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EMERGING

Potters Issue 13 January – March 2019


Emerging Potters - 13

January – March 2019

Introduction The online pottery magazine Welcome to the first edition of the New Year. There is an expectation that this year will be one of the best yet for ceramics. To start the year there is the COLLECT show at the Saatchi Gallery at the end of February, to be shortly followed by the Ceramic Art London show in March, which again will be held at Central Saint Martins in King’s Cross. Both of these shows will be reviewed in later editions of the magazine. The number of ceramic Christmas sales up and down the country have reported good sales and a steady increase in the number of people seeking out handmade ceramics. Although only one year out of Central Saint Martins, the maker Lena Peters has had a solo show called Saints & Spirits at the David Gill Gallery in London. Needless to say it was a sell-out. If you have shows during 2019 and would like to be mentioned then do send me an email at the address below. Front cover: Anna Younie who took part in last year’s New Designers show and now works in Orkney. Photo: Press & Journal

It’s always good to see new galleries, and the one in 2018 that has been making waves is ‘Thrown Contemporary’ in Highgate, London. It is run by Claire Pearce. If anyone knows of other ceramic centres of excellence then do contact us. Paul Bailey, editor

The magazine is an independent journal. The publishers do not accept any liability for errors or omissions. The views expressed in the features are not necessarily those of the editor. Reproduction in part or whole must be with the consent of the editor. All rights reserved.

Contributions to the gallery of work from makers and students are welcome and will be included wherever possible on a first come basis. Send to the email address – paulbailey123@googlemail.com. The editor’s decision is final. © Paul Bailey 2019 Emerging Potters is produced in association with Aylesford Pottery UK.


Emerging Potters - 13

January – March 2019

Advisory Panel Alan Parris and Billy Byles are master potters and joint partners of the Aylesford Pottery in Kent.. John Leach, eldest grandson of renowned potter Bernard Leach and son of David Leach, continues the family tradition at Muchelney Pottery in the heart of the Somerset Levels. Helen Walsh, Curator of Ceramics CoCA, York Museums Trust. Wendy Kershaw, international ceramic maker based in Scotland. Emily Wiles, ceramic maker based in Leicester. Sandi Cowles, A student attending pottery classes at Penzance School of Art. Ella Watkins is now a contributing features writer for the magazine.

Contents 3-5

Collect 2019

6

Rebecca Proctor

7-10

Thrown Gallery

11 - 14

Makers Plates

15 -16

Anna Younie

17 -18

Susan Evans

19 - 21

Prints & Clay

22 - 24

Saints & Spirits

25 - 26

Crafts Council

27 - 32

Aylesford Pottery Challenge

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January – March 2019

Emerging Potters – 13

COLLECT 2019  

Isobel Dennis – jigsaw expert If you have not been to the annual Collect show then visiting the Saatchi Gallery full of the finest craft work is like visiting the grandest of stately homes but updated to what is best today. Collect is one of the most important international crafts fairs and is due to run from 28 February to 3 March 2019, and is produced by the UK’s Crafts Council. It is the only Art Fair represented by commercial galleries dedicated to modern craft and design, and provides an opportunity to see and buy work produced in the last five years by living artists, much of which is made exclusively for the show. Occupying the whole of the Saatchi Gallery over four days with over 40 galleries, work is selected by an independent panel of experts, selling the work of over 400 makers. Last year alone some 13,000 people visited the show Alongside the commercial galleries, ‘Collect Open’ returns again, providing a platform for 15 individual makers to show ambitious and conceptual craft-led installations. But how is a major show like this put together? What is the role of the director responsible for this multi million pound operation? New to the post at the Crafts Council is Isobel Dennis who has been working in the industry for some 20 years. She has previously worked as a director at the Design Museum co-ordinating their exhibitions teams, a director at Upper Street that runs the New Designers graduate show plus the Top Drawer trade fairs. A long run of successes. Left: Moon Jar by Akiko Hirai Photo: Tony Hay

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COLLECT Artist: Mary O'Malley Title: 啤酒koozie Materials: Porcelain Size: 13cm x 7.5cm


Emerging Potters – 13 COLLECT 2019

Collect is open to the public : Thursday 28 February: 11am - 5pm Friday 1 March 11am – 6pm Saturday 2 March 11am – 6pm Sunday 3 March 11am – 6pm http://www.collect2019.org.uk/

January – March 2019

Originally she trained in ceramics at Camberwell College of Art, making hand-built stoneware pieces, and subsequently more decorative earthenware, selling them in the UK and overseas. So she is well positioned to understand both makers and the arts business. She commented on Collect, “ Although we are nearing the opening of the show for 2019, the team is already working on the 2020 and the 2021 shows. Accommodating all the galleries is sometimes a jigsaw, but it is helped through an advisory panel who will give guidance to the galleries and those entering Collect Open”. Two spectacular exhibitors taking part in 2019 are the China Design Centre and Korean Craft and Design Foundation from the Republic of South Korea. The latter will display the work of their makers under the theme of ‘Lost in Tradition’. Buyers at the show can be anyone from the public to curators of collections like the V&A and art advisory businesses. One new departure in 2019 will be the support of the UK’s Department for International Trade in bringing buyers over from the USA, Gulf States and China. The growth in international fairs continues and this can only be good for a vibrant arts market and young makers. It is the Crafts Council who is leading the charge and through Isobel making things happen.

Top photo : From the Zetteler Collection 2018. Photography Sophie Mutevelian

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And who to watch for this year? Following her sell-out show at the Contemporary Ceramic Centre in London is Akiko Hirai, and recent graduate from the Royal College of Art, Mary O’Malley, plus Charlotte Pack who studied at Central Saint Martins.


January – March 2019

Emerging Potters – 13

Rebecca Proctor  

Straight Shino Pouring Bowl/ Shino Juice Cup/Shino Orange Tumbler/ Celadon Pour Bowl Front/ Flower Frog Grey

Featured here is new stoneware which is fired in a Kigbeare Anagama kiln for five days and nights.

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Emerging Potters – 13

January – March 2019

Thrown Gallery Running A New Gallery: The new interest in ceramics can be seen by the number of people attending the major shows in London and around the country, but what is happening in those small independent galleries? ‘Emerging Potters’ went along to meet Claire Pearce from ‘Thrown Contemporary’ gallery which has recently opened. This is the first of two reports from the gallery. This is her story: Commenting on her area of north London, she said, “They call the area of Highgate ‘the village’ and it completely lives up to this name. It’s an absolutely beautiful spot, just a short walk away from Hampstead Heath, and has a really active and creative community who it’s been a real pleasure getting to know.

The gallery will be part of the London Art Fair in January as part of a new section called 'Platform' which will focus on a different subject each year, starting with ceramics.

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“The gallery is situated on the ground floor of a very established gallery called Highgate Contemporary Art, whose exhibitions are now upstairs on the first floor and have often included ceramics. Our building has been a gallery in various forms for a long, long time and we’ve been told that one of the past owners would never have allowed ceramics within his art gallery - which makes me even more happier that we’re here, plus there are various makers in the area”. The gallery opened in March 2018 with support from family, friends and the artists in the area. Claire studied Architecture at University and was intrigued about how artists use clay, the 3D forms and its place between art and design that really resonated with the way she looks at things. For the gallery it’s an exciting time for ceramics development as an art form and in the way that people respond.


hEmerging Potters – 13 Thrown Gallery

January – March 2019

Tom Kemp (centre) Simon Kidd (Left)

She started her gallery career interning in a photography gallery in London before moving to a job in a gallery in St Ives, which she later went on to run – and was where she first discovered ceramics. After this, came another gallery in London where she introduced quite a few ceramicists to their stable of artists.

James Pegg (above) BTM Ceramics (below)

Talking about the next move, she said, “I often get told I must be very brave for opening a gallery but for me I don’t really remember it ever not being where I was headed. It’s always been the goal but the question has always been what kind of gallery it would be. In the galleries that I worked in, I found myself getting pulled further and further towards ceramics and got a real joy out of introducing people to this art form. With the current uprising in ceramics, it felt like exactly the right time for someone to do that. As I thought more about it, I thought, ‘well, what if that someone was me…. “Our first show was titled ‘In Suspense’ and featured a group of artists, ceramicists and painters, whose work captured a particular movement within their work – the journey of a brushmark across a pot’s form, the burning of materials off the surface of a saggar-fired vessel, the build-up of paint on a canvas. It was an extremely strong start and set the precedent for the quality of curation that I aim this gallery to be known for”. How she goes about choosing makers for a show can seem a barrier to those just starting, so she explained her system as follows- For many years she has been collecting names of ceramicists that she likes the work of for a long time. To start with, she worked through this list and tried to pick ceramicists who were doing particularly distinctive things, particularly trying to pick out artists who weren’t being represented. The shows are curated with a theme – something that draws the work together and helps give a starting point. For their first year, they’ve had a lot of shows. Being in London has the bonus of not only the big shows like CAL and COLLECT but the art colleges final year shows. She commented, “I am always really excited to see what comes out of the art colleges. I think they add a different way of looking, definitely more conceptual, that you don’t see as much from other avenues into ceramics”.

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Emerging Potters – 13

January – March 2019

Thrown Gallery

One of the innovative approaches to the gallery is the supper club. She explains as follows, “If a piece is tactile, I think everyone should pick it up to experience it. The supper clubs came from pushing this idea further and thinking that if a piece is made to be used, then why not encourage people to use it. I couldn’t be more proud of these events.

“They work on so many levels: the ceramicists really enjoying seeing people responding to and using their work; the chefs (a very talented pop-up restaurant team who go under the name Fabulous 698b) loving using these incredible plates and bowls and are now working very closely with my ceramicists to discuss the perfect ‘dish’ and their individual viewpoints on this; and the whole range of people who have joined us in the gallery for these dinners. “Each course introduces a different ceramicists work and within this, as I introduce the course to the table, I try to add in a little bit of knowledge about how the ceramics are made so while you’re eating off your plate, you maybe look at the traces of the throwing rings, or the way the glazes meet or the overall form. We’ve had a lot of ceramic admirers join us for these events but we’ve also had keen foodies who thought it sounded different and are then being introduced to ceramics for the first time”.

Above: Pots by Arjan Van Dal Top left: Roger Coll

http://www.throwncontemporary.co.uk/ 26 Highgate High Street, London, N6 5JG

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January – March 2019

Emerging Potters – 13

Makers Plates In the first of a new series we are looking at new work by potters by theme. To start we look at plates.

Andrea Roman Turning Earth Studios Slab. Mixture of

stoneware clays. www.arceramics. co.uk

Arianna Halshaw The Kiln Rooms Stoneware, drape moulded www.instagra m.com/ahcera mics

Bisila Noha Turning Earth Studios Raw Marbled Surface

Marbled with slip and no glaze on stoneware www.bisilanoha. co.uk

Georgie Scully The Kiln Rooms High fired earthenware slip cast plate. http://www.georgiescullyceramics.co.

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Emerging Potters – 13 Makers Plates

January – March 2019

Ruban Farinas Turning Earth Studios Slab, bending edge and texture in stoneware. www.inproduction.studio/ru ben-farinas

Nur Polat Kantar Turning Earth Studios Earthenware/Handbuilt http://www.nurpolatkantar.c om/

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January – March 2019

Emerging Potters – 13 Makers Plates

Helen Kilner The Kiln Rooms Studio Lunar Blue Maker Mark platter. Made in Potclays white stoneware and spray glazed with a chalky matt blue glaze. It shows how divers a glaze can be when applied using different methods @thekilnerpotter https://www.thekilnerpotter.com/

Sam Marks Turning Earth Studios Wheel thrown from a mix of stoneware clays.

Lise Herud Braten Kiln Rooms Copeland Park Studio. The plates are from a mix of porcelain and stoneware clay, with oxides, dolomite and clear glaze and natural ash, fired to 1260 C in an electric kiln. https://coloursoftheland.com

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January – March 2019

Emerging Potters – 13 Makers Plates

Rebecca Brown Persistence Works Studios Toasted stoneware slabs moulded over a hump, painted with slip and monoprinted using various oxides and left unglazed. http://www.beccab rown.co.uk/

Ella Hookway Kiln Room Studios Porcelain/Stonewar e and underglaze http://www.ellahook way.com/

Sue Moreton Aylesford School of Ceramics Imprinted and incised design highlighted with iron oxide,wax masking and double dipped colours. instagram @ moretonsue

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Emerging Potters – 13

January – March 2019

Anna Younie  

Her work is made from a combination of coarse, black stoneware and china clay slip. She decided to work with these particular materials as they allowed her to create a strong contrast between the two bodies of clay, resulting in an eye catching, stand out range of work. The process begins by applying the slip to a slab of unfired stoneware, before drying and then stretching the slab - resulting in the intricate, detailed texture on the surface of the vessel. The results of this process are unique every single time, which means she will never be able to produce two pieces that look exactly the same. She can control the size and form of the vessel, however the aesthetic created when the clay is stretched and manipulated is something out of her control, which she finds both an exciting and important factor that is a crucial element to her practice. The inspiration for the work comes from both the land and seascapes of Orkney. The forms of the vessels mirror the simple yet striking standing stone circles seen at Stenness and the Ring of Brodgar. Being raised on Orkney, she never fully appreciated the wealth of inspiration that it’s so often commended for, but studying away from home made her realise how much she had taken this for granted and so, it seemed a natural choice of focus for the work with the rugged, textured detail around Orkney for her final year at Gray’s School of Art and hereafter. The detailed surfaces for the pieces are created to reflect and emulate the harsh, weathered cliff faces and coast lines of the island. Because the process she uses allows her to create a new pattern/texture every time, reflects where she takes inspiration – the same way no two standing stones are the same and the same way no two areas along the coast will be worn and weathered to the same extent. The pieces are therefore as unique as the place they are inspired by. At the moment she is concentrating on building up some stock to sell in local stores as well as distributing pieces to people she spoke to in London at New Designers who were interested in the work. A project she is looking forward to starting is being able to source clay from Orkney. Through experimenting and testing with a locally sourced clay will be exciting and satisfying so that she can make a range of work that is not only inspired by Orkney, but has been made from clay that has been sourced there too.

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Anna Younie


January – March 2019

Emerging Potters – 13

Susan Evans  

In her own words… I have always been drawn to hand-made ceramics and started buying the occasional piece at student sales, craft shows, and “artsy” shops long before trying clay myself. My focus at the time was computer science. I spent 30 years working in IT, as a programmer and analyst. I tried to maintain a balance by pursuing a series of creative, right-brained interests, but most of those passions were short-lived. By the mid-90’s, with an intense job and stressful Seattle commute, the need for an outlet I could dive into became critical. When a co-worker told me about a pottery class she was taking at the Moshier Art Center in Burien, she lit up with such delight that I knew I had to try it. From the first night of my first hand building class, I was seriously hooked. In Moshier, I found a wonderful facility with talented instructors and a community of potters that have become my friends. Although I now do most of my work in my home studio, I still take the occasional class to learn from different instructors, connect with other potters, use the gas reduction kiln, and take part in the annual Spring and Holiday sales. I have not had formal art training, but have learned from classes and workshops at local studios, clay magazines and books, online resources, and a lot of trial and error. The workshop that most inspired my work was given by Barb Campbell more than 10 years ago, where she demonstrated her soft slab construction technique. Arthritis in my hands was limiting my ability to throw on the wheel and I returned to hand building. Soft slabs provided a means to work with soft, wet clay, give more freedom to my forms, and to make my impatience work for me, not having to wait for components to reach leather-hard before assembling. My current work is hand built using thin, soft slabs of mid-range porcelain. I make impression in the clay with various found or repurposed items, my own hand-made stamps, purchased stamps, or whatever catches my eye. I use underglaze to highlight the texture and patterns, and Mayco Stroke

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Emerging Potters – 13 Susan Evans

January – March 2019

and coat glazes for bright color accents. All of this is done before bisque firing. After bisque, I use a liner glaze but generally do not glaze the outside of the pot. I like the feel of unglazed porcelain and give the finished piece a quick sanding to make it smooth and touchable.

Today I make functional, decorative pieces that I hope convey a bit of whimsy and the joy I feel in making them. I also enjoy making plaster molds for slipcast and altered work or using wood or bisque molds. After retiring three years ago and thought I would have more time for pottery, but that is not always the case. My husband and I bought an older house earlier this year and have had endless projects, inside and out. With all there was to do, the first thing we tackled was the garage. We now each have our own workspace with plenty of room and storage. Mostly I sell my work at a few local shows during the year. I usually do one big outdoor street fair-type arts festival in the summer, the two Moshier sales, and some smaller sales, which can vary from year to year. My next event is a benefit for Seattle Children’s Hospital, which I am doing for the first time. I had work in a gallery for a while, but found that it wasn’t a good fit for me. I want my work to be affordable and accessible and I enjoy the face to face interaction of live sales, both with customers and other artists and crafts people. I also have never set up online sales, mostly because a do not make a prolific amount of work, although I will try to accommodate those who find me online and ask for something to be sent to them. My goals and ambitions as regards to clay at this point are just to let each piece inform the next, challenge myself with new shapes and forms, and continue to enjoy the process. We recently moved to Edgewood, Washington State, in the beautiful Pacific NW. It’s just a few miles from our previous home of 22 years, but feels a world away. Edgewood is a semi-rural area about 25 miles south of Seattle and northeast of TacomaA tree-lined walk at a local park or on a nearby beach helps me think through the distractions that can prevent me from being able to focus in the studio. Some things require more.

Susan Evans, Fireflower Clay Art

fireflowerclayart@gmail.com

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January – March 2019

Emerging Potters – 13

Prints & Clay There is a new move from some makers to include prints with their ceramic pieces. Here we look at a few examples.

Hannah Tounsend Description: Statement Vessel and Print Painting. Materials: White earthenware vessels with decorative slips, engobes, underglaze and glaze. Wood framed canvases using paint, pastel, pencil and digital print. Printing Method: To create these prints she uses a piece of flexible plastic as a printing plate and builds up the image in rolled sections, brush strokes and splatters of ink. Then she uses a cloth and clay tools to blur or scrape back through these soft films of ink, revealing previous levels of mark making. The completed plate and damp paper are passed together through the press, transferring the image. http://www.hannahtounsend.co.uk/

   

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January – March 2019

Emerging Potters – 13 Prints & Clay

Samantha Silverstone Drawing and painting is an integral part of her practice. 2D and 3D go hand in hand. Working two dimensionally enables her to collect information, research and explore ideas relating to colour, mark making and texture. The two-dimensional work is a tool she uses to work out colour and composition before moving onto working with clay. Once a body of 2D work is complete and she feesl confident, it is then a transfer of the skills she has developed working two dimensionally into a series of ceramic pieces, treating the clay as a canvas. Working on large sheets of clay she paints the surface with slips, then cuts into panels and constructs a vessel. Once fired, the ceramic vessel is worked on multiple times, gradually building up layers of slip and glaze which creates additional depth of colour and texture.

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Emerging Potters – 13 Prints & Clay

 

Pottery West This poster was created as part of their catalogue for London Design Week, in 2018. It's a print of a photograph taken by Helena Dolby, of our porcelain and willow ash pieces. Catherine + Matt West Pottery West www.potterywest.co.uk | Instagram | Twitter Pottery West, Studio 41, Yorkshire Artspace, Persistence Works, 21 Brown Street, Sheffield, S1 2BS

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January – March 2019


January – March 2019

Emerging Potters – 13

           S aints

& Spirits

Lena Peters first appeared in this magazine in October 2017, issue 8, shortly after her degree show at Central Saint Martins. Now she has had her first solo show called Saints & Spirits, at the very prestigious David Gill Gallery, in central London during November and December 2018. Needless to say it was a sell-out at the private view. With the new work comes another intriguing story setting the ceramic pieces into a context. The following extract from the narrative comes from Lena’s own description. Lena Peters, London 2018

Above and below: Images from the David Gill Gallery. Opposite: The Gatekeeper. The jaguar was often chosen as an emblem for warriors and priests.

In the summer of 2017 I heard through a friend about an intriguing discovery in St Etheldreda’s Church in Holborn, London. Whilst the church was undergoing a restoration, workmen had broken through a previously forgotten vault beneath the alter which extended beneath the whole church. Among various papers, moth eaten alter cloths and aged communion wines, they found a startling collection of bizarre ceramic figures. This discovery made the local paper but seems to have been largely overlooked by archaeological circles. After doing a little research of my own regarding the find, I determined that I had to see the figures for myself. The priest kindly unearthed them from his office and showed them to me – as you can see, they are not exactly church appropriate, and so had been hidden away since the find – and I was struck by their unique characteristics.

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Lena Peters: The Trickster Saints & Spirits

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Lena Peters: The Gatekeeper, Saints & Spirits

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January – March 2019

Emerging Potters – 13

           C rafts

Council

Is it economic heresy to suggest that sustainable businesses are as vital to a healthy economy as scalable businesses? Asks Julia Bennett from the Crafts Council. As the national development agency for craft, the Crafts Council works with a high number of microbusinesses, including international brands such as Tom Dixon and Wright & Teague as well as sole traders like Rebecca Gouldson and Elaine Bolt. Craft businesses range from the traditional (those working with familiar tools and materials such as metal, ceramic, wood) to the fused economy of makers using their skills to innovate across the economy. Our new set of Craft in Industry cards, illustrate how craft skills are integral to product development in industries across the economy. The cards tell the story of nine businesses, each representing one of the many disciplines within: • Manufacturing; 1882 Ltd, Benchmark, Harris Tweed • Technology; Unmade, Vanessa Cutler/OMAX, Smile Plastics • Other creative industries where craft mind-sets are applied to add economic, cultural and social value; Phoebe English, Cod Steaks, Bentley Motors The craft economy, like the wider creative industries, comprises of mainly sole traders, a growth sector in UK employment, as the RSA’s Future Work Centre has highlighted in The Second Age of Small and subsequent research on the self-employed sector. The government’s Industrial Strategy white paper and the Creative Industries Sector Deal offer an opportunity to look afresh at how we support such businesses. The Crafts Council has analysed the needs of craft micros and the challenges they face in contributing to future UK growth. To unlock the full potential of craft skills in industry, we found such businesses need the following (reflected in our Craft in Industry cards which can be found on the Crafts Council website): • Better access to investment in facilities and equipment Glassmaker Michael Ruh in his studio, London, © Sophie Mutevelian

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Skills support to grow their effectiveness


Emerging Potters – 13 Crafts Council

January – March 2019

Improved regulation to assist in employing freelancers flexibly when needed

Structured opportunities to identify complementary skills and to collaborate on product development

Business mentoring advice on approaches to scaling up and exporting

Too often, the language and level of detail of available advice and support is targeted at SMEs with more employees, and at ideas that are immediately scalable. Yet this ability to work independently and on their own terms is often a driver for self-employed makers and other creatives. James Kennedy, of Kennedy City Bicycles, says “I get to meet my customers, discuss the design of their bicycle, build it, take them on test rides, teach them how to maintain and service it. I feel really privileged to do that for so many people” (Makers of East London, May 2015, Hoxton Mini Press). He pushes this idea further, in ways that aren’t always welcomed by those promoting business growth; “People criticise us for being an ‘idea that doesn’t scale’, but I bloody love being an idea that doesn’t scale”. At this time of passionate reactions to the perceived powerlessness created by globalisation, the desire to take control of one’s own skills and outputs is strong.

Silversmith Ndidi Ekubia in her studio at Cockpit Arts, London, © Sophie Mutevelian

The desire to establish a business such as Kennedy City Bicycles is likely to be motivated by the need to generate an income. But the creation of a sustainable business that creates personal satisfaction, as well as an income, over a longer period is clearly a factor in the business choices of many makers. As we seek to implement the Creative Industries Sector Deal with the Government, how can we ensure that support is tailored to recognise that sustainability is a legitimate business goal? And, in the process, do we need to redefine the ‘growth’ agenda to facilitate the healthier economy that this implies?

Julia Bennett is the Crafts Council’s Head of Research and Policy. As an experienced researcher, policy specialist and strategist, Julia leads socio-economic research into the craft sector and undertakes advocacy campaigns, writing, speaking and publishing on craft and making. This article first appeared as a blog for the RSA in 2018

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Emerging Potters – 13 Aylesford Pottery Competition

January – March 2019

           C ompetition Aylesford Pottery in Kent decided to end the year in 2018 with a series of challenges for the students, in the spirit of the pottery TV programme.

Below are judges Angela Cole from KM Newspapers and Rachel Graham editor of ClayCraft together with Billy Byles and Alan Parris directors of Aylesford Pottery

Right: Nick Taplin

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It is fair to say that none of the three devised challenges were easy. The first was to make two identical vases, each 8 inches tall after being fired in the kiln. Construction method and decoration was down to each student. The second challenge was to create a large plate, dish, or jug in earthenware and decorated in slip, taking inspiration from the English slipware tradition of the 17th and early 18th Centuries used by makers like Thomas Toft. The third was to produce a pot while being completely blindfolded, including lifting it from the wheel. Here are some of the results over the next few pages.


Emerging Potters – 13 Aylesford Pottery Competition

Above left: Sarah Gray Below left: Alison Hillman Top right: Sarah Gray Centre: Heather Lacey Bottom right: Megan Farmer

January – March 2019


Emerging Potters – 13 Aylesford Pottery Competition

Right: Kate Whittaker Far Right: Jos Kerkvliet

Right: Nick Winter Far right: Jane Scaffell

Right: Nicola Vincent-Abnett Far right: Terry Howland

Right: Kate Whittaker Far right: Sue Moreton

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January – March 2019


Emerging Potters – Aylesford Pottery Competition

January – March 2019

Right: Elaine Wikinson On a visit to Taormina in Sicily Elaine was inspired by ceramic heads which could be seen everywhere on the island. According to legend a Moorish merchant fell in love with a Sicilian girl in the 11th Century. She discovered he had a wife and family back in his homeland, so in a fit of jealously and to ensure he would remain hers forever she killed him as he slept and put his severed head on her balcony. The head was used as a vase, from which to grow a basil plant. Passers by jealous off her flourishing plant created ‘head vases’ of their own.

Far left: Michelle Stags Left: Robert Pou Bottom left: Anita Oakley Below: Nichola Barker

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Emerging Potters – 13 Aylesford Pottery Competition

January – March 2019

Left: Corinne Mulchany Often makers look to their own experiences as the start of the creative process. As part of the challenges to produce an earthenware slip decorated jug Corinne turned to her home town of Margate in Kent. The body of the piece is Terracotta and is a coil built pot with a slab base. The pot was constructed in two pieces with the jug top added after the main body had been joined together. The handle was pulled from the pot. After finishing the piece it was dipped in white slip and the drawings were added (sgraffito). Corinne commented, “I came across ‘The Margate Guide’ which is a descriptive poem written by an inhabitant and published in 1797. The positive prose describes a town built for pleasure surrounded by the pastoral idle of Kentish yeomen. Whilst the form is derived from original harvest jugs of the period, I decided the decoration would be a personal reflection on Margate”.

Zoe Marks

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Sarah Bignell-House


Emerging Potters – 13 Aylesford Pottery Competition

January – March 2019

Far left: Gill Mayes Left: Sue Maddocks Below: Louisa Barns Centre left: Rachel Ginns Bottom left: Gary Palmer Bottom centre: Karen Rutland Bottom right: Sue Darby

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Ceramics to play a central role in Scottish festival…. The Lochwinnoch

Arts Festival 27 February to 24 March 2019 Some of the headline names taking part: Karen Matheson - folk singer Alan Bissett with his Edinburgh Festival show Life and Times of Pete Seeger with Finlay Alison & Jimmy Ross Comedy Nights * Jazz Choir Rock Night * Local writers Drama Groups * Poetry Groups Art Exhibition Sunday 24 March Invitation to try throwing a pot with international maker Wendy Kershaw. Booking is required For information tel: 07761172726 http://lochwinnochartsfestival.co.uk/


D evon G uild of C raftsmen

Get Fresh S howc asing the work of emerging designermakers from the S outh W est S aturday 19 January – S unday 10 Marc h 2019 Riverside M ill, Bovey Trac ey, D evon TQ 13 9A F.O pen 7 days a week 10am to 5.30pm www.c rafts.org.uk


The Kiln   6:30pm Friday 11th January 2019: Tessa Eastman Room   6:30pm Friday 22nd February 2019: TALKS   Laura Bird http://www.thekil nrooms.com/pdp  

6:30pm Friday 22nd March 2019:

E:info@thekilnroo ms.com

Sue Paraskeva

Ceramic Art   London  2019   22-­‐24  March   2019     Central  Saint   Martins     Kings  Cross   London   Roger  Coll  


If you  would  like  to  join  the  free  mailing   list  for  Emerging  Potters  contact:   paulbailey123@googlemail.com   Back  copies  of  the  magazine  can  be  found   on  the  ISSUU  platform.   You  can  also  follow  emerging  potters  in   ClayCraft  magazine.  

Profile for Creative Sector Public Relations

Emerging Potters magazine January to March 2019  

Ceramics magazine looking at the work of new makers starting out and those who study ceramics as an interest.

Emerging Potters magazine January to March 2019  

Ceramics magazine looking at the work of new makers starting out and those who study ceramics as an interest.

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