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EMERGING Issue

4 October to December 2016

Potters


Emerging Potters - 4

October - December 2016

Introduction An online ceramics magazine Welcome to the fourth issue of Emerging Potters the online magazine produced for people who make ceramics and those ceramic students from the UK Universities about to enter the arts sector as a career. This issue looks at some of the degree students and associations of potters, as well as a mix of other items. Emerging Potters is produced by a voluntary team. Emerging Potters is produced in association with Aylesford Pottery in Kent who advise. The role of the advisory panel is to offer ideas for content and comment on how effective the content of each issue is. There is no financial reward involved for us. Please pass this copy on to anyone you think may be interested. Thanks for reading this edition and if you are not already on the mailing list then contact me by email: paulbailey123@googlemail.com

Paul Bailey Editor and owner (as every studio seems to have a dog this is our one – Dylan)  

The magazine is an independent journal. The publishers do not accept any liability for errors or omissions. The views expressed in the features are not necessarily those of the editor. Reproduction in part or whole must be with the consent of the editor. All rights reserved.

Contributions to the gallery of work from makers and students are welcome and will be included wherever possible on a first come basis. Send to the above email address. The editor’s decision is final. © Paul Bailey 2016 Emerging Potters is produced in association with Aylesford Pottery UK.


Emerging Potters -4

October - December 2016

Advisory Panel

Contents

Alan Parris and Billy Byles are master potters and joint partners of the Aylesford Pottery in Kent. Alan trained in ceramics at Medway College of Art. Then worked as a freelance thrower in London and Kent, before forming the partnership. Billy served an apprenticeship with the Chelsea Pottery and Bethnal Green Pottery in London before working as a freelance thrower in London.

The Curator

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Craft Central

7-10

RCA Show 2016

11-18

CSM Show 2016

19-24

John Leach, eldest grandson of renowned potter Bernard Leach and son of David Leach, continues the family tradition at Muchelney Pottery in the heart of the Somerset Levels. He started the pottery in 1965 with his wife Lizzie. His pots are all lovingly hand-thrown, using local clays, and wood-fired in the three-chambered kiln to the high stoneware temperature of 1320°C, which creates their distinctive 'toasted' finish.

Samantha McNamara

25-27

Falmouth Uni Show

28-29

Claire Prenton Profile

30-33

Hattie Shaw

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Helen Walsh, Curator of Ceramics, York Museums Trust. Since 2004 she has been the curator in charge of York Museums Trust’s national collection of British Studio Ceramics, known as CoCA. She has also established the Contemporary Studio Ceramics Subject Specialist Network.

Anglian Potters Ass

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Northern Potters Ass

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Valentine’s Clay

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Wendy Kershaw, international ceramic maker based in Scotland. Originally part of the Glasgow School of Art movement she has exhibited and worked in USA, Canada, China, Hungary and throughout the UK. Her work is sought by public institutions and private collectors worldwide. Emily Wiles, ceramic maker based in Leister. After receiving a first class degree from De Montfort University in design Crafts, she was selected for the show New Designers in the ‘One Year On’ section in 2015 and featured in Ceramic Review. She was also a ‘Rising Stars’ winner in 2015. Sandi Cowles, A keen student attending pottery classes at Penzance School of Art for the past two years. Sandi poses the questions which many would like to ask.

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Hazel Stone at the 2016 Degree Show


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October - December 2016

The Curator Hazel Stone has been at the Sidney Cooper Gallery in Canterbury a number of years now, firstly in a part time capacity and more recently in her full time role as curator. When she worked as a curator part time she took on a number of other projects expanding her practice into live art and even opera in her capacity as a Director of a community arts company Curious Planet. Originally she studied fine art and specialised in sculpture. Then won a junior research fellowship at Christ Church University for research into memory and the sculptural void, which led to being offered the position of curator at the Gallery. Other projects include being part of the British Council’s ‘Connection Through Culture’ Programme 2012-2015. Recently her role has included developing her practice into commissioning site -specific work in historic places. The gallery was left to the city by its founder Thomas Sidney Cooper a Victorian cattle painter who originally set it up as a gallery and art school with the intension of making the arts accessible to all. Canterbury Christ Church University now manages the gallery and the studios are once again filled with aspiring artists developing their practice. It has been important for the gallery to remain free to enter and as part of their programme they are developing a key-learning programme to engage with audiences of all ages. This also includes a recently developed summer residency programme which aims to support emerging artists to have the time and space to create new work in the original art studios of Sidney Coopers Art School.

The gallery does not rent the space out, but does welcome collaborations from a range of organisations and arts practitioners. The degree shows are the most important part of their programme and other exhibitions and events are curated around these shows. As a university gallery they have a huge resource of academics and practitioners as potential collaborators, as well as student teachers and other students.

Rosie Clay, Canterbury Christ Church University Degree Show 2016 at the Gallery Predominantly using coiled and carved stoneware her work is inspired by the forms and symbolism of seeds and seedpods creating them instinctively. Received the Valentines Clay prize, plus an award for Studentship and Theory, and long listed for the Turner Contemporary Graduate Award Platform.

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The Sidney Cooper Gallery in the centre of Canterbury They are unusual as a university gallery as they are not located on the campus but on the main street in Canterbury which is a huge asset. They have purpose built drawing studios attached to the gallery space which separates them from other galleries and means there is a rich dialogue of viewing art and making art side by side. The gallery celebrates its 150th anniversary in 2018.


Made in Clerkenwell - London 24-27 November 2016 Venues

Craft Central, St John's Square Craft Central Clerkenwell Green The Goldsmiths' Centre, Britton Street The Priory - Order of St John, St John's Square - New for 2016 Opening Night: Thursday 24 November 5-8pm Opening Hours Friday 25 November: 12-8pm Saturday 26 November: 12-5pm Sunday 27 November: 12-5pm (Craft Central venues only) For the first time, Made in Clerkenwell Winter welcomes visitors to 4 stunning venues filled with over 150 designer makers selling quality handmade home accessories, fashion, jewellery, ceramics, stationary and prints. Everything you could possibly need for Christmas. Highlights include Open Studios Throughout Craft Central St John's Square & Clerkenwell Green, you'll be welcomed to discover and meet some the UK's most notable designer makers in their private studios. This is your chance to purchase and commission directly from these designer makers - truly special gifts for Christmas. Visitor Workshops Based at Craft Central St John's Square, they will be offering visitors an array of craft led workshops which you'll be able to learn new skills and take away your own handmade product. Classes will range from wreath making, calligraphy to paper cutting master classes. Prices from £45 per class, and are available to book in advance. The Priory at The Order of St John's Sculpture Garden Alongside presenting 30 designer makers in the Priory's magnificent church, they will be brightening up their secret garden with sculptures from one of the designer makers. www.craftcentral.org.uk

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October – December 2016

Craft Central Clarkenwell has always been one of those areas of London that has attracted the extraordinary. From the Knights Templar to Karl Marx, and today just about every creative industry you can think of. Sitting at the centre of this activity in St John’s Square is Craft Central led by Chief Executive, Louisa Pacifico. For the past 40 years Craft Central has been a charity providing working studios and support for professional and amateur crafts people. This includes ceramic makers. The name might imply that it is run for London based makers, but that it not the case. As a subscription organisation with some 800 members in this country and across Europe membership is just £42 per year. It is open to all members in the UK. With two buildings in Clerkenwell housing 76 studios including 110 businesses in total, as some studios are shared, it is ideally suited to small craft makers starting out or long established makers who are known and work internationally.

And the cost of working in the centre of London? Larger studios are from £550 per month Smaller studios are from £300 per month Day rate for drop-in studios is £10.50 per day Meeting room £50 per day Being a member of Craft Central also has the advantage of having three galleries for hire, and in the centre of London.

Small gallery space £139 per week Medium gallery and reception £300 per week Large gallery space £625 per week Applications to hire the galleries are considered three to four times a year and can be from anyone in country as long as they are members.

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October - December 2016

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Pacifico has plans to develop the facilities further. The website is being rebuilt to allow network members to interact via forums, a new business training programme, and a new online directory of members work. With so much arts activity in the area there are many opportunities to be involved with London Craft Week, network with other members and take part in the ‘open house’ events and joint shows throughout the year. The website already has 29,000 followers. Case study: Tamsin Arrowsmith-Brown Working from the Craft Central studios she is a potter working in porcelain which is thrown on the wheel. On the road to working full time as a potter she had an apprenticeship with Helen Beard which was supported by the ‘Adopt a Potter’ scheme from the Craft Potters Association.

Contact/information www.craftcentral.org.uk Crafts Central has worked in partnership with: Crafts Council Crafts Magazine Handmade Britain Tutton & Young of Made London/ Brighton events Clerkenwell Design Week Design Junction New Designers Transport links - Farringdon Station is a five min walk Bars and restaurants near to the studios… Modern Pantry Albion

Foxlow Dovetail

http://www.tamsinarrowsmithbrown.com/  

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Royal College of Art Lauren Nauman

laurennauman.com


October - December 2016

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Royal College

Degree students from the Royal College of Art 2016

Manos Kalamenios 13

madebymanos.com

Mary O’Malley

maryomalley.co.uk


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October - December 2016

Degree students from the Royal College of Art 2016

Aisling Chen w: aislingchen.com

Elena Gileva W: elenagileva.com

James Duck W: jamesduck. com

Patricia Mato-Mora

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October - December 2016

Degree students from the Royal College of Art 2016

Alisa Volchkova Alissavolchkova .com

Miche Follano michefollano. com

Michal Fargo Michalfargo.com

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October – December 2016

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Degree students from the Royal College of Art 2016

Julia Schuster

juliaschuster.net

Fernanda Cortes

fernandacortes.com Aisling Chen

Manos Kalamenios

aislingchen.com

madebymanos.com

Christina Liu

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October - December 2016

Degree students from the Royal College of Art 2016

Ahryun Lee

ahryunlee.com

Eva Masterman evamasterman.co.uk

Christina Liu christinaliuceramics.com

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Emerging Potters - 4

October - December 2016

Degree students from the Royal College of Art 2016

Katie Spragg

katiespragg.com

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STUDENT

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October - December 2016

Gallery

Central Saint Martins Degree Show 2016 Ellis Hooson   .

Harriettt Sennett      w:  www.harriettsennett.wix.com/ceramics   Oi  Lam  Lee  Lulu      w:  www.lululeeoilam.com    Hairpins  jewellery  

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STUDENT

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October - December 2016

Gallery

Central Saint Martins Degree Show 2016

Sandra Stallard w: www.serasera.co.uk

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Murat Arkallayev Sarah Christe w: www.sarahchristie.net

Yung Cheuk Chung Eugene W: www.cyc eugene. com

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STUDENT

Emerging Potters - 4

October - December 2016

Gallery

Central Saint Martins Degree Show 2016 Joely Clinkard W: www.joelyclinkard.com Srabani Ghosh www.srabanighosh.com

. Jess Martin www.jessmartinceramics. com

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STUDENT

Emerging Potters - 4

October - December 2016

Gallery

Central Saint Martins Degree Show 2016

Jose Maria Salgado

Niamh Phillips

www.jmsalgado.co.uk .

Robyn Taylor Payne Mist collecting surface www.robynta ylerpayne.wi x.com/robynt aylerdesign

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STUDENT

Emerging Potters - 4

October - December 2016

Gallery

Central Saint Martins Degree Show 2016

Ronalds Ofkants Fr2645 @gmail. com

Lucy Be Phillips www.lucybeceramics.com

David McGuire 12etro@live.com

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STUDENT

Emerging Potters - 4

October - December 2016

Gallery

Central Saint Martins Degree Show 2016

Akvile Zukauskaite

Lucy Mae Anderson

www.akvilezukauskaite.com

www.lucymaeanderson.com

Megan Niell www.taurusartworks.co. uk

Ly Thien Co Friedrich www.Itclitchifriedrich

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Samantha McNamara Profile Samantha McNamara studied at Hereford College of Arts on the Contemporary Design Crafts course. She choose to specialise in pottery in the later part of her second year, after gaining invaluable work experience with a potter named Patia Davis, who is based at the Wobage Farm Craft Workshops near Ross on Wye. After deciding on her direction, she felt it was important to find a way to practice and refine her throwing skills over the summer break. To do so she says, “I couldn’t think of anything more exciting than studying in Japan. I found their aesthetic and incredible levels of craftsmanship so inspiring”. When researching places to go, she discovered a website called ‘explorejapaneseceramics’ where she managed to secure a place on a 24 day residency programme at Kasen Studios in Seto, Nagoya. During Samantha’s second year she designed an outdoors sculpture for a live brief set by the university. Out of all who submitted, six students were chosen to take their designs forwards into final pieces. These students were also invited to exhibit as part of the student section of the biannual ‘Fresh Air’ sculpture exhibition at Quenington in Cirencester. During the show her sculpture sold to a private buyer. This was her first sale of a piece of work, which she used to fund the majority of her trip to Japan.

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The duration of Samantha’s stay in Japan spanned five weeks. For her it was quite surreal arriving in a world that didn’t even use a standard letter to communicate. As much as she was aware of this prior to leaving, it didn’t really dawn on her until standing surrounded by maps, signposts and banners that she could not read. She jokingly describes her experience, “I muddled through and became very well practiced at charades. I tried lots of new foods as shopping was more a game of lucky dip, and discovered that English people are a bit like spiders, no matter where I went, there was always an English person round the corner, more often than not in a Starbucks!” Samantha’s first lesson at the pottery was to practice, repeat and refine. That nobody becomes an expert overnight, it takes time, dedication and concentration. She was taught about the history of the pottery, how

Cutting up pieces to get an even wall thickness and good footring.


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they developed their traditional aesthetics because of the natural materials their local environment provides. In her first week in Japan she stayed with an amazingly kind and generous couple through Airbnb. They became friends and one morning they were kind enough to cook her a traditional breakfast, you could say this was the Japanese equivalent to the English fry-up.

October – December 2016

They also took her to meet a friend of theirs who was a traditional potter from the Tamba region, and where they visited the Tamba museum and a traditional soba restaurant in the middle of the countryside. She reminisces “…it was the most humbling experience of all, and a true taste of what life over there is really about, that day will stay with me for a very long time”.

Sensi (Kato Hiroshige), Samantha, and Motoko Hiroshige (Kato's Mother) with all of the work she produced over the three and a half week period.

 

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A traditional Japanese breakfast. So you could say this is the Japanese equivalent to the English fry-up!

The Master potter of studio Kasen and also her teacher was called Kato Hiroshige. Whilst staying at the pottery, she was taken to visit a friend of Kato's called Seizi Itou, a traditional potter of the Tokunami region. She explains that his work is beautifully precise and refined using both very fine terracotta and grey clays. She found his work incredibly inspirational and an influence in Samantha’s work following this visit. Returning to the UK she continued to push and refine her throwing technique whilst developing a body of work that attempts to encompass her evolving aesthetic understanding. She mixes her own glazes keeping the importance of collections, the dialogue  

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between objects and investigating ways in which this dialogue can happen at the core of all her tests. Today she sees her work as being calm and understated, focused around the nature and the journey of the ‘line’. If there is any advice she can offer those who are thinking of working abroad it is –“Do it! Embrace every possibility that things can and do go wrong, expect the unexpected and try not to plan too carefully. Have an idea of where you would like to go, what you would like to see, but whilst you’re there find these places spontaneously. Allow time for amazing people to enter your life and keep your eyes open all the time.”


STUDENT

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Gallery

Degree Show: Falmouth University Three of the students who were at the New Designers Show 2016

Hannah Walters The pieces are all part of a group of work called 'The Gods of Consumerism" Introducing Athena as Google, Aphrodite as Facebook and Hera as M&S'. They are 35cm high approx. and made from porcelain, wood and wire. www.hannahwalterscer amics.com Instagram :@hannah.walters.cera mics

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“I am drawing on Cornwall's abundance of metamorphic rocks and my ongoing artistic relationship with the geological world” – Isabella Morrisonhouse

Isabella Morrisonhouse  

Degree Show: Falmouth University

The ceramic tools are slip cast and fired to around 1240 degrees. The slate has been high fired to up to around 1260. The piece above is 30cm in width and 10/15cm in height, and the large stack of slate and tools is 80cm in width and 60cm in height. missimh.wix.com/isabellamaeceramics Isobel Higley Fantasy characters and worlds created from imagined stories that are portrayed in ceramic, giving the figures a strong sense of narrative. Spirit with a Glass Bowl (far left) Ceramic, glass, organic matter H: 10cm Memory Spirit Ceramic H; 30cm www.isobelhigley.com


Claire Prenton

Emerging Potters - 4  

UK to USA After training in the UK Claire Prenton moved to the USA and a very different lifestyle. This is her story. Textiles and embroidery were very much part of my early experience of creativity; both my Mother and Grandmother were perpetually in the process of creating and making. Boxes filled with needles, brightly colored threads and fabric were readily available and the possibilities were endless, so it felt very natural to specialize in embroidery while studying “Design Crafts” at Cumbria College of Art and Design. In 2004 my husband and I moved to America. There I joined Kirkland Arts Center, just across Lake Washington from Seattle. They needed help in the pottery studio. It was the handbuilding class with Carol Gouthro that really sparked my imagination and I never looked back. The transition from working with fabric to working with clay felt natural.

October - December 2016

I was using the same processes of sourcing inspiration, developing an idea, making patterns, construction and problem solving. There is nothing quite like the experience of working in a community studio to learn every facet of working with clay. There is so much to learn and you have to be prepared to put the hours in. From there I set up my own studio after moving to Cincinnati. The work is hand building with a mid-range porcelain clay body, which is rolled into very thin slabs. My pieces are then formed and shaped using darting, I like to make the construction visible and the joins make reference to a seam of a garment. The surface decoration is built up with layers of incising, stamping, carving and then embellished with sprigs and slip trailing. Glazes are applied by brush and blended. Catchment areas are made for more reactive runny glazes to pool and drip creating an almost jewel like quality. I fire oxidation in an electric kiln to cone 6, 20 karat gold details are added and fired to 018.

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Claire Prenton

Emerging Potters - 4  

October - December 2016

 

Sketchbooks are central and I have a large inspiration board in my studio where I collect things that I find interesting. I also find that Pinterest is a perfect way to keep a virtual sketchbook. Starting by making paper patterns I will then work out the forms in clay. One piece naturally leads to another and at this point I like to go with the flow rather than sticking to a set plan. I find this is the most enjoyable aspect of making when each idea can be explored and refined.  

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The cups I make are the exception as I keep the same shape and work from the original pattern, although surface decorations are all different and each one is unique. I like the idea that people can collect them and that they will work as a collection even if they were made years apart. These cups have been a really valuable part of my process and many of my ideas for larger pieces originated in a cup.


Claire Prenton

Emerging Potters - 4  

October - December 2016

My work and process can be complex and slow, so I have found selling through galleries works best for me. I am represented by the Sherrie Gallerie, http://www.sherriegaller ie.com/claire-prenton, Columbus Ohio. I was thrilled to be selected by Ceramics Monthly to be one of their “Emerging Artists 2016”, which has brought many more opportunities.  

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Claire Prenton

Emerging Potters - 4  

The clay community online is wonderful, welcoming and vibrant. I have found it an invaluable resource and enjoy the support and encouragement we offer each other. As potters we are often working in our own studios in isolation so connecting with others gives a great sense of being part of something bigger. I use facebook www.facebook.com/Claire-PrentonCeramics and Instagram www.instagram.com/claireprenton and I have a website www.claireprenton.com and follow blogs like Carole Epps “musing about mud”.

Time management is probably my biggest issue. I love to get totally absorbed and lost in my work but find that there are never enough hours in the day. Deadlines keep me on track but probably cause me the most stress. I don’t want to dilute my work, so making sure I select the right shows and galleries that will show my work to its best is vital. Like most studio potters finding the work/life balance is difficult, lets just say this is a work in progress.

October - December 2016


Hattie Shaw reports

Emerging Potters - 4  

October – December 2016

Manchester and Stoke-on-Trent Opportunities Manchester Craft and Design Centre, a ‘department store’ for contemporary craft and design. Several studio/shop combinations where designers make and sell their wares in the same place. You can often go in and speak to the person who you’re buying from, like a smaller, permanent design fair. The Centre often runs workshops and holds exhibitions of the work of local designers, and there’s a lovely little café there too! http://www.craftanddesign.com/ Great Northern Contemporary Craft Fair is in October each year. Lots of designers all in one place, can start networking and get valuable advice from people who have done it all! They also run a ‘Great Northern Graduates’ scheme, where you can apply and be part of a communal stand alongside other people in a similar position to yourself. Good practice to be part of a large fair without the pressure of looking after your very own stand. http://www.greatnorthernevents.co.uk/homepage-gnccf.aspx Brand new communal ceramics studio opening in Hulme, Manchester. Membership is around £65 per month and they are fully equipped with wheels, kilns etc. Good place to start out when fresh from Uni as it is a similar set-up to Uni workshops, just more independent and with a reasonable monthly fee. http://www.claystudio.co.uk/ The old Spode Factory in Stoke has now been converted into fabulous-looking studios that you can apply to rent. The British Ceramics Biennial is held on this site every 2 years, and they have a team who run ceramics workshops fairly regularly, so it’s a great environment to be in! http://www.acava.org/studios/building/acava-studios-spode-works-0 Hot Air Literary Festival, held at the Emma Bridgewater factory in Stoke every summer. LOTS of (mainly ceramic) designers and fairly big names come here to display their work, give talks and run workshops. Kirsty Allsopp and Edmund de Waal were there this year! http://www.stokeliteraryfestival.org/ Craft fairs, exhibitions, open days and factory tours are very often held at Middleport Pottery. You can pop into the visitors Centre, or apply to be part of their events. They also recruit volunteers for events, plus the area houses various studios belonging to many designers – another way to meet useful people! http://www.middleportpottery.org/ The Makers Market runs every month in various locations around the North Midlands and Manchester. Professional practice, yet fairly relaxed way to get into selling and get your name out there! Always very popular! http://www.themakersmarket.co.uk/

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Hattie Shaw

Hattie Shaw is a recent graduate from Manchester School of Art, and has created a range of customisable lamps called ‘The DeLightshades’. She finds herself consistently imagining inanimate objects as living things, and wondering what sort of personalities could be hidden within them. Hattie enjoys exemplifying silliness in 3D forms that we recognise and come across in the everyday. She plays with the combination of function and decoration to make an ordinary object brim with delight. Her work incorporates humour through the juxtaposition of object and character, and she encourages her audience to be playful and imaginative in the composition of their own DeLightshade! http://www.hattiegracecreates.portfoliobox.

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October - December 2016


Emerging Potters - 4

October – December 2016

MAKER’S

Gallery

Anglian Potters Association

It was founded originally in 1983 as the Anglian Potters Association. The organisation was set up to promote contemporary studio ceramics in the Eastern region of the country. Anglian Potters now has a thriving membership of more than 500 people who share a love and enthusiasm for clay in all its many forms. The Christmas show is one of the highlights of the year. Titled Anglian Potters in Jesus Lane. 12 Nov - 11 Dec, 10 am - 4 pm daily. All Saints Church Jesus Lane Cambridge CB5 8BP

Christine Pike, MA

Hare-Belle 29 cm tall approx. Ashraf Hanna stoneware www.christinepike.com Christine comments about her work, “It is slab-built stoneware, oxides, and stains. My figurative work takes a playful approach to the idea of female archetypes; these coquettish hares with their teasing glances express a certain kind of female sexuality that is not entirely 'civilized'. Hares feature in my work a lot and are, for me, a symbol of wildness and natural wisdom'.

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Emerging Potters - 4

October - December 2016

MAKER’S

Gallery

Anglian Potters Association

Claire Knight Black Shuck Height: 14cm Material: Raku fired

Jeremy Peake Raw glazed stoneware bowl measuring approximately 80 x 130mm. www.jeremypeake.co.uk

Marion Johns Boat vessels. Aprox 30 cms by 15 cms by 5cms and the plane is 17cms by 10 cms by 12cms and are made with porcelain paper clay with cobalt and lustre and underglaze silk screen text imagery. https://twitter.com/marionjohns https://www.instagram.com/marion.stuart/

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Emerging Potters - 3

July - September 2016

MAKER’S

Gallery

Anglian Potters Association

Louise Brown www.louisebrownart.co.uk

Sharon Laslett Group of three jugs approx. 3.5 inches tall, wheel-thrown in white earthenware with slip and clear glaze, fired at 1050 degrees in an electric kiln. Working from a studio the back garden and currently has work in three local galleries.

Elizabeth Potter Measuring 31cm tall by 21 wide (unframed ) and made in crank clay. Called 'Penelope' which is a take on the myth of Penelope the faithful wife of Odysseus watching patiently for the sight of his returning ship from her window . She has been making again after a 40 year lay off 6 years ago. www.elizabethpotterceramicart. Com. Facebook page Elizabeth Potter Ceramic Art

Work can be seen on Facebook page: Shazart

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October – December 2016

MAKER’S

Gallery Anglian Potters Association Margaret Hope

Katharina Klug Still life on tray - Moonlight birch, porcelain wheelthrown katharina@klug-art.com www.katharina.klug-art.com

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Wallhanging www.thecoachhousecongham.co.uk Ceramics www.margarethope.co.uk


Emerging Potters - 4

October – December 2016

MAKER’S

Gallery Northern Potters Association

Barbara Wood Hand built, burnished, saggar fired, superwhite raku clay, 7cm h Kit Hemsley Porcelain and glaze stain agateware, 37 x 34 x 8cm, kitdesignsblog.wordpress.com

The Northern Potters Association has been supporting and promoting studio ceramics and ceramic artists since 1977 – almost 40 years. With over 500 members, mostly in the North of England, but some as far away as Japan, it provides a network for clay-workers at all stages of their involvement, whether as students, hobbyists, or professional designer/makers, and membership is open to anyone with an interest in clay. Because the area covered by the association is so large, they have six regional groups to provide more localised support. NPA-East covers East, West and most of North Yorkshire, as well as North Lincolnshire, and members can keep in touch with regular email updates. They aim to organise events for members to get together for social, educational and commercial purposes, and act as a network to share requests for selling or buying ceramic related items, publicising exhibitions and events we’re taking part in, seeking and offering technical information, and any other clay based matters that may arise.

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October – December 2016

MAKER’S

Gallery Northern Potters Association

With more than 150 in the group, there are very few questions that can’t be answered by someone, and potters are incredibly generous with the knowledge they have acquired over years of trial and error This year they have met in Ilkley, York, Pickering, and have an exciting trip to the Sculpture Lounge in Holmfirth in October. They also look for opportunities to exhibit or sell work, and this year will have a group venue as part of Ilkley Art Trail – www.ilkleyarttrail.com – from 6 to 9 October 2016. Other venues are in the pipeline for next year. To join NPA, you can download the membership form from the website – www.northern-potters.co.uk , and for more information about the regional group email Barbara Wood – npae.barbarawood@btinternet.com

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Ken Jaquiery Coiled ceramic, 70cm h, kenjaq.co.uk

Jenny Morten Earthenware, coil built, slip/wax decoration 47 x 33cm, jennymorten.com


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October – December 2016

MAKER’S

Gallery Northern Potters Association

Sylvia Holmes Thrown and hand built stoneware, 8 – 22cm h, sylviaholmes.co.uk

Michelle Freemantle Press moulded, incised and slip decorated, 18 x 18cm, creativelyoccupied.com

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Emerging Potters - 4

October – December 2016

MAKER’S

Gallery

Charlotte Morrison (below) Hand built porcelain, 7 x 4cm, charlotte-morrison.co.uk Katie Braida (below bottom) Earthenware, coil built black clay, underglazes, 15cm h, katiebraida.com

Northern Potters Association Colin Jowitt (below) Coiled earthenware, 22cm d, colinjowittceramics.co.uk

Eric Moss (below bottom) Raku and naked raku, press moulded/thrown/bolted together 45cm d, ericmossceramis.co.uk

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Northern Potters Association Jackie Needham

Earthenware, jointed  figure   on  chair,  85  x  35cm,   jackieneedham.co.uk  


Emerging Potters - 4

October – December 2016

MAKER’S

Gallery

Minty Pester is a graduate of Colchester School of Art, University of Essex, specialising in ceramic drawing. The work focuses on her generations use of sexist banter, especially of that between spouses.

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Benjamin Brown from Manningtree, Essex attended a short introduction to pottery course in Colchester. Since then he’s been hooked. He has been digging his own clay from different places around East Anglia. Using a second hand kick wheel and uses a shared electric kiln plus a Kiln at the Waiting Rooms; a community project in Colchester.


Emerging Potters - 4

MAKER’S

October - December 2016

Visit to.. Cockpit Arts Open Studios

Holborn 24-27 Nov Deptford 2-4 Dec

Katharine Morling

Contemporary Ceramics Centre Akiko Hirai

3-26 November                                                           63  Great  Russell  Street,  London   WC1B  3BF    www.cpaceramics.com    

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Turning Earth Winter Sale 3-4 December Hoxton


Emerging Potters - 3

July – September 2016

WHAT TO TOTO

Watch For

The magazine of the Crafts Council. Crafts is full of the best in modern craft design and very useful information. Well worth signing up to their newsletter for opportunities and current news.

The international magazine for contemporary and historical ceramic art

Ceramics: Art and Perception with Ceramics Technical are two of the most important international magazines available. The first looks at functional to ephemeral, traditional to provocative. The latter is dedicated to research, culture and strategy, plus all the technical subjects you would need. www.ceramicart.com.au

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On View is the inspiration for this publication. It covers the arts across Florida in the US and is beautifully produced .It is a great source of cultural information should you be visiting. Miami hosts one of the most important arts fairs. Find it on the ISSUU website or… http://onviewmagazine.com


WHAT TO BUY

Emerging Potters - 4

New Kilns

A new range of kilns has just been announced by manufacturer International Kilns. Made in the UK the company has years of experience in kiln servicing and rebuilds. This is their first venture in producing their own products. The Aylesford Pottery in Kent has been chosen as an agent for the kilns and can offer experience and advice for potential buyers. Their size makes them ideal for the start-up market of new makers and those building a studio. Aylesford Pottery Telephone 01622 790796 Email enquiries@aylesfordpottery.co.uk

Open each day 10am to 5pm

October - December 2016

Round Kiln

Runs from a 13amp plug. Suitable for up to earthenware firing. Comes with controller. External measurements Height 55 cm Width 47cm Internal measurements Diameter 38cm Height 33cm

£1,150

(including VAT)

Delivery quoted as separate item

Square Kiln Suitable for stoneware. Runs from a single phase cooker wire on its own fuse. Comes with controller External measurements 81cm x 81cm x96.5cm deep Internal measurements Width 38cm Height 46cm

£1,300

(including VAT)

Delivery quoted as separate item 48


Emerging Potters - 4

WHICH CLAY?

Valentine’s Top Tips

With so many options currently in the market, whether you are a beginner or professional potter choosing the right clay can be a difficult decision. Here the team at Valentine Clays offer some advice based on over 30 years of working directly with the studio potter community. When starting out either a terracotta (Standard Red Terracotta) or stoneware (V9A and developing on to KGM) clay body will be easy to begin with but for those who would like to develop on to using a porcelain, then our special porcelain body will be the best one to experiment with. Over recent years what we have noticed is a trend towards coloured clays such as our black and our red stoneware clay bodies. There has also been a keen interest in paperclays, so much so that we have now developed eight different options for customers to choose from. Most recently we have seen a new interest in bone china flower clay especially from Europe. It’s an interesting clay body that creates quite delicate detailing and has traditionally been used for making flowers.

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October – December 2016

When buying clay the most important thing is to know what you are trying to create and have an idea of what type of clay you might be looking to use. We can then advise on which clay body will be most suitable. Most clays do have a really good shelf life and some potters even prefer to use the clay once it has aged a bit. The best way to store clay is to ensure you keep the bag closed and stored inside in a more shaded room. It is especially important during winter months that you keep your clay stored inside to avoid frost damage. People can look on our website or in the back of our brochure to see where their local agent/distributor is located or they can always give us a call and we can help to direct them to the right company. We are more than happy for customer to buy from our agents who will be as competitive as coming directly to us. Here at Valentine Clays we try to support as many graduate shows as possible in particular Wolverhampton University and Canterbury Christ Church. We also sponsor ceramic events such as Potfest in the Pens and Art in Clay Hatfield, where we have a stand so that potters and ceramic students can come to visit us and ask any questions they might have on which clay is best for them to use for the type of ceramics that they are trying to create.


Emerging Potters - 4

Other Top Tips… Firing range of your kiln The firing range of your kiln should be the first consideration for any potter, as this will determine which type of clays you will be able to use. Lower temperature kilns are more suitable to earthernwares, where as higher temperature kilns can accommodate porcelains and stonewares. The glaze you use with the clay body is also affected by the temperature of your kiln. Application you plan to use The type of work that you intend to create is also an important factor when considering the most appropriate clay. What methods you choose to use whether it will be thrown, handbuilt, sculptured or modelled will dictate this in the same way the end use of ornamental, inside or outside use, functional, domestic or oven to tableware will. Size of your work Another key area is the size of work you plan to create, larger pieces often require a more heavily grogged clay where as smaller pieces of work can require more plasticity.

October – December 2016

Texture you would like to create This is equally as vital when identifying the best clay for use. The feel and look of the ceramic piece you are creating is affected by the amount of grogg within the clay body. No grogg will result in a smooth polished finish, a fine grogg will give some strength and stability, or by increasing the grogg size and percentage within the clay you will be able to achieve a coarser finish and high strength result. Glaze compatibility and application This can be a technical process and is important to test with the clay you choose. The temperature of your kiln is also a contributing factor when considering the most appropriate clay and compatible glaze. Samples and Testing The most important key area is testing as this will determine the ideal clay for use. Once the appropriate clay bodies have been chosen based on the above key areas then samples are the best method for testing. For technical advice, further information or free samples (postage & packaging applies) please call 01782 271200 or email sales@valentineclays.co.uk To order please call 01782 271200 or visit our online shop at www.valentineclays.co.uk

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Potters

EMERGING

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Pilot Issue JanuaryMarch 2016

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Emily Wiles on life after Uni

If you would like to join the mailing list for the magazine email: paulbailey123@googlemail.com Produced quarterly

Oct Dec 2016 ep  

Emerging Potters magazine For students of ceramics and those with an interest in ceramics. In this issue are degree shows and the work of Po...