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Potters

EMERGING

 

Pilot Issue JanuaryMarch 2016

Emily Wiles on life after Uni


Emerging Potters

January – March 2016

Introduction Why a new magazine? Welcome to the pilot issue of Emerging Potters the online magazine produced for people who make ceramics for their own enjoyment and those ceramic students from the UK Universities about to enter the arts sector as a career. For some time now those involved at the UK’s Aylesford Pottery in Kent have been concerned that there is limited opportunity for these groups to have their work published and share experiences. Added to this is the need for practical advise for this group from people already making a living in ceramics and related fields. So, this quarterly ‘online’ magazine was born. It is not in any way in competition with existing ceramic magazines which already play an important role in this country and internationally. Emerging Potters is produced by a voluntary team and is a not for profit enterprise. It is produced in association with Aylesford Pottery who advise. The role of the advisory panel is to offer ideas for content and comment on how effective the content of each issue is. There is no financial reward involved for us. We would like to thank those people who have generously given their time in writing the features and sending photographs and helped support the project. The magazine will develop and change over time in response to what people say and want, in that way it will remain relevant. Please pass this copy on to anyone you think may be interested. Thanks for reading this edition and if you are not already on the mailing list then contact me by email: paulbailey123@googlemail.com Paul Bailey Editor and owner Front cover: Emily Wiles. Photo : Dave Usher The magazine is an independent journal. The publishers do not accept any liability for errors or omissions. The views expressed in the features are not necessarily those of the editor. Reproduction in part or whole must be with the consent of the editor. All rights reserved.

   

Contributions to the gallery of work from makers and students are welcome and will be included wherever possible on a first come basis. Send to the above email address. The editor’s decision is final. © Paul Bailey 2016 Emerging Potters is produced in association with Aylesford Pottery UK.

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Emerging Potters

Advisory Panel Alan Parris and Billy Byles are master potters and joint partners of the Aylesford Pottery in Kent. Alan trained in ceramics at Medway College of Art. Then worked as a freelance thrower in London and Kent, before forming the partnership. Billy served an apprenticeship with the Chelsea Pottery and Bethnal Green Pottery in London before working as a freelance thrower in London. John Leach, eldest grandson of renowned potter Bernard Leach and son of David Leach, continues the family tradition at Muchelney Pottery in the heart of the Somerset Levels. He started the pottery in 1965 with his wife Lizzie. His pots are all lovingly hand-thrown, using local clays, and wood-fired in the three-chambered kiln to the high stoneware temperature of 1320°C, which creates their distinctive 'toasted' finish. Helen Walsh, Curator of Ceramics, York Museums Trust. Since 2004 she has been the curator in charge of York Museums Trust’s national collection of British Studio Ceramics, known as CoCA. She has also established the Contemporary Studio Ceramics Subject Specialist Network. Wendy Kershaw, international ceramic maker based in Scotland. Originally part of the Glasgow School of Art movement she has exhibited and worked in USA, Canada, China, Hungary and throughout the UK. Her work is sought by public institutions and private collectors worldwide. Emily Wiles, ceramic maker based in Leister (Cover). After receiving a first class degree from De Montfort University in design Crafts, she was selected for the show New Designers in the ‘One Year On’ section in 2015 and featured in Ceramic Review. She was also a ‘Rising Stars’ winner in 2015. Sandi Cowles, A keen student attending pottery classes at Penzance School of Art for the past two years. Sandi poses the questions which many would like to ask.

January – March 2016

Contents 4-6

A Hungarian Adventure

7

Aylesford Pottery

8-11

Student Gallery

12-15

Life after Uni.

16-17

Going Solo

18-19

Maker’s Gallery

20

What to watch for

21-22

Advice on making large pots

23-24

Crafts Council

25

Centre of Ceramic Art - York 3


Emerging Potters

   

January – March 2016

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Emerging Potters

January – March 2016

Being invited  to  take  part  in  an  international  symposium  can  sound   glamorous,  but  success  takes  a  lot  of  hard  work.     Here  Wendy  Kershaw  shares  her  experience  of  Hungary  in  2015  

A Hungarian Adventure Flying out from Glasgow airport in August 2015 in 7oC and landing in 38oC in Hungary was a pleasant shock, and only the start of many others over the next five weeks. I had been invited to take part in an international symposium, and run a masterclass, by Steve Mattison at the International Ceramic Studio, Kecskemet, Hungary. The studio is an important non-profit ceramic centre, that has been running since 1978. But what exactly does a symposium do? It brings together practitioners from all over the world to work together on a joint show, share experiences, experiment and learn from one another. The host country gains a collection of work to exhibit nationally. It was invigorating to work with such an interesting group of ceramicists, and a change from working alone. The group came from America, Russia, Finland, Hungary, Scotland, and Lithuania.

   

Getting settled in and down to some work was my first priority, starting with trying out some of the clays. Much as I love porcelain, I enjoyed using a variety of clays; as well as the ultra white Herend porcelain, I also used a red earthenware and a smooth stoneware with fine grog. These proved good clays for my slab rolled work. I had to start making my ceramic book before I saw the test results, and as the Herend porcelain usually fires very

high (1330oC and over 1400oC ! at the factory) I decided to use the stoneware. However, when I got my porcelain tests from the kiln, fired to 1224oC (cone 6), they were fine for my work, especially after a polish with diamond pads. I made a stoneware book with moveable pages, titled 'Between wakefulness and sleep', and a range of porcelain, stoneware and red earthenware wall panels. The theme of the symposium was 'borders', to be interpreted as we wanted. Most of my work illustrated the border between being awake and drifting off in to sleep, with a girl in bed, the cover of which was decorated with birds, as she began to fall asleep the birds began to fly from the cover, and when they had flown through trees and in to the dark she was asleep. The decorated border of clothes, and garden borders were other themes of my illustrations. In one, a high dark hedge, and on the other side of which roses bloomed golden. Experimenting with altering the edges of my usually straight slabs was interesting, with the birds, or head and shoulders of figures, defining the edge of the slab. I also played around with thin paperclay slabs, made separately and then arranged in layers and glued after firing. Casting a plaster mould of a book cover allowed me to press mould the ‘hardback' of my ceramic book. I then rolled out thin slabs and cut the pages, using a cardboard template.

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Emerging Potters

January – March 2016

     

It takes a lot of time making each page, as they have to be thinned at the edges, and each one must be as close to the others as possible, with the threading holes in the exact same place. After making the cover, spine and pages I started to illustrate them with soft pencil, and food colouring to finalise the images, before drawing into the clay with a sewing needle. Then through four firings layered on underglaze stains, decals, onglaze enamels and lustre. One of the big pluses of taking part in a symposium is seeing first hand how other ceramicists make their work, from start to finish, all the stages, the tools, the techniques. It was great to swap tips, compare how we made our work, debate firing temperatures and clays, and bounce ideas about. Very different from working in the solitude of our workshops, which has both it's positive and negative aspects. It was a pleasure to see Richard Notkin work, with his intense and skillful attention to detail, dealing with huge issues on a beautifully small scale, and I learned a lot by sharing a studio with him. I was amazed to hear from him that during the symposium my work has influenced his. Time was tight as we had to have the work ready for the symposium exhibition in Budapest in under four weeks. We worked seven day a week, often long hours, to fit in the work. It wasn’t always easy, using clay that we weren’t used to, firing in kilns that we didn’t know, and away from our own workshops. But it can be a good thing to be jolted out of your comfort zone, encouraging you  to be more adventurous and experimental.  

   

Through some ups and downs, and despite some pieces not making it, we all had work ready in time. The manager of the studio, Zsolt Szegedi, and gallery manager Marton Strohner decided which of our works would be kept for the permanent collection at the studio. I wasn’t pleased with all the work that I’d made, but that was fine as I had enough successful pieces for the exhibition, and was pleased with how some of my experiments had gone, which could lead to interesting new work on my return home. The masterclass group were international too, coming from Spain, England, Israel, Hungary and Taiwan. They worked really hard, and coped with a lot of information in a short space of time. In five days we covered many different surface techniques, including water etching, paper, tape and latex resist, inlay, incised line and underglaze wash, mono-printing, slip printing and trailing, sgraffito, plaster prints and on-glaze enamels. We played and experimented: the important thing wasn't the final book pages that we made and fired, but trying everything out, giving it a go, and people were surprised by the potential of some the techniques that they hadn't expected. Being at the International Ceramic Studio was a valuable and interesting experience, I met some great people and developed my practice. I am delighted to have been invited to return in 2016 to teach another masterclass. http://www.wendykershaw.org/

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Emerging Potters

January – March 2016

The Pottery The story of Aylesford Pottery There has been a working pottery on the site of Aylesford Priory since 1954, even though the Priory itself dates back to 1240. It can be found in the Kent countryside just outside Maidstone. The first person to run the pottery was the leading British craft potter David Leach, who was in turn succeeded by Colin Pearson. Two inspirational pioneering figures of hand-made British craft pottery. Today the pottery is run by Alan Parris and Billy Byles. Both master potters in their own right, but with very different backgrounds. They took over the pottery in 1999. Apart from making their own range of handthrown domestic ware the pottery runs its own gallery for visitors to the Priory and collectors of their ware come from across the south east of England.

   

As a commercial pottery, Alan and Billy undertake commercial commissions which can range from anything from tableware for restaurants to architectural restoration projects. The number of commercial potteries, which is how they describe themselves, is now very few. Conversely, the interest in ceramics and the number of individual practitioners has exploded. This has led to a demand for vocational training, and the creation of the Aylesford School of Ceramics. To date there are over 150 students from the surrounding area of Kent per week. www.aylesfordpottery.co.uk

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STUDENT

Emerging Potters

January – March 2016

Gallery

Royal College of Art: Ceramics & Glass Right: Alex Simpson 2015

Above: Charlotte Barker 2015

Left: Alicija Patanowska 2014

Above: Flavi Audi 2014 Above: Harumi Foster 2014 Below: Isabella Kullman 2015

Left: Gail Mahon 2015. Above: Lauren Ilsley 2015

   

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STUDENT

Emerging Potters

January – March 2016

Gallery

Royal College of Art

Top: Wei Zhu 2015 Above: Josh Shott 2015

Left: Tana West 2014 Below: Susana Magana del Castillo

Top: Glen Clydesdale Above: Owen Johnson 2014

Left: Mika Aoki

   

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STUDENT

Emerging Potters

January – March 2016

Gallery

 

Alice Smalley, University of Central Lancashire. Nostalgia of the British seaside theme runs through her work.

Eradu Ceramics, Staffordshire University

Jasmine Simpson Staffordshire University

Anne Haworth, University of Central Alex Allday Staffordshire University

Aneta Brudkowska Staffordshire University

Kay Kennedy, University of Central Lancashire. A former art therapist her work is inspired by nature.

Lancashire. The theme of plants and nature is her influence.


STUDENT

Emerging Potters

January – March 2016

Gallery

Hayley Kennell Graduate from De Montfort University, BA Hons Design Crafts.

Camila Perez Staffordshire University

Gemma Taylor Staffordshire University

Yuka Kikumoto Staffordshire University

Kate Welton De Montfort University graduate Thrown bowl and pouring bowls with slip decoration, inspired by traditional gardening tools and processes. Photo: David Usher. http://www.katewelton.

Emma Lyon De Montfort University Graduate in Design Crafts emmalyon2@gmail.com

Souzana Petri University of Brighton. Master of Design in 3D Design and Craft in June 2015. Centres around imagery and storytelling commenting on Cypriot life and culture.


Emerging Potters

January – March 2016

EMILY WILES

Life after Uni Name: Emily Wiles University: De Montfort, Leicester

Graduated: 2014 Course: Design Crafts

Awards: BA Hons/New Ashgate Gallery Rising Stars 2015 Artist in residence DMU/ Emerging Member of Design Factory Published: Ceramic Review/ Evening Standard/ Financial Times/ Craft and Design magazine Exhibited: New Designers + One Year On/GNCCF/Luster Galleries: Right Galleries/ CDS Gallery/ Cotesbatch/ Leicester Bevere Gallery/ Worcester/ Graduate Show 2014/ New Ashgate Gallery, Farnham, Rising Stars 2015 Open 25, New Walk Gallery, Leicester

Emily Wiles has some advice for students of ceramics Starting a business is never easy, no matter what you are doing. University is a roller coaster of massive amounts of work, information and pressure, so once its all over what do you do to keep on making while setting up your own ceramic practice? I discovered ceramics when studying Design Crafts at De Montfort University. Due to a love for textiles it made sense to combine the two together. Studying meant spending as much time in the workshops as I possibly could. Just to make sure I knew what everything was used for and how to operate it. But once you’re out in the real world, doing it on your own, it’s bound to be daunting. So, here I would like to share my experiences and how I have spent the past year after graduating developing my practice. While at University I had some brilliant tutors, and visiting makers who told us their own stories of the ups and downs of getting their  

work known, which leads me to my first point. Talk to everyone! Not only in the ceramics world but in the whole craft sector. Makers are happy to answer any questions you may have in regards to setting up your own practice. They have all been there in the beginning, so will have different and interesting advice. There is also some amazing websites that provide brilliant information and advice for craft businesses. The main one I would recommend subscribing to is The Design Trust. Patricia, who runs the Trust, knows what she's talking about, and presents information in a more understandable jargon that is clear to everyone. Also the Design Factory, an organisation that promotes artistic integrity, raises the standard of craft, commercially supports and develops the very best makers in craft practice. It is an amazing organisation and worth keeping an eye on. They constantly update their website with helpful workshops you can attend, talks from makers about business management etc, and 12


Emerging Potters

links for applications to events and competitions available in craft. Now don't get me wrong, setting up a ceramic business is not going to be a walk in the park! We all know how much equipment is needed and the cost of materials, but its not as daunting as you may think. The most important advice I can give is - don't rush it. Remember your degree show and how much you slaved away at your work, making sure every element of your work was perfect. This is the passion you need to continue with your work now. There is no point in making pieces that you don't really care about, because the people that you are trying to sell to are not going to care either. After leaving university I thought it would be a good idea to make other lines of work. Mistake. You have to stay true to what you are good at. It’s what made you fall in love with ceramics in the first place……. right? Workshop space is never going to be cheap, and not everyone has a shed at the bottom of the garden they can use. I defiantly don’t! Living in a second story flat in the centre of Leicester is not really ideal for a little kiln. But having a job half way through my degree as a waitress (and for all readers that are still at university, or are looking for work now they have finished, waitressing is perfect for it) and kept that job going, having it all through my third year, and continuing after my degree finished.

January – March 2016

Most makers will tell you to have some sort of income coming-in from somewhere else to fund your practice until it’s all off the ground. Not only to pay for your workshop (if you need to) but also to fund attending shows or applying for competitions. It can be heart breaking when you see something you know is perfect for you but don't have enough money to even think about entering. Funding is not always easy to find once you finish university. I was lucky in that my university was linked to a scene called Enterprise Inc, a funding scheme with university partners that award successful candidates £3,000 worth of business advice and £2,500 to put towards developing your own business. Other universities may be involved in similar schemes so it’s always a good idea to go and talk to student advice centres about what they can suggest. It may not always be specifically ceramic or craft related, but it’s relevant when setting up a business and financing it. My second most important piece of advice is to apply for everything you can! People are not going to seek you out, no one knows who you are yet. It’s no good making beautiful work if no one gets to see it. There are some amazing shows that run every year for crafts people, and they are always on the lookout for new talent. New Designers One Year On (for makers in there first year of business) - London Lustre, Nottingham Great Northern Contemporary Craft Fair Manchester

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Emerging Potters

100% Design Art in Action Crafts (at Bovey Tracey) Home Tent -London Made There are even shows that are specifically for ceramicists like; Aberystwyth Ceramics Festival Earth and Fire international ceramic fair Ceramic Art York Ceramic Art London Oxford Ceramics Fair Art in Clay – Hatfield  

January – March 2016

Some of these shows do a discount for recent graduates, so bare this in mind when applying. Also, if you are not accepted then don’t let it get you down. Every single maker will have had that happen to them. It’s not the organisations telling you your work is bad, it’s just the massive amount of applicantions. Just keep applying. Email galleries that you think your work would suit, and don’t cold call them! They will be busy so emailing them gives them the chance to properly sit down and read your email. Send a few good pictures of your work and see if they are interested in having your work within their gallery spaces. 14


Emerging Potters

January – March 2016

Again don’t get disheartened if they say there isn't any space straight away. If they like your work they will keep your details. This leads me to my next very important bit of advice. Make sure you have some very high quality photographs of your work. I cannot stress this point enough. Not iphone pictures or some you have taken at home. I’m talking studio photography quality. If you do get accepted by some of the bigger shows then your photos will be used in the publicity and they will not accept poor quality photographs. If you are still at university then find a photography studio and get some pictures taken. Universities are there to help students, so the lecturers will be pleased to assist. Now for social media. We all know how important it is to be online, everyone and his dog has a Facebook or Instagram page, so why not set up your own ‘makers’ page. This gives galleries, other makers, or even just fans of your work, somewhere to go to keep an eye on what you are up to. I would suggest Facebook, Twitter and Instagram are the top three social media sites. Do be professional and inspirational. Include information regarding your own work and events you will be showing at, or ones that are visiting. A good website is essential as it is the first thing people will turn to, and must be up to date. It also gives you the chance to display any press coverage. Don’t forget to include other media outlets for selling such as Pinterest and Etsay.  

Keeping yourself informed is always a problem so the trade magazines become even more important, as does appearing in them. Plan well in advance and let them know asap not after the event. Often this could be up to six months for Ceramic Review, Crafts magazine and the US publication Ceramics: Art&Perception. Remember the editor’s decision is final and they get sent a lot of things. Do join the mailing list for the Crafts Council newsletter as it contains a lot of practical advice, calls for entry and other opportunities. And finally remember to keep your old university informed about any successes. They like to be able to tell potential and current students, and you never know when they can pass your name on to other people. So, armed with all that good luck. http://http://www.knitmeastitchceramics.com/ 15


SARAH CORE

Emerging Potters

January – March 2016

Going Solo Why have your own exhibition? For Sarah Core there were two reasons, to raise her profile and to sell work. Much depends on where you are in your practice though. After a few years experience with group shows, she felt it was time to present a body of work which was backed up with a concept. When choosing a venue there are three elements - location, exposure and cost. Established galleries that are available to hire, cost a lot of money. Location is key, but start early by doing your research and finding local businesses that might be interested in stocking your work, as well as those who would buy direct. The location will always be compromised by the cost. For a first show this was only was possible in central London because of her membership of a professional body (photo: Sarah’s Society of Designer Craftsmen show). Consider joining these organisations before you launch yourself. They bring kudos, however small, and have a lot of experience in the business of selling art. Sarah also advises choosing a space you can fill with your work. Be realistic. Visit the venue and if possible build a foam-board model of it, for your own 3D thinking. It makes a difference to see the space scaled down. Timing is essential, and her recent show had been two years in development. The second year to make the work to the highest standard possible, and the first to develop ideas. Make work that a cross section of people can afford. What are the cost elements apart from Gallery hire? Printing and stationery (vinyls as well for decorating the space in her case), plus postcards. Get lots and Tell everybody! Insurance - comes with A-N membership. Cheapest and best out there. Paid advertising? didn't bother. Tell everybody! Your time and materials - make work that a cross section of budgets can afford. The cheapest item is £50. Don't expect to sell anything but have faith in your work. Card payments: invest in izettle or payment machine. This will cost you % for transactions but it makes a difference. Publicity for the event PR and social media. Facebook likes to charge per post - it might pay to raise profile of the odd post, depending on whether it takes off, so be selective. Website: devoted website for the show. Simple and informative and good photography. Mailing list is the key - find a big one. 2.4% take from Arts Mailing lists. So, if you are still keen to have your own show plan well in advance. http://www.corecreations.biz

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Emerging Potters

January – March 2016

MAKER’S

Gallery

Peter Cosentino Photo by artist Size:- apprx 12cms tall. Thrown and altered bud vase. White stoneware clay. Copper crystalline glaze - saggar reduced in an electric kiln post crystalline glaze firing. website:www.petercosentino.co.uk Member of The Midlands Potters Association (MPA) and also a member of The London Potters.

Case study: Susie Vittay She has been a student at the Aylesford School of Ceramics in Kent for some ten years, attending in the evening. Originally influenced by her native Hungarian background which has a very strong tradition of modern ceramics. She is currently exploring an individual combination of techniques. Preferring kitchenware to decorative items, such as thrown bowls, lidded pots and jugs, but she is not amiss to working on altered forms currently. The three main themes are: - decorated terracotta and slipware - stoneware with blue glaze - coloured porcelain Her full-time job is in a laboratory involving skin cancer diagnosis and tissue analysis.

Sue Mifsud                                                                   Title:  Rock  Pool  Bowl  ( 2015)   Dimension  31cm  width  by  19cm   height.  Stoneware  clay.  Three   glazes  used,  mixed  in  the  studio,   not  bought  commercially.   http://www.suemifsud.com/   Member  of  Midland  Potters  

Geoff Wilcock 12 x 6 inches The glaze is applied to thrown porcelain then stretched with contrasting brush strokes applied. b-art-on@talktalk.net Northern Potters Association West

Matthew Wilcock 83cm high Thrown terracotta clay, slip decoration, honey earthenware glaze b-arton@talktalk. net Northern Potters Association West

Karen Elizabeth Vaughan Title: May Dancers Materials: Raku fired ceramic figures with stained and sealed hardwood bases Heights: Approx. 54cm Website: www.moonbirds.co.uk Kent Potters Association

Gary Thomas Member of the Northern Potters Association. Size of work.16cm h x18 dia. Toasted stoneware with a white gloss glaze. garythomasceramics.co.uk

Eric Moss Title: 'The Big Blue with dancing sharks nested' Size: Diameter of 45cm Clay: Ashraff Hanna Super White Raku (Earthstone) Press moulded segments, thrown central bowl, thrown 'bobbin' spacers, assembled with steel bolts and rubber washers. Raku crackle glaze and 'naked raku' random smoke pattern Web: Ericmossceramics.co.uk Northern Potters Association

David Wright Coil built ceramic boxes, with carved wooden lids. The clay used is modified Dobles DSS and the pieces are wood fired. Celadon over black slip with Sapele lid, Shino Glaze with Yew lid h. 14 x 17 x 8cm www.davidwrightpottery.co.uk Northern Potters Association

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January – March 2016

MAKER’S

Gallery

 

Shirley Stewart Bowl tipped, red e/ware, 3.8" x 5" diameter www.shirleystewart.co.uk

David Melville Reduction fired stoneware. Some use found materials in the glaze such as ash and local clay others have a red glaze derived from copper. www.potteryman.co.uk Kent Potters Association

Christine Hurford (above) Maker of installation pieces. Recent work in Carlisle Cathedral of over 500 dead bone china flies on mirrors and over 600 porcelain butterflies around the pillar. www.chrishurford.co.uk Susie Ramsey-Smith Organic stoneware for the garden. Kent Potters Association http://www.experiencesussex.co. uk/

Jo Keogh The bowls are 15 cm diameter, slip cast in a semi porcelain, with a white zircon glaze, one lined with gold leaf. www.jokeoghceramics.co.uk Leicester. Northern Potters Association and CPA.

Joan Hardie Northern Potters Association 3D printer: stoneware clay and reduction fired with a celadon glaze www.printedpots.co.uk

Douglas Fitch, Slip Trail Pressed Dish. 29cm square. Wood Fired. Hannah McAndrew, Slip Trail Harvest Jugs. 32cm high.. Photo: Shannon Tofts. www.fitchandmcandrew.co.uk

Carolyn Corfield

Rosemary Jacks (above) Leaf and berries lidded bird pot. Red earthenware clay, white slip. Lead based glaze. Approx 12.5cm high. www.rosemaryjackspottery.co.uk

'Time Machine' (memories take us back whilst dreams take us forward. Northern Potters Association. H. 53cm. Hand painted head in industrial crank with mixed media, on bronze glazed stoneware base electric fired to 1260C. Web - northern-potters.co.uk

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January – March 2016

WHAT TO TOTO

Watch For

Ceramics: Art and Perception Volume 25 Issue 3

Ceramics Art and Perception

2015 ISSUE

101

INTERNATIONAL US$20

Print Post Publication No. PP255003100105 September – November 2015

Under the current editor Ceramic Review has introduced many new themes for all makers and is well worth subscribing to.

101

Ceramics: Art and Perception with Ceramics Technical are two of the most important international magazines available. The first looks at functional to ephemeral, traditional to provocative. The latter is dedicated to research, culture and strategy, plus all the technical subjects you would need. www.ceramicart.com.au

Edmund de Waal’s intimate journey in search of porcelain, a substance he has been obsessed with for most of his life. His journey takes him to China, Venice, Versailles, Dublin, Dresden USA and south west England. Published by Chatto & Windus.

Sex & Drugs & Sausage Rolls is published by Face Publications is a cook book from the West House Restaurant in Kent and features table ware by the Aylesford Pottery. www.facepublic ations.com/shop/sexdrugs-sausage-rollsgraham-garrett

The magazine of the Crafts Council. Crafts is full of the best in modern craft design and very useful information. Well worth signing up to their newsletter for opportunities and current news.

On View is the inspiration for this publication. It covers the arts across Florida in the US and is beautifully produced .It is a great source of cultural information should you be visiting. Miami hosts one of the most important arts fairs. Find it on the ISSUU website or… http://onviewmagazine.

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January – March 2016

Advice on.. Making large pots: Aylesford Pottery

I was trained as an apprentice in the south London studio of Bob and Sheila Evans on the Columbia Road Flower Market in East London. Starting at 18 years of age I made pots for the next 16 years for the shows at Hampton Court, Chelsea, Kew Gardens and Lambeth Palace to name but a few. There I would be expected to make a pot like this one demonstrated within two hours, or if two people were working on a pot within 1.5 hours. Time is money as within any industry. 1) Careful planning in advance will ensure constant standards (drawing) 2) Accurate measurement of clay is essential 3) Throwing one of the sections 4) Use a gauge to ensure constant sizes 5) Section ready to accept next stage 6) Using a torch to partly dry base section before next is joined 7) Throughout keep checking sizes of each section to be joined 8) Next section made on a second wheel is added 9) Smoothing the sides inside and out 10) Adding a moulded decoration as final making stage 11) Final stage is to add top glaze 12) Finished pot after leaving the kiln H:56cm

3

2 1

6 4 5

7 10

8

9 11

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BILLY BYLES

Emerging Potters

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An example of how to build upwards: Here I have made a three section pot, but there is no reason why you could not keep on building more using this method. Many of the giant Chinese pots you see will have been made this way. The only restrictions are having a wheel strong enough to take the weight and available size in the studio, plus kiln space. If you were making pots like this one in quantity you would first start by making a master pot, from which measurements could be taken and gauges set. Choosing the clay and careful measurements: For this garden pot I have used 78lb of Valentines Red grogged clay as it will withstand frost. Planning the job and drawings: Given the size and weight of what I am about to make means there is no room for mistakes or alterations. It has to be correct at each stage, so you must constantly take measurements to ensure each section fits. Sometimes I will make a full-scale drawing to check against. Three stages: If attempting to make something this big start by making small pots, so you get used to adding sections to each other, and work up to large pots. This is how I teach students here at the School of Ceramics.

January – March 2016

Using two wheels at once: The advantage of two wheels is not having to keep stopping and lifting off sections, then re-centring. How to construct your shape, plus planning the rim: For each section score and slip each when joining, then place together and smooth. Only when the section is joined in this way cutaway the bat. The final section being the rim should be thrown in a slightly hollow form to reduce the weight of clay. For this pot I have introduced a false removable base so plants can be easily removed if required by the owner. Adding detail to the exterior: Decoration can be added by using pre-made sprigs from plaster moulds. You need a good master, but once made they are easy to form, and can be added to the pot by scoring and slipping. Drying and kiln tips: This pot needed between two and three weeks to dry-out. A raw glaze was applied to the areas chosen at the dry stage. An electric kiln was used, even though we have a choice. Starting with four hours at 70 degrees, and then 16 hours at 600 degrees. Finally: When to throw something in one piece or to build in sections? Well, depends on the design and how easy it will be to get your arm inside the pot. I would throw in one section anything between 6lb and 55lb.

Do not over-pack the kiln with large items, and avoid putting too many smaller pots inside your large ones. This will help to reduce cracking. Why use a blowtorch? Apart from being quicker, it gives a more consistent body. Drying naturally has the problem of drafts and an uneven drying in the clay. But do not take the clay to leather-hard when using the torch.  

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Emerging Potters

January – March 2016

Crafts Council http://www.craftscouncil.org.uk

One of the challenges facing all makers when they are working alone or away from an organised environment is how to keep-up with current events, and that all important need to see what is on offer. Step forward the Crafts Council. Today it represents crafts makers across a range of activities, and should be a ‘must see’ for makers of ceramics.

International Work British craft has a strong heritage and is revered around the world for its quality, energy and innovation. The Crafts Council has a role in supporting makers to realise their ambitions to work with international clients including collectors, galleries, and retailers by showcasing their work at world-class design fairs across the world. Future work by the Council will include major shows in individual countries. Makers have to be recognised as leaders in their field, as they are very much representing the very best of the sector. Crafts Council Directory

The collection

A relatively new service, the directory is a visual showcase for makers and a chance for them to have a national profile. Worth an online visit just to see the richness of the talent in the UK.

Formed in 1972 it charts the history and development of contemporary craft in the UK, capturing significant moments in the work of a maker, and developments in practice. Currently it includes over 1,600 objects. Items from the collection are available for loan to institutions around the country. Above: Katharine Morling – Morling and the Hoard. Photo Nick Moss

 

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COLLECT Exhibition

COLLECT: The international art fair for contemporary art objects is a Crafts Council flagship event in London. It is the chance to buy world-class, museumquality contemporary craft from international galleries, each representing established and emerging artists. The next COLLECT is at the Saatchi Gallery in central London, from 3 to 6 February 2017. It is also a chance to speak to gallery owners all in one place. Crafts Council Research

Crafts magazine

The department provides rigorous evidence on craft trends, achieving recognised impact on policy and practice. The primary purpose of the research programme is to produce and disseminate evidence to inform government and educational policy and practice.

Launched over 40 years ago and published six times a year by the Crafts Council, Crafts presents a beautifully designed mix of news, reviews, profile pieces and opinions from the best writers in the business. Available in different formats.

Hothouse This is a Crafts Council Talent Development programme for makers who are within three years of setting up their practice. The six month programme runs in partnership with regional organisations and focuses on creative and business development. Not only does it bring business advice but also important networking between participants. 24

Crafts Council weekly news alert This is vital to keep makers up to date with events. A must.


January – March 2016

Emerging Potters

CoCA

Centre of Ceramic Art – York

web: centreofceramicart.org.uk

The new Centre of Ceramic Art opened in the Summer of 2015 in York. The name shortened to CcCA highlights a collection of British studio ceramics, which is the largest and most important in the UK as it covers the entire British movement.

Amounting to over 5,500 pieces by over 600 artists, CoCA includes collections of The Very Reverend Dean Milner-White, WA Ismay, Henry Rothschild and Anthony Shaw. It tells the story of studio ceramics from the 20th Century to the present day.

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Potters

EMERGING

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Pilot Issue JanuaryMarch 2016

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Emily Wiles on life after Uni If you would like to join the mailing list for the magazine email: paulbailey123@googlemail.com It will be produced quarterly

Emerging potters 1  

Ceramic makers and ceramic students at university in the UK .

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