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EMERGING Issue

3 July to Sept 2016

Potters


Emerging Potters - 3

July – September 2016

Introduction An online ceramics magazine Welcome to the third issue of Emerging Potters the online magazine produced for people who make ceramics for their own enjoyment and those ceramic students from the UK Universities about to enter the arts sector as a career. Ceramic Art London celebrated a very successful show at Central Saint Martin, and New Designers is about to start in Islington. We have comments on both shows. The Front cover features Hannah Tounsend. Emerging Potters is produced by a voluntary team. Competition: CoCA is asking for your support in the Art Fund Museum of the year competition. Just copy and paste the link for details - http://www.artfund.org/prize/photo-competition Emerging Potters is produced in association with Aylesford Pottery in Kent who advise. The role of the advisory panel is to offer ideas for content and comment on how effective the content of each issue is. There is no financial reward involved for us. Please pass this copy on to anyone you think may be interested. Thanks for reading this edition and if you are not already on the mailing list then contact me by email: paulbailey123@googlemail.com

Paul Bailey Editor and owner (as every studio seems to have a dog this is our one – Dylan) The magazine is an independent journal. The publishers do not accept any liability for errors or omissions. The views expressed in the features are not necessarily those of the editor. Reproduction in part or whole must be with the consent of the editor. All rights reserved.

Contributions to the gallery of work from makers and students are welcome and will be included wherever possible on a first come basis. Send to the above email address. The editor’s decision is final. © Paul Bailey 2016 Emerging Potters is produced in association with Aylesford Pottery UK.


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Advisory Panel Alan Parris and Billy Byles are master potters and joint partners of the Aylesford Pottery in Kent. Alan trained in ceramics at Medway College of Art. Then worked as a freelance thrower in London and Kent, before forming the partnership. Billy served an apprenticeship with the Chelsea Pottery and Bethnal Green Pottery in London before working as a freelance thrower in London.

July – September 2016

Contents The Curator

3-6

Charlotte Pack at CAL

7-8

Call for entries

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Hannah Tounsend

10-12

John Leach, eldest grandson of renowned potter Bernard Leach and son of David Leach, continues the family tradition at Muchelney Pottery in the heart of the Somerset Levels. He started the pottery in 1965 with his wife Lizzie. His pots are all lovingly hand-thrown, using local clays, and wood-fired in the three-chambered kiln to the high stoneware temperature of 1320°C, which creates their distinctive 'toasted' finish.

Fi Smart

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Student Gallery

15-16

London Design Festival

17-18

Helen Walsh, Curator of Ceramics, York Museums Trust. Since 2004 she has been the curator in charge of York Museums Trust’s national collection of British Studio Ceramics, known as CoCA. She has also established the Contemporary Studio Ceramics Subject Specialist Network.

Emily Wiles – starting out 22-23

Wendy Kershaw, international ceramic maker based in Scotland. Originally part of the Glasgow School of Art movement she has exhibited and worked in USA, Canada, China, Hungary and throughout the UK. Her work is sought by public institutions and private collectors worldwide. Emily Wiles, ceramic maker based in Leister. After receiving a first class degree from De Montfort University in design Crafts, she was selected for the show New Designers in the ‘One Year On’ section in 2015 and featured in Ceramic Review. She was also a ‘Rising Stars’ winner in 2015.

Craft Potters Association 19-21

Gallery Tips

24-26

Maker’s Gallery

27-31

Visit to..

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What to watch for

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Go to…

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Aylesford Pottery: Making moulds

35-36

Books

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Sandi Cowles, A keen student attending pottery classes at Penzance School of Art for the past two years. Sandi poses the questions which many would like to ask.

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CoCA upper gallery


Emerging Potters - 3

July - September 2016

The Curater For many people not immediately involved with museums and public galleries the work of how collections are developed and major shows produced are not understood. Here we are fortunate enough to have an insight by one of the countries leading ceramic curators, Helen Walsh from CoCA in York.

In 2009 we refurbished a large space on the first floor, which we called our ‘Gallery of Pots’ and began a program of changing exhibitions. People really began to sit up and associate York Art Gallery with ceramics. More gifts and purchases followed and we now have one of the largest and most important collections in the UK. This prompted us to begin developing our vision for the Centre of Ceramic Art (CoCA), which we launched in August 2015, as part of an £8million Capital Redevelopment Project at York Art Gallery. The gallery has been transformed during a 2.5 year closure, and now has 60% more display space, improved visitor facilities, large gardens and named CoCA.

Helen Walsh Curator of Ceramics Centre of Ceramic Art, York Art Gallery, UK I began working at York Art Gallery in 2004 and my role has been continually changing, reflecting the growth and importance of our ceramics collections. For the first five years I worked mainly on the W.A. Ismay collection of post-war British studio pottery- unpacking, (washing up!) and cataloguing 3,600 pots. The only space to display pots at that point was three cases in the stairwell, so I got into the habit of taking any opportunity to grab empty space and put pots on display in creative ways.

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Emerging Potters - 3

July – September 2016

      We are now settling back in and getting to know our gallery again. My role currently involves applying for funds for acquisitions, projects and extra help. We have several projects we are currently working on, such as the digitisation of our extensive archive of documentation relating to our ceramics collections. Also we have commissioned research on our large collection of ceramic buttons made by Lucie Rie (part of the Anthony Shaw collection). We are busily working on our exhibition programme, generating ideas and collaborations that make use of our collections that also include loans, commissions and touring exhibitions. Lots of time is devoted to making sure collections on display and in our stores are well cared for. We also run the Contemporary Studio Ceramics Subject Specialist Network and deal with a myriad of enquiries about the collection, loan requests and many generous offers of gifts to add to the collection. Making new acquisitions is one of the most exciting and challenging parts of being a curator. There are many questions to answer such as the significance of the artist, the strength of the work, how it fits with existing collections, what the long-term impact is for storage and care. Most importantly we have to be sure it can go on display and won’t end up sat in our stores forever.

       

Funding new acquisitions is always a challenge, requiring the submission of multiple applications to different bodies. As we are a small team, we have to weigh the amount of time required to put applications together against the importance of the work and what other potential acquisitions might come up requiring funding from the same sources. However, we have been very lucky to receive gifts from artists and collectors wishing to see their work in our collection and this has enabled the collection to keep growing and have a very special character. We have big ambitions for CoCA, one of which is to raise its profile internationally. We have had lots of interest from international artists, curators, collectors and enthusiasts which we are keen to take advantage of. I have been lucky enough to receive a Jonathan Ruffer Curatorial Grant from The Art Fund which will allow me to make several trips to Europe and America over the next year, to spread the word about CoCA and encourage people to visit and work with us. Web: centreofceramicart.org.uk                                                 Email:  coca@ymt.org.uk  

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The Shaw Collection


The Shaw Collection and Wall of Pots Photo: Peter Heaton


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July - September 2016

Emerging  Potters  -­‐  3  

CAL at CSM

This year the Ceramic Art London (CAL) show was held at Central Saint Martins (CSM), close to King’s Cross station. And what a success the show was in its very light and airy venue. To mark the show we feature one of CSM recent graduates Charlotte Pack who was showing for the first time amongst many well established makers. As an inspiration to other students, after graduating in 2013 she toured Africa for a year researching for her collection of endangered species, which when complete will number 2,000 pieces.

Charlotte’s studio (opposite) in Rye was made entirely from salvaged materials. Memorable moments from Africa: Sleeping with only a mosquito net under a full moon in the middle of the Okvango Delta hearing the not so distant calls of lions and Hippos grazing a stone’s throw away! During that night a Bull Elephant came through the camp and just stopped and starred at us, before crashing on through the trees just minding his own business! charlotte@marypack.co.uk

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EMERGING

July - September 2016

Potters Call for entries Bils & Rye Gallery

Announcing a new Emerging Potters show in September and October 2016. An opportunity to showcase your work as a ceramic maker starting a career.

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1. Closing date 15th July 2. Details on social media for Bils & Rye 3. Application needs to show 3 pieces of work. 4. No costs to the applicants, short-listed makers will be required to send one sample piece. 5. Applications are to be made to nick@bilsandrye.com 6. Work needs to be coded, photographed and a brief description of technique, clay, glaze and firing. Sizes are also required. 7. The show will run from 1st September 2016 to 31st October inclusive. 8. One participant will have their work showcased at the Cambridge Art Fair on our stand. 9. Key pointers for applicants are form, finish and the artists fingerprint. (When selecting work for the gallery, we look at these attributes along with a clear fingerprint) 10. Entrants must be either less than 5 years into their career or less than 3 years post graduation. Applicants must be resident in the UK or Ireland. 11. Successful applicants will be asked to not show their work within a 30 mile radius of the gallery for the duration of the show. 12. Unsold work will be returned to the entrants at the end of the show at our expense and all work is insured whilst in our possession. 13. Work will be listed on our website for the duration on a special page. Artists are responsible for supplying accurate copy for the website and images with accreditation where possible. 14. Video applications are welcomed. 15. We reserve the right to withdraw work during the show without warning.


STUDENT

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July – September 2016

Gallery

Hannah Tounsend One Year On New Designers Show

The New Designers show each year must be the high point and most important show for graduates. University ceramics course come together for one massive display of work. Part of the show is called ‘One Year On’ which follows the path of a selected group of craft makers from the previous year. For one maker Hannah Tounsend keeping-up with all the demands and success must be a full-time occupation. She said of her University, De Montfort, “The MA course really gave me the space to explore the inspiration that shapes my work. I was able to use this knowledge to push my making process into more unusual territory and to create my unique hybrid vessel forms." Already she has won a professional development bursary from the Artists Information Company, which will allow her to work with Vicky Shaw so she can extend her technical skills within the field of ceramic print.

International Ceramic Research Centre, Guldagergaard. It was part of a prize for winning the FRESH 2015 Award. Much of this research will be used to develop new work that is part of a commission for the British Ceramic Biennial 2017. Describing her time there she said, “One of the central aims to my residency in Denmark was to dramatically upscale my vessel forms. With the support and facilities available to me at Guldagergaard I was able to make pieces nearly a metre tall for my solo exhibition there. It was a valuable and very rewarding opportunity and I am grateful to have had this experience”. During this time Hannah has joined the Crafts Council’s Hothouse Scheme which includes ten one-day workshops, a two-day residential, six hours of one to one mentoring, and connects to a national network of makers and organisations. It provides Hannah with the tools to grow a sustainable and successful business when most needed- at the start of a career.

Recently returned from Denmark, Hannah embarked on a month long residency at the

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Hannah describes her collection of vessels and monoprints as exploring the layered landscapes and sea-washed, weatherworn surfaces of the British coastline. Marks, lines and diffuse merging colours are built up, cut through and dissolved away. She has developed an unusual, hybrid making technique to form her contemplative vessel pieces. Within an open plaster mould she builds layers of printed, poured and painted casting slips, overlaying colours on a porous surface.

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July – September 2016

These designs are incorporated into a cast shell of clay, before mould and cast are fixed centrally to a throwing wheel. A partially thrown cylinder of plastic clay is joined to the cut rim of the still-moulded cast and fully thrown out. Inspired by the shore, her ceramic vessels are heavy with the banding of a tiered landscape. The static cast portions of her pieces are representative of solid land; the flowing thrown porcelain a liquid tide with a disintegrating, uppermost edge akin to a smudged horizon. www.hannahtousend.co.uk


Awards 2015: ‘John Lewis Loves Commendation ’New Designers. 2015: Absolut Loves Commendation, New Designers. 2015: ‘Student Award’, The Leicester Society of Artists. 2015: ‘Showcase Award’, The Great Northern Contemporary Craft Fair. 2015: ‘FRESH’ winner, The British Ceramics Biennial. 2016: ‘Professional Member’, Craft Potters Association 2016: ‘Professional Development Bursary’, The Artist Information Company. Current & Future Exhibitions 2016 ‘Showcase Exhibition’ - Snug Gallery, Hebden Bridge, West Yorkshire. 2016 ‘One Year On at New Designers’ - Business Design Centre, Islington, London. 2016 ‘On Form’ - Ditchling Museum of Art and Craft, East Sussex. 2016 ‘Fresh Lines’ - Guldagergaard International Research Centre, Denmark. 2016 ‘Newcomer’ - Art in Action, Waterperry Gardens, Oxfordshire. 2016 ‘Beneath The Surface’ - The Craft Centre and Design Gallery, Leeds. 2016 ‘New Ashgate Selects’ – New Ashgate Gallery, Farnham

Photographs: Dave  Usher    

2017 ‘Commission’ - The British Ceramics Biennial. Original Spode Factory Site, Stoke-on-Trent.


STUDENT

Emerging Potters - 3

Gallery

Fi Smart Degree Show: Plymouth University Photographs: Helge Mruck fismart.co.uk                fi_smart@hotmail.com  

Title of work: It hardly seems possible such sorrow has come (60cm in height) A finalist in the Folio Society illustration competition in 2016. Her dissertation was on originality and Grayson Perry whose work epitomises how a surface image plus ceramics is so much more than the sum of the two parts.

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July – September 2016

Her work explores the way that the form and the images interact to enhance the telling of a complete story and not just a single scene. She is currently working on using a sequence of pots (of similar or different shapes and sizes) to tell a story and using the interior and exterior surfaces for different purposes within a story.


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For her latest illustration module she has taken a simple idea of war as being in three stages – the exciting part, the death part and the aftermath. Anyone viewing them can turn the pots themselves rather than walking round them which gives an involvement more like turning the page of a book.

also needs to work as several separate composed images so when it is stationary it still looks right.

The whole composition differs from a 2D illustration because as you turn it your eye is drawn in a pre determined route and yet it

The soldiers' families can be seen on the illuminated inner surfaces through little windows that lift out.

Filming each pot close-up as it turns produces an effect like animation because it is not initially obvious that it is a 3D object.


STUDENT

Emerging Potters - 3

July - September 2016

Gallery

University of Brighton MDes (Master of Design) A four year course with work placement

Matt Davis ‘Hi-res’ & ‘Lo-res’ vessels (Bone china & black porcelain). 15x35 cm

Alice Stewardson ‘Lemon Meringue Vessels'.Porcelain, Engobe Cream; Gold Lustre.

Emma Johnson "Atro-City" - Porcelain with stain/ coloured porcelain grog, beech, binding screws.

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STUDENT

Emerging Potters - 3

July - September 2016

Gallery University of Brighton BA (Hons) Alison Attwood (below)

Paul Morley

Contemporary Pilgrim Flasks Semi porcelain slip / Coloured slip. Leather strap with brass fittings

Single fired semi-porcelain slipcast ceramic set in concrete. (Size 600x500x350cm).

 

Bethany Ashton Slip cast stoneware coffee set

Katie Barton Wild Food Tableware with Utensils – From Wild Food Project, 2015. Plate - Petra Grog decorated with a mix of coloured slips and covered in a transparent stoneware glaze. Utensils – Animal bone and hand carved wooden spoon from Apple tree. Woven piece – Hand woven with a mix of yarn, roving, grass and an animal rib bone. Dimensions overall – 50cm x 30cm

Anastasia Telegina Cups (2016), Porcelain casting slip, Stoneware transparent glaze with 16


London Design Festival

Emerging Potters - 3  

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July – September 2016

17-25 Sept Turning Earth is collaborating with Milliken Flooring during London Design Festival (LDF) this September, on a group show, Glazed Clay. This will take place in the Milliken Showroom in Clerkenwell, London between Monday 19th September and Saturday 24th September and will be part of the LDF programme. Global floor covering supplier, Milliken, is celebrating their new carpet tile line - Glazed Clay - by championing Turning Earth's makers during the Design Festival. A new carpet tile collection ‘Glazed Clay’ from Milliken takes as its starting point the subtle colours, finishes and textures of studio pottery, a rediscovered art form where traditional craftsmanship meets instinctive artistry. It is a form of creative expression where the process is as visceral as the outcome. The Milliken design team used as its inspiration the glazed washes of colour and puddles of opacity combined with the alchemy of the earth’s most natural elements to create a fresh and contemporary collection.

Turning Earth will also be celebrating the benefits of collaborative practice in London, and will highlight the impact of the makerspace movement within the craft ceramics industry. Turning Earth, and places like this, offer a riskfree way into craft - and they think it's the way of the future. The Turning Earth group show at Milliken, Glazed Clay, will feature twenty-five of their small ceramics businesses, both alumni and emerging makers still working from the studio. This includes Skandi Hus, Pat O'Leary Ceramics, Andrea Roman Design, Ben Sutton Ceramics, and Grace McCarthy Design. Together they will be demonstrating Turning Earth's impact as an incubator for designermakers within the city. The doors to Milliken's beautiful Clerkenwell showroom will be open throughout the week, and it will be a great opportunity for the public to view the diversity of work that is being made in Hoxton, and to buy pieces from some of the most promising emerging designer-makers working in London. The show room will be open from 9.30am until 5pm each day. There will be a late night opening, with demos, on Thursday evening until 9pm for the after-work crowd.


London Design Festival

Emerging Potters - 3  

July – September 2016

   

The work pictured above is by Pat O'Leary Ceramics, SkandiHus, and Andrea Roman Ceramics from Turning Earth.

MILLIKEN LONDON STUDIO T +44 (0)20 7336 7290 5 Berry Street, Clerkenwell, London EC1V 0AA, England

Top four images are from the Milliken studio in Clerkenwell.

www.millikencarpet.com 18


Front of the gallery with the reflection of the British Museum opposite


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July - September 2016

CPA Profile

Richard Phethean is the Chairman of the Craft Potters Association (CPA) and his role is to represent the association and be its public face.

programme of themed, group and solo exhibitions. Both feature the work of the countries finest makers. To be able to sell in the gallery you need to be a Selected Member.

The gallery and offices of the association is in Great Russell Street opposite the British Museum in London, and must be one of the best locations in the capital and best looking.

He explains the association membership system as follows “Anyone interested in ceramics can join as an Associate, then the next level is Selected Member which is for professional makers. To become a Selected Member there is a two stage process; to submit six slides of work and then, if invited, to provide six actual pieces of work for a panel assessment. Nationally there are some 320 Selected Members. Fellowship is offered to Selected Members by nomination and invitation in recognition of the maturity of their work and Honorary Fellowship is a lifetime achievement award. There are around 120 Fellows.

When asked the very obvious question what does the association actually do and who is it for, the answer is various and rooted in many successes. It does not receive any government grant and is funded by membership subscriptions and its commercial activities. It started in 1958 by a group of potters to promote and sell their work. Richard (above left) is rightly proud of the flagship gallery the Contemporary Ceramics Centre, which takes-up the ground floor of the building. Divided into two spaces, the front is for the retail of work by association members and a rear exhibition space, recently named The Emmanuel Cooper Gallery, for a

It should be remembered that it is the only professional organisation for ceramic makers and carries an important status in the business world of galleries.

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July - September 2016

  The CPA produces Ceramic Review. It is the international magazine for contemporary and historical ceramic art and combines practical and theoretical features and reports on trends, shows, rising ceramic artists and collecting. An important series of dates for any maker or buyer are the three big shows the Association puts on each year: Ceramic Art London (CAL), Ceramics Art York (CAY) and the Oxford Ceramics Fair. While CAL and CAY are open to anyone to apply and attracts exhibitors from around the world, the Oxford Fair is the only CPA show restricted to the membership. These shows are now of international importance. CAL, now in its twelfth year, has a new home at UAL Central Saint Martins college at King’s Cross and CAY is in its second year, held in the beautiful gardens of the York Museum and Art Gallery. The Craft Potters Charitable Trust makes an annual Emmanuel Cooper Award at CAL. Each year a different UK museum is offered a gift from the fair purchased from an exhibitor. This year the award was purchased from Dylan Bowen and presented to the National Museum of Wales for their permanent collection.  

Professional development of its members at all stages in their career is an area overseen by the Education Officer. Included are outreach programmes, mentoring and marketing skills. The Trust also has the role of awarding discretionary grants to makers trying to set-up their own studio. Richard describes the work of the Association as follows, “ We have to be aware of the aspirations of both our longstanding members and those new makers recently graduating from University. But one thing that is crucial is maintaining the very highest standards and celebrating the international standing of our makers. The CPA is vibrant and is looking to the challenges that a new interest in ceramics is bringing”.

Craft Potters Association 63 Great Russell St, Bloomsbury, London WC1B 3BF tel: +442031370750 email: info@craftpottersassoc.co.uk

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Ceramic Art London 2016 Â

At Central Saint Martins, London


Emerging Potters - 3

July – September 2016

Starting out

Emily Wiles has some advice and tips on setting up a small ceramic workshop Just graduated and been seen at New Designers? Then you might be thinking of setting up a workshop. Sounds scary? Well here are a few simple steps to think about when starting your journey. First of all think about the space you will actually need, and the equipment you will be using. If you are a thrower then of course more space is necessary for the wheel. Also ventilation and access to electricity and water are vital. • Look out for craft workshops online or in magazines such as Ceramic Review and Craft. • Talk to other ceramicists, they may have space to share in their workshop, or know someone who does.

• Sometimes more established makers may need an assistant in exchange for making time in their workshop. • Ask around family members to see if they have space in a garage or shed to start you off. • Talk to people in ceramic or craft collectives to see if there is space for new members. There are a few around the country for example Yorkshire Artspace, Unit 12 in Stafford, Create Space in London, Makers Yard in Leicester and The Harley Gallery Studios in Worksop. • There are competitions out there to win a chance to be a part of a craft collective at a concessionary rate, so keep an eye out. • Remember, a workshop just has to be functional for you and your work, be practical about location and cost.

 


Emerging Potters - 3

Once you know the size of your workshop then start thinking about equipment. My pieces don't need a huge amount of space in a kiln, so I was able to source one that worked well within the space I have. I don't use a wheel so my workshop was able to be slightly smaller and therefore cheaper. • With kilns, think about the energy use, larger kilns mostly need a larger energy source so sockets may need to be installed to provide this. I bought an L&L Fuego Kiln, which means I can plug in to a normal socket and it still reaches the temperatures I need for porcelain. • Kilns are expensive so shop around for the best prices for the one that will be right for you. • Buying second hand is always an option, keep an eye on eBay for some good deals, but make sure you view the item first and that it’s all in working order. Be aware you will probably have to collect it from the seller.

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July – September 2016

Talk to your old Uni, secondary school and any ceramic studios. You never know they might be thinking about getting rid of a few bits. • If you can’t afford larger equipment right away then look out for kilns you can rent from other makers or ceramic classes. I used one at Fosse Arts in Leicester for months before being able to buy my own kiln. • Ask around for reviews, make sure your buying equipment that is reliable and easy for you to use on a daily basis. • For your smaller pieces of equipment such as clay, there are many fantastic websites you can order from such as Bath Potters, PotClays and Valentine Clay. These websites will also be able to provide you with throwing equipment, glazing and lustres as well. Once the basics are in place then its time to get making, good luck! http://www.knitmeastitchceramics.com


NICK BENTLEY

Emerging Potters - 3

July - September 2016

Gallery Tips

Advice from Nick Bentley Kate and I have been collecting British and International studio ceramics since our wedding back in 2007. In 2013 we opened Bils & Rye a gallery specialising in modern ceramics. During these years we have purchased a broad spectrum of ceramics, with prices starting at £10 to many hundreds. Getting pricing right is tricky indeed. There is a market price, which will vary according to style, finish, how established the maker is and what their heritage is. There are no golden rules, I am afraid! However, we do have some handy hints to make sure the pricing is right. Obvious pointers for pricing - cost of materials, number and length of firings, along with the merit of the resultant piece. Wastage, marketing, postage and packaging, years of training, position in the marketplace are also factors when trying to ascertain a price. Then again, you often have to forget all of these and look at what the market will let you charge! I have purposefully not mentioned time. It is an area that confuses many emerging potters, especially those used to a regular income from a former employment.

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Emerging Potters - 3

July - September 2016

Time, is of course, the major factor, yet it only becomes relevant when you do not have enough of it. It is the hard reality of life, that artists and artisans rarely make the money they need when they need it. Supply and demand works just the same as other industries and thus we always recommend that time is not included in the equation for working out prices for the emerging artists we represent. We highly recommend a consistent price too, particularly if you wish to gain gallery representation. Gallery owners are likely to look for an alternative supply if their price is continually beaten by a direct sale. You may think you are earning more but in the long run, galleries tend to select work that will sell well for an extended period and add a premium to your pricing structure. Clients too are happy, knowing that representation is confirmation that they are buying well. Never underestimate the amount of effort you place into your own marketing and sales function. This includes finding premium outlets to stock your work. This work needs to be recompensed for, thus finding a level price will help to create the balance required.

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July - September 2016

The main pointers for pricing are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Materials – your clay and glazes Capital equipment- your kiln, wheel, desks etc. Studio costs – rent, electricity etc. Marketing – website, photography, postcards, leaflets etc. Postage & Packaging – sending work to galleries/outlets Market Value – what the public will consider a reasonable fee

We have heard much talk of formulas over the years but in reality they are pretty insignificant when it comes to the real value of work. One consideration for those working in a more sculptural way is not to price on size alone. Value has to be added where the pot/sculpture has a particular resonance that sometimes the kiln gods bestow!

Nunnington Studios, Low Street, Nunnington, North Yorkshire, YO62 5UR Tel: 01439 748392 Web: http://bilsandrye.com

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Emerging Potters - 3

July - September 2016

MAKER’S

Gallery

In the last edition of the magazine we featured Turning Earth Studios which is an open access studio in east London. Here we profile just some of the makers from there. Featured on this page: Tom Kemp, Andrea Roman, Dominic Upson, Ayse Habibe Kucuk, Ben Sutton. Contact: (Tuesday to Friday 10am until 4pm) at info@turningearthcer amics.co.uk or 02077294819.


Emerging Potters - 3

July – September 2016

MAKER’S

Gallery

Turning Earth Studios Natascha Madeiski, Tarragon Smith, Stine Dulong (SkandiHus), Hanna Hybs

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Emerging Potters - 3

July - September 2016

MAKER’S

Gallery

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Turning Earth Studios Harriet Levy-Cooper, Pat O’Leary, Helen Lee, Sayaka Namba, Lisa Ommanney


Turning Earth Studios Grace McCarthy


Emerging Potters - 3

July - September 2016

MAKER’S

Gallery

The surface interest is further enhanced with oxides and glazes in natural colours evocative of a Whitstable seascape.

Stephen Matthews email: clay67@hotmail.com tel: 0776 113 2719 Studio: Southampton, Hampshire. Stephen (above) has a science background which has been useful in the development of his lustre technique, and is also entirely self-taught as a potter. Most of the forms he makes are open dishes, bowls, lidded jars and vases in red earthenware clay. All the work is decorated by brushwork and wet-slip sgraffito, (liquid clay 'slip' applied to the piece while wet on the wheel and wiped through to create the

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Sue wanted the form to represent the essence of the town she lives in with its windswept, north Kent coastal position. The decoration conveys her concept of Whitstable with place names, people, landmarks, coastal features, flora and fauna impressed into the clay in the form of words that create shapes and linear patterns. These draw the observer in to read and examine the pot closer to discover more about the town.

decorative design). After an initial bisque firing, a reactive glaze usually containing silver is applied and the piece and re-fired in a gas kiln.

Sue Moreton Aylesford School of Ceramics, Kent (right) Stoneware with cobalt, manganese and iron oxides. Matt white stoneware glaze with wax resist areas. Blue glazed interior with turquoise glaze poured around base.


Emerging Potters - 3

MAKER’S

July – September 2016

Visit to.. John Leach’s Muchelney Pottery Open Monday to Saturday 9am – 1pm and 2pm – 5pm 2 miles south of Langport, Somerset TA10 0DW Tel: 01458 250324

Ruthin Craft Centre Josie Seymour-Jones 16 July – 25 September 2016 Retail Gallery Showcase www.ruthincraftcentre.org.uk Denbighshire Wales                                           Tel:  01824  704774  

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The 22nd Art in Clay Festival Hatfield House,  Hatfield,  Herts  A L9  5NQ

19, 20  21  August  2016                       www.artinclay.co.uk

Contemporary Ceramics Centre               63  Great  Russell  Street,  London  

WC1B 3BF    www.cpaceramics.com  

7-­‐30 July  FORM  TONE  TEXTURE     Kate  Scott,  Matthew  Chambers,   James  Oughtibridge        


Emerging Potters - 3

July – September 2016

WHAT TO TOTO

Watch For

Ceramic Art York 2016

Friday 9  to  Sunday   11  September

WWW.CERAMICARTYORK. ORG Presented by  

the Craft  Potters   Association  with  York   Museums  Trust The international magazine for contemporary and historical ceramic art

Art in Clay Festival Hatfield House, Hatfield, Herts AL9 5NQ

The magazine of the Crafts Council. Crafts is full of the best in modern craft design and very useful information. Well worth signing up to their newsletter for opportunities and current news.

19,20,21 August 2016 www.artinclay.co.uk

Ceramics: Art and Perception with Ceramics Technical are two of the most important international magazines available. The first looks at functional to ephemeral, traditional to provocative. The latter is dedicated to research, culture and strategy, plus all the technical subjects you would need. www.ceramicart.com.au

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Royal College of Art Ceramics and Glass Degree Show 2016 25 June to 3 July at their new building in Battersea. The very best in the next wave of ceramic makers Rcaceramicsandglass.co.uk

On View is the inspiration for this publication. It covers the arts across Florida in the US and is beautifully produced .It is a great source of cultural information should you be visiting. Miami hosts one of the most important arts fairs. Find it on the ISSUU website or… http://onviewmagazine .com


Emerging Potters - 3

July - September 2016

WHAT TO TOTO

Go to… Art in Action 14th - 17th July 2016 Waterperry Gardens, Oxfordshire Potfest in the Park 29th - 31st July 2016 Hutton-in-the-Forest lies 5 miles northwest of Penrith, Cumbria (M6 junction 41) – on the edge of the stunningly beautiful Lake District National Park… (Postcode CA11 9TH for sat navs) Potfest in the Pens 5th - 7th August 2016 Skirsgill Auction Mart, Penrith – 100 yds west of junction 40 off the M6, on the edge of Britain’s beautiful Lake District (Postcode for Sat Navs – CA11 0DN). Art in Clay Hatfield 19th 20th 21st August 2016 Pottery & Ceramics Festival Hatfield House Hertfordshire AL9 5NQ Opening Times: Friday & Saturday 10am - 5.30pm Sunday 10am - 5pm Ceramic Wales 2nd - 4th September 2016 North Wales School of Art and Design, 49 Regent Street, Wrexham, North Wales. Friday 2nd 10.00 to 17.00 Saturday 3rd 10.00 to 17.00 Sunday 4th 10.00 to 16.00 Free entry (to the public). Ceramic Art York 9th - 11th September Craft Potters Association London Design Festival 17 – 25 September Ceramics in the City, 23rd - 25th September 2016 Tuesday - Sunday 10am - 5pm, Bank Holiday Mondays 10am - 5pm. Geffrye Museum of the Home,136 Kingsland Road, London E2 8EA Handmade at Kew 6th - 9th October 2016

Photo: Paul Simons

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1 2

July - September 2016

Moulds

Mould making: Plates Case Study At some point almost every potter will have the need for moulds to produce their work. With care you can tackle this process yourself. In this type of mould for cast pottery it is made in one piece and, when the clay shape has been cast, the design of the mould allows for shrinkage and the shape to drop out. • •

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First throw the profile you want as a solid lump so it is upside down. When leather hard turn the shape so it has a smooth surface as any marks will show later. Wire the shape off the wheel and place on a board which has a smooth surface, like a laminate or a plastic board.

PARRIS/Byles

Emerging Potters - 3


Emerging Potters - 3

• • • • •

• •

Next, build a clay wall around the shape, ensuring you have a sufficient gap for locating points, approx 1.5 to 2 inches depending on the size of the mould, and a couple of inches higher. Mix some plaster to a consistency that will not dissolve any more water and is smooth. Poor the plaster over the shape and tap the board so any air rises to the top. Wait to dry. Then remove the clay wall and turn the shape over. Place a cone of clay in the centre of the solid object. With a 10 pence piece gouge out three notches. Then paint slip onto the shape to act as a releasing agent. Build a wall of clay around the entire thing making sure it is watertight, but leaving the pour hole above the plaster line. Poor plaster onto the top of the cone and wait to dry. Divide the plaster mould and take out the object. Fettle the edges of plaster to ensure no plaster contamination of the clay. Leave to dry thoroughly. Turn the finished object for a perfect result.

Moulds may be purchased from suppliers, but the method of making them is not too difficult. The basic principle is that you  are  taking  an   impression  in  plaster  of  Paris  of  the  model  shape   which  has  first  been  made  in  solid  clay.   From  then  on  you  can  take  as  m any  impressions  as   you  like.  

July - Sepember 2016


Emerging Potters - 3

Book Club Simon Leach's Pottery Handbook is a valuable edition to his already popular YouTube videos. It encapsulates all of the basic techniques in one easy to carry book, from basic throwing techniques, adding appendages, trimming, to glazing and firing. Simon book is perfectly suited for the studio, as it is portable and with a wire-o binding it helps the book lay flat and stand up. For each technique, detailed step by step photography captures the subtle, intricate movements that can be found on the videos. Plus, the book includes a DVD with many of Simon's YouTube videos; callouts throughout the book tell readers which video goes with each section. Gorgeous photos throughout the book show pots in various stages of production and finished results. Coming from the internationally famous Muchelney studios it cannot have a higher pedigree.

Available on Amazon

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July – September 2016


Potters

EMERGING

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Pilot Issue JanuaryMarch 2016

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Emily Wiles on life after Uni If you would like to join the mailing list for the magazine email: paulbailey123@googlemail.com Produced quarterly

Emerging potters 3 July to September 2016  

Emerging Potters is for ceramic students and those who make ceramics for pleasure. Profiles of makers and information.

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