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EMERGING Issue

5 January to March 2017

Potters


Emerging Potters - 5

January – March 2017

Introduction A new pottery magazine soon Welcome to the fifth issue of Emerging Potters the online magazine produced for people who make ceramics for their own enjoyment and those ceramic students from the UK Universities about to enter the arts sector as a career. The big news is that a new magazine called ClayCraft will be published in February 2017. It has Identified ceramics as the next big thing in the craft market, which is partly due to the popularity of the BBC’s The Great Pottery Throwdown programme. ClayCraft will be a magazine read by ceramics enthusiasts from all levels, including those new to the subject, those at the early stages of learning, ceramics students, or intermediate makers looking to improve their skills and take them to a higher, even professional level as well as people who just love pottery. There is currently no ceramics magazine with distribution at newsagents, WHSmith stores, supermarkets and specialist retail outlets in the UK for this target audience. ClayCraft will also be available digitally and through postal subscription. Emerging Potters is produced by a voluntary team. Thanks for reading this edition and if you are not already on the mailing list then contact me by email: paulbailey123@googlemail.com

Paul Bailey Editor and owner (as every studio seems to have a dog this is our one – Dylan) The magazine is an independent journal. The publishers do not accept any liability for errors or omissions. The views expressed in the features are not necessarily those of the editor. Reproduction in part or whole must be with the consent of the editor. All rights reserved.

Contributions to the gallery of work from makers and students are welcome and will be included wherever possible on a first come basis. Send to the above email address. The editor’s decision is final. © Paul Bailey 2017 Emerging Potters is produced in association with Aylesford Pottery UK.


Emerging Potters -5

January - March 2017

Advisory Panel

Contents

Alan Parris and Billy Byles are master potters and joint partners of the Aylesford Pottery in Kent. Alan trained in ceramics at Medway College of Art. Then worked as a freelance thrower in London and Kent, before forming the partnership. Billy served an apprenticeship with the Chelsea Pottery and Bethnal Green Pottery in London before working as a freelance thrower in London.

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COLLECT (Crafts Council)

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Julie Massie

8-10

A Chinese Vision

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Hwan Hee Lee

15-16

Alexa Macleod

17-22

Dacorum & Chiltern PG

23-24

Staffordshire

25-26

Instagram

27-30

Showtime

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Jewish Museum

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What to watch for

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Roderick Bamford

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Farnham College

36-38

The Design Factory

39-40

Swindon Gallery

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Kilns

John Leach, eldest grandson of renowned potter Bernard Leach and son of David Leach, continues the family tradition at Muchelney Pottery in the heart of the Somerset Levels. He started the pottery in 1965 with his wife Lizzie. His pots are all lovingly hand-thrown, using local clays, and wood-fired in the three-chambered kiln to the high stoneware temperature of 1320°C, which creates their distinctive 'toasted' finish. Helen Walsh, Curator of Ceramics, York Museums Trust. Since 2004 she has been the curator in charge of York Museums Trust’s national collection of British Studio Ceramics, known as CoCA. She has also established the Contemporary Studio Ceramics Subject Specialist Network. Wendy Kershaw, international ceramic maker based in Scotland. Originally part of the Glasgow School of Art movement she has exhibited and worked in USA, Canada, China, Hungary and throughout the UK. Her work is sought by public institutions and private collectors worldwide. Emily Wiles, ceramic maker based in Leister. After receiving a first class degree from De Montfort University in design Crafts, she was selected for the show New Designers in the ‘One Year On’ section in 2015 and featured in Ceramic Review. She was also a ‘Rising Stars’ winner in 2015. Sandi Cowles, A keen student attending pottery classes at Penzance School of Art for the past two years. Sandi poses the questions which many would like to ask.

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Centre of Ceramic Art at York Art Gallery

Rethink Ceramics Rethink Ceramics is a campaign by CoCA which aims to celebrate the great variety and diversity of activity in the world of ceramics.

Rethink Ceramics always interested in submissions on anything and everything related to ceramics, to ensure we have the best and most up to date information about all the great activities taking place. This campaign is not solely focused on the activities at the Centre of Ceramic Art at York Art Gallery but everyone with an interest in ceramics is invited to take part, contributing to the campaign by sharing their work, experience, exhibitions and installations seen across the world. Get involved on Facebook and Twitter using the hashtag #RethinkCeramics. If you would like to submit content for the #RethinkCeramics campaign please email cocayork@ymt.org.uk. 3

Work by  Emily  Gardiner.  Photo:  Sylvain  Deleu  

From exhibition reviews to glazing techniques, new work and historic collections, interviews and testimonials, Rethink Ceramics aims to highlight all manner of topics, showcasing the strength and breadth of this art-form.


January – March 2017

Emerging Potters - 5

Collect

Launched in 2004 at the V&A Museum the ‘Collect’ show was intended to support the gallery infrastructure and develop the market for high-end craft. Then in 2009 the show moved to it’s present home at the Saatchi Gallery London, which is where it will be in February 2017. Collect is very different in that it is an art fair, where the exhibitors are mostly commercial galleries or dealers that represent makers who are museum quality artists. This does not exclude new makers though. It’s about putting the spotlight on leading work and new ideas. As such, it is considered a premiere show in Europe.

For Daniella Wells from the Crafts Council the work starts one year in advance and is a careful process of building and developing the show each year. The Crafts Council starts by announcing an open call to galleries to apply. There are several new aspects to 2017. It’s a refreshed fair after skipping a year in 2016. Many established galleries are returning and there are several new galleries too, as well as ‘Spotlight’ shows around the fair where space has been awarded to particular galleries that have proposed new ideas by specific artists. Radical new ideas in these Spotlights are very ‘off plinth’ and challenging.

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The Crafts Council is delighted to announce a new acquisition to its national collection of contemporary craft: a pair of tapestries by Grayson Perry which will form a special presentation at Collect. Also included is Collect Open which will showcase conceptdriven and experimental craft works selected by a panel led by designer Faye Toogood. Collect Open offers a unique opportunity for artists to challenge traditional perceptions of craft and design. Installations by 15 makers including Shelley James, Soojin Kang and Malene Hartmann Rasmussen will be on show. Wells goes on to describe the audience for the show as breaking down into several areas: the public that come to see the fair as an amazing exhibition, private collectors that are buying for their own collections, professional buyers (art consultants), museum curators buying for public collections as well as a fantastic mixture of artists and enthusiasts from students to critics. She goes on to say that she measures success largely from information and feedback from exhibitors. It’s a marketplace, and it’s important that they are getting the right interest in what they are showing and sales from their stands. This year’s show has a wider diversity in the countries that are taking part, with a list of artists from South Korea. The stands are paying even greater attention to how they are curated and the composition of the artists.  

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For a show this big there is a team of specialists in events and the market, as well as huge teams of contractors that service the fair when it’s on. The build-up and communications for the event is largely led from the core Crafts Council team. With over 30 international galleries taking part the 2017 show promises to be one of the arts highlights in London. Note Opening times are as follows: Thursday 2 February 12pm-6pm Friday 3 February 11am-6pm Saturday 4 February11am-6pm Sunday 5 February 11am-6pm Monday 6 February 11am-4pm Location Saatchi Gallery, Duke of York's HQ, King's Road, London SW3 4RY Collect is produced and curated by the CRAFTS COUNCIL

Images are from a previous year’s Collect show

 

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January – March 2017

Collectable Julie Massie in one of the new graduates chosen for COLLECT 2017. Trained at UCA Farnham this will be her first exposure to an international show and commercial galleries. She takes the theme of her work from the Jurassic Coastline, being a product of erosion and from the fragile edges of waves breaking onto the coastline. The different strength of these waves constantly breaking onto the shore. These strong and destructive waves are the primary shapers of the coastline and usually occur in the winter when the sea is cold and grey, and intermingled with blues. These colours are reflected within the final work. For COLLECT 2017 she has created an installation of panels made up of ceramic tiles with fragile edges which represent the beauty and importance of the eroding landscape by the sea. The audience is invited to walk between the panels so that their senses become submerged with the artwork. COLLECT is the leading international art fair for contemporary objects presented by the Crafts Council. From 2- 6 February it provides a unique opportunity to see and buy museum-quality works by leading craft masters. It has over 30 prominent galleries from across Europe, Asia and North America, that come together to exhibit exceptional museum-quality contemporary craft by artists and makers at the Saatchi Gallery, London.  

http://www.juliemassie.co.uk/


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January – March 2017

A Chinese Vision As part of the series looking at how potters start-out selling their work we were told about an inspiring story from China. This is the experience of Caroline Cheng. My first visit to Jingdezhen was in 1998. Then it was a gloomy town with hardly any young people working in ceramics. Most of the Jingdezhen Ceramic Institute students after graduating had changed career because there wasn’t any opportunities for them in the country. So, in 2005 I set up the Pottery Workshop in Jingdezhen with the help of Takeshi Yasuda who became the director for five years. We liked the way Mashiko in Japan had two annual markets where potters can sell their work, and in June 2008, I started a Creative Market outside our cafe as a platform for young budding artists to showcase their work and perhaps make a living. The first week we had 17 people attend. They put some cloth on the ground and sold their work from nine am to noon on the Saturday. The first week they sold £100 worth of work and were very excited. The second week 25 people came and sold £3 worth. Undeterred I asked them to come back every Saturday from 9-noon and try for eight weeks.

After the eight weeks more than 100 people came, and business was brisk. In two years the market got out of control. Over 300 people came to sell in front of our market and displayed their work. People were fighting over the best spots and others were copying the best sellers' work. I decided to organize it better and started curating the market each month. Today we have 80-120 artisans attending with ceramic work to sell in the market. Some of the best weekends we have sold over £12,000 worth of work.

Young people settled in Jingdezhen, bought cars and apartments, set up studios, resulting in this town’s revitalisation. Not only is there ceramic work in the market nowadays, but I have also picked woodwork, lacquerware, handmade clothes, food and drinks, tattoo artists, metalsmiths, and bamboo artists.

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Young aspiring artists from all over the country are moving to Jingdezhen after they graduate from their universities because they feel that there is an opportunity to make their work and a living. I try and pick a range of work for the market, from functional work to sculptures.

January – March 2017

Last year I took the work from the market and showcased it at the London Craft Week in May 2016. We have been invited to come back again in 2017. Many makers participated in the Aberyswyth Button Exhibition in 2016. In December we participated in the Milan Small Gift Items Expo as part of the China stand. Several makers have travelled overseas to look at how others are making ceramics and returning to Jingdezhen with fresh ideas. In this way we are trying to help promote the makers by participating in international events.

The best success story that I have heard about from one of the market people is that he came in the Fall of 2008 with a backpack of ceramic trinkets to sell. He made £40 the first week and called his parents and said, "No need to send me money, (£120 a month) I can make it on my own!" Today he has a factory with over 30 people working under him, selling his designs to shops all over the country and making £300,000 a year! He has three retail shops all over town and doesn't participate in the market anymore. Many of the makers are now independent with their own shops.

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STUDENT

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January – March 2017

Gallery Hwan Hee Lee

Currently studying at the Royal College of Art in London, Hwan Hee Lee is also running her own company ‘Imagery Code’. Originally she came to London from Korea to study at Central Saint Martins (CSM) at the age of 20, firstly on the Foundation Course and then the Ceramic Design Course. She had been interested in clay from the age of eight years. A major influence at CSM was the then course leader Katheryn Hearn who showed her how to develop ideas. She describes her work as being essentially Korean and is influenced by thought, culture, taste and feeling. The work is a transition between art and people’s everyday life.

Her company Imagery Code is inspired by the genre of Magical Realism. To produce the work she makes many drawings then models and moulds to test the manufacturing process, and then works with specialists to prepare the huge number to be made. She sees herself as an international artist.

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STUDENT

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January – March 2017

Gallery Hwan Hee Lee

Later she did an internship at the Barnaby Barford studio. In the past two years she has exhibited extensively in London, Seoul and Paris. Plus undertaking a project with British Airways, Korea.

Her online company Imagery Code was started in 2016, and each collection has it’s own characters and stories. The Korean Government gave financial help to start the company and expertise in management.

The work is made from Korean porcelain with liquid gold luster. The porcelain is harder than the British type, so better for tableware.

She sees her work not so much as products but as works of art.

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www.imagerycodeshop.com


Alexa Macleod


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Interns or Apprenticeships? Alexa Macleod

Originally she studied at Grays School of Art in Aberdeen.   Although she started off as a fashion student,  the course was not for her, so she transferred to a 3D Design course (jewellery,  glass and ceramics)  where she experimented with metal work, furniture making and laser cutting, before finding ceramics. This became her medium of choice near the end of the degree. Due to the varied nature of the course she did not have the skills needed to become a potter, so she went in search of pottery assistant placements to learn from the ground up. A summer placement started (on a food and board basis) at The Cromarty Pottery with the potter Barbel Dister.   There she began training in earthenware slipware.  Plus some hand building,  decorating and basic throwing. After Cromarty she made her way to Orkney for a winter placement working for Andrew Appleby of The Harray Pottery.   There she experienced earthenware, and advanced throwing. A year after finishing in Orkney she was lucky enough to be selected by the Leach Studio in St Ives, Cornwall for their Volunteer programme.

Originally she choose the Leach Studio because of their apprenticeship scheme.   Previously she had found it very difficult to find potteries that were able to take apprentices on,  let alone pay them! Added to this was their reputation as well as a fantastic studio team where knowledge could be found from all over the world. When she first arrived in St Ives,  she had a basic knowledge of pottery, but her throwing was not up to production level.   Since being there her throwing skills have dramatically improved as well as a general knowledge of ceramics. Now after finishing six months at the Leach Pottery she will return to do a further six months in May 2017. For Alexa one of the best things about ceramics is how vast a medium it is. She never stops learning and is continuously experimenting. Which for her is definitely part of its charm. In the future her ambition is to develop a theme of functional work. Her advice for others, “Don't give up.   Pottery is about patience and repetition.   Whether that refers to physical practice in pottery or just trying to find potteries to work and learn in.   If you keep focused on your dream,  it will happen”.

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Dacorum and Chiltern Potters Guild Open Day - Sat March 4th 2017 Lectures &  demonstrations  by  

Walter Keeler Chris Taylor Felicity Aylieff The  Sandpit  Theatre   Sandringham  School  Academy  Trust   The  Ridgeway,  St  Albans  AL4  9NX   9.45am  to  5pm  

January – March 2017

Walter Keeler  –  a  figure  who  has  been  hugely   influential  in  British  functional  ceramics.    He  will   be  demonstrating  his  precisely  executed  thrown   and  manipulated  forms,  for  which  he  is  highly   acclaimed  and  well-­‐known.       Christopher  Taylor  –  will  be  demonstrating  his   unconventional  ways  using  a  variety  of   techniques  and  building  up  layers,  creating   works  that  act  as  a  record  of  activity  during  the   process  of  making.     Felicity  Aylieff  -­‐  a  Senior  lecturer  at  the  Royal   College  of  Art,  London  she  will  be  discussing  her   international  work  of  large-­‐scale  ceramics.     Public:  £30/  DCPG  members:  £20/  Full  time   students:  £10   Tickets  available:-­‐   Online:  www.sandpittheatre.co.uk   By  calling:  01727  799565                                                                                             Or  in  person:  11:30  –  3:30pm  

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MAKERS

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January – March 2017

Gallery Dacorum & Chiltern Potters Guild

The Guild has over 100 members - largely from Beds, Buck & Herts but also as far as Derbyshire. They are a mix of enthusiastic amateurs, professional potters, art students, tutors and technicians. Meeting monthly in Kings Langley (Hertfordshire) from October to May, they have well respected local and international potters discussing and demonstrating their work & skills.

Beccy Boxer Colin Hazelwood

They hold an annual exhibition at which members show and sell their work. In addition, they support several local art fairs such as Childwickbury, Kimpton and Boxmoor. The major annual event is the Potters Open Day (POD) where leading professionals are invited to present and demonstrate. This popular event attracts many potters from all over the South East.

Google: www.thedcpg.org.uk

 

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MAKERS

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Gallery Dacorum & Chiltern Potters Guild

Far left top: Joanna Lewy Far left below: Jackie Harrop Left: Emily Good Below: Fiona Booy


MAKERS

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January – March 2017

Gallery Dacorum & Chiltern Potters Guild

Above: Audrey Hammett Left: Dianna Tonnison

Below: John Higgins


MAKERS

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January – March 2017

Gallery Dacorum & Chiltern Potters Guild

Above: Lynne McGechie Above left: Margaret Brown Far left: Nigel Carrick Left: Marshal Colman Below left: Richard Ballantyne Below: Paul Rowbottom

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MAKERS

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Gallery Dacorum & Chiltern Potters Guild

Above: Ros McGuirk

January – March 2017

Below: Sarah Crickmore Below centre: Wendy Peters

Below bottom: Richard Pearson Left: Vivienne Rodwell-Davies


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STUDENT

Gallery

January – March 2017

SUCCESS AT STAFFORDSHIRE

Caitlin Darby  

Sabrina Vasulka

Sabrina Vasulka, studying MA Ceramic Design at Staffordshire University has won an international competition which celebrates ceramic talent from across Europe. Called Future Lights it is designed to help emerging ceramic artists kick-start their careers. Three up-and-coming ceramic artists also from Staffordshire University have also been awarded scholarships to support their studies. The University has teamed up with the British Ceramics Biennial to celebrate emerging talent by launching the Staffordshire University Scholarship for Creativity and Innovation in Ceramics. Caitlin Darby, Holly Kemp and Emma Rose were chosen to receive the financial rewards of £1,000 each to support their studies and have now all started the MA programme. Caitlin, who came to Staffordshire from an undergraduate degree at Loughborough University, creates minimalistic pieces which look at the relationship between a form and its surface finish.

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STUDENT

 

Gallery

Holly Kemp   Since showcasing her collection at New Designers in June 2016, she has been invited to showcase her work at Lustre in Nottingham and will be part of the Young Meteors Scheme celebrating graduates and new designers. A mature student, Emma came to Staffordshire University to study after having her two children to study BA (Hons) in Surface Pattern Design. On the course Emma experimented with indigo and procion dyes on melamine‐faced surfaces and plywood, gaining her 3rd prize in the Bradford Textile Society Design Competition. She is now exploring how she can translate her design work onto ceramics after receiving the Staffordshire University Scholarship for Creativity and Innovation in Ceramics to study MA: Ceramic Design. Professor David Sanderson, who leads the MA in Ceramic Design, added: “I think it’s massively important that we invest in what is probably still our flagship course within the faculty and ceramic design in the Potteries.”

Emma Rose    


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How to promote your work on

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January – March 2017

Instagram Talle Maughan, Creative Director of Turning Earth Studios looks at an aspect of social media. Not long ago, if you wanted to sell ceramic work you had to follow a time honoured route - do a degree, get a masters, go to trade shows and network with stockists. This ruled out a lot of people who couldn’t afford to stop working to do a degree programme. But in today’s digital world there are great new opportunities for emerging makers, with the rise of platforms such as Instagram you no longer have to go the conventional way if you want to reach an audience. You can take your pieces straight to your market and sell them online. All you need is your ceramic work, an eye with a camera, and a bit of dedication. Turning Earth is a co-work ceramics studio in London that has launched some of the most Insta-famous makers in the UK. Its Instagram stars include Tom Kemp, who after two years on the platform has an eye-watering 110,000 followers, and Stine Dulong of Skandinavian design inspired company SkandiHus, which now has over 36,000 followers. As a result of his Instagram success, Tom’s career has started to take off; he now has an exclusive deal with a top international interiors magazine to sell a range of vases. Stine has more sales than she can fulfill via her online shop, which has propelled her to launch her own production studio.

To find out why you should get on the Instagram bandwagon, I talked to Tom and Stine to learn about how it’s worked for them, and their top tips for success. For Tom, Instagram offers a way to reflect on his artistic journey. “It’s allowed me to see my work developing” he says. “On a single page I can scroll back through months of making and learning, thereby understanding what progress I’ve made.” But that’s just the start. By posting publicly on Instagram, he also gets feedback from other people which gives him a sense of what the public appreciate. “I’ve received a small ocean of goodwill since getting involved, and it’s allowed me to see my progress.” Tom even has a good word to say about being trolled online. Trolling is unfortunately a common experience for anyone with Tom’s degree of online celebrity, but he has found a way to make it a positive experience. He uses engaging with the “haters” as a way to reach out about the making process to the uninitiated, explaining the process and the hard work that goes into making each pot. “They used to disturb me,” he says. “But now I take it as my duty to try to educate people who have at least taken the trouble to come to my page”. Stine’s thriving company, SkandiHus, has Instagram driven sales as its backbone. “I'm pretty sure that I wouldn't be where I'm at now had it not been for the platform”, she says.


January – March 2017

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..Instagram

“Most of my retailers have found me there. I can see a direct correlation between products that I've featured on Instagram and sales on my web shop.” When I asked both Stine and Tom to give their advice on the best way to grow an audience on the platform, there was a lot of overlap between their recommendations, and there’s clearly a well defined formula for success. They both spend about an hour a day on Instagram, and make sure to engage with the people that contact them. “It's important to interact with the community”, says Stine, “make sure you like other people's photos and respond to comments on yours”. Tom and Stine agree that it’s important to have discipline about how you post. They post once a day and are aware that doing any more risks making people feel like you are spamming them. “Be regular” says Tom. “Get people to want to see your latest post. Post once a day to start with, but no more. Make it a tiny but expected part of people’s day.” Neither Stine nor Tom post private photos, or anything off-theme. “Don’t mix great pot shots with hilarious videos of kittens with ducks” says Tom. “Yes,” agrees Stine, “no one wants to see you lazing on the beach. It's a platform to display your work, so stick to that.” Stine also advises that you find a consistent visual style: “Find your style and stick to it”, she says. “People want to know what kind of images you are going to post when they decide whether to follow you or not.” She gives an insight into the way she curates her own Instagram wall: “Simple, minimalist images with a clear background work well because most people will be looking at them from their relatively small smartphone screens” she says. “Oh, and use relevant hashtags so people can find your work.”

“And be interesting” says Tom. “If your work stands on its own or you’re some kind of professional god then maybe just images will gain many followers and their undying respect and adoration. If your work is less than that then I recommend you include something about you: why did you make it, what does it mean to you, what went right, what went wrong (especially what went wrong), and what did you learn. I I also watch to see what I don’t ‘like’ and it’s thoughtless images, where I’m just being shown what someone has just seen. I want to know why it’s significant in their lives or at least to be a carefully created image or video which is remarkable in itself.” Clearly getting the balance exactly right on Instagram is its own kind of art form. I think if you use this advice as a starting point you’ll be well on your way.

What you need to get started on Instagram • • • • • •

Get your hands on a smartphone. Download the Instagram app. Write a short biography that describes your feed. Put in a link to your website or online shop. Create some great product shots or videos. Find some similar makers and see what hashtags they use. Decide which you want to try. Some hashtags you can look through to get started are #ceramics #pottery #interior #home #design #handmade #crafts • Look around and follow Instagram feeds that you find interesting. But don’t follow people you don’t like. • Click on hashtags that interest you, and then press the heart button to give feedback for people whose posts you appreciate. • The first couple of thousand followers take a long time to gather, so be patient. Use uploading images on the platform as a way to document your own work. It can be part of your artistic process, so enjoy.

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Wendy Kershaw     All Shapes and Sizes exhibition

The Artichoke Gallery 21st of January till the 25th of March 2017. Church Street, Ticehurst, Kent TN5 7AE


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Showtime… In a series of features we like to look at makers experiences of taking part in shows around the country. Travelling north this is what draws maker Wendy Kershaw to some of the best shows there.

come with cash, cheque books and a real intention to buy direct from the maker. It’s a mixture of families, children and dogs, gallery owners, collectors. Each year one woman flies over in a helicopter from Ireland.

Wendy Kershaw at Potfest in the Park

A maker can expect hard work, packing your work, stand and all the many things you need to remember, driving to the show, setting up your stand, dressing it, arranging the work, then standing at your stall for three days takes some energy, before packing it all away again, but Potfest in the Park is one of the warmest and friendliest of shows that I’ve done, both in terms of the other exhibitors and the public.

There are three Potfests. Potfest in Scotland, Potfest in the Pens, and Potfest in the Park, the latter two being at Penrith, in the Lake District. Here though I am looking at Potfest in the Park. You apply online, and it’s beautifully simple, as they don’t want any artists statements, CV or anything other than photos of your work and your address. Applications are to be made in November and December, with Potfest in the Park happening at the end of July. A lot of the people that go to Potfest in the Park

It’s great to meet the other hundred potters, from the famous and established, to those that have been going a while, and those just getting started. We nearly all work on our own, so it’s interesting to get together, to see their work, how they display it, ask questions, and get to know a diverse and international group of makers, with a very wide variety of work and high standard.

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Top:  Bird-­‐bath  competition   Centre:  My  loyal  patrons  the   Cemmick  family    

The exhibitors come from as far as Australia and Japan, as well as Germany, the Netherlands, Ireland, Slovenia, France, Portugal and Spain. Many of us camp at a nearby village, with an organised potters meal and prize giving. There is a real group feeling, and many lasting connections are made. Visitor numbers are usually high, and it’s a good atmosphere. It’s held in the grounds of a stately house, with beautiful gardens and a band playing. Many people want to chat to you about your work, how you make it, the ideas behind it, and want to get to know the makers, others will just want to look, and some will give it one glance and pass by. It’s wonderful feedback, to see who likes your work, and who doesn’t. What work is attracting most attention, who lingers, and who buys. Hearing what people have to say, and what you overhear them saying is of great use. The show is also a wonderful place to meet collectors of your work year after year. Working on your own, and only selling online or through galleries, as I do, you do not get this information, and I find it invaluable. You can learn some tough and surprising lessons about people’s reaction to your work.

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Below: Fellow  exhibitor  from  Japan,   Fumihiro  Fuyushiba  


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January – March 2017

She is a figurative Below: Isabel Merrick at the end of the first day.

Potfest in the Park Sheep by Jon Barret-Danes

It’s a very well organised show, set up and run from the start by the Cox family, potters Geoff and Chris, and their son Matt. You know that help and advice is always on hand. Each year there is a theme for the completion on the lawn, a big hit with the public who get to vote for their winner and many of the exhibitors put a lot of effort into it. Last year it was bird-baths! The thing about Potfest, and other such shows, is that once you've earned enough to pay the cost of your stand and travel costs all the money you make is yours. Selling my work directly this way makes a big difference to the financial year, and my ability to make a living solely as a ceramicist. So it's a great thing that such shows exist, giving potters the opportunity to sell directly to the public. So if you are thinking of taking the plunge into selling why not give it a try?

Potters during tea-break on the first day of set-up.


Jewish Museum London

Shaping Ceramics From Lucie Rie to Edmund de Waal Until 26 February 2017 The exhibition opens with an exploration of how artists Lucie Rie, Hans Coper and Ruth Duckworth changed the face of British studio ceramics by importing modernist ideas from the continent - ideas entirely different to the Anglo-Oriental style of Bernard Leach, which had until that point dominated the field. The second section of the exhibition turns to the work of ceramicists born or based in Britain, including Edmund de Waal arguably the best known ceramicist working in Britain today. The exhibition will include ‘Arcady’ in which eighteen thrown porcelain pots stacked in a steel case can be seen but not touched, reflecting de Waal’s interest in the history of collecting and displaying of porcelain. Jewish Museum London Raymond Burton House 129 – 131 Albert Street London NW1 7NB Tube: Camden Town Daily 10am – 5pm (Friday: 10am – 2pm)

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Emerging Potters - 5

January – March 2017

WHAT TO TOTO

Watch For

Here is a selection of other online ceramic magazines to be found on ISSUU from around the world.

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Emerging Potters - 5

January – March 2017

WHO TO TOTO

Watch For New Head of Ceramics & Glass at RCA – Roderick Bamford

The Royal College of Art (RCA) has appointed Roderick Bamford as the new Head of Ceramics and Glass. He starts in post from January 2017. Previously he was a Senior Lecturer in the School of Design Studies, University of New South Wales. His works traverses the fields of art and design, drawing on experience in the field of ceramics, digital technologies, and related media. For a number of years his artwork investigated the aesthetics of tension between development, redundancy and waste, in exhibitions such as Urban Debris at the National Gallery of Australia and

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Insensible Landscape at the Kohler Company in the USA. Bamford has been awarded commissions and residencies, participated in exhibitions and presented numerous lectures internationally. His work is widely represented in major Australian public collections, including the National Galleries of Australia in museum collections in Europe, North Asia, and the USA such as the Today Museum in Beijing. As President of the Crafts Council of NSW he led the establishment of the respected journal Object Magazine. In 1999 his studio received an Australian Designex Award.


Emerging Potters - 5

STUDENT

Gallery UNIVERSITY FOR THE CREATIVE ARTS

FARNHAM SCHOOL OF CRAFT AND DESIGN

As well as participating in their end of year MA show, the recent ceramics graduates also featured at the Menier Gallery in London in September. Teresa Munn, Ingchanok Sinudom, Moya Tosh and Alice McIlroy, along with Julie Massie, who has been chosen for Collect in 2017, Hilary Williams who showed at the New Ashgate Gallery in November 2016, and Cai Yizhao, collaborated and curated with other makers to create an exceptional

Alice McIlroy

January – March 2017

exhibition showcasing contemporary practice from one of the UK’s leading specialist universities. In Conversations with Landscape, Teresa Munn’s clay-scripted wall plaques and handheld textured forms employ poetry to explore how we recollect experiences. Her work was included in Bils and Rye’s first ‘Emerging Potters’ exhibition and has been selected for Ceramic Art London in Spring 2017.


Emerging Potters - 5

STUDENT

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January – March 2017

Gallery UNIVERSITY FOR THE CREATIVE ARTS

FARNHAM, SCHOOL OF CRAFT AND DESIGN

Left: Teresa Munn Below: Moya Tosh Bottom: Ingchanok Sinudom


Â

When I was given the news that I would become a member of the Design Factory in December 2014, I was over the moon. The Design Factory promotes artistic integrity, raises the standard of craft and design and commercially supports and develops the very best designer/makers in craft practice today. Emily Wiles Â

Â


January – March 2017

Emerging Potters - 5

Being a Member of

DESIGN FACTORY Emily Wiles

I feel that I have so much still to learn about the industry, including which craft fairs are good to show at, galleries that would like my work, as well as advice on packaging, self employment ect. To be part of a network of makers and to have the support and access to knowledge from people I may not normally come across is transforming. I had heard about Design Factory through my tutors at University who were always enthusiastic about the organisation, so after University I started to look into it properly. Design Factory is primarily midlands based but there are members from all around the UK. The headquarters is at Sleaford, at the National Craft and Design Centre. If you haven’t visited this Centre then I would certainly recommend it. There you will find it chocked full of fantastic maker’s work and holds some brilliant exhibitions and workshops. The fees to be a member is very reasonable and I pay it monthly which works out at less then £10 a month.

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Hayley, the Programme Manager, and myself arranged to meet to discuss my practice and what I wanted to get out of being a member. Originally I was still in two minds about where I wanted to take my ceramics and having Hayley to talk to opened-up what I could do - shows I could apply for, talks I could attend and so on. Instantly it made me feel better about moving forward with my business. I felt supported again. The makers are split into three groups: Emerge, Flair and Fellow. Emerge is what all new members start out at, and if they choose to they can move up to Flair level. I am still an Emerge Member, but may want to apply to move up in the future. For the time being I am happy with this position. Fellow Members are those that have been with the organisation for a number of years and have obtained a recognised professional standard within the craft world. They are invited to move-up to this group as apposed to just applying like the other two. There were already a few makers I knew who were part of Design Factory, including ceramicists such as Katie Almond and Samantha Robinson.


Emerging Potters -5

These are people I looked up to while doing my degree. So being involved with an organisation that had helped them so much with their careers could only be a good thing.

January – March 2017

The primary reason for me joining the Design Factory is their involvement in craft fairs.

As this show had only ever been held in Harrogate until now, I was unsure of the popularity, so I didn't want to spend a lot of money on an unknown show! Plus I had never done a trade show before so having the promotion and the support from Design Factory was invaluable.

There are many craft fairs that for one reason or another are too expensive for me to afford, especially if I haven’t participated before and not sure what to expect. Design Factory’s involvement is with fairs such as Made by Hand Cardiff, Handmade in Kew and Craft at Top Drawer.

This backbone of support made me feel like I could ask the other members their advice on what to bring to a trade fair, and what to prepare as it was so very different to a regular craft fair. I would not have thought of half the things I was told if I hadn't had those lovely people to ask.

This is where being a member of Design Factory is perfect for me. I can apply to these shows as part of the Design Factory stand. Still having my own space to present my work, but at a lower cost and with other members. This makes uncertain shows a lot more affordable and approachable.

If anyone is interested in applying to be apart of an organisation that provides support as well as opportunities in craft fairs and trade shows then I would highly recommend applying for Design Factory.   For more information Google:

Other shows that they are involved with include trade shows such as British Craft Trade Fair in Harrogate and from September 2016, London.

About Design Factory, www.designfactory.org.uk    

I recently took part in The British Craft Trade Fair in London’s Brick Lane. This was part of Design Factory’s stand alongside five other members.

 

Emily Patricia Wiles Knit me a Stitch Ceramics www.knitmeastitchceramics.com @knitmeastitch_

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SWINDON MUSEUM & ART GALLERY

     

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An exhibition showcasing new work by ten contemporary ceramicists will be held at Swindon Museum and Art Gallery until 28 January 2017. Entitled ‘From Where I’m Standing’ this new display offers a fresh perspective on Swindon’s collection of modern British art, enabling us to see it through the eyes of ten talented ceramic artists. They are Fenella Elms, Sarah Purvey, Patricia Volk, Keith Varney, Claire Loder, Joanna Still, Sasha Wardell, Mary Jane Evans, Jo Taylor and Peter Hayes. In 2015 this diverse group of artists approached Swindon Museum and Art Gallery, looking for an opportunity to learn more about its wonderful art collection and use it to inspire their work. Over the past year, each artist has selected one or more artworks from the collection and responded by creating unique ceramics for this show. In most cases the artists have selected paintings, taking the opportunity to respond to two dimensional works using their three dimensional medium.  

Dark Hill 2 Joanna Still Jo Taylor Riffing on Horsfield


Emerging Potters - 5

January – March 2017

Meanwhile one artist has been inspired by a much-loved ceramic piece, and another has ventured outside the art gallery to the archaeology collection. This project has provided Swindon Museum and Art Gallery with a special opportunity to work closely with artists from the West Country who have achieved significant national and international reputations, with work in public collections in the UK and abroad. Each talented artist brings something fresh and unique to contemporary ceramics. From delicate porcelain layers to mixed media sculpture, monumental vessels to figurative abstraction, and refined baroque elegance to natural erosion; their diverse styles and approaches are instantly recognisable. ‘From Where I’m Standing’ will showcase the ten new ceramic pieces created by the participating artists, as well as over thirty works they have selected from Swindon’s collection. This will include paintings by John Nash, Basil Beattie, Howard Hodgkin and Graham Sutherland. The exhibition runs until Saturday 28th January 2017. Swindon Museum and Art Gallery in Bath Road, Old Town, is open from Wednesdays to Saturdays, 11am-3pm.

Fenella Elms/ Peter Hayes


WHAT TO BUY

Emerging Potters - 5

New Kilns

A new range of kilns has just been announced by manufacturer International Kilns. Made in the UK the company has years of experience in kiln servicing and rebuilds. This is their first venture in producing their own products. The Aylesford Pottery in Kent has been chosen as an agent for the kilns and can offer experience and advice for potential buyers. Their size makes them ideal for the start-up market of new makers and those building a studio. Aylesford Pottery Telephone 01622 790796 Email enquiries@aylesfordpottery.co.uk

Open each day 10am to 5pm

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January – March 2017

Round Kiln Runs from a 13amp plug. Suitable for up to earthenware firing. Comes with controller. External measurements Height 55 cm Width 47cm Internal measurements Diameter 38cm Height 33cm

£1,150

(including VAT)

Delivery quoted as separate item

Square Kiln Suitable for stoneware. Runs from a single phase cooker wire on its own fuse. Comes with controller External measurements 81cm x 81cm x96.5cm deep Internal measurements Width 38cm Height 46cm

£1,300

(including VAT)

Delivery quoted as separate item


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If you would like to join the mailing list for the magazine email: paulbailey123@googlemail.com Produced quarterly

Jan/March 2017 Emerging Potters magazine  

Looking at the work of Hwan Hee Lee a student at the RCA, Dacorum & Chiltern Potters Guild, using Instagram, work from Farnham College and a...

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