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Caribbean Creatives The Barbados Creative Economy The Barbados Creative Economy

Spotlight on Rihanna

The Awon-Akyem Connection

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Profiling Creative Entrepreneurs

Caribbean Export - Design Caribbean

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PAGE 20 EPA and Barbados Cultural Economy PAGE 22

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Issue 1 Volume 2: January - March 2011 Available online www.creativeindustriesexchange.com www.shridathramphalcentre.org


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Contents Production Team

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What is the Creative Industry Exchange? CIE is an outreach project of the Shridath Ramphal Centre for International Trade Law which was initially funded by the UNESCO, Kingston office. The CIE is a web portal that provides a regional mechanism for the collection, collation, analysis and dissemination of data and information on the cultural/ creative industries.

Editorial

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The Barbados Creative Economy

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Spotlight on Rihanna !

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The Awon-Akyem Connection

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Profiling Creative Entrepreneurs

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Creative Industries Start Ups

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Copyright & Music

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Barbados Museum & Historical Society

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Persaud’s Portrait

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Caribbean Export - Design Caribbean

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The EPA and Barbados‘ Cultural Economy

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Barbados Festivals and Cultural Directory

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Dr. Keith Nurse - Director Jessica Jones - Research Consultant Alicia Nicholls - Research Consultant Stephanie Alleyne - Communications Consultant Shridath Ramphal Centre for International Trade Law Policy & Services CARICOM Research Building University of the West Indies Cave Hill Campus St Michael, BARBADOS, BB11000 246.417.4805/246.471.4553 Email: src@cavehill.uwi.edu Website: www.shridathramphalcentre.org

On the cover: The Sins of Daniel (1995) Ras Akyem Oil on Canvas Mervyn Awon Collection

Editorial This second issue of Caribbean Creatives, sponsored by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) and the Caribbean Export Development Agency (CEDA), puts the spotlight on the creative economy in Barbados. Barbados is the first country profile to be done by Caribbean Creatives. The main objective is to capture some of the contemporary and salient features of the Barbadian creative economy and entrepreneurship.

What are the aims and objectives of CIE?

Undoubtedly, such an endeavour cannot but examine the Rihanna phenomenon. Professor Mike Alleyne, a son of the soil, kick-starts this issue with a searching and well-elaborated analysis of the impact of Rihanna on the music industry in Barbados and by extension the whole region. This is followed up with an assessment of Rihanna’s global impact “in numbers” by Nurse and Nicholls.

The principal objective of the CIE is to document the economic impact and contribution of the cultural/creative industries to the Caribbean.

Dr. Yanique Hume, through a critical assessment of the relationship between collector Mervyn Awon and artist Ras Akyem Ramsay, unmasks the art and business of patronage in the visual arts. The following section offers profiles on creative entrepreneurs and ends with a synopsis of creative start-ups that have been shepherded by the Barbados Business Enterprise Corporation.

The CIE aims to facilitate a stronger national and regional framework for the strategic management of the cultural/ creative industries.

The spotlight then shifts to institutions in the Barbados cultural economy. The first is COSCAP, which is a rights-administration agency for the music industry, next is the Barbados Museum and Historical Society which is one of the longest running institutions on the island, and whose contribution continues to expand.

The CIE aims to enhance the image and profile of the Caribbean cultural/creative industries sector in the regional and international context.

The magazine then looks at visual artist Ingrid Persaud whose work spans multiple media. The importance of aesthetics and design is further amplified by the feature on the strategic shift by the Caribbean Export Development Agency to rebrand and upgrade the Craft and Gift Fair to that of “Design Caribbean”. This piece is followed by an excerpt from a manual published by the Ministry of Trade and Foreign Affairs on how Barbadian firms could gain market access under the Economic Partnership Agreement between CARIFORUM and the EU. Caribbean Creatives concludes with an analysis of the festival economy in Barbados and offers a listing of the key festivals and cultural and trade-related institutions. We thank all the contributors, institutions and sponsors that gave graciously to this issue. Keith Nurse, Ph.D Co-ordinator, Creative Industries Exchange Director, Shridath Ramphal Centre for International Trade Law, Policy and Services

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Barbados’ Creative Economy in Perspective Keith Nurse The Caribbean region, for decades, has produced many globally recognizable artists and cultural events that have generated global reach beyond what the region’s size would suggest. Barbados is no exception. The recent and sustained success of global pop icon, Rihanna, is testimony to this. However, the issue at hand is how does this success translate into economic realities for the wider economy and the population of Barbados. The cultural or creative industries have emerged to be a key growth sector in the Caribbean economy through its contribution to the GDP, exports, employment and intellectual property earnings. In Barbados, on account of the wide array of festivals (e.g. Crop Over) and cultural events, the cultural sector has a significant spillover effect on the wider economy; especially on tourism arrivals and destination branding, as well as a major impact on the media, retail, food and beverage, ground transport, hotel and airline sectors. Barbados, like most Caribbean countries, has a significant deficit in the trade of cultural goods. As Figure 1 illustrates, exports of creative goods are at best one-third of imports based on data for 2008, which is the most recent year of data. Imports have fluctuated in the period 2005 to 2008 with a peak in 2005 at US$94 million. What this means is that Barbados imports more CD, DVDs, books, magazines and paintings than it exports.

Figure 1: Creative Goods Exports & Imports Barbados 2005 - 2008 ($M)

Figure 2: Caribbean Creative Goods Imports & Exports 2006 ($M)

This should be of no surprise to anyone familiar with the sector and its declining capabilities in the artisanal and manufacturing arena. It is also well recognized that the collection of data on goods exports tends to be weak and consequently does not accurately reflect total exports for the sector. The scenario for Barbados is not unlike that of other Caribbean countries with the exception of Dominican Republic as exemplified in Figure 2.

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Trade in creative services is an area where Barbados has fairly strong capabilities and generates some foreign exchange earnings. Services trade is manifested in different modes. Table 1 outlines the various modes of services supply as it would apply to the creative sector. Mode I is cross-border supply which refers to services that is transmitted via some form of telecommunications, such as sound engineering (a soundtrack) or architectural services (e.g. blueprints) that are sent to a client for example, via email. Consumption abroad (Mode II) is where consumers from one country travel to use services in another country. This involves tourism related activities such as cultural, heritage and festival tourism, where Barbados has some export capabilities given the importance of the tourism sector to the Barbados economy. Mode III refers to a firm establishing commercial presence in another country to provide a service, for example, setting up a radio station or a booking agency. This is an area of weak capabilities in spite of the importance of the diasporic markets. The last Mode (IV) speaks to the movement of natural persons, for example, a visual artist or a music band on tour. This is the area where a large share of the services exports are earned. Table 1: Modes of Supply in Trade in Creative Services Mode I: Cross-border supply Mode II: Consumption abroad Mode III: Commercial presence Mode IV: Movement of natural persons

Supply of services from one country to another, for example, sound engineering services or architectural services transmitted via telecommunications. Consumers from one country using services in another country, for example, cultural, festival and heritage tourism. A company from one country establishes a subsidiary or branch to provide services in another country, for example, setting up a booking agency. Individuals travelling from their own country to offer services in another, for example, an artist or band on tour.

Data on trade in creative services is very weak and largely absent. In most territories trade data (extended balance of payments in services) does not capture this information. In addition, because industry associations do not adequately represent the sector it is very difficult to get an appreciation of the volume or value of trade in creative services emanating from the region. The only area for which there is any reliable data is in Mode II activities (consumption abroad) such as cultural, festival and heritage tourism. The other key area in the creative sector in Barbados for which there is some published information is copyright administration. In this regard the role of the Copyright Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers Incorporated (COSCAP) has been critical in generating positive earnings in terms of royalty income for Barbadian authors and composers and also in terms of deepening the institutional structure of the sector. As the global cultural economy shifts increasingly to the digital arena so will the role of COSCAP and other institutions in the business of intellectual property exploitation. All told, it can be argued that the creative sector makes an important contribution to the economy of Barbados and ranks in the top export earning sectors. The creative or cultural industry sector of Barbados has experienced some expansion in industrial and export capabilities in the last few decades with the growth of the festivals sector and the deepening of the music and audiovisual industries, in particular. In addition, shifts in the structure and operation of the global economy; for example, the negotiated market access in the Economic Partnership Agreement, presents new opportunities for expansion and diversification of the Barbados economy. The projections are that the sector can grow multi-fold over the next decade once the required investments and business support mechanisms are put in place. Going forward it is important to note that the business environment for the creative industry sector has suffered from a lack of investment capital, managerial talent, business support and a weak institutional framework in terms of industrial, trade and intellectual property policies. Low levels of media access, high levels of copyright infringement (e.g. piracy), and weak distribution channels plague the growth of the sector. In this regard, the role of the Barbados Business Enterprise Corporation in funding new startup companies in the creative sector is a welcome addition to the policy landscape

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Spotlight on Rihanna Rihanna and the Barbados Music Industry Mike Alleyne Professor, Department of Recording Industry Middle Tennessee State University

“Barbados is now seen as an active site for sourcing globally marketable artists in the Urban R&B mold.” Patricia Meschino, “Replicating Rihanna”, Billboard, December 2009

“When Rihanna makes music that fits the appeal of hip-hop, we play it.” Monica Herrera, “The Happiness Project”, Billboard, October 2010

In a 2009 Billboard magazine article, prophetically titled “Replicating Rihanna”, Patricia Meschino states that Barbados is now seen as an active site for sourcing globally marketable artists in the Urban R&B mold. Recent major label signings have demonstrated that the ‘localized global’ model is likely to persist. Within the past few years, Sturken/Rogers Productions (SRP) has also signed Hal Linton, Shontelle, and Vita Chambers to develop the acts in conjunction with Universal/ Motown which is releasing the music from these Barbadian artists. Even performers not associated with SRP - such as Livvi Franc signed to Jive/Sony and also Capitol Records signing Jaicko/J-Co - fit a template which may honestly reflect the artist’s musical influences but which also effectively distances them from the Caribbean, dislocating any relevant Barbadian creative contexts. All of these major label signings have in fact had to physically relocate to further their careers, and their geographical repositioning is distinctly culturally metaphoric. The sound of cultural neutrality has become the global music business norm for the newlyemergent artists in question, and this should be a stark warning to all concerned with issues of identity and representation, and the frameworks within which international recording industry commerce occurs. The same historical moment within which little-known artists from Barbados have been catapulted into the major label spotlight also contains the threat of an ominous digital cloning whereby replication negates innovation. In the realm of current commercial reality, Rihanna’s own prodigious sales peak of 2.6 million copies for her third album Good Girl Gone Bad (2007) is itself unlikely to be replicated by any reggae or soca release in the near future. Operating under the umbrella of the world’s largest record company, Universal, Rihanna spoke of her artistic reinvention and growth on her late 2010 release, Loud during her Billboard interview with Monica Herrera. However, the development to which she refers is difficult to locate within the sound of the record which takes much of its duplicative shape from international pop production and songwriting teams whose work often makes artists anonymously interchangeable. The record returns Rihanna to a sonic comfort zone - a sphere of commercial safety - with which her audience can more easily identify, as opposed to the more idiosyncratic Rated R album of 2009 which sold 998,000 copies, but which was also her lowest selling record since her gold debut release. As a representative of New York radio station Hot 97 tellingly asserted, “When Rihanna makes music that fits the appeal of hip-hop, we play it”.

Photo Courtesy Marie Claire Magazine 2010

Volume 2 January - March 2011

Finally, from an industry developmental perspective it needs to be recognized that Barbados has so far actually gained little direct economic benefit from the profile and sales of its major label artists. Whereas Rupee’s 1 On 1 album featured local musicians, producers, and studio facilities, there appears to have been little local creative participation on the other recent international releases from Barbadian artists which could fuel the industry economy, globalizing the local in a manner which is empowering rather than limiting. Rihanna’s success has to be seen as the opening of a gateway to many different commercial and creative paths, rather than an entrance to a single economic route which consolidates long-held major label hegemonic power in an era of potential digital diversity and multimedia opportunity. www.creativeindustriesexchange.com

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Rihanna in Numbers While Rihanna’s success in numbers is impressive, one cannot forget her... Keith Nurse & Alicia Nicholls Rihanna’s journey from ordinary Barbadian school-girl to one of the most recognized faces on the planet has been truly impressive. In this article we attempt to chronicle her success in numbers. Rihanna is the most successful Barbadian performing artiste to date. Second only to Bob Marley, Rihanna is the top selling Caribbean recording artiste of all time. As of October 1, 2010, Rihanna has sold more than 25 million albums and 45 million singles worldwide. Her musical resumé includes five studio albums: Music of the Sun (2005), A Girl Like Me (2006), Good Girl Gone Bad (2007), Rated R (2009) and Loud (2010). Her latest album, Loud, sold 206,018 units in the first week alone, topping Rated R, which had topped 181,000 in its first week. Rihanna has not only achieved twenty-one entries on Billboard’s Mainstream Top 40 chart to date, but with seven number-ones to her name, she has recently made history by becoming the artiste with the most number-ones in the entire eighteen year history of that chart, beating out the likes of Beyoncé, Mariah Carey and Lady Gaga. Her discography also includes five studio albums, one video album, three compilation albums, thirty-four singles and twenty-five music videos. Rihanna has made television appearances on numerous highly-rated shows which include the likes of Good Morning America, the X Factor and Jimmy Kimmel Live. She has also been featured on the cover of over thirty top lifestyle, fashion and music magazines across the world, most notably Billboard (US Edition) in October 2010 and Vogue (Italy Edition) in September 2009. Rihanna has performed at music awards all over the world, copping a total of 94 awards and receiving 185 nominations to date. Her most recent performances and awards were at the Grammy Awards and the BRIT Awards where she received her fourth Grammy (Best Dance Recording with her song Only Girl (In the World)) and her first BRIT Award (Best International Female Artist). Rihanna’s success is not limited to music. This is exemplified by the release of a self-titled book in 2010, a cameo appearance in the movie Bring It On: All or Nothing and a role in the movie Battleship which will be released in 2012. In 2011 Rihanna launched her first fragrance Reb’l Fleur and announced in late 2010 that she would soon launch her own entertainment company, Rihanna Entertainment. Rihanna’s appeal has landed her lucrative endorsement deals with a slew of internationally renowned brands, including Secret Body Spray (2005), Nike, JC Penny and Clinique (2006), Cover Girl (2007), Totes (2007) and Gucci (2008). In 2010 she appeared in a television ad for Optus in Australia. Rihanna’s star power has also not gone unnoticed in her home country of Barbados. In 2007 she signed on to do a marketing campaign with the Barbados Tourism Authority. A segment of this campaign was a television commercial based on a sample from the music video of her reggae-inspired hit song “If it is loving that you want”. In honour of her success, Rihanna was also made an Honorary Cultural Ambassador of Barbados by the Government of Barbados in 2008. While Rihanna’s success in numbers is impressive, one cannot forget her charity work. In 2006, Rihanna founded the Believe Foundation, a donor-funded charity, which assists terminally ill children. She also launched a series of free charity concerts two years later called “A Girls Night Out” to benefit Believe

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Photo Courtesy Warner Brothers 2011 Rihanna in Numbers Studio Albums :

5

Singles :"

34

Music Videos :

25

Compilation Albums :

3

Video Albums :

1

Albums sold :

25 million (as of Oct 2010)

Singles sold :

45 million (as of Oct 2010)

Awards :

94

Nominations :"

185

Grammy Awards :

4

Grammy Nominations :

15

Billboard Top 40 Entries

21

Billboard Top 40 No 1:

7

Endorsement Deals :

7

Magazine Covers : Movie Appearances:

Over 30 worldwide 1 (and 1 upcoming in 2012)

Fragrances:

1

Charities:

1 Sources: www.wikipedia.com www.whosdatedwho.com www.believefoundation.com www.billboard.biz

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Patronage in a Caribbean Context The Awon and Akyem Connection Yanique Hume, PhD Lecturer in Culture Studies University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus When we speak about art patronage within a Caribbean context, to what exactly are we referring? Is the assumption that our governments are the principal agents charged with providing public subsidies to further the development and support of the arts? Or should individual collectors inadvertently assume the role of patron in the absence of formalized infrastructural frameworks and institutions? Indeed, the answers to these queries are quite complex and far from uniform when we take into consideration the diverging colonial histories, structures of power, as well as the socio-political and economic landscapes that have developed in the region before and after independence. Keeping in mind this central problematique, what might an exploration of the relationship between collector Mervyn Awon and artist, Ras Akyem Ramsay reveal about the intricacies and meanings of “assistance” and support of the arts? To what degree did Awon’s intervention impact Akyem’s visual production, career and the visual arts tradition of Barbados? While not being able to fully address the questions posed in the space delimited here, what follows is an exploration of some of the definitive moments and opportunities that served to seal a friendship and animate the symbiotic reciprocity that undergirds the relationship between an artist and a collector.

The Seeing Eye: The Intersections of Collecting and Supporting Driven primarily by his keen appreciation and love for the arts, Awon an architect by profession, would attest that collecting paintings and sculptors presented him an opportunity to further elaborate on his childhood passion of collecting. While his pursuits of amassing works of art has more aesthetic value or potential socio-economic impact then his beloved marbles, stamps and coins, Awon would argue that at no time was the act of collecting envisaged as a means to procure future financial gains. Instead, his passions were driven by the sheer pleasure, enjoyment and satisfaction he garnered from identifying pieces of great aesthetic merit. It is Awon’s ‘eye’ and ardent search of the ‘right’ piece that led him to that fateful meeting of both Ras Akyem and fellow painter and brethren, Ras Ishi in 1992. Although they all knew of each other, it was renowned Guyanese painter, Stanley Greaves who initiated the initial contact that would in turn change the course of each of their lives. Akyem recalls his first meeting with Awon as being one of great significance. It was three years after the notorious 1989 VEXX exhibition, which catapulted both Akyem and Ishi into the public eye as social provocateurs. Although the exhibition attracted record numbers, it received ambivalent reviews in the press. Continued on next page

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In order to assist with financing their studies as The revolutionary ethos of the exhibition and well as to affirm and validate their work as the physical presence of Akyem and Ishi had artists, Awon organised two solo exhibitions challenged the social mores of polite society. and secured potential buyers for their work. It Akyem’s visual explorations of the Caribbean was the first time in their careers that the two mindscape and social condition of the displaced “renegade” artists exhibited separately. Akyem’s diasporic African - which is represented exhibition, “Art Animal: Retentions and through his use of primal marks, depictions of Redemptions” opened to critical praise at the amputated and disfigured limbs, and bold Barbados Museum. Although well attended, orchestration of colours and textures - audiences still had difficulty relating to his transgressed the sanctity of the romantic graphic iconography and arresting raw visual picturesque landscapes that had come to define language. the visual arts of the ‘tropics’. The overt message of VEXX regarding the ostracization of In his two-year sojourn in Cuba Akyem’s Rastas and the disregard for the visual arts in unique stylistic disposition was meticulously Barbadian society did not translate into any honed and perfected. However, perhaps the noticeable shift in public perception. most noted change happened off the canvas, for being in Cuba provided a moment for Akyem Even though they had subsequent shows, both to experience living in a country that not only artists had fallen out of favour with certain supported and admired artists, but also circles and the struggle for visibility and a validated their presence as critical to the social consistent economic base from which to pursue fabric of any society. their art would remain a constant battle. Discouraged by the isolation and lack of sales from his painting and desperate to make a living, Akyem turned to ceramics in an attempt to sell his work in the tourist market. It was at this critical juncture that Mervyn Awon entered his life and for the next decade would lend his support through providing professional advice, moral support, monetary assistance, art supplies, in addition to collecting and promoting his paintings and facilitating the further development of Akyem’s craft and international exposure.

Art Animal (1994) Oil on Canvas 72" x 52" Mervyn Awon Collection

One of the more noted acts of generosity and support, which underscores Awon’s role as facilitator, if not enabler, was when he secured a two-year (1995-1997) artistic residency for both Ras Akyem and Ras Ishi at the prestigious Instituto Superior de Arte (ISA) in Cuba. Having exhibited their work to great acclaim at the 1992 and 1994 Santo Domingo Biennial, Awon believed they had developed enough of an international reputation and collection to have their own show. 8

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Simultaneously, Awon began to develop a reputation as being a renowned collector and arbiter of taste, thus validating his own passions and opening up markets that were hither fore closed to him. Unfortunately, 1996 encapsulated both the peak and eventual demise of such a successful collaborative showing of Barbadian artists on an international scale.

Migration (1996) Oil on Canvas 48" x 52" Private Collection

What can we glean from this rather abridged account of Awon’s role as supporter of the arts? At one level, patronage in this context cannot be removed from Awon’s sense of moral duty. In his words Awon states, “I am not a patron of the arts, I am a collector…what I do is help and I help those who I feel need it most.” However, this help can only go so far to sustain the growth and development of the arts on a wider Ras Akyem-I Ramsay in his studio. national level. The integrated creative and Recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award in entrepreneurial approach to funding from the Visual Arts, 2010 private individuals has to be mirrored in some way by the public sector in order to attain any Akyem’s artistic production in Cuba served him sustained impact on the region’s visual arts well when in 1996, Awon, for the third landscape. consecutive time selected paintings by Akyem and Ishi in addition to works of art by several One of the critical consequences of Awon’s other Barbadian artists (e.g. (Arthur Atkinson, intervention was his ability to identify Akyem’s Alison Chapman-Andrews, Annalee Davis, raw talent and the subtext of his work beyond Nick Whittle and Santley Greaves) to be judged its aesthetic value to its broader existential at the Santo Domingo Biennial. By this time, concerns. This acknowledgement also allowed Awon had developed not only a keen eye for Awon to be recognised internationally. Each in a selecting winning pieces (both Ras Ishi and way thus affirmed the other. The mutuality of Stanley Greaves took home gold in 1992 and their existence benefited Awon and his passion 1994), but also masterfully understood the rules for collection but also contributed to the of engagement involved in selecting works for development of an internationally renowned international biennials. In 1996 the submission visual artist. The question remains, in the entry in its entirety won a gold for Barbados absence of an integrated patronage system that and Ishi and Akyem both won individual gold recognises and supports the arts, how do medals. upcoming Caribbean-based artists attain and Following on the heels of this success Awon received further invitations to submit work in other international biennials of global repute, including Sao Paulo and Cuenca. Through his personal investments in selecting works of art, innovating a system to stretch and transport large canvases and financing the submission of works of art, Awon single-handedly made an indelible mark in introducing Barbadian and Caribbean art to a larger international audience. www.creativeindustriesexchange.com

sustain visibility and economic independence at home and abroad?

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Profiling Creative Industry Entrepreneurs

Five Key Questions with a Creative Industry Entrepreneur In this section we profile four creative industry entrepreneurs. In the first segment, Alison Saunders of Blue Waters Productions, discusses the progress and future of the Barbadian creative economy. Five (5) key questions were asked to document her experiences and observations of this sector in Barbados. Next, we highlight Teneille Doyle and her agency Made in March, music consultant, Phil Phillips, and music entrepreneur Santia Bradshaw.

has to be modified since the current financial and market realities would make it difficult to achieve profitability.

What innovations have your company brought to the industry in recent years? Blue Waters Productions pioneered the regional theatrical distribution of a Barbadian feature length film through the production Hit for Six! This film also was innovative in the partnerships created between the creative talent and business in Barbados and the involvement in one venture of equity partners from the private and public sectors as well as the Barbadian diaspora. Volume 2 January - March 2011

Alison Saunders Blue Waters Productions The film project also allowed some equity contributions in kind such as equipment but took a commercial approach of paying most of the cast, crew and other suppliers cash at near market rates, thereby making a significant contribution to the Barbadian and indeed Caribbean economy. This business model however, www.creativeindustriesexchange.com

Hit for Six! However brought to Barbados a true Caribbean production with high professional standards of operation and with guidance from first world practitioners in areas such as script development, production design, continuity and editing. The director was mentored by internationally acclaimed filmmaker Moussa Sene Absa. During the shoot it was amazing to hear Barbadian, Trinidadian, Jamaican, Dominican, UK American and African voices on the set. The film also allowed production in two Caribbean countries - moving cast and crew from Barbados to Trinidad for several days of shooting, which may not have been attempted before. Continued on next page

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Hit for Six! Was also the first Barbadian feature to be shot in HD using a high end Sony Camera supplied by Merville Lynch Productions (who is a partner) and transferred to film (at great cost in New York at Duart). Many persons said that the film did not look like a “local” production which was a back handed compliment to the unprecedented high production values We also conducted audience research on our film which may have been a first.We were selected for many festivals internationally where no Barbadian films had gone before and won some awards and were screened at the American Film Institute Silver Theatre, just outside of DC…definitely a first for Barbados! Given the transformations in the global industry, (e.g - technological changes, global economic recession) where do you see your business going in the next 2-3 years? We have two projects – one a documentary in production and another a narrative feature film in development. We are exploring viable models for production. We have also signed with CaribbeanTales Worldwide Distribution for the distribution of Hit for Six! and look forward to breaking other barriers as a result. We have made many industry contacts and relationships globally through the experience of producing and distributing Hit for Six! A key focus is on finding markets before production begins. Even

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with our documentary that work is being done with the help of a consultant. We would not transfer to film again unless some major entity chose to pay for it since it is too expensive and cinemas are changing to digital. How was your company financed in the initial stages and what are your key sources of income now? I invested heavily in my film company and specifically the feature film Hit for Six! we were also financed through equity, loans, sponsorship/placement and two small grants. We must also thank the Barbados Investment and Development Corporation who assisted with the marketing of Hit for Six! locally, regionally and internationally. It is a long road and the true benefits of efforts on our first film will hopefully accrue on other projects, and not just our own but for other producers. We recently got another grant from Caribbean Export for development of the documentary project. We have a financing plan and we are working with a consultant on accessing other funding. In terms of earning revenue, Blue Waters Productions currently do corporate and public education video projects and we offering our services as fixers as well for international productions. Hit for Six! is being distributed on DVD by VP Records and ourselves and recently to educational institutions, Television and via the internet by CaribbeanTales Worldwide Distribution.

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What are the key lessons that you have learnt from working in the industry that new entrants should know? For my first effort I don’t think I would have done it if I followed the advice I now give. However, we must find business models that meet our reality in terms of markets and distribution. Some filmmakers are finding some success with cooperative models where persons are not paid or paid minimally and equipment is donated etc. People in the sector have different objectives, but filmmakers with a commercial focus must seek out markets and distribution first. We did a business plan and sought distribution before production, but our first distributor who was in India had a fire and went out of business! Know who your audience is for your script. Seek international partners in production and financing as well as distribution. Make sure you have a great script! The road is long and hard but don’t give up! If the creative sector in your country was granted US $10 million, over a 3-5 year period, what should be done with it? • Set up a production fund and support distribution efforts by enticing international partners with the funds to really push our products. • Support practical training in specific areas like sound, production design and directing. • Research markets for our products.

Blue Waters Productions Inc focuses on producing film and video and is a subsidiary of SFA Communications Inc, one of the Caribbean’s leading public relations and public education firms. The company has a strong track record of producing quality video and audio productions over the decade of its existence. Blue Waters has produced narrative drama, documentaries, short corporate features and public service announcements for television. The company has also developed the strong event management and co-ordination skills essential to film production having worked closely with major sporting and entertainment events such as the ICC Cricket World Cup 2007 and the Barbados Jazz Festival. Contact: Blue Waters Productions Inc Suite #4, Wildey Plaza Wildey, St Michael Barbados Tel: (246) 437-5588 info@sfacommunications.com

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Marching to the Beat of her own Drum Made in March (MiM) is a management and branding agency and record production label focused on the development, support and elevation of unique musical talents within the Caribbean. MiM’s goals are to enable export to world markets and therefore open new and major revenue streams for the Caribbean economy. MiM wishes to achieve this by developing a strong global infrastructure, enabling MiM’s clients and music and entertainment signings to be presented with exciting, groundbreaking and expansive opportunities for marketing and distribution in a large number of territories. MiM already has existing relationships within the corporate private and public sector and with producers, writers, video production crews, studio owners, graphic artists, publishers, distributors and agencies within the Caribbean market and internationally. MiM is currently setting up for the release of artist projects from Barbados, St. Lucia, Trinidad and Antigua. Their marketing and promotional strategy includes a reality TV show, promotional tour, and brand alliances in various business sectors. Some companies supporting these releases include Noise Inc., Madison Strategic Integration, Phrequency Studios, Innovative Media and MyVp.com. A very important unique selling point for MIM is their concentration on the promotion of multi genre artists from within the Caribbean region. The overarching goal is to become the premier Caribbean music label, with international scope and appeal. Key objectives and areas of focus for 2011 are: • Signing key joint ventures and added value partnerships enhancing and enabling global marketing, sales and live performance strategies in multiple markets • Setting up a digital music distribution infrastructure for the Caribbean music community

Teneille Doyle Made in March

• Where relevant, attach a major distribution company/record label to support individual projects • Innovate by integrating with key digital technologies and new platforms MiM was founded in 2007 by Teneille Doyle and her artist client Hal Linton in a partnership where Teneille brings a wealth of knowledge and experience in the management of a major recording artist and new marketing strategies. Hal Linton is a singer/ songwriter/producer currently signed to Universal Motown and complements MiM on the music and creative side. For more information visit www.madeinmarchrecords.com and www.madeinmarch.com.

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A Paradigm Shift Towards Entrepreneurship for Barbados’ Music Industry Jessica Jones To build Barbados’ music industry, Phil Phillips advocates a paradigm shift towards entrepreneurship, which he sees as a prerequisite for the necessary investment. He encourages artists not to wait to be discovered, rather to be entrepreneurs, working with venture capitalist or funding agencies willing to assist in building a brand. Agencies such as InvestBarbados, which are there to help transform and develop the artist’s talent, are important. The missing link, however, is entrepreneurs: to present business plans to such agencies for funding and support. The rationale is compelling. With foreign label signings, profits are directed outside of the local industry. Further, shrinking label budgets are not only putting more pressure on artists to be immediately successful, but also making it increasingly difficult for artists to find sponsors willing to work with the reduced budgets on offer. Now, more than ever, it is necessary to build a culture of entrepreneurship, rather than think that we can shape talent for someone else to sign. The Association of Music Entrepreneurs (AME) in Barbados, for which he is Music Consultant, was developed with this paradigm shift in mind; to encourage music entrepreneurs to build the export capacity of the music sector. AME is also represented at the Caribbean Music Industry Networking Organization (CaMINO), ensuring that knowledge gained can be shared with counterparts across the region Beyond Carnival The abundance of carnivals and festivals in the region have inadvertently comprised and diluted our global focus. Packaging local music as seasonal music generally shortens the shelf-life. Locally, around Crop Over, there is a tremendous amount of new music available for consumption, which means that an artist can spend a long time in the studio. However, touring is when the majority of revenue is made, and new audiences and markets cultivated. A plethora of songs and a short-term product provide an unsustainable circuit for career growth. If we are going to create a sustainable industry, it will be important to maintain existing audiences, but play to a broader market. Expanding markets

Phil Phillips Music Consultant

For Phil, the recession is probably the best thing that could have happened to Barbados’ music industry, as necessity will prompt invention. If the current market continues to shrink, the diaspora will not be the comfort zone which it has been for so long. Wider markets exist, and in light of the recession, artists need to strategically expand their vision and explore markets beyond the USA, into Europe, Asia, Africa and Latin America (which is right next door). Europe, in particular, could be a better market fit for our artists as they embrace a broader spectrum of music genres. It is a major advantage that a visa is not required for Barbadian short-stay travellers to several European countries. Barbadian music entrepreneurs need to capitalise on the opportunities which Europe offers, including the market and any funding available through the European Development Fund. Phil Phillips is the Managing Director of e-Vision Concepts. He is a highly a highly experienced Marketing and Visioning Entrepreneur. Phil is Music Consultant to the Board of the Association of Music Entrepreneurs (Barbados), and a member of the Ernst & Young World Entrepreneurs Hall of Fame.

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Santia Bradshaw Profile of a Music Entrepreneur Jessica Jones Santia is an accomplished entrepreneur. As a lawyer, with a passion for entertainment law, Santia saw the growing need for a more structured approach to the music industry. Thus was started, Pyramid Entertainment Management Inc., an artist representation and booking agency, which provides established and newer artistes, from a variety of musical genres, with a range of services to increase their earning potential and exposure in established and non-traditional music markets. The company, of which she is the CEO, currently represents some of the leading entertainers in Barbados and the region. A firm believer in continually honing her skills, Santia has developed a practical knowledge of the cultural industries throughout the region and participated in several regional and international music conferences. She has provided consultancy advice on building a strategic plan for the export of the cultural industries and in the spirit of entrepreneurship is the Vice President of the Association of Music Entrepreneurs. For Santia, music drives the Crop Over festival. In addition to the direct impact of income generated by shows, there is also the indirect influence of the artist’s representation of their country. The export potential of the music sector can have a tremendous impact on the creative economy of Barbados and the wider Caribbean. This would ensure that more music related revenue remains in Barbados and the region, to build the infrastructure available for artists. In addition to continuing to build the capacity of their artists, what then does Santia think that the future holds for Pyramid Entertainment and the local and regional music sector in general?

Santia Bradshaw Music Entrepreneur These are but a few items on the list: • Continue to represent the biggest names • Continue to be on the look-out for new talent Phil Phillips Music Consultant

• Enhance presentation of artist product • Create a new fee structure, for artists to earn more • Change the attitudes of people to appreciate that there is an income to be generated from the Creative Industries. • Improve attitudes towards investing in culture • Embrace and become a driving force for the technological changes sweeping the industry • Take more control over product and service • Continue to collaborate with others Above all, Santia wants to be able to help shape policy thereby enhancing the very structure of the local music industry Santia Bradshaw is CEO of Pyramid Entertainment Management Inc, and Vice President of the Association of Musical Entrepreneurs.

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Going Global with CaribbeanTales Founded by acclaimed filmmaker FrancesAnne Solomon, CaribbeanTales Worldwide Distribution (CTWD) is the first-of-its-kind film distribution company in the Englishspeaking Caribbean. Positioned to become the go-to solution for Caribbean-filmed products, it already boasts a distribution catalogue of over 60 films and television series by Caribbean, European, British, Canadian and American p ro d u c e r s . Launched internationally in 2010 at the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), and regionally in Barbados, CTWD also offers market-driven activities and events, including an annual film festival in Barbados, a market development program during TIFF, and coproduction services. CTWD is a member of the Barbados Business Enterprise Corporation that provides seed and venture capital services.

Under the theme “Going Global”, the CaribbeanTales 2011 all-day Symposium event scheduled to take place on March 17th at the Island Inn. Featured speakers include Mia Mottley, MP, QC and former leader of the Opposition in Barbados, and Derwin Howell, CEO of the Barbados National Bank, as well as international visitors like Sonia Heinen, Director of the World Cinema Fund and CoProduction Market of the Berlinale Film Festival, Michelle Materre, US Marketing and Distribution Consultant, and Mark Walton EVP of the Africa Channel in the US. New York - June 2011 CaribbeanTales Worldwide Distribution   will be hosting a very special one day event and screening of CTWD films in New York City on June 11, 2011 as part of the Caribbean Tourism Organization Week in New York.  

Toronto - September 2010 In September 2010, CTWD held its first Market Development Program, which brought together 40 industry stakeholders from the English-speaking Caribbean, UK, Canada, USA and Africa to develop longterm, international industry partnerships and to create business opportunities for their products. Participating tutors shared knowledge on financing, distribution, coproducing and production, through participatory workshops and pitching sessions aimed to make participants’ projects market-ready. The program supported content creators in their efforts to raise financing, find matching funds, and connect with appropriate buyers through the facilitation of networking sessions and participation at the Toronto International Film Festival - the largest film market in North America. Bridgetown - March 2011 The Caribbean Tales Film Festival 2011 at Island Inn, Barbados runs from March 14- 20, 2011. The festival will include an Incubator Program for Caribbean audio-visual content development starting on March 14, a Symposium, Marketplace and Workshops as well as Screenings of films from the Caribbean and its diaspora.

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Our proposed program is (subject to revision): Brunch (NYC VIPS), Screening Block 1, Panel Discussion (Industry), Wine and Cheese and Screening Block 2. The proposed venue is at the New School in New York City. We   are looking to bring   an audience of the   Caribbean public and supporters in the Tri-State area of New York;   as well as Mainstream Media attention to the company and films screened. Since we are ultimately a distribution company, we're also targetting the New York film community of buyers and distributors for Broadcast the NY film and arts community, and all other media in the city. We're also hoping for some help to bring on board a couple of catering/drink sponsors for the brunch and wine and cheese. Toronto - September 2011 CaribbeanTales will be going to Harbourfront, Toronto. See you there! CaribbeanTales Worldwide Distribution the region's first full-service film distribution company, is founded by award-winning filmmaker Frances-Anne Solomon. CTWD is a member of the Barbados Business Enterprise Corporation that provides Seed and Venture Capital Services.

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Investing in the Creative Sector: BBEC Funded Start-ups Basil Springer GCM PhD, Project Manager, Barbados Business Enterprise Corporation

In the next ten years the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in Barbados has the potential to grow in three areas: (1) existing businesses (large, medium and small) in the tourism, financial services, agricultural and manufacturing sectors; (2) start-up businesses in the creative (film, music, art, culinary art, fashion), renewable energy, Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), business development services, education, health & wellness and construction industries; and (3) international businesses which locate their Global Headquarters in Barbados.

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(5) First established in 2009, Studio Caribe TV Inc. (SCTV) is an independent production and multiplatform media company at the cutting edge of the future of television and film - online. An International Business Company based in Barbados, SCTV, produces, acquires and distributes content via its hub. (6) Went Caribbean Inc.   offers a diverse selection of goods and services as a healthy, island lifestyle support system. The company produces WentWorx, an aromatic blend of natural herbs and spices that are free from MSG, sugar, salt, preservatives or food additives.

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Over the last year, a 25 year old vision of Venture Capital as the preferred instrument to fund start-up enterprises has begun to take traction through the Barbados Entrepreneurs’ Venture Capital Fund. This vision now manifests itself as the CBET Shepherding Model™.

(7) Eezee Kricket Inc. produces the innovative, challenging, international award winning cricket trivia board game EeZee Kricket. The game is designed for the global market and can be customized for any country simply by changing the questions. It has been patented in the UK, South Africa, India, ! Australia and the USA.

Every country in the world is interested in models or strategies for economic growth. The CBET Shepherding Model™ consists of three components: (1) “DNA of an Elephant” enterprises to increase the marketing foot print of a country by exploiting the global market; (2) Shepherding as a means of mitigating the risk of business failure; and (3) a Quick response venture capital fund, in a symbionic relationship with a Quick response revolving and growth seed capital fund. The Model is promoted as a necessary and sufficient condition for sustainable business success.

(8) CaribbeanTales Worldwide Distrbution Inc.(CTWD) is a worldwide film and television distribution company specialising in Caribbean-themed content. The company facilitates independent film producers and acquires, promotes, sells and delivers Caribbeanthemed content to international buyers in sectors such as the educational (non-theatric) sector and the international television sales sector.

The profiles of the first ten Bimventures companies in the Barbados pilot project are as follows: (1) Movementunes Inc. offers socially positive content from world class artistes for download on its website. The website features a variety of artistes with diverse musical styles such as reggae, jazz, hip-hop, spoken word poetry, soul music, world music and more. (2) Manipura Inc. provides a unique Caribbean experience through imagery and discussion on Caribbean society. The company manages two artistic brands - Annalee Davis, a contemporary body of work that looks at universal issues through a Caribbean lens and Manipura, a commercial line that celebrates the beauty of the Caribbean. The range of products offered includes paintings, limited edition prints, home decor, installations, objects and several more. (3) La Rosa Couture Inc. produces high quality tailored apparel for both men and women. The company functions only as a manufacturer offering specialized production services to clients who need clothing custom made to fit their specific needs. (4) Caribbean Webcast   Inc. capitalizes on the exciting developments in new media by offering rich online content in the form of music videos, concerts, festivals, music and much more.

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The company is a Business to Business operation dealing regionally and internationally with content creators, educational institutions, large private and government broadcasters and cablecasters, and DVD/ Internet-based distributors.

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(9) Ras Akyem-I has now created a vehicle - the company art ani-MAL Inc - to market his original art images and products with its mission being: “To produce and market the original fine-art images of Ras Akyem-I, as well as selective components of ancillary, high quality limited and open-ended edition reproductions”. Ras Akyem-I promises for Caribbean Art what Bob Marley did for Caribbean music.

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(10) The Kerkaba’s mission is to revolutionise the known health care culture of Barbados and the Caribbean region by empowering the public, through the information, services and products that The Merkaba provides, to improve the quality of their mental, physical and emotional health. The current pilot project Bimventures in Barbados is a partnership between the Model, the Government and the Private Sector of Barbados. Already, interest has been shown in this type of smart private/public partnership in Africa, Bahamas, Dominica, India, Latin America, Martinique, Papua New Guinea, St. Lucia, Trinidad & Tobago, and the USA

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Copyright & Music Introduction The Copyright Society of Composers, Authors & Publishers Incorporated (COSCAP) is a non-profit making membership organisation representing, the performing and reproduction rights in music of composers, authors and publishers, and the related rights of performers and producers of phonograms and videograms. It was established in 1997, and was initially called the Barbados Association of Composers, Authors and Publishers (BACAP), changed its name to COSCAP in 1999.

In terms of payments to writers, for the top three writers, there was a significant increase in earnings primarily reflecting the impact of incoming royalties from overseas, mainly the United Kingdom, which remains an important source of revenue for local creators. It should also be noted that whilst the writers composing the top ten list does not vary little, based on the size and activity of the writer’s catalogue locally and internationally, the top writer of 2010 was a relatively new entry. Unlike the case with related rights, for copyright there are multiple distributions including two broadcast and general distributions covering January to June and July to December and these payments include payments received from broadcast, hotels, restaurants, hotels, nightclubs etc. as well as separate distributions for major live performances, Crop Over and incoming foreign royalties.

In 2004, the Directors of COSCAP together with the Directors of the Caribbean Related Rights Association (CARRA), which at the time represented the related rights of performers and producers of phonograms, decided that the conditions within the local marketplace warranted one collective organisation only. As a result, As with other CMOs in the region, COSCAP is a net exporter of CARRA dissolved and COSCAP expanded its mandate to include royalties except for the Crop Over distribution which reflects a high related rights. level of local music use and major live events held during the Crop Over season which feature local music. The net export of royalty The organisation presently has 753 unique members (this does not may also reflect the effectiveness of collections for Barbadian creators take into account membership in multiple categories: songwriters, in foreign markets. music publishers, performers and producers of sound recordings). Membership The membership of COSCAP consists of songwriters (lyricists and composers), music publishers, performers and the producers of sound recordings. The organisation has been experiencing strong growth rates in all categories of membership since 2000 however, perhaps not surprisingly, the largest category of membership is in related rights, that is, performers and producers (labels). Nonetheless, there has been vibrant growth in all categories for both copyright and related right.

The Distribution of Royalties There are two distributions annually for related rights covering January to June and July – December. In spite of some challenges with receivables, there was an increase in the royalties paid to producers and performers in 2010 compared with 2009. 16

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Continued from previous page

As is seen in the Copyright and Royalties Chart, tracking the export of royalties since 2002, the primary recipients of royalties are England and the USA. Regional recipients receive much lower levels of royalties, reflecting the music played in Barbados but also, in the case of Jamaica, the fact that many songwriters and publishers are actually members of English and American CMOs. There are a number of issues including the extent of use of local and regional music, which must be addressed regionally, which affect the level of royalties earned locally and regionally: • The regional taxation regime, withholding taxes on royalties earned within CARICOM are subject to 15% taxation. This places regional rightsowners at a disadvantage as more favourable non-resident withholding tax rates afforded citizens in countries, which benefit from double taxation treaties with rates lower than the 15% rate, which exists amongst CARICOM territories. • The need for regional countries to sign double taxation treaties with more treaties, which afford lower withholding tax rates on incoming foreign royalties. Nonetheless, COSCAP has licensed digital monitoring software, which allows it to independently monitor local airplay on radio, television and the Internet. Licensing COSCAP collects from a wide variety of music users. Licensing fees are based on a schedule of tariffs, which are based on the type of music, the size of the audience and admission fees if any among other parameters. As is seen in the chart below, the largest single source of revenue from public performance, which does not include broadcast are permits (single events). These include major live events such as Crop Over and the Reggae Festival in addition to smaller events such as fairs and corporate events. Other significant sources of revenue include shops, restaurants and hotels. International Relations Copyright COSCAP is a member of the International Federation of Societies of Composers and Authors (CISAC) and the Caribbean Copyright Link (CCL). In 2010, CISAC membership consisted 229 authors’ societies from 121 countries and it indirectly represents around 3 million creators and music publishers within all the artistic repertoires: music, drama, literature, audio-visual, graphic and visual arts. These organisations, according to the rights administered are linked through reciprocal agreements, which allow them to represent each others repertoire in the respective territories. CISAC was founded in 1926 and is a non-governmental, non-profit organisation (www.cisac.org). COSCAP currently has reciprocal and international agreements with 36 agencies in the USA, UK, Europe, Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean CCL is the regional is the regional umbrella body of CMOs and it was the genesis of two meetings: World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO) Regional Meeting of Heads of Intellectual Property Offices of Caribbean Countries 1997 WIPO Ministerial Level Meeting on Intellectual Property for Caribbean Countries 1997 CCL has been actively working with stakeholders throughout the Caribbean promoting the expansion of collective management. This has included meeting with the members of the Caribbean Broadcasting Union (CBU), consultations in various islands and meetings with various policy makers and Government representatives (www.cc-link.net). Related Rights In terms of related rights, COSCAP has since 2005 had a very close relationship with the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI). IFPI represents the recording industry worldwide with over 1,400 members in 75 countries and affiliated industry associations in 49 countries. Its international Secretariat is based in London and is linked to regional offices in Brussels, Hong Kong, Miami and Moscow. COSCAP represents in the English speaking Caribbean, except Jamaica, the rights of its members. More recently, COSCAP has become a member of the Ibero Latin American Federation of Actors and Performers (FILAIE). FILAIE was founded in 1992 at a meeting of societies representing actors and performers and its membership includes most Latin American countries, Spain and Portugal. Through its membership of FILAIE, there are plans to work collaboratively throughout the region educating and training performers (filaie.com)

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On Location: The Barbados Museum and Historical Society The Barbados Museum and Historical Society (BMHS) is one of the leading institutions which have helped to shape and promote Barbados’ rich cultural landscape. Steeped in history, the museum with its seven galleries and a collection of over 250,000 objects - is housed in ornate historic buildings that were originally used as the military prison at St. Ann’s Garrison and which today form part of the Garrison Historic Area. The Act of Incorporation of the Barbados Museum & Historical Society was passed by the Barbados Legislature on May 31, 1933 after a petition by a group of advocates who had seen the need to record the history of the island. The BMHS is a non-profit, non-governmental organization with a membership of over one thousand individuals and companies. A fourteen member Council and the Director are responsible for its policies and operation. The daily operations are managed by a Director, Dr. Alissandra Cummins, and by the head of each of its six departments: curatorial, development, education, finance, library and marketing.

Going forward there are some key issues to be addressed. At the microstrategic level, the BHMS’ main source of income is a government subvention, which has been declining over the years. This has prompted the BMHS to seek to diversify its sources of income as exemplified by the Museum’s newly improved gift shop. With regard to the macrostrategy, the BHMS not only has a strong collection that tells the history of Barbados and the Caribbean, but it also publishes one of the longest running academic journals in the Caribbean.

Museum Bookstore

Turning finally to the brand strategy, the BHMS’ business model is driven largely by its curatorial function. However, given its location in the Garrison Historic Area, its outstanding collection and beautiful facilities there is much scope for an expanded brand identity.

The Museum attracts approximately 15,000 visitors annually. Cultural tourists and special interest tourists comprise the bulk of visitors to the museum as shown in Figure 1 below.

BHMS 75th Anniversary Journal Cover Figure 1: Tourists by Type 2004-2006

The BMHS has, for the last two decades, played an important role in advocating the need for legislation to protect and preserve Barbados’ cultural heritage, including providing advice to the Government on the development of the Antiquities and Relics Bill to aid in the protection Barbados’ cultural heritage. The BMHS contributed a significant portion of the images and research that formed the dossier that was submitted as part of the nomination process for World Heritage status for Bridgetown and its Garrison. The BMHS is also well represented on the Barbados World Heritage Committee. 18

Information and photos for this article were kindly provided by Mrs. Christine Franklyn, Marketing Officer at the Barbados Museum and Historical Society. Information was also taken from the Caribbean Tourism Organization (2008) study

Contact: Address: St. Ann’s Garrison, St. Michael, Barbados BB14038 Telephone: 1-246-427-0201/ 1-246-436-1956 " Fax: 1-246-436-1956 Email: musepr@barbmuse.org.bb" " Website: www.barbmuse.org.bb

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Persaud’s Portfolio: Exploring Conceptual Boundaries Trinidadian born artist Ingrid Persaud has made her home in Barbados via a long detour of living in London and Boston. She came to fine art having first pursued a successful legal career that included posts at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy (Harvard/Tufts) and Kingʼs College London. Persaud works in the tradition of conceptual art and often incorporates text as an art form. But it is a fascination with boundaries that is most evident in her art. Sometimes it is the Threads with artist under the quilt presence or absence of literal boundaries as in the installation Stroll Down Memory Lane where Ingrid showed 110 images of houses taken in the Bank Hall, a economically challenged area The concern with boundaries is also explored and the solidly middle-class suburb of in another piece she showed recently at Barbados Community College where she has Stratchclyde. worked in the fine art department. The piece There used to be a wall running down the Threads, shown above as a photograph of a middle of the road separating the two hand stitched blanket wrapped around her neighbourhoods. That wall no longer exists; body, was the result of a call to friends in her but the artist invites us to examine the unseen virtual community to send a picture taken on a particular day and at a particular time. The boundaries that persist. images were then transferred to cloth and hand quilted over several weeks. Persaud has also had a very successful solo show that came out of a residency at the Barbados Museum and has gone on to curate shows including one for UNESCO Memory of the World entitled Uncover, Recover, Discover.

Image from the collection Stroll Down Memory Lane

During the interview it became more evident that Persaud’s talent and tenacity played a major role throughout her vibrant career; and it is a trend that will continue in her upcoming project. Persaud has been tied to her desk for the past year and has just emerged with the completed draft of her first novel. She is reluctant to give any of the plot away, only confirming that it explores the theme of finding home in contemporary society. We wish her continued success and know that we’ll be hearing more about her in the years to come

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Taking Caribbean Excellence to the World Readers of our e-magazine, all involved in the region’s fast moving creative sector, will want to block off September 14, 2011 to be part of Design Caribbean in Port Sansouci, Dominican Republic. Hosted by Caribbean Export Development Agency (CEDA), Design Caribbean is the place for makers in need of greater regional market penetration as well as international exposure. It is expected to attract international buyers curious to know more about our very original artisans. Design Caribbean, with its emphasis on high end, original and handcrafted products, grew out of the Caribbean Craft Fair that has taken place annually for the past fifteen years. Many artisans like David Speiler of Earthworks pottery in Barbados, who has attended every Craft Fair since its inception, says “it’s a great selling idea generating good export business. I am every excited by the move to make the show even better with more quality products and by seriously extending the network of buyers and producers”. His enthusiasm is matched by many others including Mark Daniels of Avark. Daniels sees this as “the perfect opportunity to show products to an international audience. In addition to buyers we love that we get the opportunity to meet with experts who are involved in marketing and product development”. All products at Design Caribbean are vetted for excellence so only the best of the region will be on show. Alongside the main trade fair, there will be several related events including a major musical event, a film programme, spa and wellness and a fashion show. Participating artisans will also be able to attend a number of product and market development workshops on hot topics such as copyright, growing a business and accessing foreign markets.

“Design Caribbean is an opportunity for exhibitors and visitors to experience the Caribbean, where all cultures collide to create something beautiful,” says Pamela CokeHamilton, Executive Director of CEDA. “Participants will leave the show inspired and invigorated by the creative splendor of the Caribbean and new business insight.” Mrs. Coke Hamilton believes that Design Caribbean operates within a unique environment where “every race, culture and creed has been able to create a truly genuine melting pot of racial, religious and ethnic blending, which has now become the foundation of the Caribbean identity and culture. This region is the only one where anyone can land and immediately fit in without fear of exclusion or isolation. We merge all the varying aspects of our differing ethnic backgrounds to create a spirit, which is uniquely and quintessentially Caribbean. This spirit is captured and reflected in the originality, boldness and inherent creativity that mirror the experience of those who landed on our shores from disparate parts of the globe. The Caribbean soul is, without apology, dynamic, vibrant and intrinsically beautiful. This is Design Caribbean.” All artisans engaged in design in the Caribbean region are eligible to participate in Design Caribbean. Products may include ceramics, jewelry, fashion accessories, home furnishings, spa and wellness items, leather goods and specialty foods. In addition, there will a number of cash awards and incentives for winning various design categories

For participation criteria and sign up details, please email: info@designcaribbean.com.

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Entertainment and Culture in the EPA The provisions of the EPA, with respect to cultural cooperation and market access for entertainment services and other cultural services, far exceeds what was provided in the Cotonou Agreement. The cultural sector and entertainment services in particular are addressed through two instruments in the EPA. These are as follows:

Mode 2:" Consumption Abroad, involving the consumption of services by nationals of one country while physically in another country so that the service is supplied to consumers outside their countries of residence. (e.g., Europeans attending a music concert at Holders Hill, tourists travelling to Barbados, or foreign executives coming to Barbados to attend training sessions. This mode also applies if the service is provided on equipment sent • A special Protocol on Cultural Cooperation that sets out the abroad (e.g., a British yacht coming to Barbados for repairs). framework within which CARIFORUM and the EU will cooperate in a wide range of cultural activities and exchanges Mode 3:" Commercial Presence or investment in a foreign market, of cultural products. where the services supplier establishes a commercial presence through which the service is supplied to clients in that market • Market access commitments by 26 European states (all EU (e.g., a Barbadian show promoter, bank, hotel, restaurant, Members except Belgium) for Entertainment Services from engineering firm etc. establishes in an EU Member CARIFORUM states that are governed by the rules of the State)." Services and Investment chapter and the general provisions of the EPA. Mode 4:" Presence of Natural Persons or temporary entry for individuals to go into another country on short-term contracts to In terms of market access for entertainment services, the supply services directly to customers (e.g., singers, musicians, conditions and benefits are the same as for other Contract consultants, architects) or to manage companies located in the Services Suppliers (CSS) under the EPA. Therefore, Caribbean other country. artists, musicians, and other cultural practitioners, who are registered as businesses, will be able to send their members or A country may allow foreign firms to operate through any or all employees to all EU states, except Belgium, to supply of these four modes of supply. However, governments often open entertainment services. only some modes with respect to particular services sub-sectors and may stipulate certain conditions under which the foreign Modes of supplying services suppliers can operate in their market. In order to determine the degree of market access for their particular services and the In international trade agreements, market access or liberalization conditions under which any access is granted, Services providers of trade in services takes place through four different means of are encouraged to study the “List of commitments in services delivery. These are referred to as Modes of Supply and it is sectors”, which is detailed in Annex IV to the main EPA Text. important to understand how they work in order to appreciate how they affect the business model that a firm might be able to It should be noted that Mode 4 (temporary entry of natural employ, whether in the cultural sector or any other services persons) regulates the temporary entry of services providers to activity. The four modes of supply with respect to services are as deliver a service under the stipulated conditions. It does not follows: address immigration issues or the movement of persons seeking to enter the workforce in another country. These activities are not Mode 1:" Cross Border Trade, in which the service is sent from one classified as “trade in services” and are outside of the scope of country or territory to another, where only the service itself trade agreements crosses the border (e.g., satellite broadcast of movies for cable TV, music downloads or the transmission of information by Excerpt from “Opportunities in the CARIFORUM-EC Economic electronic mail, fax etc.)." Partnership Agreement for Barbadian Entertainers & other cultural services suppliers” produced by The EPA Implementation Unit, Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade of Barbados.

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Barbados Festivals and Cultural Directory Festivals in Barbados Keith Nurse & Jessica Jones Barbados enjoys a year-round calendar of festivals and events. Headlined by Crop-Over, a carnival-type festival, the festivals sector provides a boost not only to Barbados’ cultural calendar but also to tourism visitation and to the branding of the destination. Crop Over celebrations, originally a means of celebrating the end of the sugar cane season, were revitalized in 1974 to boost the tourism industry in the then traditionally slow period of July and August. The festival attracts mainly overseas nationals or diasporic tourists and intra-regional visitors and plays a significant role with an estimated economic impact of $75M, each year, from 2005-2007, and an overall impact of 1.5% of GDP (according to a 2007 study by SALISES). Additionally, Crop-Over is the second most popular reason people visit Barbados, after vacation in general, during the Crop Over period (see figure 1 below). It is perhaps the dawn of the music festivals in 1993 that signified Barbados’ formal pursuit of a new tourism thrust, i.e. Festival Tourism. The Barbados Jazz Festival, Holders’ Season and Gospelfest, were all started in 1993, each promoting distinctly different genres of music – jazz, opera, and gospel, respectively. These festivals are also focused on blending culture with music, and provide a mix of local and international talent.

Figure 1: Purpose of visit during Crop Over season

In its calendar of festivals, Barbados annually showcases a number of other Festivals that seek to blend local culture with music. The first of these is usually the Holetown Festival, which commemorates the landing of the first European settlers to Barbados, in the parish of St. James. Highlights of this Festival normally include street fairs; folksongs and folkdance by various cultural groups; as well as markets and food fairs. Similarly, the Oistins Fish Festival features this combination of music and culture, but with the major focus on paying tribute to the island’s fishing industry. Fishermen demonstrate their abilities in fish-boning, and boat-racing. Culminating in a Gala performance, there is the National Independence Festival of Creative Arts (NIFCA), in which Barbadians of all age groups showcase their talents in the fields of the performing, visual, culinary and literary arts. Government in recent times have added the Community Independence Celebrations which involve parish celebrations as well as community-based and youth activities

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Barbados Calendar of Cultural Events March - December 2011 DATE

EVENT

CONTACTS

14-20

Best of Caribbean Tales Film Festival “The Best of Caribbean Tales 2011: Film Festival and Symposium” brings together the best films screened in recent years from Caribbean Tales, with a Symposium, Film Market, Workshops and school screenings.

E-mail: info@caribbeantales.ca Website: www.caribbeantales.ca

19-April 02

Holders Season Barbados’ exciting season of operas, classical, jazz, Latin and Caribbean music takes place in the open air gardens of historic Holders Plantation House.

Contact: Wendy Kidd/ Holders House Tel: (246) 432 6385 Email: theseason@holders.net Website: http://www.holders.net/

MARCH

APRIL! 23-25

Oistins Fish Festival Contact: Dan Carter Held in the scenic fishing town of Oistins on Barbados’ south coast, the annual Tel: (246) 428-6738 Oistins Fish Festival is a time of celebrations for those that work in the local fishing Website: www.oistins.org industry.

25-May 01

Reggae Festival Barbados This is a live music extravaganza showcasing top reggae artistes.

Website: www.the barbadosreggaefestival.com

15-31

Celtic Festival This festival celebrates the links between this wonderful balmy West Indian Caribbean island and the Celtic countries.

Contact: Ms. Ruth Williams Tel/Fax: (246) 426-3387 Email: celticruth@hotmail.com Website: http://celticconnectionsbarbados.com/ index.html

21-29

Gospelfest Featuring top local, regional and international gospel talent, the annual Barbados Gospelfest is one of the most popular Christian music festivals in the Caribbean.

Contact: Adrian Agard Tel: ( 246) 426-5128 / Fax: (246) 228-8723 Email: info@gospelfest.com Website: www.barbadosgospelfest.com

MAY!

JULY! 01-August 01

Crop Over Festival Contact: National Cultural Foundation Crop Over is Barbados’ biggest and best–loved festival, which sees the whole Tel: (246) 424-0909 island taken over by the party spirit. Events last five weeks and revellers can expect Website: www.ncf.bb a heavy mix of live music, dancing, carnival, markets, cultural presentations and more.

NOVEMBER! 18-21

Barbados Food & Wine & Rum Festival Contact: Barbados Tourism Authority Epicurean superstars, celebrity chefs, wine and spirits experts gather on the island Tel: 467-3600 to offer the very best in food, wine, rum and culture, from the culinary capital of the Caribbean.

TBA

Caribbean Rum and Beer Festival Website: http://www.rumandbeerfestival.com/ This festival is for everyone who enjoys sampling fabulous beverages, whether you are a curious novice or consider yourself a connoisseur of rums or beers. The range of products, familiar and rare, on offer will be sure to satisfy everybody.

DECEMBER! TBA

Barbados International Film Festival http://www.facebook.com/group.php? The Barbados International Film Festival is set amidst endless sandy beaches and gid=40715986819 rich Caribbean tradition. The Festival puts emphasis on the discovery of film works (Link to official website currently unavailable) by new talent and emerging filmmakers that embody the imagination, boldness " and the fresh spirit of independent film.

Source: Information on these events was provided by the Barbados Tourism Authority and as well as the official events websites

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Directory of Cultural Industries Organizations in Barbados

Barbados Coalition of Service Industries

Corporate Affairs and Intellectual Property Rights Office

14 Pine Plantation Road, St. Michael, BARBADOS Tel: (246) 435-2400 Fax: (246) 429-5352 Weblog: http://www.bcsi.org.bb Barbados Community College - Division of Fine Arts Eyrie Howells' Road, St. Michael, BARBADOS Tel: (246) 426-2858 Fax: (246) 429-5935 Website: http://www.bcc.edu.bb/

Copyright Society of Composers Authors and Publishers No. 11 8th Avenue, Belleville St. Michael BARBADOS Tel: (246) 435 1777/437 2163 Fax: (246) 435 2777 Email: coscapevents@caribsurf.com Members: coscapmembers@caribsurf.com Website: http://www.coscap.org

Barbados Film and Video Association c/o BCSI, 14 Pine Plantation Road, St. Michael, BARBADOS Tel: (246) 435-2400 Fax: (246) 429-5352 Weblog: http://bfva.blogspot.com/

Invest Barbados

Barbados Museum & Historical Society

Trident Insurance Financial Centre Hastings, Christ Church BARBADOS, BB11142 Tel: (246) 626-2000 Fax: (246) 626-2099 E-mail: info@investbarbados.org

St. Ann’s, Garrison, St. Michael, BARBADOS Tel: (246) 427-0201 Fax: (246) 436-1956 Email: musepr@barbmuse.org.bb Website: www.barbmuse.org.bb

Ministry of Family, Sports, Youth and Culture “Elsie Payne Complex” Constitution Road St Michael Tel: 430-2704 Fax: 436-8909

Barbados Small Business Association 1 Pelican Industrial Park Bridgetown BARBADOS Tel: (246) 228 0162 Fax: (246) 228 0613 Email: theoffice@sba.org.bb Website: http://sba.org.bb

National Cultural Foundation

Community Independence Celebrations Secretariat Prime Minister's Office Government Headquarters, Bay Street, St. Michael BARBADOS Tel: (246) 436-6435 PBX: (246) 436-9660/427-6675 Fax.: (246) 228-3432 Email: cics@caribsurf.com Website: http://www.barbados.gov.bb/cics/ contact.htm 24

" Clarence Greenidge House" Keith Bourne Complex Belmont Road St. Michael BARBADOS Tel : (246) 436-4818/9 Fax:  (246) 437-3072 Email : general@caipo.gov.bb or caipo@caribsurf.com Website: www.caipo.gov.bb

West Terrace, St James BARBADOS Tel: (246) 424 0909 Website: www.ncf.bb Office of Trade Negotiations 1st floor, Speedbird House, Independence Square, Bridgetown BARBADOS Tel: (246) 430-1670 /71 Fax: (246) 228-9528 Website: www.crnm.org

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For additional information visit our website www.shridathramphalcentre.org Ground Floor CARICOM Research Building University of the West Indies Cave Hill Campus, St Michael, Barbados Telephone: 246.417.4805/4533 Fax: 246.417.4058 Email: src@cavehill.uwi.edu

We are very interested in your feedback. Please email you comments to: src@cavehill.uwi.edu. Visit our website: www.creativeindustriesexhange.com

The production of this magazine was made possible through support from the Caribbean Export Development Agency and funding from the European Union 9th EDF Caribbean Trade and Private Sector Development Program

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Caribbean Creatives - Issue 1; Volume 2: January - March 2011  

This second issue of Caribbean Creatives, sponsored by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) and the...

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