate in Monticello, Illinois, includes formal gardens, an extensive landscape park dotted with

streets in Urbana, the Alma Mater stood until 1962 behind Foellinger Auditorium on the south campus—where romantically inclined students were wont to keep the throne “shiny and well used.” Designed by university graduate Lorado Taft, the sculpture was unveiled on June 12, 1929. The Alma Mater is shown “as a benign and majestic woman in scholastic robes, who rises from her throne and advances a step with outstretched arms, a gesture of generously greeting her children” (Taft). Learning and Labor flank the main figure. An inscription reads: To thy happy children of the future those of the past send greetings. Note: At press time, the Alma Mater is off-campus for restoration.

Altgeld Hall Designed by Nathan C. Ricker and James M. White, Altgeld Hall was completed in 1897, with additions in 1914, 1919, 1926, and 1956. When first occupied, it had a museum in the basement, the University Library on the first floor, and stacks and offices on the second floor. It then served as the law building (1927 to 1955), and the math building and library (1955 to the present). Named after Illinois Governor John P. Altgeld, the building is considered one of the finest examples of Richardsonian Romanesque architecture in Illinois. The central room is decorated with murals by Newton A. Wells.

The Armory The Armory was designed as a military drill hall, an athletic facility, and an assembly hall. More than 2,000 soldiers used the Armory as a dormitory during World War I. Constructed in 1912-14, and modified in 1925-27 and 1962, the building is something of an engineering feat: The long span structure was unique in its day. An example of Georgian Revival architecture, Allerton Park and Conference Center

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the Armory is an anchor point for the south campus.

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Astronomical Observatory Constructed in 1896, the Astronomical Observatory was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1990, primarily for the advances in astronomy associated with the structure. Under the direction of professor Joel Stebbins from 1907 to 1922, the observatory was the site for developing the selenium cell and the photoelectric cell, which revolutionized the science of photoelectric photometry—the technique used to measure celestial magnitudes. Much of the original equipment is intact, and the 12-inch refracting telescope is still used for classes.

Foellinger Auditorium

Foellinger Auditorium With its dome, Foellinger recalls Thomas Jefferson’s Rotunda on the University of Virginia campus. The auditorium has a copper roof and cornice. Considered an example of the Beaux Arts Classical style, it was built in 1907 from a design by Clarence Blackall. In 1984, the auditorium was completely renovated with funds provided by alumna Helene Foellinger.

Grainger Engineering Library Information Center Named in honor of William Wallace Grainger, this library information center opened in 1994. The history of the site of the Grainger Engineering Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology

Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology

Library Information Center is intertwined with the history of north campus, the cradle of the University of Illinois. The facility sits on the spot where one of the first campus buildings, Mechanical Building and Drill Hall, was erected in 1871, and houses more than 300,000 volumes of engineering materials.

Beckman is the largest academic building on campus and anchors the far end of the north campus. It is constructed on the site of the university’s

Halfway House

first building, which was demolished in 1881 (also site of the Illinois Field

The trolley stand at the north end of the Quad on South Mathews Avenue

baseball diamond and the university’s first collegiate homecoming in

was originally located on Green Street. It was situated halfway between

1910). Completed in 1989, the institute was made possible by a $40 million

Champaign and Urbana and served as “University stop” on the horse-

gift from alumnus Arnold O. Beckman and his wife, Mabel M. Beckman.

drawn street-car that ran east-west. First erected in 1885, the structure was

Engineering Hall

moved from storage to its present site in 1964.

This example of Renaissance Revival architecture was built in 1894.

Hallene Gateway

Architect George Bullard, a student of Nathan C. Ricker, won a design

The east entry to the campus at Lincoln Avenue and Illinois Street in

competition open only to university graduates. The interior has oak wood-

Champaign features the stone portal from the entrance to the first universi-

work; the ceiling is paneled in Washington fir. The building underwent an

ty-built classroom building, University Hall. The portal entrance apparently

extensive renovation that was completed in 2000.

was kept behind the Architecture Building for a number of years and then

Engineering Hall

Hallene Gateway

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seemingly disappeared from the campus until it was found at Allerton Park

academic, cultural, and natural setting for promoting an understanding of

in Monticello in 1994. Alan and Phyllis Welsh Hallene donated the funds to

Japanese culture and of Asia. Funded primarily through private contribu-

construct the gateway plaza, which was dedicated in 1998.

tions, the 3,120-square-foot facility was designed by Jack Baker, professor

Harker Hall

emeritus of architecture, and Isaken Glerum PC Architects.

Originally the Chemical Laboratory, Harker Hall was until recently the oldest remaining classroom building on the Urbana campus. Designed by Nathan C. Ricker (with John M. Van Odsel) and built in 1878, Harker Hall is considered Second Empire in style. It is named for Judge Oliver A. Harker, the third dean of the law school (1903 to 1916) and the first university counsel. The University of Illinois Foundation moved to Harker Hall after extensive renovations of the building in 1992.

Japan House

Krannert Art Museum and Kinkead Pavilion Ranked second among public museums in Illinois in size and value of the collection, the main museum opened in 1961, funded largely by a generous contribution from alumnus Herman Krannert and his wife, Ellnora Krannert. The Kinkead Pavilion, designed by architect Lawrence Booth and completed in 1988, greatly expanded the exhibition space. Harker Hall

Illini Union

Krannert Center for the Performing Arts One of the pre-eminent performance facilities in the nation, Krannert Center is largely the result of a gift from Herman and Ellnora Krannert. Completed

At the heart of campus, the Illini Union serves as a community center for

in 1969, the center covers 10 acres and includes four theaters and an outdoor

students, alumni, faculty, staff, and guests. Constructed in 1939-40, in

amphitheater. The complex was designed by alumnus and architect Max

Colonial Williamsburg style, the Union was conceived by Ernest L. Stouffer,

Abramovitz, who served on the design team for Lincoln Center in New York

university architect, and Howard Cheney, consulting architect. The cupola,

City. Krannert is home to more than 350 performances each year.

clock, and bell from University Hall (demolished) are retained in the Illini Union. It is considered one of the most significant buildings on campus because of its location, character, quality, and use.

Lincoln Hall

Lincoln Hall Illini Union

Japan House The University of Illinois has a history of the study of Japanese culture dating back to 1900. Founded in 1998 as a permanent home for Japanese culture and initiatives, Japan House and its gardens provide an important

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Lincoln Hall honors the Springfield lawyer who went on to become president of the United States. Completed in 1911 with an addition in 1929, it is an example of Renaissance Revival architecture. Terra cotta plaques on the east exterior depict scenes from President Lincoln’s life; those on the sides display quotations. Lincoln Hall recently reopened after undergoing a historic renovation.

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Memorial Stadium

Natural History Building

Dedicated October 18, 1924, Memorial Stadium is a mixture of Georgian

Designed by Nathan C. Ricker, the Natural History Building is an

Revival and Neoclassical architecture, and is considered one of the nation’s

example of the High Victorian Gothic style. The original building was

most distinctive sports stadiums. More than 20,000 students, alumni,

completed in 1892, and the departments of botany, zoology and

and friends of the university contributed about $1.7 million to fund the construction. The second story is a colonnade of paired limestone Roman Doric columns, representing University of Illinois students who died in World War I.

geology moved in that fall. It is scheduled for a $70 million renovation and modernization in the coming years.

Round Dairy Barns These round barns are the inspiration of Wilbur J. Fraser, the first head of the Department of Dairy Husbandry (1902 to 1913). Fraser was a strong advocate of round barns, which offered the dairy farmer “economy of consideration, low maintenance, and labor efficiency.” Fraser and the university’s demonstration barns were apparently instrumental in popularizing the round barn type found throughout Illinois. The first barn was built in 1907-08; the second and third about 1910.

Smith Memorial Hall An example of the Beaux Arts Classical style by campus architect James M. White, Smith Hall is considered one of the most handsomely detailed classical buildings on campus. Captain Thomas J. Smith, a member of the Board of Trustees from 1897 to 1903, gave farmland and money totaling about $480,500 to finance the construction. Details throughout the building, including the ornate Memorial Room on the second floor, feature intricate Red Grange Statue at Memorial Stadium

friezes and door surrounds.

Morrow Plots Beside the underground Undergraduate Library, the Morrow Plots are the country’s oldest experimental agricultural fields in continuous use. Agriculture professor Manley Miles and, the first dean of agriculture, George Morrow began laying out the plots in 1876. Miles first divided the fields into 10 plots of 1/2 acre each, then later divided the area further into plots of 1/20 acre. Morrow modeled the plots after agriculture techniques he had observed in Great Britain (Rothamsted in particular) and France. The plots were designated a National Historic Landmark in 1968. Smith Memorial Hall

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State Farm Center From a purely structural standpoint, State Farm Center is the university’s most significant and revolutionary building. Designed by alumnus Max Abramovitz, the reinforced concrete structure cost $8.5 million and is one of the world’s largest edge-supported domes, spanning 400 feet in diameter and rising 128 feet above the floor. The building is the site of commencement ceremonies and basketball games and hosts many performances, plays, and concerts. It opened March 2, 1963.

Spurlock Museum

Spurlock Museum Funded by a gift from William and Clarice Spurlock, the museum opened on September 26, 2002. The state-of-the-art facility houses about 45,000 artifacts from diverse cultures and varied historical time periods, augmented by noteworthy selections from the University of Illinois Museum of Natural History and Department of Anthropology.

University Library

University Library This intellectual heart of the campus is part of the ensemble of fine Georgian Revival buildings designed by Charles Platt that form a strongly unified portion of the south campus. Initial construction was completed in 1926, with many subsequent additions. Decorative elements include 27 art-glass windows by J. Scott Williams of New York, and murals by Barry Faulkner. It is the largest public university library in North America.

State Farm Center

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Housing 23 Undergraduate university residence halls accommodate 8,350 students,including nine Living-Learning Communities.

10,636 Per year for double room and board (20 meals/week) in 2011-2012. $

6,000 Undergraduate students living in 16 private certified housing units and 62 Greek houses. 2,000 Single graduate students or students

ILLINOIS BY THE NUMBERS

with families living in three university-owned apartment complexes; two residence halls are home for 720 graduate students.

1,000+ Registered student organizations, coalitions, honorary societies, and teams.

History 1867 Year the University of Illinois at Urbana-

Academic Resources

Champaign began. Chartered as the Illinois Industrial University, the university opened for business in 1868. Renamed the University of Illinois in 1885, it is one of the original 37 public land-grant institutions created after President Abraham Lincoln signed the Morrill Act in 1862.

24,000,000+ Items in the largest public university library in North America.

Location 40°06’36.88”N 88°13’38.13”W Longitude/latitude of the main Quad. The university is in the twin cities of Champaign and Urbana (total population 180,000) in East Central Illinois. Situated about 140 miles south of Chicago, 125 miles west of Indianapolis, and 180 miles northeast of St. Louis.

Facilities 320 Main campus buildings, 2.8 square miles (1,468 acres). 

Library Collections

1,000,000+ Visitors to the online catalog every week. 20+ Area studies libraries; one of the larger engineering libraries in the country, state-of-the-art agricultural library, and world-renowned rare book and manuscript library. Campus Research

583,754,000 Spending on research and development in science and engineering in 2012.

$

Cultural Centers 4 Asian American Cultural Center, Bruce D. Nesbitt African American Cultural Center, La Casa Cultural Latina, Native American House. These centers offer the entire campus community opportunities to learn about and to experience the rich historic traditions and the modern living cultures that have shaped our world.

100% of all classrooms have wireless access.  360 buildings on and off campus with wireless access. $29.4 million initiative implementing increased

Museums, Galleries, and Collections 9,000+ Works of art in Krannert Art Museum

community access to high-speed fiber-optic Internet and developing community-wide intranet with special federal and state funding.

and Kinkead Pavilion’s permanent collection; KAM hosts high-caliber temporary exhibitions and interdisciplinary programs.

Colleges & Instructional Units 17 College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences College of Applied Health Sciences Institute of Aviation College of Business College of Education College of Engineering College of Fine and Applied Arts Division of General Studies Graduate College School of Labor and Employment Relations College of Law College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Graduate School of Library and Information Science College of Media College of Medicine at Urbana-Champaign School of Social Work College of Veterinary Medicine

46,000 Artifacts of global cultures in the Spurlock Museum.

75% of John Philip Sousa’s original music manuscripts, the worlds largest collection, in the Sousa Archives and Center for American Music.

Programs/Services for People With Disabilities # 1 Rated as one of the most “disability friendly” U.S. campuses. First to provide students with disabilities access to all university services, curricula, and facilities; developed first architectural accessibility standards; designed and instituted a wheelchairaccessible bus system; first to offer comprehensive wheelchair sports programming. Developed the first transitional living program for students with physical disabilities needing personal assistant support services.

Undergraduate Education 32,281 Students from all 50 states. 6,914 New freshmen enrolled in fall 2012; about 32,000 apply annually.

4,447 International undergraduate students. 5,000+ Courses offered; more than 150 programs of study.

70 of America’s Fortune 100 companies (including eight of the top 10) recruited on campus last year.

6,748 Companies recruited at Illinois In 2011-12. People Students

44,520 total students: 32,281 undergraduate and 12,239 graduate and professional students.

4 Theaters in the Krannert Center for the

Faculty and Instructional Staff

Performing Arts seat about 4,000 and host 350+ annual student and professional performances, lectures, and commencements.

2,548 Members; 1,851 tenure/tenure track, and 697 visiting faculty & instructional staff.

Sports and Recreation 10 & 11 Number of men’s and women’s (NCAA)

3,665 Administrative and academic professional 4,136 Support staff.

Staff

teams (respectively) with 15 major facilities.

Alumni

470,000 Square feet of recreational space in

425,000+ Living alumni of the University of

two newly expanded campus recreation and wellness centers.

100,000 People visit 1,500-acre Allerton Park

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, one of the largest U.S. alumni organizations.

and Retreat Center each year.

16,000 Daily visitors to the Illini Union have access to a hotel, banquet facility, food court, art gallery, and recreation room; two ballrooms and 24 break-out rooms are available for conferences and events.

This content is managed by Public Affairs and updated at the beginning of each calendar year.

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ACADEMIC CALENDAR Aug 22 Aug 25 Aug 26 Sept 2 Nov 23 Dec 2 Dec 11 Dec 12 Dec 13 Dec 20 Jan 20 Jan 21 Mar 22 Mar 31 May 7 May 8 May 9 May 17 May 19 May 26 June 14

Move-in Day Quad Day Instruction Begins Labor Day Thanksgiving Vacation Begins Instruction Resumes Instruction Ends Reading Day Final Exams Begin Final Exams End M.L. King Holiday First day of instruction, Spring Semester Spring Vacation begins Instruction resumes Instruction ends for Spring Semester Reading Day Final exams begin Commencement Summer session I instruction begins Memorial Day (no classes) Summer Session I final examinations (final class day or following day) June 16 Summer Session II instruction begins July 4 Independence Day (no classes) July 14 Beginning of 2nd 4-week period of instruction Aug 7 Summer Session II instruction ends Aug 7 Reading Day Aug 8 Summer Session II final examinations begin Aug 9 Summer Session II final examinations end

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“At Illinois, it’s all about our commitment.” The University of Illinois is committed to cultivating a campus in which students, staff, and faculty are welcomed, valued, and celebrated.

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At Illinois, we promote excellence through diversity.

www.inclusiveillinois.illinois.edu

2013 | 2014

53


Industrial Design continued Society of America as the best design student from a Midwest college. McDonagh teaches a course called Disability and Relevant Design, in which able-bodied students are required to do “empathic modeling” by spending a day or more navigating campus in a wheelchair, on crutches, with visionreducing glasses, with one arm strapped down, or otherwise incapacitated. Some designers in the course don’t need to pretend: Graduate teaching assistant Sheila Schneider, who has retinitis pigmentosa, uses a service dog. Kwak, the former engineering major, is spending her summer working as a design intern at the John Deere office in the U. of I. Research Students in McDonagh’s empathic design course simulate dexterity and vision impairments to spark sensitivity and creativity for designing new products.

Park, and looking forward to her senior year. She is glad she changed her major, even though I.D. isn’t any less rigorous than engineering. “I would actually say it’s harder, because it’s

design competitions, and their senior year focus-

at the Illinois Fire Service Institute on the U. of

a non-stop thing,” Kwak said. “In engineering,

ing on one thesis design, often using computer

I. campus. “They put him in some very hot and

I would study for an exam, and once it was

modeling and 3-D printing to investigate and

smoky places,” Weightman said, “and he had a

over, it was done. But as a designer, I feel like

develop a product.

better understanding of what it was like to wear

I’m never really satisfied. I’m always going back

that gear.” The student noticed that the bracket

and tweaking my projects, just to improve them

popular I.D. has become in the past few years,

holding the firefighters’ oxygen tanks tended to

a little bit more. You stay up until 3 a.m. not

because kids now know what that is,” she said.

snag, so he designed a rounded clasp. He won a

because you have to, but because you want to.

district merit award from the Industrial Designers

You design because you love it.”

“It’s really interesting how much more

Parents, however, don’t always understand this hybrid avocation. Professor Cliff Shin, who joined the U. of I. faculty in 2010, recalls having to hide his interest in industrial design from his own father, an electrical engineer who hoped his son would follow his path. Shin enrolled at Arizona State University as a manufacturing engineering major, but happened to stroll through the student union on a day when the industrial design department had an exhibition on display. “It was an instant ‘Wow! That is what I want to do!’ ” Shin said. He became a double major, hiding his art courses until his father asked for a transcript. Shin went on to win honors in an international student design competition and to work for LG, where he designed several home appliances, including a front-loading washer and dryer that received Consumer Reports’ highest rating. (“Now my father thinks my talents are OK,” Shin said.) On each project at LG, Shin said, he worked with a team that included engineering, marketing and design. “Industrial design cannot be done with one discipline; it’s multi-disciplinary,” he said. “I.D. is a mixture of philosophy, psychology, economics, social science—all kinds of things.” Their uniting expertise is empathy—the yen to place themselves in the role of the consumer, even for products they’re unlikely to use. Weightman had a student who was so interested in firefighting equipment, he enrolled in a course

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Budding Potential. Ellison has always loved playing in the dirt. And like the plant in her hands, she is destined to grow and to bloom. Who knows what her future will bring? What is certain is a world increasingly affected by poverty, hunger and global warming will come to rely on the creativity and ideas of people like her. At Illinois, these ideas take root and lead to discovery and innovation. In 10 years, Ellisonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s big idea may blossom and change the world. Imagine that. The solutions to the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s problems begin with herâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a girl who loves to play in the dirt.

go.illinois.edu/bigideas


On Campus: A Guide to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 2013-14