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EMERGING Â

Issue

6 April to June 2017

Potters


Emerging Potters - 6

April - June 2017

Introduction The online pottery magazine Welcome to this issue of Emerging Potters the online magazine produced for people who make ceramics for their own enjoyment and those ceramic students from the UK Universities about to enter the arts sector as a career. The BBC’s The Great Pottery Throwdown programme has continued to raise the awareness of ceramic making with the public, and here at the Aylesford Pottery extra courses have had to be added due to demand, Turning Earth has just opened a second studio in East London and the Kiln Rooms studio have just opened their second building in South London. About to start is Ceramic Art London, and the Degree Shows with the all important New Designers Show in June. Pictured on the cover are students from Cardiff Met University.

Emerging Potters is produced by a voluntary team. Thanks for reading this edition and if you are not already on the mailing list then contact me by email: paulbailey123@googlemail.com

Paul Bailey Editor and owner (as every studio seems to have a dog this is our one – Dylan)

The magazine is an independent journal. The publishers do not accept any liability for errors or omissions. The views expressed in the features are not necessarily those of the editor. Reproduction in part or whole must be with the consent of the editor. All rights reserved.

Contributions to the gallery of work from makers and students are welcome and will be included wherever possible on a first come basis. Send to the above email address. The editor’s decision is final. © Paul Bailey 2017 Emerging Potters is produced in association with Aylesford Pottery UK.


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Advisory Panel Alan Parris and Billy Byles are master potters and joint partners of the Aylesford Pottery in Kent. Alan trained in ceramics at Medway College of Art. Then worked as a freelance thrower in London and Kent, before forming the partnership. Billy served an apprenticeship with the Chelsea Pottery and Bethnal Green Pottery in London before working as a freelance thrower in London. John Leach, eldest grandson of renowned potter Bernard Leach and son of David Leach, continues the family tradition at Muchelney Pottery in the heart of the Somerset Levels. He started the pottery in 1965 with his wife Lizzie. His pots are all lovingly hand-thrown, using local clays, and wood-fired in the three-chambered kiln to the high stoneware temperature of 1320°C, which creates their distinctive 'toasted' finish. Helen Walsh, Curator of Ceramics, York Museums Trust. Since 2004 she has been the curator in charge of York Museums Trust’s national collection of British Studio Ceramics, known as CoCA. She has also established the Contemporary Studio Ceramics Subject Specialist Network. Wendy Kershaw, international ceramic maker based in Scotland. Originally part of the Glasgow School of Art movement she has exhibited and worked in USA, Canada, China, Hungary and throughout the UK. Her work is sought by public institutions and private collectors worldwide. Emily Wiles, ceramic maker based in Leister. After receiving a first class degree from De Montfort University in design Crafts, she was selected for the show New Designers in the ‘One Year On’ section in 2015 and featured in Ceramic Review. She was also a ‘Rising Stars’ winner in 2015.

April - June 2017

Contents 4

Heal’s

9

Collect 2017

13

Turning Earth 2

17

Cardiff Students

24

Hot House

26

West End Pottery

27

Kirsteen Holuj

28

CAL 2017

30

Chrysalis

34

Royal College of Art

37

Anglian Potters

42

Book Review

43

What to watch for

47

New Kilns

Sandi Cowles, A keen student attending pottery classes at Penzance School of Art for the past two years. Sandi poses the questions which many would like to ask.

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Centre of Ceramic Art at York Art Gallery

Rethink Ceramics Rethink Ceramics is a campaign by the Centre of Ceramic Art (CoCA) which aims to celebrate the great variety and diversity of activity in the world of ceramics.

Rethink Ceramics is always interested in submissions on anything and everything related to ceramics, to ensure we have the best and most up to date information about all the great activities taking place. This campaign is not solely focused on the activities at the Centre of Ceramic Art at York Art Gallery but everyone with an interest in ceramics is invited to take part, contributing to the campaign by sharing their work, experience, exhibitions and installations seen across the world. Get involved on Facebook and Twitter using the hashtag #RethinkCeramics. If you would like to submit content for the #RethinkCeramics campaign please email cocayork@ymt.org.uk. 3

Work by  Emily  Gardiner.  Photo:  Sylvain  Deleu  

From exhibition reviews to glazing techniques, new work and historic collections, interviews and testimonials, Rethink Ceramics aims to highlight all manner of topics, showcasing the strength and breadth of this art-form.


April - June 2017

Emerging Potters - 6

Heal’s

Established in 1810 Heal’s first innovation was the French-style feather filled matress. Under Ambrose Heal junior, a furniture designer, his Arts and Craftsstyle furniture bought him a knighted for raising British design standards in 1933.

His appreciation for innovation resulted in the opening of the forward-thinking Mansard Gallery in-store. It was the first in the UK to exhibit the (then shocking) work of Modigliani. Ambrose’ youngest son Christopher became Heal’s design director in1952. What followed was a whirlwind period that saw Heal’s introduce British shoppers to new styles such as mid-century Modern, Scandinavian design, and 1960s Pop Art. Today that ethos is still alive and well.

Here Emily Rubner, the Dining Buyer from Heal’s gives her perspective on today’s ceramic movement. Heal's has long been associated with Craft. Ambrose Heal had a keen interest in fine art and his involvement with painting and drawing paralleled his development as a designer, manufacturer and retailer. His interest in the relationship between art, design and commerce led eventually to him setting up a gallery at Heal’s to show the most innovative art of the period. The importance of craft is not just within the Heal's heritage. It is also very much a part of the current collections and is celebrated in the annual Modern Craft Market, held at the Tottenham Court Road store in London.

‘My conviction is that there is a real demand for handmade ceramics today’… Emily Rubner


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Emerging Potters - 6

Heal’s

My conviction is that there is a real demand for handmade ceramics today because as a customer you have that immediate connection through the piece with the maker's hands, and the decisions that have been made. Making is such a unique process, and the desire to obtain something that is unique in a world of mass production has become increasingly popular. With every handmade piece comes the story and storytelling which has become such a valued part of the process for customers buying.

On 7th April for 4 weeks, we will launch our annual Modern Craft Market in the front showroom of the Tottenham Court Road store.

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Makers who are chosen for the Collectables range at Heal's are selected on their aesthetic, price and point of difference. Price can sometimes be quite a tricky aspect to master within craft, because no matter how long the production process is, there will always be a perceived value from the customer. Products that have a point of difference are the ones that catch my eye, with a considered aesthetic and a justified price point. Currently I believe that ceramics has had a huge resurgence in the last two years. I remember from my own art college background that ceramics was not a very celebrated craft at all. In fact, a large proportion of the pottery studios had been closed down. What is wonderful is that this craft has not died off, but has exploded back in popularity and in a much more accessible fashion. Ceramic studios are popping up at a rate never seen before. This makes for a very exciting time within the ceramics movement with more and more makers bursting onto the scene. Perhaps, because many of these makers do not come from a specific ceramics art college background, the breadth of functional ceramics has blossomed and there is a real drive behind the commercial aesthetic with many of these makers.


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Heal’s

April - June 2017

Live demonstrations at Heal's have been a huge success recently because of the theatre and customer experience. High street retail spaces can be quite uniform, especially in larger stores, and the connection between the origin of products can seem very distant even when the products are handmade. With the maker there demonstrating, the customer can connect directly with the background to the product and it creates an experience and memory attached to the product that is unique. Customer experiences in physical retail stores are hugely important in a world where online retail growth dominates.

   

On 7th April for 4 weeks, we will launch our annual Modern Craft Market in the front showroom of the Tottenham Court Road store. The market will have a made in London focus, and the theme will be incorporating the maker's studio into our front showroom and windows. Demonstrations and events will take place throughout this four-week period. For the last week of the market, one of the windows will be taken over by QEST makers; Mia Sarosi and two textile makers: Bea Larkin and Dash & Miller. Mia will be demonstrating decorating her ceramics in the window at certain points throughout that week.

Jode Pankhurst

Today muted tones that provide a complementary mix and match story, soft simple shapes and contemporary classic designs are the styles that I have identified from this year's shows so far. There is still a huge importance on the handmade, but this year the emphasis on cross-disciplinary collaborations in design is also a key trend. Casual dining is growing still which reflects the changes in the different foods that we eat, living situations and work habits. If I could bring someone back to design today it would be Jessie Tate.

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April- June 2017

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Heal’s Case Study: Jo Davies, Ceramic Maker

 

Heal’s originally approached me at the London Design Festival. At the time I was showing at Heal's Modern Craft Market 2015, which went well for me so they invited me back to be part of Heal's Collectables. It was during this time that they suggested I demonstrate in the store in December 2015 alongside my work. The biggest difference between demonstrating at Heal’s compared to other venues is that the people were simply wandering in and out. They were there to 'shop' so were a little surprised to come across a potter working in a section of the store! This was tricky as it gave the demonstrating little structure but I did end up having a lot of chats with interested people and it was an opportunity to show my work to people who weren't expecting it. In a gallery or studio setting I have been used to a slightly more engaged audience for a demo that has a definite start and finish time. In Heal’s it was a matter of turning up and potting/demonstrating for a number of hours, which was strangely exhausting! Overall the audience did understand some of the complexities of ceramic making and the difference between my work and mass production. I think that people are generally looking for the craft made item.

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Heal’s Case Study: Jo Davies, Ceramic Maker www.jodavies.com

I had a lot of enthusiastic chats with people who may have subsequently bought from my website, studio or elsewhere but I wouldn't know it was them. Sometimes people have said 'we saw you demonstrate at Heal’s or 'we saw/bought your work at Heal’s so it has had an effect and whenever I do these things I assume that there will be a ripple effect that pays me back steadily afterwards. Anyone or any opportunity that stands out is a bonus. Major stores supporting craft makers should happen more. Obviously we all need to be a bit careful. But remember there's an expectation of margins on the part of retailers, which are difficult to meet as a craft-maker. Heal’s are a little more flexible and have a deep understanding of independent producers within their organisation.

You can next see Jo’s work at the Dulwich Festival’s Open House on 13/14 and 20/21 of May 2017

Lastly, Heal’s were also very supportive of me through marketing and social media campaigns. As a team they seemed to genuinely care about their suppliers. Being involved with them has been a real aspiration of mine so I grabbed it with both hands - ultimately I am certain that simply having a selection of my work at Heal’s brought me added interest and buyers.

www.jo-davies.com


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April - June 2017

COLLECT 2017 One of the highlights this year has been Collect one of the leading international art shows for contemporary work. This is the 13th edition of the show, which is presented by the Crafts Council and shown at the Saatchi Gallery in London. Some 37 galleries were exhibiting between the 2nd and 6th February 2017, and represented makers from the UK, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, South Korea, the UAE and the USA. Also on show this year were the Essex House Tapestries by Grayson Perry. Here we give you a glimpse of what was on show should you have been unable to attend.

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Following page- Sensorial Edges by Julie Massie, 2016. Materials: Porcelain on canvas Julie Massie has taken inspiration for her work from the fragile edges of waves breaking onto the coastline. Strong and destructive waves are the primary shapers of the coastline and usually occur in the winter when the sea is cold and grey, intermingled with blues. These colours are reflected within her final outcomes. Her work also explores the senses, especially touch, sight and sound. Physical touch is the fundamental element of human development and culture and she enjoys watching people’s reactions when they touch her work. What does it feel like, what does it sound like or will it break?


Julie Massie at COLLECT 2017


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April - June 2017

Mary O’Malley     Cynthia   Corbett   Gallery   COLLECT   2017

Akiko Hirai Flow Gallery COLLECT 2017

Katie Spragg Flow Gallery COLLECT 2017

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April - June 2017

Matt Smith Cynthia Corbett Gallery Lauren Nauman

Flow Gallery

COLLECT 2017

COLLECT 2017

The Essex House Tapestry: Grayson Perry Collect   2017  

Tanya Gomez

COLLECT OPEN 2017

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Turning Earth

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We set up Turning Earth to provide people with a different way of engaging with making ceramics Tallie Maughan, Founder and Creative Director of Turning Earth

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Photo: Dunja Opalko


April - June 2017

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Turning Earth has launched a second studio in London’s Lea Bridge Pioneering social enterprise, Turning Earth, opened its second space in London on 10 March 2017. At 8,500 square feet the studio, based in an old engineering factory in the recently regenerated Lea Bridge area of London, will be the largest open ceramics facility in the UK. Reprising and expanding on the successful model established with Turning Earth E2 - which opened in Hoxton in December 2013 - Turning Earth E10 provides yet more makers with the opportunity to develop their craft, whether as a hobby or a profession. As well as offering 200 spaces for hobbyists and part-time makers and 120 class spaces per week, the new studio complex offers opportunities for professional development through a newly developed incubation programme for emerging ceramics businesses. So far, over 200 people (comprising 136 class spaces, 50 members and 14 professional makers) have pre-booked places at the new Lea Bridge site. 200 more spaces will be made available over the coming months. Launched as a Crowdfunded social enterprise that aims to create affordable open-access ceramics facilities in London, Turning Earth is the brainchild of Tallie Maughan, whose background in theatre management and sustainable business, plus a four year period visiting community ceramics studios across the US, inspired her to bring the gym membership model to making. Since opening, Turning Earth has provided spaces for 2,100 people, whether as students or open-access members. They can sign-up for up to 15 hours a week, getting expert advice, access to 16 state of the art wheels and specialist support with firing and glazing. The support of studio staff means that even a novice maker can be confident to progress to make more complex work.

Photo’s: Dunja Opalko


Emerging Potters - 6

As well as enabling hundreds of people to develop their hobby, whether as a future career choice or simply for enjoyment, Turning Earth has also enabled 50 makers to graduate from part-time hobbyists to viable businesses who sell their work locally throughout Hackney and Greater London as well as online. Turning Earth encourages entrepreneurialism and holds a quarterly studio sale where people sell their work straight to the public. This has become immensely popular. During the Winter Sale in 2016, Turning Earth makers sold £36,600 worth of pots in just two days.

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April - June 2017

Photo’s: Dunja Opalko


Emerging Potters - 6

April - June 2017

Tallie Maughan, Founder and Creative Director of Turning Earth, said: “We set up Turning Earth to provide people with a different way of engaging with making ceramics. Rather than people having to make the choice between taking a course for a couple of hours a week or committing to a degree or setting up on their own, we want people to be able to get stuck in on their own terms, in a way that fits in with their lives.

“Our experience in the short time we have been running shows us that there is clearly a huge demand for people to make, and to learn how to make and have spaces in which to do it with expert guidance. Ironically, this increased demand to learn and participate has coincided with countrywide cuts to FE courses and the closure of affordable studio space due to crippling rent rises. “We believe that the culture of making should be integral to the communities in which we live and not just an add-on or solely the preserve of artists or those lucky enough to have the resources. The opening of Turning Earth E10 not only triples our capacity but also offers those makers who wish to develop professionally the space and guidance to do so.”

Photo above: Dunja Opalko

In recent months, sparked by increased public appetite for making and the rising profile of ceramics culturally on TV, applications to Turning Earth have tripled - outstripping provision at the original studio and prompting the search for a new site. The hunt for a new long-term venue took 18 months. Alerted by a friend to the former Lewden’s engineering works (still owned by the family who built it) the team was further drawn to the Lea Bridge area, which has recently been regenerated by Waltham Forest Council with the provision of cycle paths, affordable parking and the recently opened Lea Bridge Station with direct links to Stratford and Tottenham Hale”. The crowdfunding campaign is still live on the website e10.turningearth.uk 11 Argall Avenue, London. E10 7QE

Page Photo: Artur Rummel


Donations of work for the auction: Edmund De Waal Kate Malone Walter Keeler Jane Williams Matthew Wilcock


STUDENT

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April - June 2017

Auction Keith Brymer Jones Matthew Thompson Paul Taylor

Charlotte Manser, Spencer Penn and Meg Beamish

Sally Bertram Allison Wiffen

Enterprising ceramics students from Cardiff Metropolitan University went about raising funds to support their final year degree show by having an auction of work. But not any work…they have approached some of the leading potters in the country for donations of work, and they have responded generously. In fact they raised £2,500. This was a fantastic opportunity to buy some important collectors pieces of work Funds go towards helping the 18 students pay for the show catalogue of their show, advertising and the national show in London – New Designers and to the Hatfield show which they need to attend. The auction took place in February 2017, and held at Cardiff School of Art and Design. Viewing at 5pm and from 6pm the bidding started. About 10-15 items were auctioned live by the compere Billy Adams and the other 30/40 items were auctioned via a physical bid sheet in front of the items.

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STUDENT

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April - June 2017

Auction Below: Jim  Ranson  ,Mark  Sanger,  Jack  Laverick,  Gwen  Vaughan,             Richard  Heeley,    Rhiannon  Evans   They received donations from artists such as Walter Keeler, Kate Malone, Keith Brymer Jones, Edmund De Waal, Contestants/Winner of The Great Pottery Throw Down, Christie Brown, and Alex McErlain and Alice Kettle. One of the students Meg Beamish said, “We decided to host an auction to fundraise for our exhibition (27th May - 2nd June 2017) with the aim of raising £1000. This event also aims to bring together our community of ceramicists, artists and potters, to support each other”.  

 

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Gallery Cardiff Metropolitan University

Charlotte Manser Stoneware glazed, crank rock with porcelain unfired rock (2017)

Spencer Penn Unglazed, two are porcelain and one is porcellaneous stoneware. Finely thrown vessels that take their inspiration from oriental ceramics.

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STUDENT

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Gallery Cardiff Metropolitan University

Georgie Phillips Pictured is a work in progress based on 2D optical illusions she has been researching.

Shawn Kwan

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Three slab-built vessels with a decal narrative sequence of birds migrating and hand-drawn birds. The glaze is commercial stain of cobalt, light blue, coral, white and black which is distressed in layers on the surface of the White Ash (stoneware) clay.

April - June 2017

Alice Corby Her sculptures are decorated with a mixture of 1260 glazes, over fired earthenware slips and red iron oxide as these help create an ethereal quality to the work.


STUDENT

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April - June 2017

Gallery Cardiff Metropolitan University

Youngeun Shin

The exploration of abstract themes by looking, arranging and making. Often creating small and intricate artefacts that are suggestive to be in a state of flux or have a sensory element to them.

Harriet Andrews White St Thomas, Bisque fired vessels. Inspired by trees, manmade objects made from wood, specifically wooden stair spindles.

Jack McGonigle Shawn Kwan

Three slab-built vessels with a decal narrative sequence of birds migrating and hand-drawn birds. The glaze is commercial stain of cobalt, light blue, coral, white and black which is distressed in layers on the surface of the White Ash (stoneware) clay.

Series of 1 off pieces. Glazed with Shino, gas and soda fired stoneware

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Gallery Cardiff Metropolitan University

Rach Wellbeing The work is based on a perception of invisible disability, evoking feelings and empathy of the figure.

Fflur Green The work is organic and has a sense of growth, which is therapeutic and offers a different perspective from which to view the world.

April - June 2017

Meg Beamish Elm ash glaze jar 2017. Using locally found clays and wood ashes, the surfaces of these pots express a landscape of materials.


Emerging Potters - 6

April - June 2017

Hothouse Craft Council talent for 2017 The Crafts Council through its Hothouse programme has chosen six ceramicists from a total of 35 craft makers for 2017. Hothouse is a creative and business development programme for up-and-coming makers. It has established itself as the goldstandard professional development programme over the last seven years. Over the last six years more than 200 makers have benefitted from Hothouse with over 90% of makers saying it has enabled them to think differently about the direction of their career.

Verity Howard also commented, “I am really excited to have been selected for Hothouse 2017. Not only will this programme help my future business but it will also support my long-term aspirations to exhibit nationally and internationally.

Sophie Southgate said, “I hope that Hothouse will help me build a really strong foundation for my career. I believe the knowledge shared and the networks I make will be invaluable”.

    The six ceramic makers are: Verity Howard, Sophie Southgate, Sarah Hitchins Mella Shaw, May Wild Studios,Emma Johnson

 

Craft Scotland is funding the places for makers living and working in Scotland. 24


Emerging Potters - 6

Verity Howard  

Sophie Southgate  

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CRAFT

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April - June 2017

Pottery Focus on the West End Pottery www.westendpottery.co.uk

Run by Anne Whittlesey & David Wilson this studio is situated at Littleton, near Somerton in Somerset.

After college Anne worked at a pottery in Yorkshire (The Pot Shop) for a few years, then Hawkeshead pottery in Cumbria, and Nantwich Pottery. After a few years out of potting she also worked at Winchcombe Pottery for approx. five years making a range of production items.

They are committed to producing a range of quality, high-fired stoneware pottery for everyday use. Both have worked in potteries in other parts of the country, but in 2012 they moved to Somerset to further develop their individual styles. All work is handmade at the studio, decorated and finished, using traditional techniques. Amongst others, they are currently using their own ash glazes, whose subtle qualities enhance the surface decoration.

Today they get passing trade and regular customers, plus repeat orders. They also sell at the Somerset Guild of Craftsmen in Wells, as members, plus Ace Arts in Somerton.

Previously David worked at a pottery in Lesotho, Africa after college. Then Nantwich Pottery in Cheshire and after working with another potter for a few years, worked at Winchcombe pottery for approx.13 years (centre photo). While there he worked with Ray Finch making a wide range of their production ware.

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MAKERS

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Gallery Kirsteen Holuj

Kirsteen has a Joe Finch designed soda kiln in the grounds of Westbury Arts Centre in Milton Keynes, where she also has a studio. These porcelain stem pots fill lots of the little gaps in the kiln pack, the tallest is only about 3" high. She treats them all differently - some have a copper carbonate slip or black slip brushed on, some have a celadon glaze, some are just left naked - the results are always a surprise. A soda dilution is sprayed into the kiln from about 1200 - 1280 degrees for 3 hours and really enhances the textured clay.

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Emerging Potters - 6

April- June 2017

CAL 2017 Ceramic Art London (CAL) is of national and international importance. For the second year it is being held at Central Saint Martins building at King’s Cross. Many exhibitors are well established and for some it is their first time. As there are over 90 makers taking part, here we are profiling one of the new makers, Raewyn Harrison. The inspiration for her work comes from the tidal landscape of the Thames with its urban and industrial history which is an endless source of inspiration not just for the imagery that she puts into the work but also for thinking about forms and glazes when working. She uses crawling glaze as shoreline and to fragment images. .

For Raewyn, Mud Larking- finding fragments of everyday life in London and pressing those finds into the clay is an everpresent fixation. The Mud Larking range came from research undertaken when she was studying Architecture and discovered the print collection at the London Metropolitan Archive. From these maps and panoramas of London at various time periods were added to the vessels impressions in their bases from things she has collected on the river. The dribble tops came from slip casting which she developed into my thrown work as it reminds her of the river and provides spontaneity.

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 Raewyn Harrison While in Japan she learnt that as important that your food is, so too is what you serve it on. Each type has its own specially chosen piece of ceramic ware and it is considered poor taste to have dinner sets that all look the same. Raewyn had a wonderful day while there exploring traditional anagama kilns in Shigaraki. She found it fascinating to see the work that had been fired in them and how the natural glazes were created from ash deposits added at high temperatures. People babysit these kilns for days and days as well as using enormous amounts of wood to fuel the kilns.

She uses a variety of making methods. Throwing, hand building, mould making and slip casting. Then she inlays lines and impressions into the clay. Her glazes have been developed over several years so they are perfected to what she wants.

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April - June 2017

Chrysalis Following a dream – Diana Tonnison Potters come from a variety of backgrounds. Some follow traditional college training and some come to it later in life. In the case of Diana Tonnison she has used her design training to move across several mediums, and now she is an accomplished ceramic maker. Diana trained at St Martin's School of Art in London studying Fashion & Textiles, later graduating with a first class degree. After a decade in the fashion industry that took her to Hong Kong and New York, Diana turned her interests to interior design. She worked with artists and craftspeople placing their work in high-profile business interiors. Her long career in fashion and especially in the early years it included working with Missoni, the well known fashion and knitwear house in Italy, and Bill Gibb, the 1970's influential fashion designer, and Kaffe Fassett who designed knitwear for Bill at that time. She was always very excited about colour while a student, and these people helped her see colours, combinations and sources of inspiration in a much broader manner.

Today colour continues to play a particularly strong part in her work with inspiration coming from her travels in India, Morocco, South Africa, South America, Mozambique and Mallorca. The work weaves a rich tapestry of intriguing natural finds, ancient artefacts, traditional crafts, and treasures found in the flotsam and jetsam of seashores. Her fish, fruit and veg market boxes and her still life sculptural ceramic paintings continue to be central, and her work can be found in collectors houses around the world. Her trademark is the sculptural artworks for wall display. They include fish, fruit and veg market boxes inspired by local markets in this country and also from her travels, especially in Mercat Olivar Palma, Mallorca. The still life works are inspired by simple kitchen displays of food waiting to be prepared- like oil paintings of the old masters or the colourful foodie magazines of today. Each wooden box frames the ceramics. They are handmade, stained and distressed using lime wax to give an authentic feel of market stalls from years gone by, or give a vintage feel to the still life pieces.

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Just before she was 50 and approaching one of those crossroads in life as Course Leader for a Fashion and Textile course, she had to decide on college management, or leave and find a new challenge! The challenge won. Next was a 'mid life' gap year to research the subject and she travelled to India, Mozambique and South Africa, and recorded it by sketching and painting. The Indian travels were the most inspirational. Travelling across the Rajasthan desert and through Gujarat. Until then ceramics had been a long-term interest and hobby. Next was some residential courses lead by some well-known potters - Peter Beard, Ian Gregory and Sandy Brown. They each had different approaches and specialised in different styles and techniques. Her art & design 'principles' from St Martin's, a career in the fashion industry and teaching helped, so it was just a question of applying it to new media. Books were also important.

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Sales come through exhibitions with the membership of various ceramics and art & craft guilds/associations, galleries, design or craft fairs, open studio weeks and commissions directly from the public in her marketing activities. Her website is a good reference point and gives a professional profile, Facebook business page gets lots of likes and interest, and now she is moving onto Instagram, Pinterest and Twitter. Marketing was a new challenge and pricing is always an issue. Next to evaluate will be Etsy and TicTail. When she started to have work accepted in galleries, they would advise the retail price. It was a good starting point. Choosing a gallery carefully has been important. Most work has been on sale or return so making sure this suits the work and price range of the gallery is really important. There was a big learning curve here, and experience.


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Having a good warm quiet place to work has made a big difference. Somewhere where she can leave things out at the end of the day to return the next with everything exactly where she left off! Originally she had a tiny room at the end of the garage which she shared with mice. Very cold in winter, and having to dry the ceramics pieces in the house. The kilns were in the garage along with glazing materials and other stuff. There came a point where she needed either to rent space or invest in a new purpose built studio, which is what she did.

When talking to students and at schools she always tells them that with a practical art degree or qualification you will be able to apply the principles of art and design to other media, and while one may start off in one particular field of art or design, there are many others that may interest you to work in later. One's working life after college or university is a very long one, and life should always be about learning new things and new experiences, nothing is a waste of time, whether for work or pleasure.

Time is spent on Facebook and other social media (which needs to be done on a regular drip, drip basis) and investigating various potential selling opportunities like fairs, galleries and exhibitions and events for the coming year. On top of this there are always the financial aspects of the business to do.

Her art and design education has taken her to many places around the world, meeting some amazing influential people, tried all sorts of art and craft subjects, and knowing she will never be bored in life either making something, learning about an artist or new designer or visiting exhibitions.

For the past year she has had a ceramic student working with her. It has helped enormously. Doing the little routine jobs and helping her with Raku firings and scrubbing up! In return she teaches her various techniques, information and tips about running a business and other really useful information. The student has now started her ceramics degree so a new assistant is wanted this year.

Follow on: Facebook/Instagram/Twitter/Pinterest

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STUDENT

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April - June 2017

Gallery Royal College of Art Work in progress

Annie Hardy

Helen Johannessen

Jessics Steel


STUDENT

Emerging Potters - 6

Pryanka Sharma Mette Lyng Peterson

April - June 2017

Gallery Royal College of Art Work in progress

Amber Zuber


STUDENT

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April - June 2017

Gallery Royal College of Art Work in progress

Lucille Lewin (below left) Yao Wang (below) Victoria Andrew (bottom)


Emerging Potters - 6

April- June 2017

Susan Cupitt, below left Cathy D’Arcy below Anglian potters


Emerging Potters - 6

MAKERS

April - June 2016

Gallery

John Masterton Anglian Potters

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MAKERS

Emerging Potters - 6

RogerDuke     Anglian  Potters  

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Gallery

April - June 2016


Emerging Potters - 6

MAKERS

April - June 2016

Gallery

Tony Orvis   Anglian  Potters  

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Emerging Potters - 6

MAKERS

Marion Stuart   Anglian  Potters  

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Gallery

April - June 2016


Emerging Potters - 6

BOOK REVIEW

April- June 2017

The Ceramics Reader Edited by Andrew Livingstone and Kevin Petrie Published by Bloomsbury ISBN: HB:978-1-4725-8442-7

This book is a collection of essays on what is described as ‘art ceramics’. It covers a range of and thinking that will be of interest to makers, curators, critics, collectors and those want to understand the theory behind present ceramics. It is not an illustrated ceramics book though. The prime focus of the book is the creative practice in Europe, United States and Australia. It looks at the changing relationship modern ceramics has to fine art and at the same time brings an up to date perspective to the academic approach to the subject. Divided into three sections, the book looks at Ceramics- materiality and metaphor, Ceramics in Context and Key themes. The articles focus on the debate from the last thirty years, but also gives the reader an overview of the last century.

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Emerging Potters - 6

April- June 2017

WHAT TO TO TOTO

Watch for

The new pottery magazine ClayCraft was published in February in the UK. It is a monthly publication and available in the UK from newsagents and supermarkets. www.claycraft.co.uk

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Emerging Potters - 6

April - June 2017

WHAT TO TO TOTO

Watch for Thursday 4 May 201704

London Craft Week: Ceramics in Conversation by The Kiln Rooms As part of London Craft Week renowned ceramicists, Stuart Carey, Duncan Hooson, Robin Levien and Nicola Tassie discuss the future of ceramics and craft in a changing market. There will be a drinks reception in The Kiln Rooms studio in Copeland Park from 6pm before moving next door to The Nines events space where the talk will start at 7pm, followed by a Q&A. www.thekilnrooms.com

The Kiln Rooms SALE

2-4 June 2017 Friday 2pm to 8pm Saturday and Sunday 11am to 6pm Between 70-80 makers Arch 198 Bellenden Road, Peckham, London SE15 4QJ 300 metres from Peckham Rye station

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Emerging Potters - 6

April - June 2017

DATES TO TOTO

Watch For

Ceramic Art London Central Saint Martins, King’s Cross 31 March – 2 April 2017 Ceramic Art York September? Date tba Contemporary Ceramics Centre (CPA) London Shows change over the year British Ceramics Biennial 2017 Stoke-on-Trent, England 28 September until 5 November 2017 Lustre Contemporary Craft Makers’ Market Nottingham 3/4/5 November 2017 British Craft Trade Show Harrogate 2-4 April 2017 Hey Clay! Crafts Council Celebration Various locations 7-9 April 2017

Centre of Ceramic Art York Picasso –ceramics from the Attenborough Collection 28th July - 5th November 2017 "See the extraordinary ceramic works of Pablo Picasso as York Art Gallery presents highlights from the most significant private collection in the UK for the upcoming exhibition. Heads of women, Aztec vase by Pablo Picasso, 1957. Image by kind permission of the estate of Lord and Lady Attenborough and the Leicester Arts and Museums service.

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London Craft Week Various locations 3-7 May 2017 Clerkenwell Design Week Various locations (Crafts Centre) 23-25 May New Designers 2017 Business Design Centre, Islington 28 June to 1 July and 5-8 July 2017 Cockpit Open Studios Holborn 9-11 June Deptford 16-18 June


Emerging Potters - 6

April - June 2017

DATES TO TOTO

Watch For

Royal College of Art Ceramics & Glass Battersea Campus 24 June – 3 July Central Saint Martins Degree Show Ceramics and Glass mid to late June tba Potfest in the Park 28-30 July

Penrith

Potfest in the Pens August tba

Penrith

Potfest Scotland 9 to 11 June

Perth

Art in Clay 18 to 20 August

Hatfield

Ceramic Wales Cardiff

Made by Hand 3 to 5 November

Ceramics in the City Late September tba Great Northern Contemporary Craft Fair Manchester Late October tba Aberystwyth Ceramics Festival 30 June – 2 July

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Emerging Potters - 6

Aylesford Pottery advice

 

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April - June 2017

New Kilns Aylesford Pottery uses a variety of kilns. Both gas and electric are used to fire the work of their students and for their own commercial work. But for someone just starting out and wants to have their own kiln the pitfalls can be costly. Here are some basic tips for newcomers. 1) Before starting with those precious pieces always fire the kiln when empty to test the kiln. It will also make the elements last longer. 2) Again before starting in earnest, run a series of tests with the glazes you intend to use. Here at Aylesford we have the test mounted on a board for easy reference. 3) The first time you fire the kiln you will be with it at all times during the cycle to watch for any problems. 4) If buying second hand always have an electrician check the kiln. They can be dangerous. 5) Do not use extension leads. They will not take the power lead on electric kilns. 6) Ensure no leads are touching the side of the kiln. 7) Read the instructions properly. 8) Before starting your pieces ask the clay supplier for some sample clay to test in the kiln, before placing an order. 9) Is there any advantage between gas and electric? Only that gas will allow you to do reduction firing.


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If you would like to join the mailing list for the magazine email: paulbailey123@googlemail.com Produced quarterly

Emerging Potters magazine issue 6  

A magazine for ceramic makers profiling work and features. How students at Cardiff Met Uni funded their final show, looking at the Collect s...

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