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On Campus 2016-2017

A GUIDE TO THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN I L L I N O I S   S TO R I E S

CAMPUS MAP

A R T S   +   C U LT U R E

POINTS OF INTEREST

GREEN ST

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On Campus Contents

Campus Guide

More On Campus

06 06 07 08 10 14

28 32 38 58

Lodging Getting Around Dining Recreation and Activities

Illinois by the Numbers Landmarks Map Our Illinois Family: Bill Geist

Arts & Culture Libraries

Illinois Stories 16 College of Medicine New engineering-based college revolutionizes the study of health care

20

20 Family Affair Celebrating five generations of a proud Illini family

24 Film Graduates turned their degrees into successful film industry careers

44 Study Abroad Student journeys the world through inclusive study abroad program

46 iMBA Online Program College of Business offers affordable,

44 44

flexible online degree

48 Street Gangs Research Graduate student discovers protective factors for at-risk youth

50 Chinese Play by Play Students make football more accessible by

44 52

broadcasting NCAA games in Mandarin

52 Illinois is Home Freshmen reflect on their first year at Illinois

On Campus On Campus, a guide to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is published by Creative Services at Public Affairs, 507 E. Green St., Champaign, IL 61820. The information contained in this guide is collected and managed by Public Affairs and has been reviewed for accuracy. If there is an error or omission, email creativeservices@illinois.edu. For advertising and distribution information, or to submit content for consideration, contact 217.333.9200 or creativeservices@illinois.edu. General information about On Campus is available at go.illinois.edu/campusguide. Volume 6, 2016; Š2016. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced without written consent of the publisher. 16.053 All photos are credited to Public Affairs unless otherwise noted.


Welcome

4

W E LCO M E TO

Illinois Whether you’re here as a student, a new member of the faculty, a parent or just visiting for a few days, we want your experience to be memorable. We hope you can take some time to explore the campus – from a legendary corn field to what we think is the finest public research library in the world to a supercomputer that did 52 quadrillion calculations while you read this sentence, Illinois has nearly 150 years of life-changing discoveries and stories waiting for you. More than 45,000 students, representing more than half of the nations in the world call this place home. And while we speak many different languages and come from very different backgrounds, there is one thing we all have in common: We’re always excited to invite someone new to be part of the Illinois family.

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign


Welcome

5

Any one of these events is the perfect jumping off point for a visit to the University of Illinois.

Q U A D DAY  August 21 ISEE CONGRESS 2016: PAT H S TO A S U S TA I N A B L E F U T U R E  September 12-14 VET MED OPEN HOUSE  October 2 S TAT E FA R M C E N T E R GRAND REOPENING  October 20-23 HOMECOMING  October 23-29 AC E S & E N G I N E E R I N G OPEN HOUSES  March 10-11 EBERTFEST  April 19-23 I L L I N O I S M A R AT H O N  April 20-22 EARTH WEEK EVENTS  April 21-26 COMMENCEMENT & G R A D U AT I O N  May 13 For more events, visit illinois.edu.

On Campus | 2016-2017


Guide

6

Getting Around

On Campus Guide Lodging

BICYCLING Biking is one of the most convenient ways to get around campus. Nearly 16 miles of

throughout campus.

In 2011, the University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign was certified as a bronze-level Bicycle Friendly University by the League to improve active transportation

Street, the Illini Union Hotel is located at the

infrastructure and promote bicycling as

center of the University of Illinois campus.

a preferred means of transportation.

the Illini Union Hotel puts campus attractions right outside your door, including the State Farm Center, Memorial Stadium, Campus Recreation facilities, Green Street restaurants, shops and most major campus buildings.  1401 W. Green St. Urbana  union.illinois.edu/hotel  217.333.3030

locations and six bicycle

and into the surrounding community.

Tucked away in the Illini Union on Green

expansive views of the Main Quad. Staying at

There are over 400 bike parking repair stations dispersed

of American Bicyclists for its commitment

suites with spacious sitting rooms and

DID YO U K NOW

marked bikeways run through campus

ILLINI UNION HOTEL

The hotel has 72 guest rooms and two VIP

The Campus Bike Center, a collaboration between the university and The Bike Project of Urbana-Champaign, offers an educational workspace where visitors can learn to repair, maintain and build bicycles, or purchase refurbished bicycles. All bicycle owners on campus are required to register their bikes online and to learn the rules of the road for safe cycling.  go.illinois.edu/bike

PARKING ON CAMPUS Metered parking for university visitors is available on university streets, drives and several lots and parking garages designated by visitor parking signs. Temporary permits also are available from the Parking Department by calling 217-333-3530. The University District comprises three primary parking jurisdictions: the University of Illinois, the city of Champaign and the city of Urbana. Please read all meters and signs, as there are differences between city and university rules and regulations. Many university-owned lots are free to the public in the evenings, but a permit is required during weekdays and no overnight parking is

I HOTEL AND CONFERENCE CENTER

permitted. Housing lots, handicapped spaces and 24-hour spaces are restricted at all times.

The I Hotel and Conference Center

 parking.illinois.edu/visitors

is located in the University of Illinois Research Park, a vibrant community of

WILLARD AIRPORT

entrepreneurs, academics and innovators.

The university’s Willard Airport, named

Minutes from central campus, Illinois

after Arthur Cutts Willard, who served as

sports facilities and Willard Airport,

university president from 1934 to 1946,

the I Hotel features well-appointed

has been providing airline service to the

rooms, Houlihan’s restaurant, workout

campus and east central Illinois since 1945.

facilities and a complimentary shuttle.

Located in Savoy, Willard Airport offers daily

 1900 S. First St., Champaign

connections to destinations around the world.

 stayatthei.com

Student requesting a stop on CUMTD bus

 217.819.500

DI D YOU K N OW

The Illini Union was designed in the shape of an “I” to honor the University Fighting Illini.

 flycmi.com

CHAMPAIGN-URBANA MASS TRANSIT DISTRICT (CUMTD)

ZIPCAR

Hop on the bus and go at Campus iStops!

members the convenience of a vehicle

At all other stops, show your i-card or pay

when they need one. Rates start at $7.50 per

$1 per ride. Monthly passes are $20, and

hour or $69 per day and include gasoline,

annual passes are $84. With CUMTD apps

insurance and up to 180 miles. Located on

and the website’s Trip Planner, enter your

campus and in the two downtowns, Zipcars

location and destination to find a quick

are a great way to explore Champaign-

and easy route. Get real-time departure

Urbana or take a weekend getaway.

info using apps and at-the-stop signage.  cumtd.com University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

The Zipcar car-sharing program offers

 zipcar.com/universities/university-of-illinoischampaign-urbana


Guide

Dining RESIDENCE HALL DINING SERVICES

EINSTEIN BROS BAGELS AT SIEBEL CENTER

BEVIER CAFÉ

Serving freshly baked bagels, breakfast

and Human Nutrition students,

sandwiches, lunch sandwiches,

Guests are welcome at any of the six dining

soft drinks and coffee.

halls across campus, where meals are

 Open: Monday – Friday

all-you-care-to-eat. For a quick snack or

7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday – Thursday

food on the go, visit an a la carte location

7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Friday

where items are priced individually. On designated days, dining halls offer specialty cuisines such as Asian, Mexican,

 Siebel Center, first floor, 201 N. Goodwin Ave., Urbana

southern-style and vegetarian.

DERALD’S CAFÉ AT THE COLLEGE OF LAW

 go.illinois.edu/dininghalls

Serving a wide selection of items for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Voted “best

BECKMAN INSTITUTE CAFÉ Serving hot breakfast, sandwiches, salad bar, fresh fruit and specialty hot food daily.  Beckman Institute Atrium, 405 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana  go.illinois.edu/beckmancafe  217.244.1792

7

fish sandwich in C-U” (Fridays).  Open: Monday – Friday 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday – Thursday 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Friday  Law Building, first floor, 504 E. Pennsylvania Ave., Champaign  217.333.3626

Staffed and managed by Food Science Bevier Café is a real-life classroom laboratory and full-service cafe.  Open: Monday - Friday 8 to 10 a.m. for hot breakfast 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. for lunch 1 to 3 p.m. for self-service  Bevier Hall, second floor, 905 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana  beviercafe.illinois.edu  217.333.8469

ARRAY CAFÉ AT THE CARL R. WOESE INSTITUTE FOR GENOMIC BIOLOGY Serving gourmet salads and sandwiches, coffees, smoothies and soft drinks. Daily lunch specials offered.  IGB Gatehouse, lower level, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana  go.illinois.edu/arraycafe  217.244.1113

On Campus | 2016-2017


Guide

8

PALETTE CAFÉ AT KRANNERT ART MUSEUM

ILLINI UNION EATERIES

Recreation & Activities

 union.illinois.edu/food

Serving coffee, espresso, soft drinks,

COLONIAL ROOM LUNCH BUFFET

cookies, pastries and sandwiches.

Serving daily buffet lunches in

 Open: Monday – Saturday, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

a formal dining setting.

7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Thursdays when classes are in session

From Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey, Harlem Globetrotters, WWE and monster

 Open: Monday – Friday, 11:30 a.m.

trucks to national touring Broadway shows

to 1:30 p.m.

 Krannert Art Museum, first floor, 500 E. Peabody Drive, Champaign  217.344.2791

and concerts, the stars come out at the

 Main level, East Wing

State Farm Center. Since 1963, the venue

EINSTEIN BROS BAGELS

has been bringing the best and brightest

 Lower level, Food Court

INTERMEZZO CAFÉ AT KRANNERT CENTER Serving freshly baked breakfast goods, light lunches and dinners, vegetarian and nonvegetarian fare, sweet treats, yogurt, fruit, juice and Krannert Blends coffee.  Open: Monday – Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Extended hours on performance days  Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, lobby, 500 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana.  217.333.8412

STATE FARM CENTER

entertainment to the Midwest. It’s one of

JAMBA JUICE

the world’s architectural wonders, and only

 Main level, southwest

a small handful of other arenas can match

KO FUSION  Lower level, Food Court

its size, versatility and dramatic scope. The

QDOBA MEXICAN GRILL

center is also home to the Fighting Illini

 Lower level, Food Court

men’s and women’s basketball teams. The

QUAD SHOP

State Farm Center is undergoing a state-of-

 Main level, southwest

the-art, multimillion-dollar renovation.

QUAD CONES

A grand re-opening is set for Oct. 20-23, 2016.

 Main Level, southwest

 1800 S. First St., Champaign

SBARRO

 statefarmcenter.com

 Lower level, Food Court

 866.ILLINI.1

STARBUCKS

ILLINI UNION REC ROOM

 Main level, Courtyard Cafe

Outfitted with 14 bowling lanes, 12

WENDY’S

billiards tables, arcade and console

 Lower level, Food Court

games, a TV lounge and snack bar, the Illini Union Rec Room is a great place to

relax and unwind with friends. Cosmic

DID YO U K NOW

Bowl is offered some evenings.

Students commonly prepare

 Illini Union, lower level, 1401 W. Green St., Urbana

diverse cultural dinners at

 union.illinois.edu/recroom

Spice Box, including Pacific

 217.333.2415

Northwest, German, BBQ and French dinner themes.

Students selling vegetables from the Student Sustainable Farm

SPICE BOX Spice Box is a student-run restaurant associated with Illinois’ hospitality management program. Each Spice Box meal has two menu selections: a prix fixe four-course meal and a special two-course meal. Specialty beverages and wine are available. Meals are served most Wednesdays and Fridays during the semester.  Bevier Hall, second floor, 905 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana  spicebox.illinois.edu  217.333.6520

Marching Illini drum major leads the band during a home football game

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign


Guide ORANGE AND BLUE GOLF COURSE Built in the 1950s as an 18-hole championship course, the University of Illinois golf course added another 18-hole tract in 1966, resulting in what is now known as the University of Illinois Orange and Blue Golf Course. Home to the men’s and women’s University of Illinois golf teams, the course is open to the public and located in Savoy. Rental clubs and a driving range are available.  800 Hartwell Drive, Savoy  uofigolf.com  217.359.5613

CAMPUS RECREATION Campus Recreation provides a welcoming environment for everyone with sustainable facilities and programs that inspire the university community to engage in recreation and wellness opportunities. With the Activities and Recreation Center, Campus Recreation Center East, and the Ice Arena, there are approximately 500,000 square feet of state-of-the-art recreation space available to concentrate on wellness and healthy lifestyles. Campus Recreation also offers many diverse programs and services, including almost 100 group fitness classes each week, 38 personal trainers, eight intramural sports each semester, rock climbing, aquatic activities, ice skating and hockey programs, and more than 40 club sports.  campusrec.illinois.edu

CAMPUS RECREATION CENTER EAST (CRCE) CRCE (pronounced SIR-see) is located in the heart of campus, behind Freer Gym. Its 110,000 square feet includes an aquatic center (featuring a leisure pool, water slide, volcano fountain and 12-person spa), 1/8-mile indoor track, free weights and machines, cardio equipment, a three-court gymnasium, three racquetball courts and an indoor soccer/roller hockey court.  1102 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana  217.333.3806

On Campus | 2016-2017

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Guide

10

ILDING A U B

ACTIVITIES AND RECREATION CENTER (ARC) The ARC – at 340,000 square feet – is one of

the country’s largest on-campus recreation

The Ice Arena has $2 discounted

centers. Hundreds of weight and exercise

OF

INCLUSION

machines, 1/5-mile indoor track, four gymnasiums, 12 racquetball courts, a 35-foot

DID YO U K NOW

public skating on the first Wednesday of every month.

climbing wall and two 50-meter swimming pools are just some of the amenities at this tremendous facility.  201 E. Peabody Drive, Champaign  217.333.3806

ICE ARENA

1 st 1st collegiate wheelchair basketball team in America. The men’s basketball team was established in 1948, followed by the women’s in 1971.

The University of Illinois Ice Arena offers a variety of skating opportunities for the campus, surrounding communities and visitors. In addition to instructional ice skating programs and public skating sessions, the arena supports intramural sport leagues and club activities including Illini Hockey.  406 E. Armory Ave., Champaign  217.333.2212

Arts & Culture 29 combined national championship titles for men and women’s wheelchair basketball.

ALLERTON PARK & RETREAT CENTER Built as a private residence in 1900,

29

Allerton Park and Retreat Center is a historical treasure that was donated to the University of Illinois in 1946. Located in Monticello, Illinois, about 25 miles from the Urbana-Champaign campus, the

4+ winners of the most prestigious world races for wheelchair track athletes, including the London, New York City, Chicago and Paris marathons.

4+ #1 Illinois is one of the most disability friendly and wheelchair accessible campuses in the nation.

property contains 1,500 acres of woodland and prairie areas, a Georgian-inspired mansion and reflecting pond, several lodging facilities, a 10-acre meadow, formal sculpture gardens and hiking trails.

Student biking through the Arboretum

ARBORETUM The Arboretum is a living laboratory, including plant collections and facilities that

Allerton is available to host a wide range of

support the teaching, research and public

events including meetings, conferences,

service programs of several units throughout

weddings, retreats and special

campus. Located on the southeast corner

events. Overnight accommodations

of campus, it was developed from the late

are also available. Visit Central

1980s to early 1990s, and covers 160 acres.

Illinois’ “best-kept secret”

Visitors can experience the lush gardens – a

and discover why it is considered one

series of great outdoor rooms – ask questions

of the Seven Wonders of Illinois!

about plants and get ideas for designing

 Open: daily, 8 a.m. to sunset

their own gardens. Admittance is free.

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. for the

 Open: daily, sunrise until sunset

Visitor Center

 arboretum.illinois.edu

 515 Old Timber Road, Monticello  allerton.illinois.edu  217.333.3287 University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign


Guide

On Campus | 2016-2017

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Guide

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JAPAN HOUSE

SPURLOCK MUSEUM

The mission of Japan House is to bring

Spurlock Museum of World Cultures

about cultural understanding and to

celebrates our shared humanity by collecting,

give a necessary refuge for all to embrace

preserving, documenting, exhibiting and

tranquility in an immersive Japanese

studying objects of cultural heritage. The

environment. Through the study of Japanese

museum features exhibits representing

traditional arts, and particularly the Way of

ancient Mesopotamia, ancient Egypt and

Tea, Japan House provides an opportunity

Africa; ancient Greece and Rome; East

for students and the community to gain a

Asia, Southeast Asia and Oceania; Europe;

deeper sensitivity toward diverse cultures.

and American Indian cultures of North

The gardens are open dawn to dusk and

and South America. Special exhibits,

tea ceremonies are offered on Thursdays

based in the Campbell Gallery, serve

at 3 p.m., and on the third Saturday of the

as a springboard for unique programs,

month, from September through June.

tours and special events. Admission is free with a suggested donation of $3.

 Open: daily, sunrise until sunset A tea ceremony held at the Japan House.

 2000 S. Lincoln Ave., Urbana

 Open: Tuesday – Sunday

 japanhouse.art.illinois.edu

12 to 5 p.m. on Tuesday

 217.244.9934

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday

KRANNERT ART MUSEUM AND KINKEAD PAVILION Krannert Art Museum promotes a

DID YO U K NOW

The Japan House Gazebo was

vibrant exchange of ideas in the visual

built by actor and alumnus

arts. KAM’s rich permanent collection

Nick Offerman to pay homage

contains over 10,000 works of art from

to his mentor, professor

the fourth millennium B.C. to the present,

emeritus Shozo Sato.

10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday  600 S. Gregory St., Urbana  spurlock.illinois.edu  217.333.2360

representing a broad range of cultures and varied modes of artistic expression. As the second largest general fine arts museum in Illinois, KAM presents high-

KRANNERT CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

quality exhibitions, educational programs,

Krannert Center is the country’s premier

films, concerts and special events to

university-based performing arts complex. Its

more than 125,000 visitors each year.

simultaneous roles as classroom, laboratory

KAM is nationally recognized for its

and public square enliven world-class artistry

extensive collections of ancient Andean,

and life-affirming public engagement work.

European and American art, including

The unprecedented facility includes four

20th- century paintings, photographs and

formal theatres, an outdoor amphitheatre,

works on paper. KAM’s award-winning

numerous classrooms, rehearsal halls

gallery Encounters: The Arts of Africa

and technical areas, a flexible 1.5-acre

celebrates the contemporary relevance of

lobby, Intermezzo cafe and Promenade

the arts of Africa and its diasporas. These

gift shop. Working together with faculty,

holdings, combined with collections of Asian,

staff and students from the College of

ancient Mediterranean and medieval art

Fine and Applied Arts and across the

make KAM one of Illinois’ premier cultural

university, Krannert Center serves as a

destinations. Admission is free and open to

central hub for the expansion of creativity,

the public; free-will donations are accepted.

the discourse surrounding the arts and the

 Open: Monday – Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

collective enjoyment of live performance.

9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Thursdays when classes

 500 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana

are in session

 krannertcenter.com

 500 E. Peabody Drive, Champaign

 217.333.6700

 kam.illinois.edu  217.333.1861

Concert at the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign


Guide

On Campus | 2016-2017

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Guide

14

MATHEWS AVE

I-SHARE PROGRAM GREEN

ST

1,000,000+

GOODWIN AVE

500,0001,000,000

ARMORY AVE

LINCOLN AVE

With the I-Share program, students can reserve, check out and return items to the nearest library. There are 20+ departmental libraries extended across campus, holding more than 13 million volumes.

Number of Volumes

Only physical libraries are mapped GREGORY DR

100,000500,000

20,000100,000 >20,000

PENNSYLVANIA AVE

1 mi.

.5 mi

N

Libraries UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

MAIN LIBRARY

The University Library, open to everyone, is the largest public university library in the nation with more than 13 million

H

volumes and 20 area studies libraries. It

C

Proust, H.G. Wells, Carl Sandburg and

G Located D in the heart of campus, the Main Library houses the Main Stacks collection and contains over 5 million items,I archives, reference resources and several departmental libraries. Explore inside. B A KEY F E

Gwendolyn Brooks. The Library at Illinois

A

includes one of the largest engineering libraries in the country, a state-of-the-art agricultural library and an acclaimed rare book and manuscript library. It is renowned worldwide for its innovative services, the expertise of librarians and staff, and extensive and specialized collections – which include those of John Milton, Marcel

American Bibliography of Slavic and

plays a vital role in the teaching, research

East European Studies (ABSEES),

and service missions of the university.

4th Floor, Room 435

 The Main Library is open daily.

B

Classics, 4th Floor, Room 419A

I

E

International and Area Studies Library, 3rd Floor, Room 321

F

Literatures and Languages, 2nd Floor, Room 225

C History, Philosophy, and Newspaper G Map Library, 4th Floor, Room 418 a American Bibliography of Slavic and East European Studies (ABSEES) (includes African American Research H Rare Book and Manuscript Library, b Classics 1 to 5 p.m. on Saturday Center), 2nd Floor, Room 246 3rd Floor, Room 346 c History, Philosophy, and Newspaper (includes African American Research Center) 1 to 10 p.m. on Sunday D Illinois History and Lincoln Collections, d Social Sciences, Health and Education Illinois History and Lincoln Collections I  1408 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana 3rd Floor, Room 322 e Library, 1st Floor, Room 100 & 101 International and Area Studies Library  library.illinois.edu f Literatures and Languages  217.333.2290 g Map Library University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign h Rare Book and Manuscript Library i Social Sciences, Health, and Education Library 8:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday – Thursday 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday


Guide

On Campus | 2016-2017

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16

College of Medicine

New College New Medicine The Carle Illinois College of Medicine expands translational research

W R I T E R Liz Ahlberg

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign


College Feature of Medicine Title disciplines – not limited to engineering.

Implantable health monitors that

Disciplines such as data mining and

dissolve away when no longer

information security, predictive modeling,

needed. HIV diagnosis from a single drop of

quality assessments, ethics and others also

blood. A machine that can build molecules of

will play a critical role in health care.

new drug candidates. A cellphone biosensor.

“The greatest challenges we face today

These are just a few examples of University

cannot be solved by approaches in single

of Illinois research at the intersection

disciplines,” said Dr. Stephen Boppart, a U.

of medicine, science and technology.

of I. professor of electrical and computer

The university is expanding on this

engineering and of bioengineering who

rich tradition of medical innovation by launching a new engineering-based college of medicine, the first of its kind.

is also a medical doctor. “Students today want to tackle these grand challenges and explore interdisciplinary solutions. Our

The Carle Illinois College of Medicine

new College of Medicine will give them

brings together the Carle Health System,

education, training and experiences in the

one of the top health care providers in the

cultures of both medicine and engineering

state of Illinois, and the vast research and

where they will use their many talents

educational enterprise at the University of

to innovate new solutions to solve the

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The formation

challenges we face in medicine, health care,

of the college was announced in 2014, and

disease prevention and healthy living.”

curriculum is being developed for the first class of students, expected to enroll in 2018. “The new engineering-based College of Medicine will provide many opportunities to faculty across campus in a range of disciplines to engage in translational and clinical research,” said Rashid Bashir, the head of the department of bioengineering at the U. of I. and a co-chair of the core curriculum development committee for

We aim to produce physician-innovators and physicianleaders who will think differently and work to transform health care delivery and the health care system as a whole.

Administrators of the College of Medicine believe that it will offer unique opportunity to students following in the footsteps of Boppart and Dr. Martin Burke, a U. of I. professor of chemistry. Both hold medical doctorates as well as Ph.D. degrees, and both hope that the new college will provide future students with more direct paths to translational research than the routes they took.

RASHID BASHIR Abel Bliss Professor, Engineering Head, Department of Bioengineering

the new College of Medicine. “Our students

Burke began his education as a medical

and faculty will have the opportunity to be

student, but in the course of his studies

leaders at the forefront of a revolution that

came to realize the power of basic

will transform the educational model and

chemistry for clinical applications.

the practice of medicine, to develop new

“I was struck by the extraordinary power

solutions to deliver higher quality health

one day perform the function of the missing

of small molecules to treat human disease.

channel in cystic fibrosis patients. In the

It’s an amazing thing to witness – a patient

process of this pursuit, Burke developed

The U. of I. is already a site for convergence,

is sick, you give them a chemical, and they get better,” Burke said. “I’ll never forget a

a set of molecular “building blocks”

with more than 80 research institutes and centers bringing together faculty from 16

remarkable young woman I cared for who

different colleges and schools. The Carle

had cystic fibrosis, a disease caused by a

Illinois College of Medicine will be distinct

missing protein ion channel in the lungs.

from the medical school at the University of

She asked me one day, ‘It sounds like you

Illinois at Chicago both in its governance and

know exactly what the problem is, so why

in its curriculum, taking advantage of the

can’t you fix it?’ Knowing how powerful small

Boppart took the opposite path to

expertise in engineering and basic science

molecules can be as medicines, I became

translational medicine. Trained as an

among the faculty of the Urbana campus.

fascinated by an idea: Might it be possible to

electrical engineer, he became interested

The College of Medicine hopes to attract

find small molecules that could replicate the

in biomedical engineering while

students with an interest in translational

functions of missing proteins, thus operating

working with neurons and other cells

medicine and research across various

as prostheses on the molecular scale?”

that respond to electricity and light.

care at a lower cost to more people.”

On Campus | 2016-2017

That question has fueled Burke’s research career. He has studied the anti-fungal drug amphotericin, a derivative of which could

for simple assembly of complex small molecules and an automated machine for assembling them, which could make it much easier and faster for researchers to create and explore new drug candidates.

Photo: L. Brian Stauffer

A

light wand that can detect cancer.

17


Feature Title College of Medicine

18

clinical sciences will be delivered in the

It’s not just a medical school, it’s a platform of incubation that will develop relationships throughout the state and potentially outside of the state.

language of engineering,” Bashir said. “Students will have access to the world-class faculty and facilities at the U. of I., and the excellence in clinical practice and health care delivery at Carle. The curriculum will be systems-based and quantitative, will integrate the recent technology advances, and will provide innovation, problem solving and entrepreneurial experiences and

“In biomedical imaging, I realized that I needed to understand not only the technology, but also the medical and patient care aspects. To fully

DR. MATTHEW GIBB Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, Carle Health System

Photo: Carle Health System

understand those, I needed an M.D. as

pathways to students. We aim to produce physician-innovators and physicianleaders who will think differently and work to transform health care delivery and the health-care system as a whole.”

well as a Ph.D. I realized that engineers

Dr. Matthew Gibb, an interventional

can’t fix everything,” Boppart said.

cardiologist and system chief medical officer

Boppart now heads the Biophotonics Imaging Laboratory at Illinois, where he has developed a number of light-based devices

for Carle, believes that such a curriculum could lay the foundation of a new paradigm for health care and medical education.

for basic diagnostics, such as examination of

“My specialty has a significant translational

eyes, ears and skin, and for cancer detection

engineering relationship with stents and

and treatment. He also has a long-standing

devices. I did not get exposed to that

partnership with the Carle Foundation

until well into my specialty training,”

Hospital, where he completed his residency

Gibb said. “The Carle Illinois College of

and now holds an appointment.

Medicine will allow medical students

“My research group has had a strong and productive collaboration with Carle and physicians there for more than 15 years, which has certainly helped to translate our ideas and technologies into clinical applications and toward commercialization,” Boppart said. “Having a new engineering- or innovationbased college of medicine here with Carle will enable broader opportunities

to begin participating in new types of education and care right from year one: team-based care, project management, creating a process where they are thinking about what could be changed. Medical education has traditionally been a very top-down hierarchical type of philosophy. We are now moving into a new space where we need people to be critical thinkers, working in teams and solving problems.”

for our university faculty to make this

Both Boppart and Burke have worked

translation, and to find local clinical

with the many resources at the university

partners and collaborators who can

to commercialize their technologies,

articulate the clinical challenges to be

founding multiple startup companies.

solved by technological solutions.”

Gibb believes that the College of Medicine

The classes in the College of Medicine will be small – initially limited to 25-30 students – and those enrolled will be immersed in the integration of engineering principles and technologies, analytical problem-solving and clinical application throughout the four-year curriculum. “This unique curriculum where the information of biological sciences and University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

will facilitate many other such startups and boost the economy. Gibb also said the College of Medicine will recruit new specialists and joint hires, physicians who will practice at Carle while also teaching and conducting research at the university. A feasibility study that the steering committee commissioned estimated that the Carle Illinois College of Medicine would create continued on page 54


Feature Title

On Campus | 2016-2017

19


Family Affair

20

Ralph Allen Sr., Agriculture

1876

Ralph Allen Jr., Agriculture

1912

Martha Allen Zumwalt, Home Economics

1943

I absolutely love U. of I., and being the fifth generation was definitely part of my decision. It’s just really unique to have that long of a blood lineage attending one school.

1985 Jack Zumwalt, Agricultural Communications

o: ot

Ph ia Br L. tau nS r ffe

2018 Tara Zumwalt, Civil Engineering

Photos courtesy of the Zumwalt family.

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign


Family Affair

21

A Family Affair One family has been attending Illinois for more than 140 years

W R I T E R Allison Vance, BS, ‘11 MEDIA

T

ara Zumwalt grew up in Iowa, and she always assumed

degree as well. He gained a reputation as a progressive grain and

she would attend Iowa State University like her mom.

cattle farmer. In an October 1927 Illinois alumni publication, he was

But when she started looking at various colleges

recognized as “one of the best-known Illinois agriculture graduates.”

around the country, she became interested in the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the school her dad attended.

He and his wife, Ada Mary Allen, (who also attended Illinois) had 10 children. Eight of those children graduated from Illinois

Her dad always talked about his great experiences at Illinois, but

including Ralph Allen Jr., Tara’s great-grandfather. Two of the

he never put any pressure on her to attend his beloved school.

Allen children died of influenza while they were U. of I. students.

While going through the college search process, Tara learned more

Ralph Allen Jr. graduated in 1912 with a degree in agriculture.

about her family’s Illinois history. If she decided to attend Illinois, she

His daughter, Martha Allen Zumwalt, graduated from Illinois in

would be the fifth generation in her family to attend the school. That

1943 with a degree in home economics. Martha’s siblings, Anna

fact, combined with the strong engineering program and Marching

Louis Farnsworth and Stella Orwig, also attended Illinois.

Illini, led her to pick Illinois. She says it was a great decision.

Martha began dating Delmar Zumwalt while at Illinois. They soon

“I absolutely love U. of I.,” she said, “and being the fifth generation

married and eventually had five children: Gene, Ann, Connie, Clark

was definitely part of my decision. It’s just really unique to

and Jack. All but Clark graduated from Illinois, including Tara’s

have that long of a blood lineage attending one school.”

father, Jack, who graduated in 1985 with a degree in agricultural

Ralph Allen Sr. was the first member of the family to attend Illinois, then known as the Illinois Industrial University. He graduated in 1876 with a degree in agriculture and later earned an advanced

communications. Now Tara is a sophomore in civil engineering at Illinois and Tara’s cousin, Eve Zumwalt (daughter of Clark), is a junior in speech and hearing science. Eve’s brother Jacob Zumwalt just

On Campus | 2016-2017


Family Affair

22

“I tell him all about Illinois,” she said. “It’ll be exciting to see where he chooses.” Tara said one of her favorite parts of choosing Illinois was visiting her grandma, Martha, and telling her the decision. Martha had endured a decline in health, but as soon as Tara told her the good news, her disposition changed completely. “Her face just lit up,” Tara said. “She started telling me stories about her experience and about dating my grandpa, Delmar, on campus before he graduated early in 1943 to become a liaison pilot in World War II.” With family history all around, Tara said she can’t help but think about them when she walks through campus. “It’s really special,” she says. “My freshman year I lived in a dorm right by the AGR house, my grandpa’s fraternity. I’ve seen pictures of my family on the Quad or in front Martha Allen Zumwalt receives the first ACES Alumni Association “Family Spirit Award” on behalf of her family.

of their Greek houses, and it’s crazy that they are the same buildings that are there

graduated from Illinois last year. Connie’s

When anyone asks Ann if her children

son Mac Zumwalt graduated in 2007.

attended Illinois, she will sigh and reply,

When Ann Gerdes (a fourth generation Illinois alumna) was an undergraduate, her mother, Martha, decided to return to Illinois

“No, they went to Stanford.” Then she quickly adds, “But they are still Illinois fans when it comes to sports!”

now. It’s just a huge part of our family.” For Homecoming every year, several members of the family come back to campus and celebrate. In 1995, the Allen family was chosen as the first recipient of the ACES

to get her master’s degree in education. In

She said she is glad that her nieces, Tara and

Alumni Association “Family Spirit Award.”

fact, one summer the mother and daughter

Eve, choose to attend Illinois. “Attending

There is also a room in the ACES Library

both lived in Illini Tower in different rooms.

Illinois was one of the highlights of our

commemorating Ralph Allen Sr. and his

In 1973, they both graduated. Ann received

lives,” Ann says. “It’s been really fun to go

legacy appropriately named the “Ralph

her undergraduate degree and her mother

back and visit our nieces. We are reliving

Allen Family Room.” The room includes a

received her master’s degree. Another year,

our college days a little bit through them.”

bronze portrait of the family patriarch that

Ann, her brother, Gene, and her sister, Connie, were all enrolled at the same time. One year, Ann also had four first cousins

Going back to Ralph and Ada Mary and their ten children, it adds up to a huge

was created by his daughter Lucy Elizabeth Allen, who is also an Illinois alumna.

Illinois family tree. More than 100 family

The future of the family lineage at

members who are direct descendants of

Illinois isn’t in question, but Tara

Ann had hoped that her two children

Ralph and Ada Mary or have married into

said it has crossed her mind.

would also follow the family legacy,

the family have attended or graduated

but they had other plans.

from the University of Illinois.

who were enrolled simultaneously.

I’ll just tell them it’s a great school, and hopefully they’ll choose Illinois.

“It would be sad if the lineage doesn’t continue,” she said, “but I will handle

And even though Tara has several aunts,

it with my kids how my parents did.

uncles and cousins who have attended

My dad never pressured me to go here.

Illinois, her position in the family is unique.

I’ll just tell them it’s a great school, and

“I think I’m one of the few direct, blood descendants who is a fifth generation Illinois student,” she said. Then she paused. “Unless my younger brother, Axel, goes here!” Tara said her brother is still trying to decide on a major, but he’s interested in engineering. University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

hopefully they’ll choose Illinois.” 


Love Connection

“[Vanessa] was across the room from me, and in between us was the nude model. Our eyes met and we busted out laughing because it was so awkward and hilarious at the same time.”

VA N E S S A and  D O U G B U R G E T T  met in a  N U D E D R AW I N G  C L A S S 

“We were at a party, but he was sitting talking to a couple of other people. We danced once, and then he found me again at the party and it wasn’t until we stepped out and started talking that we really connected. We have three kids now, and our kids are so familiar with the campus at Champaign-Urbana. They feel like it’s home for them.”

A M B E R and DWAY N E C O M M O D O R E met at ALUMNI HOMECOMING

ILLINOIS Love Connection Rumor has it that lovers who kiss beneath the Eternal Flame, a beloved landmark on the Quad, will see their relationship last forever. These couples share where they first met on campus, and how an instant Illinois connection can lead to love – even in the most unlikely of places. M E L I S S A and  W I L L C A L K I N S 

L U C I A and PETER WYLER

met at the 

met in the  

C A M P U S 

FIRST WEEK OF

S W I M M I N G P O O L  “When I first saw Melissa, she has a really angelic appearance, even with a bathing cap on. When it happened, I don’t think either of us was expecting to meet our future partner. I was going to graduate in three months, and I didn’t know if I’d be around or not. Because Melissa is such a kind, sweet person, I couldn’t help falling in love with her and stay with her.”

L AW S C H O O L “I’m Brazilian and he’s Swiss, and I went to do a master’s of law and he as well. That’s where we first met on the first day of school. Five weeks after I have arrived in Brazil, Peter said, ‘I’m coming to Brazil.’ He arrives and he could speak fluently Portuguese, and could write. I said, ‘Oh my God that’s the man I have to marry. He learned the language in five weeks for me.’”

On Campus | 2016-2017

23


Film

24

On the Big Screen Illinois alumni let their talents shine in the film industry

W R I T E R Jodi Heckel, JD, ‘90 LAW

before coming to the University of Illinois. He earned a

ANSHUMAN PRASAD

A

nshuman Prasad is an architect who designs the interiors of buildings, the facades of skyscrapers and the look of cities. He designs cars, trucks and spaceships. His designs aren’t lived in or driven in the real world, but they must seem as though they could be. They provide

master’s degree from the School of Architecture, and he wrote his thesis on the role of architecture in films. Since moving to Los Angeles to work as a set designer, Prasad has helped create the sets for “Live Free or Die Hard,” “Terminator: Salvation,” “The Hangover,” “The Expendables,” “Little Fockers,” “Total Recall” and “Captain America: The Winter Soldier,” as well as numerous TV series.

an atmosphere for the movies

He shared in a 2012 Excellence in Production Design Award from the

in which they appear that

Art Directors Guild for his work on “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.”

contributes to the storytelling. Prasad – who has always loved movies – received an architecture degree in his native India and worked for three years in a New Delhi firm, doing sustainable design,

Prasad said his education and experience in architecture has helped him to achieve the right look for films. “When you work in architecture, you see the construction site, you see how things are being built. You understand what the detailing is, how joints are supposed to be made, visually how they look if they are made by machine, if they are made by hand. You see all the little differences around you and appreciate the environment around you. It helped me see and grasp all the visual details around me,” he said.

Photo: Jeffrey Fiterman

ANSHUMAN PRASAD set designer

Prasad recently worked on “Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice.” The film uses a dark palette with a lot of browns and grays – “an anti-Marvel world” – and emphasizes gadgets.

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign


25

Photo: Anshuman Prasad

Film

Above: A set from the 2012 film “Total Recall” designed by Anshuman Prasad. Below: A truck from the 2009 film “Terminator Salvation” designed by Anshuman Prasad.

“It was about Batman’s technology. He’s always had that belt and had that car and the cool gadgetry and technology. I worked on the batwing, his plane,” he said. “It was a struggle to design something in a compact space, fitting in all these things like in a fighter plane cockpit. Everything is very tight and utilitarian and has to look like it’s functional. Ben Affleck (who plays Batman) is a very big guy, and it was a very difficult task trying to put him in there, but it was a very fun task and it looks really good.” His favorite set was in “Total Recall.” The elaborate sets included a gravity elevator that goes through the center of the Earth, transporting people from one side of the planet to the other.

look like. It’s completely fanciful, but we tried very hard to place it in some real-time technology,” Prasad said. He worked on the set of “Passengers,” a science fiction movie due out late this year that is set entirely in space, with a love story central to its plot. The work included building a futuristic photo booth. “It’s a gimmicky thing on the spaceship. It’s very cool and modernist, kind of like an obelisk design, a single piece of chrome,” Prasad said. “It’s definitely a job I want to do. I want to come into work every day,” he said. “I like movies and watch movies a lot and like to talk about them. Movies are fun. It’s a great field to work in.”

On Campus | 2016-2017

Photo: Anshuman Prasad

“It was fun to think about the engineering and what it might


Film

26

“In terms of types of characters, I’m really

“I find the story so compelling,”

drawn to misfits and anti-heroes. I’m drawn

said Gordon, who is working with

to people who are a bit more conflicted, for

a writing partner on a script.

whatever reason. They have

JUSTIN GORDON actor & director

a sense of what’s morally right, but their own actions of the past contradict that. I love that beautiful interplay between dark and light,” Gordon said. His enjoyment of acting comes not just from portraying a character, but also from working with a group of people to tell a story. “It’s the collaborative nature

Photo: Tim Navis

JUSTIN GORDON The adage “It’s who you know” proved to be true when it came to actor Justin

that comes along with telling

Illinois theatre graduate was the spark that started Gordon’s movie career. Gordon was in the graduate program in the Illinois Department of Theatre when he met Morgan Peter Brown, who had graduated from Illinois a few years before, at the Utah Shakespeare Festival. After receiving his master’s degree in 2009, Gordon began working on projects with Brown. The two produced and acted in

“Meet as many people as you can, as honestly as you can. Don’t pretend to be someone you’re not, don’t take everything at face value and keep pushing forward. Work begets work. “As long as it fulfills you creatively, emotionally, spiritually, even if you’re not making a huge amount of money doing it, keep doing it,” he said. “Success in this industry doesn’t always have to be a financial payoff.”

DAV I D M AG E E

a good story. You go to see a play or go see a

Screenwriter David Magee started working in

film and you’re focusing on the actors, but

the entertainment industry as an actor. But

there are so many other variables that go

while studying acting and earning a master’s degree from the University of Illinois

Gordon getting a break in Hollywood. A random meeting with a University of

Gordon offered advice for theater students:

Department of Theatre, Magee was laying the

That’s been a benefit (of studying at the U. of I.) apart from the excellent training. ... You find people who become your artistic family.

foundation to write. “I was learning how to speak other people’s words and perform them, but unknowingly I was learning how to write. I was learning how to find the voice of a character and put it on the page,” he said. “When I’m writing, I’m really improvising in my head and writing it down and figuring it out.”

“Absentia,” a supernatural thriller released in 2011. That led to two movies with “Absentia” director Mike Flanagan – “Oculus,” a 2013

into it. There’s something about so many

horror film, and “Before I Wake,” a thriller

people coming together to tell a singular

not yet released, in which Gordon has a

story that I find very compelling,” he said.

small part opposite Kate Bosworth.

Gordon, who has done some directing as well,

“The bulk of my professional film work

owns the film rights to a story about a Seattle

started with producing the movie with

police officer who

Morgan. All my contacts fanned out

created a foundation

from there,” Gordon said. “That’s been a

to help rehabilitate

benefit (of studying at the U. of I.) apart

sex workers in that

from the excellent training. … You find

city, taking in young

people who become your artistic family.”

women and helping

He has a role in “Gehenna,” a horror film set to be released at Halloween, and he

them to get off drugs and get job training.

DAV I D M AG E E screenwriter

just finished work on a Netflix series, “Age of the Living Dead,” to be aired in 2017.

Photo: Suzanne Schirm

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign


Film

27

Magee did a lot of theater, and he supported

nominated for an Academy Award for Best

can show what he’s dealing with and how his

his acting with voiceover work, narrating

Adapted Screenplay.

emotions are changing.”

Magee wrote the screenplay for “Life of Pi”

Magee would rather be writing screenplays

(2013), which gave him the opportunity to

than a novel.

audio books. That led to work abridging novels that would be recorded as audio books – his first work as a paid writer.

work with director and U. of I. alumnus Ang

Magee abridged 80 novels and became skilled

Lee and earned Magee another Academy

at reading story structure. He began writing

Award nomination.

plays and tried out some scenes at the 42nd

“I started as an actor, which is not only extremely collaborative, but as a theater actor, where you get feedback as you perform.

“I did worry that it was going to be a difficult

You’re performing for an audience and

novel to turn into a film because so much of

hearing what the audience is responding to,”

it is philosophical reflection that takes place

he said. “To put myself in a room for half a

An audience member, Nellie Bellflower,

on a boat,” Magee said. “There’s not a strong

year while I wrote a book sounded abysmal.

encouraged Magee to turn the scenes into

narrative structure. It’s someone sitting on a

The collaborative nature (of film and theater)

a full play. He did, and after the play’s

boat suffering. We had to find that narrative

is much more appealing to me. I enjoy what I

run, Bellflower asked Magee to write the

structure that would compel you to wonder

do very much.”

screenplay for a story for which she held the

what was going to happen next.

Street Workshop in New York City, a venue for developing new plays.

rights – the story of J.M. Barrie, who wrote

Among his current projects is writing the

“It had a lot to do with his relationship with

script for a new Mary Poppins film, set 20

that tiger as he goes on his journey, and

years after the original, as well as the script

“After years of hanging out in the

escalating attempts to come to terms with

for “The Chronicles of Narnia: The Silver

entertainment business, I happened to be

the tiger and master the tiger. It’s about the

Chair,” the fourth film in the Narnia series. 

talking to the right person at the right time,”

power dynamic changing over time, and you

Magee said.

have to find a way to show the victories and

“Peter Pan.”

The screenplay became the 2004 film

defeats,” he continued. “Through that, you

“Finding Neverland,” and Magee was

On Campus | 2016-2017


Illinois by the Numbers

28

Illinois by the numbers C H I C AG O 140 MILES

1867

Longitude and Latitude of Main Quad

Founding Year

C H A M PA I G N - U R B A N A INDIANAPOLIS 125 MILES

40° 06´36.88˝N

S T. L O U I S

88°13´38.13˝W

180 MILES

AC A D E M I C S  15 colleges and units  $640 million was spent on research

and development in 2015  24 million items mark the largest public

university library in North America.  100 percent of all classrooms have wireless access. A R T S & C U LT U R E  75 percent of John Philip Sousa’s

original music manuscripts, the world’s largest collection, are housed at the Sousa Archives and Center for American Music.  4 cultural centers: Asian American

S P O R T S & R E C R E AT I O N  10 men’s and 11 women’s NCAA

teams; 15 major sports facilities  470,000 square feet of recreational

space between two campus rec centers  1,000+ registered student

organizations, coalitions, honorary societies and teams

 10,381 international students in

2015-16 from 114 countries  2,422 study abroad students in

2013-14 participated in more than in more than 60 countries.

 647 total buildings, 7.1 square

universities in number of earned doctorates awarded annually PEOPLE  45,842 total students

 4,031 administrative and

Center, La Casa Cultural Latina,

square miles (1,783 acres)

students; among the top 10 U.S.

 3,059 faculty and instructional staff

African American Cultural

 353 main campus buildings, 2.8

 12,474 graduate and professional

& STUDIES

400 programs and affiliations

FAC I L I T I E S

E D U C AT I O N

I N T E R N AT I O N A L P R O G R A M S

Cultural Center, Bruce D. Nesbitt

Native American House

G R A D U AT E & P R O F E S S I O N A L

U N D E R G R A D U AT E E D U C AT I O N  33,368 students from all 50 states  69 of America’s Fortune 100

companies (including seven of the top 10) recruited on campus last year.

miles (4,552 acres)  23 undergrad residence halls

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

academic professional staff  4,349 support staff  450,000+ living alumni, one of the

largest U.S. alumni organizations


More On Campus

On Campus | 2016-2017

29


SEPTEMBER 9

Opening Night Party with The Pedrito Martinez Group, Davina and the Vagabonds, and Red Baraat

13

RUBBERBANDance Group: Vic’s Mix

15-16

The Triplets of Belleville: A cine-concert with live music

16

Going Broader and Deeper: New Play Reading

17

The Laurie Berkner Band: The Greatest Hits Sinfonia da Camera: Sounds of Youth

21-25

The Unreliable Bestiary: BEAR

22

The Pygmalion Festival

23

Joshua Redman/Brad Mehldau Duo

24

Chicago Symphony Orchestra

9.28-10.2 The Unreliable Bestiary: BEAR 9.29-10.2 Dontrell, Who Kissed the Sea

K R A N N E RT C E NTE R 2 01 6 -2 017

CAMPAIGN FOR YOUNG AUDIENCES PHYLLIS & KYLE ROBESON, LEAD SPONSORS SUSAN & MICHAEL HANEY GERTRUDE BROKAW MCCLOY ENDOWMENT DONNA MURRAY TIEDGE & ROBERT TIEDGE ANONYMOUS

K R ANNER TCENTER .COM

29

Lang Lang, piano

30

Black Violin

OCTOBER 8

Champaign-Urbana Symphony Orchestra: Mahler’s Resurrection

8-9

Dontrell, Who Kissed the Sea

12-14

Dontrell, Who Kissed the Sea

13-15

Mr. Burns, a post-electric play

15

Art of Time Ensemble performs Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band

20-23

Mr. Burns, a post-electric play

20

Nathan Gunn, baritone and Julie Gunn, piano with the Jupiter String Quartet

21

Sinfonia da Camera: Beethoven: The Middle Period

25

Shanghai Acrobats of the People’s Republic of China: Shanghai Nights!

27

Lucky Plush Productions: Trip the Light Fantastic: The Making of SuperStrip

27-29

The Minotaur


29

Aida Cuevas and Mariachi Reyna de Los Angeles: México y su Mujer

NOVEMBER

FEBRUARY February Dance

4

Venice Baroque Orchestra: Vivaldi’s Juditha triumphans

9-12

Romeo and Juliet

9-11

Studiodance I

11

Sinfonia da Camera: Elijah

14-15

Les 7 doigts de la main: Cuisine & Confessions

16

Akademie für Alte Musik Berlin: Foreign Affairs: Characters of the Baroque

17

Champaign-Urbana Symphony Orchestra: Music of the Heartland

The Minotaur

7

3

ELLNORA Special: Pablo Villegas, guitar: Americano

Sonic Illinois: TWO: The Music of the New York School

8-12

Failure: A Love Story

10-12

November Dance

9

10-13

Poppea

Sonic Illinois: The Black Composer Speaks

10-12

Susan Werner

13

Naumburg Cello Competition Winner: Lev Sivkov, cello

Sonic Illinois: Afterglow: Kahil El’Zabar’s Ethnic Heritage Ensemble 10

Red Sky: Mistatim

11

The Five Irish Tenors

28

16-18

René Marie and Experiment in Truth: Sound of Red

En Garde Arts presents WILDERNESS

29

St. Louis Symphony

16

Sonic Illinois: Jupiter String Quartet with Todd Palmer, clarinet

3.30-4.1

Iago’s Plot

30

Night Music: Donal Fox: Inventions in Blue

18

Sinfonia da Camera: The American Century

19

Young Concert Artists Winner: Zorá String Quartet

DECEMBER The Nutcracker

1

Sinfonia da Camera: Windless Winter

8

Champaign-Urbana Symphony Orchestra: Holiday Glories

JANUARY 17-19

22

26

27-28

28

Russian National Ballet Theatre: Carmen/Romeo and Juliet, Giselle, and The Sleeping Beauty Concert Artists Guild Winner: Daniel Hsu, piano

CultureTalk: Barry Lopez and Deke Weaver

2-4

2-6

1-4

7

Failure: A Love Story

Ensemble Basiani

The Havana Cuba All-Stars: Cuban Nights

National Symphony Orchestra of Ukraine

2-4

1

16

4

23

Cleveland Quartet Award Winner: Dover Quartet

23-26

Viva Verdi!

24

Going Broader and Deeper: New Play Reading

28

University of Illinois Sesquicentennial Kickoff Celebration with Funkadesi

Inon Barnatan, piano; Anthony McGill, clarinet; Alisa Weilerstein, cello Mark Morris Dance Group and Music Ensemble

MARCH 2-4

Romeo and Juliet

Champaign-Urbana Symphony Orchestra: British Bounty

3

Sonic Illinois: Bang on a Can All-Stars: Julia Wolfe’s Anthracite Fields

APRIL 4

Jupiter String Quartet

5-9

Iago’s Plot

20-22

Studiodance II

20-21

Step Afrika!: The Migration: Reflections on Jacob Lawrence

22

Sinfonia da Camera: Scheherazade

23

Krannert Center Debut Artist

27-30

The Light in the Piazza

29

Champaign-Urbana Symphony Orchestra: Latin Sensations

30

Compagnia TPO: Farfalle (Butterflies)


Landmarks

32

Take a Tour Through Campus Illinois is home to over 350 buildings, many of which belong to the National Register of Historic Places. A full map of buildings is listed on page 38, with the featured landmarks called out in orange.

2

in Monticello, Illinois, includes formal

ALICE CAMPBELL ALUMNI CENTER

1

2

Alice Campbell Alumni Center is located at Lincoln Avenue and California Street in

ACES LIBRARY, INFORMATION AND ALUMNI CENTER

1

The ACES Library, Information and Alumni Center stands as an informational and architectural landmark on the University of Illinois campus. Dedicated on Oct. 4, 2001, the $21 million state-of-the-art facility integrates traditional information sources

Urbana, just south of the Hallene Gateway Plaza, the east entryway to the UrbanaChampaign campus. Named by lead benefactors, Robert C., ‘54 BUS, and Alice Curtis Campbell, JD ‘43 LAS, of Los Angeles, this facility is a warm and welcoming haven for alumni and friends on every visit back, be it for business or pleasure.

with new learning and information

ALLERTON PARK AND

technologies. The facility houses four

CONFERENCE CENTER

instructional and multimedia laboratories and studios, as well as an Information and Career Services Office and an Alumni Center.

3

Allerton was deeded to the University of Illinois by Robert Allerton in 1946. Originally called “the farms,” the former private estate University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

gardens, an extensive landscape park dotted with ornaments and fine art, and a manor house modeled after Ham House in England. Allerton House was built in 1900 and now serves as a conference center. In 1971, the lowland and southern forests of 1,000 acres were declared a National Natural Landmark. ALMA MATER

3

Now positioned at the west gateway to the university at Green and Wright streets in Urbana, the Alma Mater sculpture stood until 1962 behind Foellinger Auditorium on the south campus. Designed by university graduate Lorado Taft, the sculpture was unveiled on June 12, 1929. The Alma Mater is shown “as a benign and majestic woman in


Landmarks

33

4

scholastic robes, who rises from her throne and advances a step with outstretched arms, a gesture of generously greeting her children,” according to Taft. Learning and

5

ARMORY

BECKMAN INSTITUTE FOR

4

The Armory was designed as a military drill

ADVANCED SCIENCE

hall, an athletic facility and an assembly hall.

AND TECHNOLOGY

More than 2,000 soldiers used the Armory as

Beckman is the largest academic building

a dormitory during World War I. Constructed

on campus and anchors the far end of the

in 1912-14 and modified in 1925-27 and 1962,

north campus. It is constructed on the site

the building is something of an engineering

of the university’s first building, which

feat: The long span structure was unique

was demolished in 1881 (also the site of the

in its day. An example of Georgian Revival

Designed by Nathan C. Ricker and James M.

Illinois Field baseball diamond and the

architecture, the Armory is an anchor point

White, Altgeld Hall was completed in 1897,

university’s first collegiate homecoming in

for the south campus.

1910). Completed in 1989, the institute was

Labor flank the main figure. An inscription reads: “To thy happy children of the future those of the past send greetings.” ALTGELD HALL

with additions in 1914, 1919, 1926 and 1956. When first occupied, it had a museum in the

ASTRONOMICAL

basement, the University Library on the first

OBSERVATORY

floor, and stacks and offices on the second floor. It then served as the law building (1927 to 1955), and the math building and library (1955 to the present). Named after Illinois Gov. John P. Altgeld, the building is considered one of the finest examples of Richardsonian Romanesque architecture in Illinois. The central room is decorated with murals by Newton A. Wells.

made possible by a $40 million gift from  13

Constructed in 1896, the Astronomical Observatory was designated a National

alumnus Arnold O. Beckman and his wife, Mabel M. Beckman. ENGINEERING HALL

5

Historic Landmark in 1990, primarily for

This example of Renaissance Revival

the advances in astronomy associated

architecture was built in 1894. Architect

with the structure. Under the direction of

George Bullard, a student of Nathan C.

professor Joel Stebbins from 1907 to 1922,

Ricker, won a design competition open

the observatory was the site for developing

only to university graduates. The interior

the selenium cell and the photoelectric

has oak woodwork, the ceiling is paneled

cell, which revolutionized the science of

in Washington fir. Engineering Hall

photoelectric photometry — the technique

underwent an extensive renovation that was

used to measure celestial magnitudes.

completed in 2000.

Much of the original equipment is intact, and the 12-inch refracting telescope is still used for classes. On Campus | 2016-2017


Landmarks

34

FOELLINGER AUDITORIUM

6

architect Lawrence Booth and completed in

HARKER HALL

1988, greatly expanded the exhibition space.

With its dome, Foellinger (prounounced

Originally the Chemical Laboratory, Harker

with a hard “G”) recalls Thomas Jefferson’s

Hall was until recently the oldest remaining

Rotunda on the University of Virginia

classroom building on the Urbana campus.

campus. The auditorium has a copper roof

Designed by Nathan C. Ricker (with John

and cornice. Considered an example of the

M. Van Odsel) and built in 1878, Harker Hall

One of the pre-eminent performance

Beaux Arts Classical style, it was built in 1907

is considered Second Empire in style. It is

facilities in the nation, Krannert Center is

from a design by Clarence Blackall. In 1984,

named for Oliver A. Harker, the third dean

largely the result of a gift from Herman and

the auditorium was completely renovated

of the law school (1903 to 1916) and the first

Ellnora Krannert. Completed in 1969, the

with funds provided by alumna Helene

university counsel. The University of Illinois

center covers 10 acres and includes four

Foellinger.

Foundation moved to Harker Hall after

theaters and an outdoor amphitheater. The

extensive renovations of the building in 1992.

complex was designed by alumnus and

GRAINGER ENGINEERING LIBRARY INFORMATION CENTER

KRANNERT CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

architect Max Abramovitz, who served on ILLINI UNION

9

the design team for Lincoln Center in New York City. Krannert is home to more than 350

Named in honor of William Wallace Grainger,

At the heart of campus, the Illini Union

the library information center opened in

serves as a community center for students,

1994. The history of the site of the Grainger

alumni, faculty, staff and guests. Constructed

Engineering Library Information Center

in 1939-40 in Colonial Williamsburg style, the

is intertwined with the history of north

Union was conceived by Ernest L. Stouffer,

Lincoln Hall honors the Springfield lawyer

campus, the cradle of the University of

university architect, and Howard Cheney,

who went on to become president of the

Illinois. The facility sits on the spot where

consulting architect. The cupola, clock and

United States. Completed in 1911 with

one of the first campus buildings, Mechanical

bell from University Hall (demolished) are

an addition in 1929, it is an example of

Building and Drill Hall, was erected in 1871,

retained in the Illini Union. It is considered

Renaissance Revival architecture. Terra

and houses more than 300,000 volumes of

one of the most significant buildings on

cotta plaques on the east exterior depict

engineering materials.

campus because of its location, character,

scenes from President Lincoln’s life; those

quality and use.

on the sides display quotations. Lincoln Hall

HALFWAY HOUSE

7

The trolley stand at the north end of the

performances each year. LINCOLN HALL

reopened in fall 2012 after undergoing a $6.4 JAPAN HOUSE

 10

million renovation.

Quad on South Mathews Avenue was

The University of Illinois has a history of

originally located on Green Street. It was

the study of Japanese culture dating back

situated halfway between Champaign and

to 1900. Founded in 1998 as a permanent

Dedicated Oct. 18, 1924, Memorial Stadium

Urbana and served as “University stop” on

home for Japanese culture and initiatives,

is a mixture of Georgian Revival and

the horse-drawn streetcar that ran east-west.

Japan House and its gardens provide an

Neoclassical architecture, and is considered

First erected in 1885, the structure was moved

important academic, cultural and natural

one of the nation’s most distinctive sports

from storage to its present site in 1964.

setting for promoting an understanding

stadiums. More than 20,000 students, alumni

of Japanese culture and of Asia. Funded

and friends of the university contributed

primarily through private contributions,

about $1.7 million to fund the construction.

the 3,120-square-foot facility was designed

The second story is a colonnade of

by Jack Baker, professor emeritus

paired limestone Roman Doric columns,

of architecture, and Isaken Glerum

representing University of Illinois students

PC Architects.

who died in World War I.

HALLENE GATEWAY

8

The east entry to the campus at Lincoln Avenue and Illinois Street in Urbana features the stone portal from the entrance to the first university-built classroom building, University Hall. The portal entrance apparently was kept behind the Architecture Building for a number of years and then

KRANNERT ART MUSEUM AND KINKEAD PAVILION

 11

seemingly disappeared from the campus

Ranked second among public museums in

until it was found at Allerton Park in

Illinois in size and value of the collection, the

Monticello in 1994. Alan and Phyllis Welsh

main museum opened in 1961, funded largely

Hallene donated the funds to construct the

by a generous contribution from alumnus

gateway plaza, which was dedicated in 1998.

Herman Krannert and his wife, Ellnora Krannert. The Kinkead Pavilion, designed by

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

MEMORIAL STADIUM

MORROW PLOTS

 12

 13

Beside the underground Undergraduate Library, the Morrow Plots are the country’s oldest experimental agricultural fields in continuous use. Agriculture professor Manley Miles and George Morrow, the first dean of agriculture, began laying out the plots in 1876. Miles first divided the fields into 10 plots of 1/2 acre each, then later divided


Landmarks

35

11

6

9

1.8 mi Squirrel Crossings

plosion

tive Ex .6 mi Crea

12

.7 mi Lovie’s Turf

7

10

13 8

On Campus | 2016-2017


Landmarks

36

14

the area further into plots of 1/20 acre. Morrow modeled the plots after agricultural techniques he had observed in Great Britain (Rothamsted in particular) and France. The plots were designated a National Historic Landmark in 1968.

Designed by Nathan C. Ricker, the Natural History Building is an example of the High Victorian Gothic style. The original building was completed in 1892, and the departments of botany, zoology and geology moved in that fall. It is now undergoing a $70 million renovation.  14

The round barns are the inspiration of Wilbur J. Fraser, the first head of the department of dairy husbandry (1902-13). Fraser was a strong advocate of round barns, which offered the dairy farmer “economy of consideration, low maintenance and labor efficiency.” Fraser and the university’s demonstration barns were apparently instrumental in popularizing the round barn type found throughout Illinois. The first barn was built in 1907-08; the second and third about 1910.

SMITH MEMORIAL HALL An example of the Beaux Arts Classical style and designed by campus architect James M.

NATURAL HISTORY BUILDING

ROUND DAIRY BARNS

15

White, Smith Hall is considered one of the

Designed by alumnus Max Abramovitz,

most handsomely detailed classical buildings

the reinforced concrete structure cost $8.5

on campus. Thomas J. Smith, a member

million and is one of the world’s largest

of the Board of Trustees from 1897 to 1903,

edge-supported domes, spanning 400 feet in

gave farmland and money totaling about

diameter and rising 128 feet above the floor.

$480,500 to finance the construction. Details

The building hosts many basketball games,

throughout the building, including the

performances, plays and concerts. It opened

ornate Memorial Room on the second floor,

March 2, 1963. The State Farm Center is

feature intricate friezes and door surrounds.

undergoing a state-of-the-art, multimillion-

SPURLOCK MUSEUM

dollar renovation. A grand reopening is set for October 20-23, 2016.

Funded by a gift from William and Clarice Spurlock, the museum opened on Sept.

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

 15

26, 2002. The state-of-the-art facility

This intellectual heart of the campus is part

houses about 46,000 artifacts from diverse

of the ensemble of fine Georgian Revival

cultures and varied historical time periods,

buildings designed by Charles Platt that

augmented by noteworthy selections from

form a strongly unified portion of the south

the University of Illinois Museum of Natural

campus. Initial construction was completed

History and department of anthropology.

in 1926, with many subsequent additions.

STATE FARM CENTER

Decorative elements include 27 art-glass windows by J. Scott Williams and murals

From a purely structural standpoint,

by Barry Faulkner. It is the largest public

State Farm Center is the university’s most

university library in North America. 

significant and revolutionary building. University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign


More On Campus

On Campus | 2016-2017

37


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South campus locations not pictured: • Administrative Information Technology (AITS) Building • Art Studios • Ashton Woods Family and Graduate Housing • Bee Research Facility • Biological Control Laboratory • Children’s Research Center • EnterpriseWorks • Fire Service Institute Building • I Building • iCyt • Illinois Sustainable Technology Center • Illinois Technology Center • Imported Swine Research Laboratory

B On Campus | 2016-2017

• LIttlefuse Research Center • Natural Resources Studies Annex • Physiology Research Laboratory • Remote Library Storage Facility • Robert A. Evers Laboratory • Special Materials Storage Facility • State Regional Office Building • State Universities Retirement System • State Water Survey Research Building • U of I Employees Credit Union • Waste Management Research Center • Wildlife Research Laboratory • Z Building • Z-2 Building

A

1


40 ALPHABETICAL LEGEND 219 Abbott Power Plant (H2) 18 ACES Library, Information and Alumni Center (D4) 209 Activities and Recreation Center/ARC (F2) 19 Admissions and Records (D6) 35 Advanced Computation Bldg. (E7) 266 Aerodynamics Research Lab. (E7) 93 Aeronautical Lab. A (F6) 68 708 South Mathews Avenue (E6) 64 Afro-American Studies and Research Program (D5) 59 Agricultural Bioprocess Lab. (D4) 160 Agriculture Engineering Sciences Bldg. (D4) 238 Agriculture Services Bldg. (C1) 239 Agriculture Services Warehouse (B1) 241 Agronomy/Plant Pathology Farm (B1) 242a Agronomy Seed House (B1) 247 Agronomy Soybean Research Farm (A1) 262 Alice Campbell Alumni Ctr. (D6) 267 Alma Mater (F5) 132 Altgeld Hall (F5) 62 Animal Sciences Lab. (D4) 192 Arcade Bldg. (F5) 61 Architecture Annex (D4) 152 Architecture Bldg. (E4) 169 Armory (F4) 167 Art and Design Bldg. (E3) 256 Asian American Cultural Ctr. (E5) 25 Astronomy Bldg. (E7) 230 Atkins Bldg. (E1) 269 Atkins Tennis Ctr. (C2) 87 Atmospheric Sciences Annex 2 (E6) 29 Atmospheric Sciences Bldg. (E7) 88 Aviation Ground School (E6) 111 Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology (G7) 205 Beckwith Hall (H4) 63 Bevier Hall (D5) 176 Bielfeldt Athletic Administration Bldg (D1) 108 Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Facility (A1) 58 Burnsides Research Lab. (C4) 85 Burrill Hall (E6) 107 Campbell Hall for Public Telecommunication (WILL A M-FM-TV (F7) 5 Campus Recreation Ctr. East/CRCE (D5) 211 Campus Recreation Outdoor Ctr. (H2) 258 Carl R. Woese Inst. for Genomic Biology (D5) 23 Ctr. for Advanced Study (D6) 226 Central Receiving Warehouse (G1) 91 Ceramics Bldg. (F6) 90 Ceramics Kiln House (F6) 81 Chemical and Life Sciences Lab. (E5) 139 Chemistry Annex (E5) 9 Chez Family Center for Wounded Veterans in Higher Education (D6) 15 Child Development Lab. (D5) 70 Children and Family Research Ctr. (E5) 283 Clark Hall (F3) 186 Coble Hall (F5) 271 College of Business Instructional Facility (E4) 203 Colonel Wolfe School (H5) 113b Computer and Systems Research Lab (G7) 199 Computing Applications Bldg. (G6) 188 Credit Union Mini-branch (G5) 246 Dairy Experimental Round Barns (B2) 6 Dance Administration Bldg. (C5) 7 Dance Studio (C5) 140 Davenport Hall (E5) 151 David Kinley Hall (E4) 118 Digital Computer Lab. (F6) 259 Doris Kelley Christopher Hall (C6) 237 Duplicating/Quick Copy Bldg. (C1) 17 Early Child Development Lab. (D5) 257 Gregory Place I (D5) 235b Eichelberger Field (C3) 279 Electrical and Computer Engineering Bldg. (G7) 130 Engineering Hall (F6) 36b Engineering Sciences Bldg. (F7) 37 Engineering Senior Design Studio (E7) 265 Engineering Student Project Lab. (E7) 138 English Bldg. (F5) 30 Environmental Health and Safety Bldg. (E7) 28 Environmental Research Annex (E7) 131 Everitt Lab. (F5) 60 FAA Performing Arts Annex 207 Flagg Hall (F3) 144 Foellinger Auditorium (E5) 249 Food Science Dry Processing Lab. (A1) 142 Foreign Languages Bldg. (E5) 38 Frederick Seitz Materials Research Lab. (E6) 46 Freer Hall (D5)

Map 274 Gable Home (E1) 228 Garage and Car Pool (F1) 217 Geological Survey Lab. (H2) 121 Grainger Engineering Library Information Ctr. (F6) 145 Gregory Hall (E4) 257 Gregory Place I (D5) 268 Hallene Gateway (D6) 170 Harding Band Bldg. (F4) 135 Harker Hall (F5) 136 Henry Admin. Bldg. (F5) 224 Housing Food Stores (H1) 168 Huff Hall (F3) 113a Hydrosystems Lab. (G7) 270 I Hotel and Conference Ctr. (E1) 172 Ice Arena (F4) 16 ICS Oregon Computing Laboratory (C6) 3 Illini Grove (B4) 191 Illini Hall (F5) 173 Illini Tower (F4) 133 Illini Union (F5) 185 Illini Union Bookstore (F5) 235a Illinois Field (D2) 55 Integrated Bioprocessing Lab (D4) 272 Demirjian Golf Practice Facility (C2) 202 Information Kiosk (G1) 14 Inst. of Government and Public Affairs (D5) 66 Intensive English Inst. (D5) 175a International Studies Bldg. (F4) 21 Irwin Academic Services Ctr. (F4) 158 Irwin Indoor Football Practice Facility (E2) 260 Japan House (A3) 116 Kenney Gym. (G6) 117 Kenney Gym. Annex (G6) 166 Krannert Art Museum and Kinkead Pavilion (E3) 42 Krannert Center for the Performing Arts (E6) 65 510 East Chalmers Street (D5) 195 Latina/o Studies (F4) 165 Law Bldg. (E3) 22 Levis Faculty Center/Visitor’s Center (D6) 146 Library (E4) 175b Library and Information Science Bldg (F4) 141 Lincoln Hall (E5) 39 Loomis Lab. (E6) 47 Madigan Lab. (D5) 227 Mailing Ctr. (G1) 179 909 South Sixth Street (F4) 129 Materials Science and Engineering Bldg. (F6) 275 McFarland Carillon (D4) 4 McKinley Health Ctr. (C5) 56 Meat Science Lab. (C4) 86 Mechanical Engineering Bldg. (F6) 125 Mechanical Engineering Lab. (F6) 83 Medical Sciences Bldg. (E5) 210 Memorial Stadium (F2) 177 512 East Chalmers Street (F4) 115 Micro and Nanotechnology Lab. (G6) 84 Morrill Hall (E5) 149 Morrow Plots (E4) 150 Mumford Hall (D4) 157 Mumford House (D4) 12 Music Education Annex (C6) 45 Music Bldg. (D5) 53 National Soybean Research Ctr. (C4) 261 Native American House (E5) 134 Natural History Bldg. (F6) 164 Natural History Survey Greenhouse (D3) 162 Natural Resources Bldg. (D3) 163 Natural Resources Garage (D3) 104 NCSA (F7) 278 NCSA Petascale Computing Facility (F1) 75 1203 1/2 West Nevada Street (D5) 114 Newmark Civil Engineering Lab. (G6) 208 Noble Hall (F3) 112 North Campus Chiller Plant (G7) 254 North Campus Parking Deck (G7) 137 Noyes Lab. (E5) 92 Nuclear Engineering Lab. (F6) 221 Nuclear Physics Lab. (H2) 89 Nuclear Radiations Lab. (F6) 40 School of Nursing (E6) 255 Oak Street Chiller Plant (H2) 148 Observatory (E4) 196 Optical Physics and Engineering Lab (G6) 183 Parking Deck (G5) 128 Parking Deck and Fire Station (C5) 216 Personnel Services Bldg. (H2) 225 Physical Plant Service Bldg. (G1) 263 Physics Research Lab. Storage (H1) 244 Plant Clinic (B2) 52 Plant Sciences Lab. (C4) 31 Plant Services Bldg. NE (E7) 32 Plant Services Building-North (E7) 27 Plant Services Storage Bldg. (E7) 174 Police Training Inst. (G4) 1 President’s House (A4)

206 Printing Services Bldg. (H2) 201 Professional Arts Bldg. (G6) 180 Psychology Bldg. (F5) 36a Public Safety Bldg. (F7) 220 Rehabilitation Education Ctr. (H2) 107a Richmond Studio/Swanson Center (F7) 74 Roger Adams Lab. (E5) 264 Roller Hockey Rink (G2) 171 School of Labor and Employment Relations (F4) 106 R.T. Ubben Basketball Complex (D1) 193 School of Nursing(G5) 281 School of Social Work (Gregory Place II (D6) 197 Shelford Vivarium (G6) 143 Smith Memorial Hall (E5) 236 Soccer and Track Stadium (C2) 242b South Farms Field Lab. (B1) 240 South Farms Warehouses (B1) 181 Speech and Hearing Clinic (F4) 20 Spurlock Museum (D6) 229 State Farm Center (E1) 161 Stock Pavilion (D3) 282 Student Dining and Residential Programs Building (G3) 153 Surveying Bldg. (E4) 187 Swanlund Admin. Bldg. (F5) 57 Taft House (C4) 122 Talbot Lab. (G6) 194 Technology Plaza (G5) 156 Temple Hoyne Buell Hall (D3) 103 Thomas M. Siebel Center for Computer Science (F7) 94 Transportation Bldg. (F6) 204 Tower at Third (H4) 50 Turner Hall (D4) 51 Turner Hall Greenhouse (C4) 190 Turner Student Services Bldg. (F5) 147 Undergraduate Library (E4) 100 University High School Gym. (F7) 102 University High School (F7) 223 University Press Bldg. (H1) 48 Vegetable Crops Bldg. (C4) 251 Veterinary Basic Sciences Bldg. (A2) 248 Veterinary Feed Storage Bldg. (A1) 250 Veterinary Surgery and Obstetrics Lab (A2) 252 Veterinary Teaching Hospital (A2) 222 Volatile Storage Bldg. (H1) 154 Wohlers Hall (E4) 159 Wood Engineering Lab. (D4) 40 408 S. Goodwin, U. (E6) 215 51 E. Armory, C. (H3) 214 55 E. Armory, C. (H3) 213 57 E. Armory, C. (H3) 212 59 E. Armory, C. (H3) 189 505 E. Green, C. (G5) 273 507 E. Green, C. (G5) 177 512 E. Chalmers, (F4) 76 608 S. Mathews, U. (E5) 68 708 S. Mathews, U (E5) 2 805 W. Pennsylvania Avenue (B4) 178 911 S. Sixth, C. (F4) 179 909 S. Sixth , C. (F4) 10 1001 W. Nevada, U. (C5) 11 1003 W. Nevada, U. (D5) 75 1203 1/2 W. Nevada, U. (D5) 71 1205 W. Oregon, U. (E5) 67 1205 1/2 W. Nevada, U. (D5) 72 1207 W. Oregon (E5) 98 1208 W. Springfield, U. (F6) 200 508 S. Sixth, C. (G6) 126 912 S. Fifth, C. (F4) 34 1009 W. Springfield, U. (E7) 253 1208 W. Nevada Street (E5) 104 1208 W. Stoughton, U. (F7) 99 1210 W. Springfield, U. (F7)

UNIVERSITY RESIDENCE HALLS Champaign Residence Halls BR Barton (F3) BF Bousfield Hall (G2) CL Clark Hall (F3) GR Garner (G3) HP Hopkins (G2) LN Lundgren (F3) NG Nugent Hall (G3) SC Scott (F2) SN Snyder (F2) TF Taft (F3) VD Van Doren (F2) WJ Wassaja Hall (G3) WS Weston (F3) Urbana North Residence Halls AL Allen (C5) BS Busey (D5) EV Evans (D5) LA Lincoln Avenue (C5) Illinois Street Residence Halls TW Townsend (D6)

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

WR Wardall (E6) Pennsylvania Avenue Residence Halls BB Babcock (B4) BL Blaisdell (B4) CR Carr (B4) SD Saunders (B4) Florida Avenue Residence Halls OG Oglesby (B4) TR Trelease (B4) Graduate Halls DN Daniels (E6) SM Sherman (G4) Family Housing AW Ashton Woods Family and Graduate Housing (see C1) GG Goodwin/Green Apts. (E6) OD Orchard Downs Apts. (see A4) Privately Owned Residence Halls AH Armory House (G3) BH Bromley Hall (G4) HH Hendrick House (D7) NH Newman Hall (F4)

NUMERICAL LEGEND 1 President’s House (A4) 2 805 West Pennsylvania Avenue (B4) 3 Illini Grove (B4) 4 McKinley Health Ctr. (C5) 5 Campus Recreation Ctr. East/CRCE (D5) 6 Dance Administration Bldg. (C5) 7 Dance Studio (C5) 9 Chez Family Center for Wounded Veterans in Higher Education (D6) 10 1001 W. Nevada, U. (C5) 11 1003 W. Nevada, U. (D5) 12 Music Education Annex (C6) 14 Inst. of Government and Public Affairs (D5) 15 Child Development Lab. (D5) 16 ICS Oregon Computing Laboratory (C6) 17 Child Development Lab. (D5) 18 ACES Library, Information and Alumni Center (D4) 19 Admissions and Records (D6) 20 Spurlock Museum (D6) 21 Irwin Academic Services Ctr. (F4) 22 Levis Faculty Center/Visitor’s Center (D6) 23 Ctr. for Advanced Study (D6) 25 Astronomy Bldg. (E7) 27 Plant Services Storage Bldg. (E7) 28 Environmental Research Annex (E7) 29 Atmospheric Sciences Bldg. (E7) 30 Environmental Health and Safety Bldg (E7) 31 Plant Services Bldg. NE (E7) 32 Plant Services Building-North (E7) 34 1009 W. Springfield, U. (E7) 35 Advanced Computation Bldg. (E7) 36a Public Safety Bldg. (F7) 36b Engineering Sciences Bldg. (F7) 37 Engineering Senior Design Studio (E7) 38 Frederick Seitz Materials Research Lab (E6) 39 Loomis Lab. (E6) 40 408 S. Goodwin, U. (E6) 42 Krannert Ctr. for the Performing Arts (E6) 45 Music Bldg. (D5) 46 Freer Hall (D5) 47 Madigan Lab. (D5) 48 Vegetable Crops Bldg. (C4) 49 Ornamental Horticulture Bldg. (D4) 50 Turner Hall (D4) 51 Turner Hall Greenhouse (C4) 52 Plant Sciences Lab. (C4) 53 National Soybean Research Ctr. (C4) 55 Integrated Bioprocessing Lab (D4) 56 Meat Science Lab. (C4) 57 Taft House (C4) 58 Burnsides Research Lab. (C4) 59 Agricultural Bioprocess Lab. (D4) 60 Architecture Annex (D4) 61 FAA Performing Arts Annex (D4) 62 Animal Sciences Lab. (D4) 63 Bevier Hall (D5) 64 Afro-American Studies and Research Program (D5) 65 1203 W. Nevada, U (D5) 66 Intensive English Institute (D5) 67 1205 1/2 W. Nevada, U. (D5) 68 708 South Mathews, U (E5) 70 Children and Family Research Ctr. (E5) 71 1205 West Oregon Street (E5) 72 1207 W. Oregon (E5) 74 Roger Adams Lab. (E5) 75 1203 1/2 West Nevada Street (D5) 76 608 South Mathews Avenue (E5)


Map 81 Chemical and Life Sciences Lab. (E5) 83 Medical Sciences Bldg. (E5) 84 Morrill Hall (E5) 85 Burrill Hall (E6) 86 Mechanical Engineering Bldg. (F6) 87 Atmospheric Sciences Annex 2 (E6) 88 Aviation Ground School (E6) 89 Nuclear Radiations Lab. (F6) 90 Ceramics Kiln House (F6) 91 Ceramics Bldg. (F6) 92 Nuclear Engineering Lab. (F6) 93 Aeronautical Lab. A (F6) 94 Transportation Bldg. (F6) 98 CSO Systems Consulting Office (F7) 99 1210 W. Springfield, U. (F7) 100 University High School Gym. (F7) 102 University High School (F7) 103 Thomas M. Siebel Center for Computer Science (F7) 104 NCSA (F7) 106 R.T. Ubben Basketball Complex (D1) 107 Campbell Hall for Public Telecommunication (WILL AM-FM-TV) (F7) 107a Richmond Studio/Swanson Center (F7) 108 Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Facility (A1) 111 Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology (G7) 112 North Campus Chiller Plant (G7) 113a Hydrosystems Lab. (G7) 113b Computer and Systems Research Lab. (G7) 114 Newmark Civil Engineering Lab. (G6) 115 Micro and Nanotechnology Lab. (G6) 116 Kenney Gym. (G6) 117 Kenney Gym. Annex (G6) 118 Digital Computer Lab. (G6) 121 Grainger Engineering Library Information Ctr. (F6) 122 Talbot Lab. (G6) 125 Mechanical Engineering Lab. (F6) 126 912 S. Fifth, C. (F4) 128 Parking Deck and Fire Station (C5) 129 Materials Science and Engineering Bldg. (F6) 130 Engineering Hall (F6) 131 Everitt Lab. (F5) 132 Altgeld Hall (F5) 133 Illini Union (F5) 134 Natural History Bldg. (F6) 135 Harker Hall (F5)

136 Henry Admin. Bldg. (F5) 137 Noyes Lab. (E5) 138 English Bldg. (F5) 139 Chemistry Annex (E5) 140 Davenport Hall (E5) 141 Lincoln Hall (E5) 142 Foreign Languages Bldg. (E5) 143 Smith Memorial Hall (E5) 144 Foellinger Auditorium (E5) 145 Gregory Hall (E4) 146 Library (E4) 147 Undergraduate Library (E4) 148 Observatory (E4) 149 Morrow Plots (E4) 150 Mumford Hall (D4) 151 David Kinley Hall (E4) 152 Architecture Bldg. (E4) 153 Surveying Bldg. (E4) 154 Wohlers Hall (E4) 155 Education Bldg. (E3) 156 Temple Hoyne Buell Hall (D3) 157 Mumford House (D4) 158 Irwin Indoor Football Practice Facility (E2) 159 Wood Engineering Lab. (D4) 160 Agriculture Engineering Sciences Bldg (D4) 161 Stock Pavilion (D3) 162 Natural Resources Bldg. (D3) 163 Natural Resources Garage (D3) 164 Natural History Survey Greenhouse (D3) 165 Law Bldg. (E3) 166 Krannert Art Museum and Kinkead Pavilion (E3) 167 Art and Design Bldg. (E3) 168 Huff Hall (F3) 169 Armory (F4) 170 Harding Band Bldg. (F4) 171 School of Labor and Employment Relations (F4) 172 Ice Arena (F4) 173 Illini Tower (F4) 174 Police Training Inst. (G4) 175a International Studies Bldg. (F4) 175b Library and Information Science Bldg. (F4) 176 Bielfeldt Athletic Administration Bldg. (D1) 177 512 East Chalmers Street (F4) 178 911 South Sixth Street (F4)

179 909 South Sixth Street (F4) 180 Psychology Bldg. (F5) 181 Speech and Hearing Clinic (F4) 183 Parking Deck (G5) 185 Illini Union Bookstore (F5) 186 Coble Hall (F5) 187 Swanlund Admin. Bldg. (F5) 188 Credit Union Mini-branch (G5) 189 505 E. Green, C. (G5) 190 Turner Student Services Bldg. (F5) 191 Illini Hall (F5) 192 Arcade Bldg. (F5) 193 School of Nursing (G5) 194 Technology Plaza (G5) 196 Optical Physics and Engineering Lab (G6) 197 Shelford Vivarium (G6) 199 Computing Applications Bldg. (G6) 200 508 S. Sixth, C. (G6) 201 Professional Arts Bldg. (G6) 202 Information Kiosk (G1) 203 Colonel Wolfe School (H5) 204 Tower at Third (H4) 205 Beckwith Hall (H4) 206 Printing Services Bldg. (H2) 207 Flagg Hall (F3) 208 Noble Hall (F3) 209 Activities and Recreation Center/ ARC (F2) 210 Memorial Stadium (F2) 211 Campus Recreation Outdoor Ctr. (H2) 212 59 E. Armory, C. (H3) 213 57 E. Armory, C. (H3) 214 55 E. Armory, C. (H3) 215 51 E. Armory, C. (H3) 216 Personnel Services Bldg. (H2) 217 Geological Survey Lab. (H2) 219 Abbott Power Plant (H2) 220 Rehabilitation Education Ctr. (H2) 221 Nuclear Physics Lab. (H2) 222 Volatile Storage Bldg. (H1) 223 University Press Bldg. (H1) 224 Housing Food Stores (H1) 225 Physical Plant Service Bldg. (G1) 226 Central Receiving Warehouse (G1) 227 Mailing Ctr. (G1) 228 Garage and Car Pool (F1) 229 State Farm Center (E1) 230 Atkins Bldg. (E1) 235a Illinois Field (D2)

On Campus | 2016-2017

41 235b Eichelberger Field (C3) 236 Soccer and Track Stadium (C2) 237 Duplicating/Quick Copy Bldg. (C1) 238 Agriculture Services Bldg. (C1) 239 Agriculture Services Warehouse (B1) 240 South Farms Warehouses (B1) 241 Agronomy/Plant Pathology Farm (B1) 242a Agronomy Seed House (B1) 242b South Farms Field Lab. (B1) 244 Plant Clinic (B2) 246 Dairy Experimental Round Barns (B2) 247 Agronomy Soybean Research Farm (A1) 248 Veterinary Feed Storage Bldg. (A1) 249 Food Science Dry Processing Lab. (A1) 250 Veterinary Surgery and Obstetrics Lab (A2) 251 Veterinary Basic Sciences Bldg. (A2) 252 Veterinary Teaching Hospital (A2) 253 1208 West Nevada Street (E5) 254 North Campus Parking Deck (G7) 255 Oak Street Chiller Plant (H2) 256 Asian American Cultural Ctr. (E5) 257 Gregory Place I (D5) 258 Carl R. Woese Inst. for Genomic Biology (D5) 259 Doris Kelley Christopher Hall (C6) 260 Japan House (A3) 261 Native American House (E5) 262 Alice Campbell Alumni Ctr. (D6) 263 Physics Research Lab. Storage (H1) 264 Roller Hockey Rink (G2) 265 Engineering Student Project Lab. (E7) 266 Aerodynamics Research Lab. (E7) 267 Alma Mater (F5) 268 Hallene Gateway (D6) 269 Atkins Tennis Ctr. (C2) 270 I Hotel and Conference Ctr. (E1) 271 College of Business Instructional Facility (E4) 272 Demirjian Golf Practice Facility (C2) 273 507 E. Green Street (G5) 274 Gable Home (E1) 275 McFarland Carillon (D4) 278 NCSA Petascale Computing Facility (F1) 279 Electrical and Computer Engineering Building G7) 281 School of Social Work (Gregory Place II) (D6) 282 Student Dining and Residential Programs Building (G3)


Study Abroad

44

Parasailing in New Zealand, Safari in South Africa

We have 2,400+ students studying abroad in 200+

Student shares experiences traveling around the world, in a wheelchair, through study abroad

than 60 countries across the world.

W R I T E R Meaghan Downs

S

programs in more

And when our students hannon Kelly arrived in Australia

Melbourne campus lacked an accessible gym

aren’t exploring other

and already felt doomed to

like the one at Illinois, so Kelly needed to find

countries, they thrive on

repeat her freshman year.

someone willing to work out with her. Again.

transformational learning

When she first came to the U. of

But as she did at the U. of I. by joining

experiences at one of the

I., Kelly didn’t get along with her

Sigma Kappa sorority, Kelly eventually

most disability-friendly

roommate. She struggled to click with

found her way. She connected with

campuses in the nation.

friends and questioned her broadcast

students at the residence hall where she

journalism major. She went home to

stayed at the University of Melbourne.

Elmhurst, Illinois, every weekend.

She went parasailing in New Zealand

time, this service-learning trip to Cape

Not the life Kelly thought she’d

and saw the Great Barrier Reef.

Town, South Africa,” Kelly said.

create after high school.

By the time she graduated from the U. of I. in

Although Brooks had offered the three-

The summer before Kelly came to

May 2016, Kelly had traveled on four separate

week trip to South Africa since the 2007-08

the Urbana-Champaign campus, she

study abroad trips: South Africa, Sweden,

school year, it was the first time Brooks

said she asked herself, “What would it

Australia, and Hong Kong and Taiwan.

specifically planned a trip to include

take for a girl in a wheelchair to travel

For her trip to Sweden, Kelly received the

students with disabilities. She moved

around the world by herself?”

Enabled Abroad scholarship, which aims

the trip to May and June when more

to encourage Illinois undergraduates with

accessible work sites, such as the school

disabilities to travel by helping cover the

where Kelly spent her time, were open.

So Kelly flew to Costa Rica for a threeweek volunteer trip, and found traveling in another country in a wheelchair means

cost of aides and other accommodations.

relying on strangers. It requires advance

Kelly said her passion for study abroad

upfront worrying about accessibility made

planning to do anything – sleeping, eating

really started with a service-learning trip

the trip go so much smoother,” Kelly said

at restaurants and even bungee jumping.

to Cape Town, South Africa, led by human

of Brooks. “I didn’t really have to worry

“It’s a very inaccessible country. They’re

development and family studies teaching

about accommodations as much as I

trying, but I could not physically go

associate Jan Brooks. Kelly, who worked

would have if she didn’t do all that work.

anywhere on my own. But the country was

out three times a week at the Disability

That was really the first trip I did here – it

beautiful and I made great friends. I grew as

Resources and Educational Services (DRES)

kind of led to my love for study abroad.”

a person and realized that I wanted to do it,

facility, learned about Brooks’ trip from

regardless of my circumstances,” Kelly said.

one of the facility’s physical therapists.

Years later, in Australia, Kelly watched as

“She knew about this study abroad

trip for two years. After a 2013 study

exchange students gathered in fast-formed

program that was trying to include

abroad trip to Cape Town, she extended

cliques during orientation. The University of

students with disabilities for the first

her stay by a week to check out restaurants,

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

“The fact that she spent so much time

Brooks said she had been thinking about planning for a specific, accessible-friendly


Study Abroad

H O N G KO N G

45

NEW ZEALAND

AUSTRALIA

SOUTH AFRICA

Photos courtesy of Shannon Kelly.

housing and tourism sites to ensure

Kelly volunteered at Tembaletu, a

“I was committed that they didn’t have

students would be able to access them.

K-12 school for students with physical

to feel the difference, that they were

She learned quickly that calling something

and learning disabilities.

full participants,” Brooks said.

“That was very eye-opening because that

Brooks said she plans to offer a similar

could be me. If I lived in South Africa, I

trip next spring. Several students with

could be going to that school,” Kelly said.

disabilities, including wheelchair

wheelchair-friendly doesn’t mean it translates to accessibility by U.S. standards. “Wheelchairs were my biggest concern, simply because the city of Cape Town is built into a mountain,” said Brooks, who compared the city to San Francisco. “Nothing is very level. There are no curb cuts anywhere except in the wealthy tourist sector – and before World Cup 2010, even those weren’t there.”

Brooks said she also had to think differently about how the students would participate with one another during the trip. She initially arranged for her daughter, who lives in Cape Town, to drive the students with wheelchairs in a vehicle more accessible

Twelve students traveled with Brooks during

than a van. But Brooks said Kelly would

her 2013 service-learning trip to South

crawl up the steps to the van so that she

Africa, three of whom were students with

could enjoy camaraderie with the rest of the

disabilities and two who used wheelchairs.

group instead of riding in a separate car.

The goal of the trip remained the same,

Brooks wanted to make sure her students

Brooks said. All students took a predeparture

didn’t feel set apart just because they

course on the history and culture of South

required the use of a wheelchair, she

Africa, then spent two weeks completely

said, whether it involved choosing

immersed in the community of Cape

historical tourist sites they’d visit or

Town by volunteering at women’s shelters,

selecting a different safari park tour

hospitals, orphanages and schools.

with more accessible vehicles. On Campus | 2016-2017

athlete and upcoming U.S. Paralympics competitor Chelsea McClammer, have expressed interest in applying. When she thought about graduating from Illinois, Kelly said she’d miss being five minutes away from all of her friends and the opportunities to travel. She planned to spend her summer working for Spirit Cultural Exchange in Oak Park, Illinois, where she would coordinate jobs and internships for international students coming to the U.S. “I think every student should study abroad if they can,” Brooks said.” There are so many programs out there that students should explore those and see what fits them best. The goal in study abroad is to help students solidify their own identity.” 


iMBA

46

Photo: College of Business

Business Education Remastered Online MBA degree launched by College of Business W R I T E R Phil Ciciora, M.S. ‘04 Media

T

Raj Echambadi Senior associate dean of MBA programs and strategic innovation for the College of Business

he “i” of the new “iMBA” degree

The iMBA is the first online graduate

could easily stand for “Illinois.”

business degree offered in partnership with

But on the campus that invented

Coursera, the Silicon Valley educational

digital marketing, accounting and finance. In fact, Inc. magazine rated the course “Marketing in a Digital World” as one of

the graphical web browser and other

technology company that already offers

world-changing discoveries and creations,

a number of U. of I. courses through its

it could also stand for “innovative.”

platform of massive open online courses,

When it was announced last summer that an

more commonly known as MOOCs. All told,

The stackable nature of the degree

the iMBA will cost one-third as much as an

program also means that students are not

of Business Administration degree program

MBA from an institution of similar stature.

trapped in a particular course sequence.

was being launched, the University of

“Offering an online-only MBA degree

“Students can take any set of courses in any

Illinois College of Business was celebrating

will ultimately help the U. of I. connect

order that suits them and their interests,”

the 100th anniversary of its founding. The

with students around the world who wish

Echambadi said. “The iMBA program will

college considered its centennial celebration

to earn a master’s degree in business

work for the entire spectrum of potential

an opportunity to reinvigorate the land-

administration but can’t afford to go back

students – from those who are curious and

grant mission of the U. of I. as a public

to school full time,” Echambadi said.

merely want to dip their toes in the water

online-only version of the popular Master

university as well as a chance to inject a little ingenuity into the traditional delivery method of the coveted business credential, said Raj Echambadi, the senior associate dean of MBA programs and strategic innovation for the College of Business.

By leveraging Coursera’s innovationfriendly platform, the iMBA also amounts to a total reconceptualization of the MBA degree curriculum. “Rather than simply dump traditional

“The 10 Hottest Online Classes for Professionals in 2015.”

to those who know they want to earn a full master’s degree right away. The iMBA is also perfect for those who want to round out their STEM or liberal arts educations with some business know-how.”

MBA content online, we’re creating all

Students can apply for the iMBA either before

new active learning packages about how

they’ve enrolled in classes or after they’ve

businesses work,” Echambadi said. “For

already sampled one or more classes.

business education, it’s truly innovative.”

“A student or working professional could sign

a professor of business administration

In addition to the core curriculum of an

up for a class in a topic they need right away

and James F. Towey Faculty Fellow at the

MBA program – strategic leadership and

for their work and keep stacking courses

college. “In doing so, we’re democratizing

management; economics and business

and credits to eventually build toward a full

access to the world-class business faculty

analysis; value chain and financial

iMBA degree,” Echambadi said. “The iMBA

of the Urbana campus, which affords

management – “stackable credentials”

really redefines business subject areas so

prospective students a tremendous

that will have their own appeal to current

that they’re not confined to the way other

amount of flexibility in their education.”

professionals are offered in topics such as

b-schools or universities are organized.” 

“We entered the online MBA field motivated to find new ways to return to the tradition of great public universities making education available to all,” said Echambadi, also

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign


Feature Title

On Campus | 2016-2017

47


Street Gangs Research

48

Photo: L. Brian Stauffer

Study Explores Gang Recruitment School, positive relationships with adults key influences Gabriel “Joey” Merrin, a doctoral student in child development, is the lead author of a recent study that explored the risk and protective factors associated with young people who are recruited by, but resist joining, street gangs.

W R I T E R Sharita Forrest, MS, ‘01 MEDIA

T

he allure of street gangs is something Gabriel “Joey” Merrin knows firsthand, having grown

up in low-income neighborhoods in

involvement, Merrin said he believes his

personnel, and to report having at least one

study to be just the second to explore the

adult in their lives they could depend on for

risk and protective factors associated with

help with their problems, Merrin found.

kids who were targeted for recruitment

Published in the American Journal of

inner-city Chicago that are notorious

but resisted joining street gangs.

for gang violence, crime and poverty.

“Researchers don’t really talk about the

the importance of positive educational

For kids living in these hardscrabble

individuals who have resisted membership

experiences and supportive relationships

as a way to better understand the youth

with teachers and other adults as

gang phenomena, and that’s one of the

buffers against the influences that lure

things I’m really proud of about the paper,”

youth into gang affiliation – findings

Merrin said. “We know that some of these

that mirror Merrin’s early life.

surroundings, “It’s not a question of if, it’s a question of when you’ll be faced with an offer or pressure to join a gang,” said Merrin, who affiliated with a neighborhood gang for part of his youth. “I grew up very scared,” Merrin said. “I was surrounded by crime, drugs and violence at a very young age. I was around older kids a lot, and I looked up to them. My mother was a single parent who was always gone, so I spent a lot of time in the streets. Many of my friends had been shot, killed or arrested. I was searching for protection and a way out.” Currently a doctoral candidate in child development at the University of Illinois, where his research focus is delinquency and youth gangs, Merrin also is the lead

individuals who face similar risks as their peers choose not to join gangs, and I want to better understand these individuals and identify some key protective elements.”

Orthopsychiatry, the paper underscores

Nicknamed “Smart Guy” by his friends, Merrin’s intellect, along with his aptitude for sports, may have saved him from the bleak consequences that awaited many of

Of the more than 15,700 participants in

the young men around him. Recognizing

Merrin’s study, 973 kids (5.6 percent) reported

Merrin’s potential, his football coach and

they had been asked or pressured to join

some guidance counselors at his school

a gang but declined. Another 625 kids, or

encouraged Merrin to concentrate on sports

3.6 percent of the participants, reported

and academics. They also urged him to

being current or former gang members.

envision a future that included going to

Many of the kids who resisted recruitment were exposed to the same risk factors as their peers who became gang

college, a brass ring that Merrin, and many kids in impoverished neighborhoods like his, perceived as being beyond their grasps.

members, including alcohol or drug use,

“They encouraged me to stay in school,

dysfunctional families, and residing in

and I trusted them, so I threw myself into

family, school and neighborhood factors

chaotic, dangerous neighborhoods.

school, not knowing where it would take

associated with young people who resist

However, compared with peers who became

the magnetic pull of street gangs.

gang members, kids who resisted pressure to

While numerous studies have explored

join were 11/2 times more likely to perceive fair

author of a recently published study that examined the individual, peer,

the risk factors associated with gang

me,” Merrin said. “When I left high school, I was running in search of a better life with more certainty and opportunities.”

treatment by their teachers and other school Continued on page 56

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign


Feature Title

On Campus | 2016-2017

49


Athletics

50

Photo: Division of Intercollegiate Athletics

College Football in Mandarin Mandarin broadcasts of Illini football games a hit for student announcers Liaohan “David” He broadcasting a Fighting Illini football game in Mandarin from the Memorial Stadium press box.

W R I T E R Phil Ciciora, MS, ‘04 MEDIA

O

ne of the highlights of the 2015

beginners, because that’s how you get

With more than 5,200 Chinese students on

football season didn’t happen on

viewers,” Lu said. “You can hear our

the Urbana campus, the ultimate goal is to

the field at Memorial Stadium

personality in it, too. We get excited. We

get them more involved with American sports

but high above it in the stadium press box.

explain things about football, but we also talk

and culture at their home away from home.

It’s where University of Illinois students

off-topic about other things between snaps,

Liaohan He and Yekai Lu became the

like what’s going on in the Big Ten and the

first broadcasters to announce an NCAA football game in Mandarin, the most widely spoken language of China.

rest of college football. Part of our mission is to get students to go to games, or at least get them interested in it. We try to make it fun.”

“As a sports management major, I knew some of the student-athletes from class and some of the people at the athletic department,” said He, a junior who goes by “David” on the Urbana campus. “When they asked if I would be interested in doing broadcasts in Chinese, it was three months before the season started. They said we would be the first in the country to broadcast an NCAA football game

... perhaps the best way to bring two totally different countries together is through sports ...

in Chinese. I said, ‘Sounds good. Let’s do it!’

“Sports is a big part of American culture, so perhaps the best way to bring two totally different countries together is through sports,” He said. “There are no limitations on that.” “A lot of students are passionate about it, but many still don’t know what’s going on, although they’re curious about it,” Lu said. “So that’s where we come in.” For example, many Chinese students don’t know what homecoming is, and why it’s such a big deal on campus. “Why the parade? Why does our team wear a special uniform? To a foreign student,

“Ever since, we’ve been pretty shocked

The games are broadcast through

they don’t understand, so we explain it

with the response we’ve received.”

FightingIllini.com, but last year’s inaugural

to them during the broadcast,” Lu said.

Lu is a junior who studies financial planning and goes by “Bruce” on campus. He said the broadcasts focus on explaining the basics

season only featured audio, “which is not very approachable for an audience that doesn’t know the sport well,” He said.

The tailgating that’s so prevalent at Grange Grove, the former parking lot directly west of Memorial Stadium

of the game – yards, downs, touchdowns,

“So we’re going to make things happen

that opens at 7 a.m. on game days to

the personnel on the different squads – to a

next season with video. Students in the

accommodate camper vans and cookouts,

Chinese audience, whether they’re listening

Big Ten will be able to log in for free

is also unfamiliar to foreign students.

in their dorm rooms or around the world.

and watch the game and listen to us in

Although the NFL is rapidly gaining a following in China, it’s not as wellknown or popular as basketball. “What we’re trying to do is make college

Chinese. We’re also talking to companies in China to have our games on. So we’re putting things together to try and make it a bigger and better experience.”

football fun and understandable for University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

“The game-day experience – the stuff you do before, during and after the game– we don’t do that in China. It’s really an American cultural thing,” Lu said. 


Feature Title

On Campus | 2016-2017

51


Illinois is Home

52

Welcome to Illinois With a year under their belts, students share what made their freshmen experience unique.

“What it means to be an Illini is different for everyone, but you’re united by the fact that you bleed orange and blue, you love your university, and “When we get to yell I-L-L and

you wear its name everyday.”

the entire stadium responds

ASI A PER KI N S

with I-N-I, I didn’t expect the chills I would get. It’s the instant connection we make as Illini that bonds us.” “We are all unique and here for

E M ILY CRE W

a reason, as a piece of the puzzle

All Photos: L. Brian Stauffer

that makes up the University

When we get to yell I-L-L and the entire stadium responds with I-N-I, I didn’t expect the chills I would get. EMI LY CR EW

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

of Illinois. What we have in common is our intelligence and drive to succeed.” DA R R I EN R OSE


Illinois is Home

53

We push each other to do things that we didn’t know we could do. B OB B I MCSWI N E

“Even on a campus of 40,000 students, there is still a close knit community around here. I’ve met so many people and still see them around campus.” KI MB ER LY AG US

“In my wildest dreams, I never thought I’d be building a rocket in my first introductory aerospace class. I figured it would be much further in advance.” “When I go home for a weekend,

SA M A N T H A PA I G E

I miss school and can’t wait to be back. I’m comfortable in my dorm, in the undergraduate

What we have in common is our intelligence and drive to succeed.

library, or wherever on campus. Now, this is home for me.” “We push each other to do things

MA RYA LLI SON MA HACEK

that we didn’t know we could do. I thought first semester I would just focus on academics, but I’ve already found a fit in

“The people make campus

about four extracurriculars.”

home for me. I was nervous

BO BBI M CSWIN E

coming here, but everyone is very willing to work together and faculty leads as a support system. I’m already looking forward to next year.”

DA R R I E N R OS E

GODSON RA HEEM

On Campus | 2016-2017


College of Medicine

54

New College, New Medicine, continued

nearly 8,000 health care-related jobs and generate more than a billion dollars for the economy in the state of Illinois. “It’s not just a medical school, it’s a platform of incubation that will develop relationships throughout the state and potentially outside of the state,” Gibb said. “We believe that the community will benefit from an economic halo effect. For us as a health system, we also can add services in some specialties that we would not be able to recruit to central Illinois on our own. It gives us opportunities to offer more for our patients and more for the community in terms of health care.” Yet the broadest impact of the College of Medicine may echo far beyond the Champaign-Urbana community, thanks to the innovations developed and the physicians trained. “Advances in engineering, technology and big data are driving medical breakthroughs. The future of medicine lies in discovering new sensors, materials, robotics, imaging, devices, uses for big data and remote monitoring,” said Phyllis Wise, U. of I. professor of molecular and integrative physiology, former chancellor and member of the core curriculum committee for the Carle Illinois College of Medicine. “The new curriculum will train physicians to care for patients and solve problems in fundamentally different ways, equipping a new generation of physician-engineers, physician-inventors and physician-scientists to develop new devices, medications and technologies to improve patient care.” 

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign


Feature Title

On Campus | 2016-2017

55


Street Gangs Research

56

Study explores gang recruitment, continued

Since then, Merrin has earned a bachelor’s degree in sociology and a master’s degree in human resource development, both from the U. of I. Although Merrin initially sought a doctorate in HRD, the program didn’t seem like the right fit: His early experiences piqued an interest in researching issues related to delinquency and gang involvement instead. Merrin transferred into the educational psychology department and began working with Dorothy Espelage on her research into bullying and youth violence at schools in central Illinois and Wisconsin. Merrin also has led interventions with ganginvolved kids at the schools and mediated conflicts between youth at the Champaign County Juvenile Detention Center. “I have a perspective that’s a little bit different from some people, and I can relate to some of the students and speak to them in their own language,” Merrin said. “I try to have a dialogue with them, listen to them, learn their truths without judgment, and offer some suggestions that worked for me when I was facing similar situations. “It helps when someone that looks like them with similar lived experiences is standing there and saying, ‘Look, regardless of your current situation, there’s still light at the end of the tunnel. You can still engage in education, get out of the gang and have a productive, high-quality life,’” Merrin said. Espelage and Illinois social work alumnus Jun Sung Hong, currently a faculty member at Wayne State University and at Sungkyunkwan University in Seoul, South Korea, were co-authors on the study. 

University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign


Feature Title

On Campus | 2016-2017

57


Our Illinois Family

58

Photo: L. Brian Stauffer

Our FA M I LY BILL GEIST

From war photographer to Emmy Award-winning journalist, this courageous Illini is an expert storyteller

OC: What was your favorite campus hangout? BG: The Illini Inn, then known as Midway Cafe. It had everything: pinball upstairs, bar brawls in the basement. ... They wouldn’t serve

Bill Geist, MEDIA `68, chronicles life with humor, imagination and ambition. Through a celebrated career including a Bronze Star, four Emmy Awards and a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, Bill counts his experiences at the University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign among his favorites.

What was your favorite place to study?

I’m not familiar with this word, “study.”

anyone without a valid junior high I.D. OC: What was the best concert you saw on campus? BG: Local bands in local pubs – REO Speedwagon and Duke Tumatoe and the All-Star Frogs. OC: What was your first job out of college and what did you learn from it?

almost could be called skyscrapers. Almost. When I was there I don’t think the fire department had ladders. OC: Do you tweet? Why or why not? BG: Occasionally, but not well. Usually

Vietnam, where I learned to never

after a great victory by an Illini team

more proudly: your Emmys or

take another job where they had you

and of course after a terrible loss

your U. of I. honorary degree?

wear your blood type around your

Bill Geist: I’m most proud of my third-

when I need emotional support.

neck. Bad working conditions.

place ribbon from the Illinois State

OC: What’s the most interesting

OC: What was your worst job out of

Fair Bake-Off (apricot sour cream

college and what did you learn from it?

story you’ve ever done?

coffee cake – Yeast and Quick Breads

BG: I worked at a major food company

Division). I would have been first place

in Chicago answering customer

but the judges said I had “uneven nut

complaints: “Dear Mrs. Johnson:

distribution.” I’ve had to live with that.

We regret your finding a thumb in

OC: Do you wear those

a package of our frozen French cut

orange shoes in NYC?

green beans. Enclosed is a 50-cents-off

BG: I wear them when I work the night

coupon toward your next purchase.”

that subscribed. (He’d had several

shift on road repair crews – for safety.

OC: Dee Brown or Red Grange?

heart operations, his 50-year-old plane

BG: Tough call. Both have bobbleheads.

had to be jump started, and I had to

Both took us to the Promised Land. I

point out a looming mountain when he

attended Dee’s Final Four game. My

became preoccupied with folding.)

parents cheered the Galloping Ghost,

OC: Any advice for current students?

who scored four touchdowns against

BG: Don’t believe the hype.

Photo: L. Brian Stauffer

BG: U.S. Army photographer in On Campus: Which do you display

Michigan in 12 minutes. Seems like we haven’t scored that many touchdowns against Michigan in all the years since. OC: When you visited campus last fall for homecoming, what seemed most different? BG: It’s twice the size, with what University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

BG: Maybe the 92-year-old flying paper boy in northern California who delivered the newspaper he published in his small plane, folding the papers while he flew and dropping them within 20 feet of the front door of ranches

OC: Seriously, what role did Illinois play in preparing you for your success? BG: I grew up in Champaign-Urbana and did not fully realize what a truly great school Illinois was until I read about it in The New York Times. 


More Feature On Campus Title

On Campus | 2016-2017

59


On Campus: a guide to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 2016-17  

On Campus: a guide to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 2016-17, is the official campus guide for Illinois. It contains feature...

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