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Caribbean Creatives The Audiovisual Sector The Regional AV Sector in Context

Five Key Questions - Film Entrepreneurs

Film Commissions, Schools & Festivals

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Rough Cuts - Filmmakers’ Pitches

Caribbean AV Sector Survey Results

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EPA and the AV Sector PAGE 25

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Issue 1 Volume 1: September - November 2010 Available online www.creativeindustriesexchange.org www.shridathramphalcentre.org


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Contents Editorial

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The Regional AV Sector in Context

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Spotlight on the Global AV Sector

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Five Key Questions - Film Entrepreneurs

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Film Commissions, Schools and Festivals

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Rough Cuts: CT Marketplace Pitches

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CTWD takes Caribbean Film to Toronto

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UNIDO/CEMA Awardees at TIFF

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Regional AV Sector Survey Results

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Film in the Commonwealth

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What is the Creative Industry Exchange?

Caribbean Export and the AV Sector

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CIE is an outreach project of the Shridath Ramphal Centre for International Trade Law which was initially funded by the UNESCO, Kingston office.

Yes We CAN

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EPA and the AV Sector

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Production Team Dr. Keith Nurse - Director Shalisha Samuel - Research Consultant Stephanie Alleyne - Communications Consultant Shridath Ramphal Centre for International Trade Law Policy & Services CARICOM Research Building University of the West Indies Cave Hill Campus St Michael, BARBADOS, BB11000 246.417.4805/246.471.4553 Email: src@cavehill.uwi.edu Website: www.shridathramphalcentre.org

On the cover: Colorful Caribbean Feelings. Illustration by JP Joyette St Vincent & the Grenadines

The CIE is a web portal that provides a Regional AV Sector Groupings 26 regional mechanism for the collection, Editorial collation, analysis and dissemination of data and information on the cultural/creative industries. This inaugural issue of Caribbean Creatives, sponsored by the United Nations Industrial Development Organisation (UNIDO), United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) and the Caribbean Export Development Agency (CEDA), puts the spotlight on the region’s Audiovisual What are the aims and objectives of CIE? Sector. The main focus is on documenting some of the key global and regional trends as well as some of the initiatives being pursued by creative entrepreneurs and organizations. The principal objective of the CIE is to document the economic impact and contribution of the cultural/creative industries to the Caribbean. The CIE aims to facilitate a stronger national and regional framework for the strategic management of the cultural/creative industries. The CIE aims to enhance the image and profile of the Caribbean cultural/creative industries sector in the regional and international context.

In a question and answer segment select filmmakers, including Howard Allen (HAMA Productions), Frances-Anne Solomon (CaribbeanTales Worldwide Distribution) and Christopher Laird (Gayelle the Channel), provide their outlook on the film and audiovisual industry in the Caribbean and offer advice to aspiring professionals. Included in this issue is a comparative analysis of the film commissions, film schools and film festivals in the English, French and Spanish-speaking Caribbean. The focus is on the main functions of these agencies in the audiovisual industry and their role in the advancement of the regional sector. The article also identifies best-practices that can be used as a model for like bodies to emulate. In this regard, a thorough breakdown of the process required to film in the Caribbean is outlined in the section on Film Commissions. The analysis also highlights and emphasizes the need to document the financial contributions of “on location” filming and film festivals. The segment entitled “Rough Cuts” features the work of filmmakers that pitched their projects at an international panel of buyers and distributors at the CaribbeanTales Marketplace which was co-hosted by the Shridath Ramphal Centre. Also included is an analysis of the visitor and audiovisual producers’ survey, conducted at the Caribbean Tales Film Festival in Barbados, March 2010. Caribbean Creatives concludes with a broad strategic look at the future of the audiovisual sector in the Caribbean and proffers some recommendations Keith Nurse, Ph.D Co-ordinator, Creative Industries Exchange Director, Shridath Ramphal Centre for International Trade Law, Policy and Services

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The Regional Audiovisual Sector in Context The audiovisual industry in the Caribbean is an emerging sector with scope for diversifying the region’s exports, employment, economic structure. The audiovisual sector also has shown the potential for generating high value-added jobs as well as destination and intellectual property branding for the region’s tourism sector. In addition, the composite nature of the audiovisual sector provides a fillip to the other main components of the cultural and creative industries (e.g. the music industry, the performing arts, photography, etc.). In this respect, investment in the audiovisual sector will have a synergistic impact on the wider creative economy. The Caribbean is a small but growing player in the on-location filming sector and is able to earn income for local film producers, actors, artists and technicians. The creation, distribution and exhibition of regional audiovisual content has grown in recent years on account of the increased global, diasporic and regional demand for local content along with reduced costs of technological and equipment inputs. This content comes in many different forms such as documentaries, feature films, music videos, advertisements, animation, television programmes, and soap operas. The target markets crosscut national, regional, diasporic and international economies along with a range of broadcasters, exhibition spaces, festivals, multimedia, online and mobile providers. Like many developing country regions, the Caribbean is faced with the challenge of low economies of scale, poor market visibility, limited distribution and access when compared to the main global exporter and producer countries like the United States, India, France, the United Kingdom and Australia, etc. Only recently have incentive regimes been put in place in some countries in the region to attract private and public investment. A key challenge facing the audiovisual sector is the wide range of tariffs, other duties and charges that make the importation of equipment and supplies unduly expensive. There is also much scope for the harmonisation, simplification, and Volume 1 September - November 2010

implementation of intra-regional trade measures to facilitate the deepening of the regional market. The latter issue is being addressed by the CARICOM cultural industries taskforce which is documenting and examining the feasibility of such measures. Regional networking and advocacy is another weak feature of the landscape that needs to be addressed to achieve the necessary critical mass. The Caribbean Audiovisual Network (CAN) which was recently established under the auspices of the Caribbean Export Development Agency has as its mandate this particular challenge. Indeed, CAN’s mission is to facilitate business and export development in the regional audiovisual sector. The audiovisual sector is also plagued by an absence of data and information on economic performance and market trends, therefore, policy is often made without an evidence base that would allow for improved strategic planning, management and industry coordination. What is required are more detailed economic impact assessments. As it now stands only a handful of countries can present any credible data on the structure or performance of the audiovisual sector in their countries. Global technological trends and the growth of alternative genres and markets makes for a viable sector in the region. The Caribbean is now rising to the occasion and preparing to seize the opportunities through regional networking and new start-up firms. In this endeavour, strategic partnerships and collaborations are required to make the transformation to global competitiveness. Industrial upgrading in the home environment is a critical first step that all the key stakeholders must co-operate on to achieve the desired results

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Spotlight on the Global Audiovisual Sector The audiovisual sector has various dimensions but from an economic and business perspective it is useful to categorize the industry in terms of the financial and trade flows associated with goods, services and intellectual property. A DVD is an audiovisual good, while advertisements and radio broadcastings are considered services and films also generate income through copyright. The audiovisual industry involves the production of feature films, documentaries, television dramas, sit-coms, animation, commercials and music videos to name a few. The World Trade Organization’s classification goes further to include radio, advertising services, transmission services and sound recording.

The audiovisual industry as a whole is now on a long term path of transitioning from a traditional, linear "offline" distribution model that has served it well for the better part of a century, to an emerging digital future that will increasingly be depending on a connected world requiring on demand experiences. ITVE, Global Audiovisual Market, 2009-2013

The global audiovisual market which is valued at US$ 471 billion in 2009 is projected to grow to $550 billion in 2013 despite the ongoing financial and economic recession. What the data (see figure 1) indicates is that television will remain the dominant source of income with a steady eighty per cent of the market; filmed entertainment appears to have peaked and is trending downward slowly; online video is growing rapidly but from a low base. However, below the surface there are tectonic shifts that are impacting the structure of the industry and the viability of business models. Advertising revenue in television is slowing down but Pay TV is rising; traditional cinema is declining while alternative content in cinemas is growing; digital film and online distribution is expanding rapidly but is insufficient to offset the drop in traditional revenue streams. The global cinema market remains highly concentrated even with the growth of world cinema. It is estimated that 5 countries (US 36%, Japan 7%, India 6%, France 5%, UK 4%) account for fifty-eight per cent of worldwide box office revenues (see figure 2).

Figure 1: Global Audiovisual Market, 2009-2013. Source: International Television Expert Group

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Figure 2: Worldwide Box Office Revenues, 2009. Source: Dataxis Intelligence

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Similarly, in the realm of Pay TV the top fifteen markets account for ninety per cent of global revenues with the US alone capturing fifty-four per cent of global subscriptions. What is interesting to note is that among the top markets are large developing economies like China, Brazil, India, Argentina and Mexico. The rest of the world accounts for eleven per cent of the global market. So where does this leave film industries from developing countries, especially from small states? The new technologies offer an opportunity for enhanced production but the cost of marketing and distribution can still be prohibitive. For small states, domestic and regional markets are often too small for firms in the sector to achieve economies of scale and scope, hence the need for a strong export orientation from the outset. So where are the opportunities? At the same time that traditional markets are declining new market opportunities are arising for new forms of content and alternative genres. Seizing the chance requires foresighting and the implementation of innovation and industrial policies. Linking with entrepreneurs and organizations in the diasporas is a critical resource in the new marketing thrust. Diasporas are both markets as well as levers to enter global markets. At home the entrepreneurs and the facilitating agencies need to be on cue with the quality and professionalism issues. Enhanced training, venture capital funding and intellectual property protection and promotion are but a short list of achievable requirements for making it in the global AV sector www.creativeindustriesexchange.org

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Five key questions with Caribbean Film Entrepreneurs For this review, three film entrepreneurs, Howard Allen, HAMA Productions; Frances-Anne Solomon, CaribbeanTales Worldwide Distribution; and Christopher Laird, Gayelle - The Channel, discuss the progress and future of the Caribbean audiovisual industry, their responses follow. Five (5) key questions were asked to document their experiences and observations of the regional audiovisual sector. These questions aim to educate and inform those in the sector and others with an interest in film.

Howard Allen - HAMA Productions What innovations have your company brought to the industry in If the audiovisual sector in your country was granted US $10 million, recent years? over a 3-5 year period, what should be done with it? Independent screenings known as “fourwalling” was introduced by HAMA Productions in Antigua. We screened our first feature film The Sweetest Mango to 600 people in one sitting by renting an auditorium and building our own screening. The film ran for three months with an average of two screenings per day and four on weekends.

economic recession) next 2-3 years?

Given the transformations in the global industry, (e.g - technological changes, global where do you see your business going in the

Our intention is to invest in technology that allows HAMA to produce low cost high quality content. We also plan to take better advantage of the internet for distribution and marketing.

Training would be key with the establishment of a school for film & television production accompanied by a fund to support independent filmmakers.

Biography Antiguan film director Howard Allen founded HAMA Productions along with his Wife Mitzi Allen in 1992. His debut film The Sweetest Mango (2001) is based on the story of how he met his Wife. The Sweetest Mango became Antigua and Barbuda’s first locally produced feature film and the first indigenous film for the Eastern Caribbean. It has since been screened at several film festivals in North America and the Caribbean and made its world television premiere on Caribvision in 2007 to a potential audience of 280 million via DirecTV. Following The Sweetest Mango, Howard directed and released No Seed (2002) and Diablesse (2005) which is a Caribbean folklore drama.

Howard’s interest in media and communications began at an early age. What are the key lessons that you have learnt from working in the At 15 he produced and hosted a children’s radio program for ABS industry that new entrants should know? Radio and ZDK Radio in Antigua. Throughout the years he has been establishing himself as a pioneering filmmaker and his work has been It is important to find your niche, determine what makes your product singled out by the department of Cinema and Photography at Ithaca unique and know your market and what the consumers want. College in New York, for his innovative approach to filmmaking in a developing country. He has conducted master classes at Ithaca College How was your company financed in the initial stages and what are on “Feature Filmmaking on a Shoestring Budget.” Howard currently your key sources of income now? trains young people in the art of television and film production in the hopes of building a cadre of future film industry professionals in HAMA Productions was self-financed in the initial stages. We continue Antigua and Barbuda. to re-invest in our productions with support from the private sector and the government. The trailer for Howard Allen’s recent film The Skin can be viewed on the TrulyCaribbean channel on YouTube.

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Frances-Anne Solomon Caribbean Tales Worldwide Distribution

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being developed in partnership with Dr. Basil Springer's investment company, the Barbados Entrepreneurs’ Venture Capital Fund. Parallel to this, we will be producing a number of market development initiatives to assist producers to raise finance for their projects including an Annual Pitch Marketplace, A Market Incubator, and a number of codevelopments with partners including South Africa. Given the transformations in the global industry, (e.g - technological changes, global economic recession) where do you see your business going in the next 2-3 years?

What innovations have your company brought to the industry in recent years?

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television industry. We will never get anywhere by each island developing content specifically for their minuscule populations; there simply isn’t the audience base to support it financially in that way. However we must first consider the region, including the French, Spanish and Dutch territories, including the Diaspora. The Diaspora is important because there are huge populations of Caribbean people in every major urban city in North America and Europe. Our Diaspora extends also to Africa, India, China, and Lebanon which clearly indicates that the stories of Caribbean people speak to a very wide audience base. Then we can begin to talk about a sustainable audience base hungry for stories.

We are moving to be more global in focus by tapping into international diasporic and south-south spaces. To do so we are employing a range of strategies from viral marketing to strategic collaborations and 2. As has happened in many developed partnerships. countries government needs to partner with the private sector and the region’s What are the key lessons that you have learnt broadcasters sector to financially support from working in the industry that new content creators. Regulation of the entrants should know? industry should be regional rather than by island. Establishment of regional and • Persistence is the main quality needed. local film funding commissions, and Keep going and you will get there. Give incentives for producers and investors to up and it is over. If first you don't engage with the production profitably succeed... try, and try, and try, and try... should follow.

10 years ago I started CaribbeanTales which aimed to be an interactive online home for Caribbean culture and storytelling in all its forms. One of the most exciting projects was an interactive multimedia newsletter featuring authors and storytellers. Such things are perhaps commonplace now, but five years ago • Expect nothing, prepare for everything. it was quite the innovation and we were very gratified by the feedback we got. • Marketing, marketing, marketing. Five years ago I started the CaribbeanTales Film Festival in Toronto and again at the time, it was a great brand new idea to have a Caribbean-themed film festival that moreover apparently was destined to fail according to naysayers. However the growth and interest in the Caribbean, it's culture, and its burgeoning media industry has helped the festival to go from strength to strength. In 2008, my feature film A Winter Tale was completed. We released it in the Caribbean where it opened in five cinemas in Jamaica, four in Trinidad, as well as in Antigua. Illness prevented me from completing the tour; however, we also had screenings in a number of other Caribbean islands, including Barbados, St Lucia, Dominica, Martinique, (not counting all the international screenings and releases). Again we were not the first to self distribute a Caribbean feature film in the region (Alison Saunders’ Hit For Six did the same) but it is still a very new way of thinking about regional film distribution. We also initiated a program called Talk It Out to screen this film and others for schools across the region as well as in North America, for audiences of high school students.

3. Marketing marketing marketing. Create and promote Film Brand Caribbean so it sits proudly on the world stage alongside Hollywood, Bollywood Nollywood and the British Film Industry. • Don't be afraid to do every single thing yourself! Learn about the business, become a business person. "I am an artist, 4. Nurture and develop a range of not a business person" is no excuse in filmmakers. Encourage exploration of filmmaking. You will get left behind. storytelling from inside the Caribbean perspective, whatever that may be. • Don't hit your head on the wall, walk Develop a brand and aesthetic for our cinema that is parallel to our wonderful around it! We black people are inventive. Literature. Such a development would Learn from Anansi - find alternatives to reveal the Caribbean as so much more get what you want. than sun sand and sea but for what it is an extraordinary diverse and complex • Live your passion. Don't become bitter. combination of cultures, an extraordinary Don’t compare yourselves to other people. Enjoy each step of the journey - the multi-cultural, multi-ethnic and multibusiness is too hard to face it with lingual world. anything but a smile and a wink each and every day. 5. All this is doable in my opinion. Similar industries have been developed in recent How was your company financed in the years in South Africa, Canada, Australia, initial stages and what are your key sources using many of the methods listed above. of income now? These are all now major film economies. Hollywood itself is no more than 100 BEFORE: Canadian Government grants; years old. The audiovisual sector is a broadcast licenses; business incentive potentially very lucrative, multi-billion schemes. NOW: Same as above but also dollar industry - we need to claim a piece sponsors, private investors and the tourism of this monster business to tell our stories industry. and show the world how great it is to be Caribbean. If the audiovisual sector in your country was granted US $10 million, over a 3-5 year period, what should be done with it?

Finally, we are about to launch C A R I B B E A N TA L E S WORLDWIDE DISTRIBUTION, a film distribution company that aims to meet the demand from producers 1. First there needs to be a regional body and buyers for a company that specializes in that supports the development of an acquiring, promoting and selling Caribbean International Caribbean film and themed audio visual content. This company is 6

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Biography Frances-Anne Solomon has made a considerable contribution to the regional and global film industry.  The director, writer and producer behind   A Winter Tale   (2007), has a long list of credits including directing   Peggy Su!   (BBC Films 1997) and producing   Heart Beat (Bravo! 2007-2008). Frances-Anne trained in Theatre Arts at the University of Toronto, and the Lecoq School of Mime in Paris before moving to Great Britain where she built a successful professional career with the BBC as a Producer, Director and Writer. Since her return to Toronto in 2000, she has continued to create, direct, write and produce television and film projects through her own company, Leda Serene Films. In 2002, she established CaribbeanTales, an innovative multimedia not- for-profit that promotes and celebrates the rich tradition of Caribbean-heritage storytelling through a variety of multimedia products, including an annual CaribbeanTales film festival and marketplace. CaribbeanTales Wordwide Distribution Inc. was established in May 2010 to provide a platform for Caribbean-themed film and television content in the international marketplace.  Known for her savvy way of addressing controversial and taboo subjects in our society, Frances-Anne's films deal with race, class, sexuality and violence from a Caribbean and Diasporic perspective.

Christopher Laird - Gayelle

What innovations have your company brought to the industry in recent years? GAYELLE completely opened up the television environment in the Caribbean by showing that 100% local content on television is feasible and welcome. In doing this within the limitations of the present market Gayelle had to pioneer the use of appropriate technology, new production workflows and techniques and also a new relationship with the television audience – all developed from an indigenous base and intimacy with Caribbean culture combined Volume 1 September - November 2010

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with a familiarity with developing global If the audiovisual sector in your country was digital technology. granted US $10 million, over a 3-5 year period, what should be done with it? Given the transformations in the global industry, (e.g - technological changes, global There is no doubt that market penetration is economic recession) where do you see your key to the sustainability of a growing business going in the next 2-3 years? economic sector. There are two areas to which funds should be directed: production and Endogenous television production has only distribution. one future: State subsidy and/or larger markets. The regional and local markets Production needs to be subsidised to improve cannot sustain production above a certain production values and build local competence. quality. To achieve higher production values This would increase the marketability of both Caribbean film and television has to enter a the products and the services in the regional larger market to access a more sustainable industry. If say, $3 or $4 million US was put in revenue base. a feature film fund it could conceivably produce five or six feature films of quality – The first and most obvious expansion is into many more than has emerged from the region the Caribbean diaspora in North America and in decades. Five good features from the region Europe. A lot of hot air has been generated by in a five year period would attract tremendous this over the years but no one has achieved it. attention and funding for future production. We believe this is because until Gayelle no one has generated sufficient original Caribbean There is no doubt that the Caribbean Diaspora content. Gayelle does and the region is on the is thirsty for access to Caribbean content. verge of a flood of amateur generated content There are many ways being developed to taking advantage of the new technologies. We deliver such content but the business would expect within 2-3 years to have Gayelle infrastructure to give the Caribbean some available to cable viewers in these markets. If measure of control over distribution and we are successful in this it is possible that marketing of its content is almost non existent Caribbean production can be sustained and where it may exist is still in the realm of beyond a period of novelty and become an the ‘hustle’ rather than credible organisation accepted presence in world television. based on sound business principles and expertise. Development of the Diaspora What are the key lessons that you have learnt market is only a step towards a presence on from working in the industry that new the wider global market as production values entrants should know? improve. Entering the world of television or film production is increasingly easy as the technology is more and more accessible. Earning a living and sustaining one’s efforts is correspondingly increasingly difficult. Without significant funding and access to new and bigger markets new entrants will not be able to sustain themselves financially and the industry will not be able to absorb the flood of graduates from the films schools.

Biography Christopher Laird, has been a teacher, published the arts journal Kairi and ran a theatre in Port of Spain during the 1970s. He has produced over 300 documentaries, dramas and other video productions with Banyan Ltd. over the past 30 years garnering a score of national, regional and international awards.

How was your company financed in the He has overseen the establishment of what is initial stages and what are your key sources arguably the world’s largest collection of Caribbean culture on video in the Caribbean of income now? Film and Video Archive. He is now CEO of Gayelle was financed in the early stages by Gayelle: The Channel, the region’s first all four sponsors who each put up $300,000TT to Caribbean free to air television station which be associated with the station over the first year. This was enough to purchase a he co-founded with Errol Fabien in 2003. In transmitter and basic equipment to start 2009 Christopher was awarded an Honorary operations. Lack of proper capitalisation has Doctorate from the University of the West dogged us ever since and become most telling Indies as competition suddenly arose inspired by our example and as the recession hit. Most of all we have been financed by a mixture of sponsorship, airtime sales and the enthusiasm and sweat equity of those that work with Gayelle.

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Film Commissions, Schools, and Festivals In this article we profile key stakeholders in the audiovisual sector such as film commissions, film schools and film festivals in the Caribbean region.

Film Commissions There are minor differences in the characteristics and services of the regional film commissions. Generally, the commissions facilitate the process of scouting talent and locations, attaining film licenses, work permits and duty free entry of equipment for film production companies. Assisting film crews with finding local services is a focal point in the function of the commissions. The commissions maintain a list of local production companies, talent such as actors and models, custom brokers, accommodation and a photo library of prime locations. Details on the climate, the people, culture, language and film locations are also provided by the commissions. In most 8

cases, the commissions would act on behalf of the production company and liaise directly with the various government departments and agencies. Production companies, across the board, are however, required to submit an application which details the project; the budget, the number of staff requiring work permits, a list of all the equipment that would be imported along with the serial number and a time frame for completion of the film. While most commissions operate from one location, mainly their home base, the Bahamas Film and Television Commission has six locations. The commission has two offices in the Bahamas, one in the U.K and three in the U.S that are located in the West, South and East Coast. Their website provides information that covers all aspects of filming in the Bahamas. Producers can apply for a permit, or filming license online while having access to a photo

library of different locations in the Bahamas. A production guide is also developed of local talent, production services and accommodation on each island. Caterers, actors, boat captains, models, marine videographers/ photographers, personal assistants, music publishing, underwater stunt actors are a few of the talents listed. Emergency medical services, trucking and cranes, floral and environmental designers are also some of the services available. Bahamians are invited to “Join the Guide� by submitting a description of their services; this provision aids in the development of the local industry by providing employment. The film commission has facilitated approximately 160 television commercials, feature films, television series and specials, many of which are film crews from abroad. Most recent shoots are Ugly Betty and an ELLE fashion photo shoot in Nassau.

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The services provided by the Bahamas Film and Television Commission are not exclusive to the sector; commissions within the region operate in a like manner by facilitating film crews through the necessary steps to film their project. On average, film crews can expect to begin filming at least 11 days after submitting their application to the film commissions; the chart below highlights the days needed in each territory. The Bahamas has a keen focus on welcoming foreign film crews and likewise, the other commissions are determined to develop an infrastructure that provides services for on-location filming. The commissions in Belize, The Cayman Islands, Dominica, Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago have implemented policies to build the capacity of the local film industry and related sectors.

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Number of days it takes to begin filming

Firstly, some commissions encourage the employment of local services but others specifically express this obligation and provide incentives based upon the fulfilment of these requirements. The requirement to hire a local production manager who is a Belizean citizen or legal resident indicates a dedication to strengthen the local industry. Jamaica’s film commission mandates the hiring of local production companies in which a list is available on their site: “Overseas companies are expected to source film crews from Jamaica before bringing in personnel from abroad.” (Jamaica Film Commission, 2007). Secondly, The Cayman Islands, Dominica, Puerto Rico and Trinidad and Tobago require film crews to complete an expenditure report of the goods and services purchased in the country. In The Cayman Islands, the report should detail the number of days spent at the hotel, funds spent on catering, supplies and other services utilised locally. In Dominica, production companies are required to report all funds spent on services and goods in Dominica seven days before departure. Given this requirement, the Dominican government was able to document the revenue from Pirates of the Caribbean. 500 Dominicans were hired which generated US$ 1 million; however, Dominica overall earned US$ 18 million. Specifically, US$ 400, 000 was spent on telecommunications, US$ 300, 000 on security forces and a whopping US$ 3.7 million went towards accommodation. (Nurse, 2007). The Puerto Rico budget for filming of the Rum Diary was US$19 million, US$901, 050 was spent on accommodation for 6, 007 nights. Puerto Ricans were also employed as creative personnel and for providing other services such as catering; 7, 242 jobs were created. Trinidad has an exhaustive expenditure form that covers a broad range of local services. The enforcement of these requirements in the various countries is debateable. However, the Cayman Islands have developed a system that encourages employment of local services and the submission of a detailed expenditure report. The commission offers film crews a 30% rebate on qualified expenditure, provided that a detailed report of the funds paid for local services is presented. Only the commissions in Dominica, Jamaica, Puerto Rico and Trinidad and Tobago have requirements like those seen in the Cayman Islands. In order to have consistent responses, film commissions should, in accordance to their country’s international obligations, attach requirements to their incentives. Nonetheless, the approaches by the commissions are forward thinking as it seeks to provide employment and capture the economic impact of each production in their respective country. Most of the regional commissions employ a pull strategy where their services are catered to invite foreign film crews. The film commissions in Puerto Rico and Trinidad and Tobago diverge from this view as they offer considerable financial support to local film producers through production assistance grants and technical assistance. Puerto Rican residents, under the Film Fund, can receive funding for the development of their business and financing for short, feature length films, documentaries and other educational activities related to film. A maximum of US$ 50, 000 is allocated for business development while US$1.2 million or 80% of the film budget can be financed by the commission. Firstly, 60% of the budget for the film can be financed by the commission on the condition that 40% of the project is completed; the 60/40 scheme. Secondly, financing of up to US $10, 000 is available for short films. Alternatively, the film commission would buy the local distribution rights of the short film at no more than US $10, 000. The crews are required to submit an application, a business plan, financial statements and a license to operate as a film company. Open calls are made for interested applicants; the open call in January 2010 attracted 26 filmmakers and the commission is now exploring biannual open calls for business development and financing. Additionally, IBERMEDIA, a coalition of Latin American countries, including Spain and Portugal, promotes co-production, funding, distribution and exhibitions amongst the countries. For a period of 13 years, the programme has facilitated filming across the region in an attempt to integrate the regional industry. Technical support such as training in the use and development of new techniques and knowledge exchange is also facilitated via the programme. The Trinidad and Tobago Film Company has a production assistance and scriptwriting developing programme for nationals and residents only. An annual award is granted to assist in developing creativity with the overall aim of stimulating employment.

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Breakdown of Production Logistics in each Territory

Country

Application Form

Application Fee (US$)

Duty Free Entry of Equipment

Immigration Assistance

Time Frame1

Incentives

Local Service Requirement

Production Guide2

Photo Library3

Location /Talent Scouting Assistance

Production Expenditure report requirement

Anguilla

Email letter of intent

$1,000

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2 weeks

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Bahamas

Online

x

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7 days

Cash Rebate7

Highly encouraged but not required

Belize

Online

$250 (film/video) $150 (photography)

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3-30 days8

x

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Partial List

x

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BVI

Online

x

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10 days

x9

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Ministry of Tourism

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Cayman Islands

Online

$150 (film)

!!

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10 days

30 % rebate

Highly encouraged but not required

!!

!!

!!

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Dominica

Online

x

!!

!!

3 days

15 % rebate12

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!!

!!

!!

!!

2 weeks

x

x

Partial List

x

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Dominican Republic

!!

Partial list can be e-mailed

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Guadeloupe Martinique French Guinea

Partial List

Partial List

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Guyana

!!

!!

!!

Jamaica

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!24

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Dominican Republic14

E-mail letter of intent

x!

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Work permits not required

Guadeloupe Martinique French Guinea

E-mail letter of intent

x!

!!

!!

1 days15

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Guyana

E-mail application form

x17

!!

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3 weeks

x

Jamaica

Online

$300

!!

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1 day18

GCT of 17.5 %19

Indirect: Provides contacts of attorneys

45 days

40%22

x25

Highly encouraged but not required

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Ministry of Tourism

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30 % rebate

!26

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!27

Online

1% of the budget21

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St. Vincent & the Grenadines

E-mail

Case by case negotiation (presented to Cabinet)

Case by case negotiation (presented to Cabinet)

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Small 2-4 weeks Large 4-6 weeks

Trinidad & Tobago

Online

x

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1 week

Puerto Rico

1

Highly encouraged but not required Highly encouraged but not required !20 !23

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Time frame to receive permit, customs clearance and immigration approval. Production guides that list local services; talent, catering, accommodation etc. 3 Database of photos; locations on the island (s) such as beaches, caves, mountains etc. 4 The application fee of US$ 1, 000 can be waived on the condition that local services are credited in the final production. 5 The waiver of $US 1, 000 is for local services only. 6 A Destination Management Company, Blue Sea Anguilla for e.g., assist the film crews with finding local services/ talent. 7 Legislation for a cash rebate draft was developed but has to be passed in government. 8 Film crews can receive the all clear to film in 3 days however, depending on the visa requirements; the process can take up to 30 days. 9 There are no set incentives but the commission works with each production team on an individual basis. 10 Film crews are asked to hire a Local Production Manager to assist with permits and other logistics needed to film in the B.V.I. The LPM would act as liaison officer for the film crew and the B.V.I Film Commission. 11 The 30% rebate is based on the funds spent on local services; hence in order to receive the rebate, crews are required to complete an expenditure report. 12 On specified local expenditure for large projects; waiver of bond on imported duty free equipment 13 Film Crews can only access the 15% rebate on local services. 14 The DR has very few requirements; a bill on the film industry, which highlights requirements, was passed in the Senate but has to be passed in the House of Representatives. 15 Granted that all required information is submitted to the commission, the process can take 1 day. 16 Details on the Tax Rebate for International Production (T.R.I.P) are found at www.filmfrance.net/v2/gb/home.cfm?choixmenu=taxcredit Please view the brochure for details on the incentives www.filmfrance.net/telechargement/IncentivesGuide2010.pdf 17 If filming is organized by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), there is an application fee of US $75 and the film permit is US $750 18 Granted that all required information is submitted to the commission, the process can take 1 day. Film crews would be issued a temporary document in lieu of the film license, which can take one week. Given the temporary license, filming can begin after 24 hours. 19 General Consumption Tax on goods purchased in Jamaica Duty-free concessions on equipment, machinery and materials for capital projects (items used to build studios for motion pictures); 70% investment allowance for expenditure on production facility 8.5% tax waiver for hotel services (based on local expenditure); Tax free dividends to shareholders in Recognized Motion Picture (RMP) production companies 20 Foreign crews are required to hire a local production manager or coordinator team. The crew must employ the services of a customs broker; otherwise they run the risk of their equipment being detained. Jamaican services must be sought out before bringing in personnel from overseas. 21 1% of Budget that is allocated to local services (Puerto Rican services) 22 Tax credit on all local services. Tax waiver on hotel stay. Free government locations available. Government hotel fees/taxes waived. 23 In order to gain 40% tax credit, local services must be hired 24 In order to gain 40% tax credit, a financial report detailing local expenditure must be submitted. 25 There are no set incentives but the commission works with each production team on an individual basis. 26 In order to be granted 30% rebate, production expenditure on local services must be presented. 27 In order to be granted 30% rebate, an audited production expenditure of local services must be presented 2

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Film Schools Universities throughout the region offer a cadre of degrees in the arts but at least 9 offer Diplomas, Certificate, Associate and Bachelor Degrees related to audiovisual production. The film programmes offered at the universities regionally are new; the St. Augustine Campus of the University of the West Indies is in its 5th year of teaching while the Cave Hill Campus in Barbados would soon celebrate the graduation of their first class in October 2010. Film schools are located in Barbados, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, and Trinidad and Tobago. The Media Technology Institute in Jamaica has a wide yet targeted set of diplomas and certificates for experienced and upcoming audiovisual producers. Video production and digital design are diploma programmes that are taught over the course of two (2) years. Students are also taught still photography, television directing, screen writing and animation. The Caribbean Institute of Media and Communication (CARIMAC), also located in Jamaica at the University of the West Indies, allows students pursuing Bachelors in Digital Media Production to specialise in related areas such as multimedia, television and social marketing. Web page design and web development are also an integral feature of digital media production and undergraduates are given great insight into these areas. Producers interested in studying film in the Spanish-speaking Caribbean have options in the Dominican Republic and Cuba. Located in the capital of the Santo Domingo, the Universidad Autonoma de Santo Domingo’s school for film and television covers areas such as theory, makeup characterisation, set design for film and television. The programme also offers students the opportunity to complete Spanish courses and become better acquainted with Dominican history.

Film Schools and Degrees Offered ! ! Location

School

Degrees Offered

Barbados

University of the West Indies: Cave Hill. The Errol Barrow Centre for Creative Imagination

Dominican Republic

Universidad Autonoma de Santo Domingo: Escuela de Cine y Televisión de la AUASD

Bachelors of Fine Arts in Creative Arts - Drama Students chose 2 areas of focus - Film - Theatre Technical Photography and AV Media Motion Picture Arts Technician Audiovisual/Film Film and Television Audiovisual

Jamaica

University of the West Indies: Mona Caribbean Institute of Media and Communications (CARIMAC)

B.A. Digital Media Production - Multimedia Students may specialise in - Radio these areas - Social marketing - Television ! - Print/online journalism B.A Television Production

Northern Caribbean University

Trinidad and Tobago

Time Period 3 years

3 years

3 years

Media Technology Institute

B.A Mass Communication Associate Degree in Mass Communication Associate Degree in Video Production

4 years 2 years 2 years

The University of the West Indies: St. Augustine

Diploma in Digital Design B.A Programme in Film Specialities in film studies and film productions

2 years 3 years

Music and Entertainment Technology (certificate) Stage Management and Production Management (Diploma) B.S.A Design Technology and Management Television production, photography, sound and recording engineer, television broadcasting, graphic design, Media and Communications (Higher National Diploma) Which leads into a B.A in Media and Communications from the University of Greenwich B.A Media and Communications Basic Audio Elements (certificate) Digital Photography (certificate)

1 year 2 years

The University of Trinidad and Tobago: The Academy for the Performing Arts Institute of Broadcasting Careers School of Business and Computer Science Ltd.

4 years 6- 8 weeks 2 years 3 months 13 months 8 weeks 8 weeks

! !

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Film Festivals Film festivals generally feature narratives, animations, documentaries feature lengths and short films that can either be a comedy, drama, action or fantasy. The festivals are a celebration of the films but are also a time where producers can network and build relationships with buyers and distributors. There are at least 18 film festivals held in the Caribbean throughout the year. Two common features of the festivals are symposia, which aim to inform upcoming producers of the film industry, and workshops or labs which are designed to teach techniques in film. The symposia panels are often on specific topics such as broadcasting or intellectual property rights.

Upcoming Film Festivals

Guyana Folk Festival Film & Video Festival September 2 - 5, 2010

Workshop facilitators are often very skilled in their field and they therefore teach filmmakers lighting and camera techniques such as shooting at the right angles for a desired outcome. A number of the festivals welcome submissions for competition; the Guadeloupe International Film Festival has opened competitions in feature films, documentaries and short films. The Caribbean Tales Film Festival which took place in Barbados in March 2010, invited filmmakers to make pitches to a panel of prospective investors. The panel included broadcasters, a cinema owner, buyers from the South African Broadcast Corporation and other investors. The filmmakers presented a synopsis of their films. Some of the pitches are highlighted in the segment entitled “rough cuts�.. A number of Caribbean film festivals occur outside of the region and are organized by the diaspora. Festivals such as the Havana Film Festival and the Guyana Folk Festival Film and Video Festival are held in New York City while the CaribbeanTales Film Festival also takes place in Toronto. These festivals capture the lives of the home country which in turn attracts Caribbean nationals living abroad to attend. It is also an opportunity for regional filmmakers to showcase their talent in a larger market. Some of the film festivals in the region are tourism products, in other words, they are to a large extent designed to attract tourists. Few regional films are featured. For example, the Bahamas International Film Festival 2009, featured 68 films 26 of which were from the US, 18 from Europe and there was a spotlight on 6 Caribbean films. The 2009 Nevis Film Festival showcased 10 films; three were co-production between Nevis and the U.S., France and Haiti and Cuba and Spain. The other films were from France and the United States

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The Trinidad & Tobago Film Festival September 22 - October 5, 2010

The Montreal International Black Film Festival September 22 - October 3, 2010

Bahamas International Film Festival December 1 - 5, 2010

CaribbeanTales Film Festival - Toronto February 23 - March 2, 2011

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Rough Cuts: CT Marketplace Pitches KINGSTON PARADISE MOVIE

and sense of humour that links our islands. The series will not be restricted to the English speaking Caribbean but will include the French, Spanish and Dutch islands, embracing all the cultures that enrich the region.

This is a funky off beat story set in Kingston, Jamaica that has already been shot in the HD format for a 90-minute flick. But it’s a flick with a purpose. It’s a story that follows a young man and woman, who’s destiny becomes intertwined when a stolen car causes them to re-evaluate their lives and define their own paradise. Rocksy, a young taxi driver/part-time pimp, his best friend Malt and prostitute woman Rosie, define their own paradise as they change their crazy lives when an expensive car is stolen is because the find forces them to know themselves in an obvious way, in a beautiful cinematic journey that travels there and becomes redeemed in the chaos and complexity of their very ordinary, everyday lives. Target Market: It’s a drama that hopes to inspire and uplift a younger adult audience, particularly the marginalized inner-city youth of Kingston and the Caribbean. But of course it is for an older audience as well, within the Caribbean and beyond. Production Budget: US$160,000 this includes the first rough cut. The project has three co-producing partners. We of course, didn’t have this to work with. We only had in CASH, US $32,000 and HUGE help ‘in kind’. The film was shot in summer 2009. Post-Production Budget: After the first rough cut in Jamaica, to professional post-produce, which would involve a 35mm film transfer, for exhibition purposes for festivals, theatrical release, television, DVD’s and for international sales and distribution, we would need another US$250,000. Contacts: Mary Wells Director/Producer filmeart@yahoo.com Volume 1 September - November 2010

Target Market: While the films are about childhood, they are not made for children, but are meant for general audiences. The target markets for the series are:

Mary Wells, Director - Kingston Paradise Mary Wells is an independent Director/ Writer and Producer currently based in Jamaica. Over the last twenty years her work has consisted mainly of documentaries and small dramas with children for the Caribbean region. A short documentary, Now Jimmy! was awarded ‘Outstanding Documentary from the Caribbean’ from the then Sheryl Lee Ralph Film & Music Festival, 1999 and was accepted in the prestigious ‘Toronto International Film Festival, 2002. She has also lived and worked on projects in the USA, Europe and in Southern Africa. She continues to do Film/TV production work of all kinds and the Kingston Paradise movie is her first feature narrative film. A PROPOSAL FOR A TELEVISION SERIES OF HALF-HOUR DRAMAS FROM THE CARIBBEAN REGION Growing up Caribbean proposes a series of 13 half-hour dramatic films, produced on several Caribbean islands. The films would depict a childhood story that illustrates life on each island, each one written and directed by a writer and director from the island. The cumulative effect of the series would be to celebrate or reveal what it means to grow up in the Caribbean and to share with the region and the rest of the world the vibrancy, beauty, complexity www.creativeindustriesexchange.org

(a) Television networks in countries around the world that have large Caribbean and African populations, such as Canada, the USA, the UK, France, Germany and Holland, Africa etc. (b) Caribbean regional television stations (some 14) (c) International and regional film and television Festivals and markets. Budget: The budget is divided into three phases: Development, Pre-and Production, and Post- production. We are actively in the Development phase. Until the scripts and countries are finally chosen, the budget cannot be finalized. Approximately 93% is allocated for pre and post-production and 7% for marketing. A more detailed proposal will be provided upon request. Contacts: Penelope Hynam Producer/Director pennyhynam@gmail.com Tel 246.823.0013 or Beatrice Hallenbarter Co-producer/Production Manager bh@caribbean-island-film.com Tel 246.253.9654 CaribbeanTales is a Toronto-based multimedia company that brings together local, regional and international partners to showcase and promote Caribbean film

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Ms. Penny Hynam has had a 30-year career in film and television production in North America and Barbados. A graduate of the University of Alberta with an Honours degree in English and Theatre, she worked in Toronto at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and CITY television for a total of 5 years, co-founded the documentary production company Mobius Productions, worked as a Script Reader for Telefilm Canada and as a Script Supervisor/Continuity on the set of over 40 movies and television dramas shot in Canada, Europe and the US between 1975 and 1991.

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BACKSHOTS

She was the founding Assistant Director of the Canadian Centre for Advanced Film Studies, a prestigious training school set up by Director Norman Jewison, and President for two years of Toronto Women in Film and Television. In Barbados since 1992, she has worked in heritage and historic site conservation as Director of the National Trust and Project Director of the historic restoration and creation of the George Washington House and Museum and continued to work in filmmaking, combining her love for social history and film. She co-produced the documentary Chattel House with Gladstone Yearwood, conceived and produced the awardPenny Hynam, Director, winning docu-drama George Washington in Barbados Growing up Caribbean (shown daily at the George Washington House historic site) and was a Senior Producer for the Caribbean Media Corporation’s coverage of the Beijing Olympic Games in 2008. She was the founding President of the newly formed Barbados Film and Video Association. Beatrice Hallenbarter Co-producer & Production Manager Although originally Swiss, Ms. Hallenbarter has lived, studied and worked in Hamburg Germany for the past 25 years, where she studied for an MA in Linguistics, American Literature, Language and Culture and Teaching of Adults between 1984 and 1989. Due to her former commercial practice mainly in the field of Import - Export and Marketing for large US Computer Companies such as IBM and Digital Computers she started towards the end of her studies to teach Adults in the use of various Computer Programs and conducted vocational training in administrative and other communication skills for businesspeople. In 1993 when she finally did an internship for a feature film she found her true passion and love for a career. Since that time she has worked in the film industry and leads a very successful career as a Production Manager and Line Producer for TV and Movie feature films and documentaries, as well as conducting occasional vocational training for new people in the Production Department. Thus from her home-base in Hamburg, Germany she has travelled and conducted film shoots all through Europe, Turkey, Morocco and the Caribbean. She was head of production of a shoot for 2 x 90-minutes feature films for German TV in Barbados. Due to the very positive experience she had in Barbados, she decided to start a small International Film and Service Company in Barbados which is now actively developing products for shooting in the Caribbean, the first of which is a major movie for television from Lisa Films of Austria, to be shot in Tobago in June 2010.

What happens when the nice-girl meets the rude-boy? Zoology student Winifred Burke (21) and her undercover lover Reese seem an unlikely pair. But are things ever really as they seem? While images of the Caribbean evoke sensual and sexual pleasures, the culture of sexual violence which pervades the region remains a taboo topic. A starstudded cast including Soca Queen Alison Hinds and Barbadian/Canadian actress Alison Sealy-Smith brings to the big screen a Caribbean tragedy of sex, vengeance and betrayal. From the laid-back ghetto communities of Cave Hill, Barbados, an area known more for academia and middle-class respectability, springs a story where perception and truth are questioned, relationships challenged, and choices made that can no longer be reversed. Back Shots as benchmark: This feature-length drama by Barbadian/Canadian writer/director Cabral ‘LARC’ Trotman marks the first of its kind artistically. Fusing musical elements with theatrical poetics, the director’s vision is supported by research into the development of an authentic Caribbean film aesthetic. Its unique film language, voice and methodology all serve to create a piece that acts as an artistic educational reference for generations to come and celebrates the creative dynamism of the region. It is at once a unique blend of old and new school cinematographic artistry and a trenchant rendering of the violation of the human spirit. Target Market: Our target demographic of 18-44 year olds is based on market research valuation and an assessment of the needs of the region in relation to gun violence, sexual violence and HIV/AIDS. The film inspires dialogue about these issues, creating awareness and helping to bring about change. Distribution Strategy: Back Shots will be included in reputable international film festivals in order to secure Caribbean and North American theatrical distribution and licensing and distribution of the DVD and Soundtrack regionally and internationally. Cross marketing and educational

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campaigns with regional organisations dedicated to addressing sexual violence and HIV/AIDS will ensure our target audience is reached and dialogue about the traumatic impact of sexual assault is brought to the forefront in a unique, creative and unconventional way. Financial Requirements: The film is approximately 60% complete. Funding is currently required to complete the final production phase, post-production, marketing and distribution phases of the project. Funds needed for completion (including post-production and marketing): USD $257,450*

Cabral Trotman, Director - Back Shots Cabral ‘LARC’ Trotman is a Bajan/Canadian Filmmaker and Arts Educator. On completion of the three-year Film & Television program at Humber College he shadowed Malcolm Lee, cousin of famed director Spike Lee for three months on the film Undercover Brother. After this professional experience LARC finally emerged as a self-proclaimed filmmaker, truly understanding the execution of the art form for the first time in that capacity. He then joined the director roster at Dante Entertainment where he made the Toronto underground classic Where I’m From for recording artist Black-I still considered one of the strongest conceptualizations in Toronto rap music videos to date. Shortly after his tenure at Dante Entertainment, LARC lost his older brother to a horrible act of violence in front of their apartment building in Rexdale. He then decided that it was critical to play a small role in creating safe spaces where young people could acquire skills while discovering positive outlets of expression. He started by designing and facilitating filmmaking workshops in lowincome inner-city communities. He was then approached by the Community Safety Secretariat, City of Toronto, to direct The Survivors Project: Voices from the Inside Out! a film that looks at the impact of gun violence on mental health among young black youth in Toronto. *Back

Shots screener and breakdown of the budget available on request.

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LARC is currently a Technical Officer for the Film Unit at the Errol Barrow Centre for Creative Imagination, University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus, Barbados, where he plays an integral role in the development of films and filmmakers through the BFA Creative Arts program. He is currently producing his first Bajan drama Back Shots with aims to set a bench mark for Barbadian cinematic storytelling while providing a critical voice and face to the taboo topic of the culture of sexual violence which pervades the Caribbean. Contact: Cabral ‘LARC’ Trotman Writer/Director, Skylarc Pictures No. 2, Lot No. 5 Reservoir Road, Lodge Hill, St. Michael, Barbados 246.267.5401 thirtyfpsworkshop@gmail.com www.backshotsthefilm.com For Press and Media Inquiries: Patrice Benn Benn Media Group patrice@bennmediagroup.com 416.456.0031 RUM THE CONCEPT Pudgy Productions Ltd. is a highly creative marketing solutions company focused primarily on video productions and television media solutions. We also specialize in various other media and strategic marketing concepts as well as corporate restructuring and business development. With several portfolios under our directorship, all our products are created in-house. Pudgy Productions is a wellrounded solutions company for all your media, marketing and business development needs. We will take your project from rough idea to successful completion. Rum the Concept is an educational and entertaining travel and cultural series designed to provide an entertaining and educational television viewing experience for the Caribbean and International community, while providing insight to the History, Current Culture and Future of Rum and its own immediate culture through out the Caribbean. The product shall cover the following areas:

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• Cooking with Rum (a Master Chef’s recipes using Rum as an ingredient) • Future evolution of Rum Chocolate - Duane Dove)

(Rum

and

Target Market: The target audience is comprised of two primary classes and one secondary class. Primary Class: The implied social drinker who is independent (or wants to be) and the Rum connoisseur or aristocrat drinker (professional taster) Secondary Class: Individuals who are interested in world history and understanding the totality of cultures throughout the Caribbean To enhance the viewing experience, there will be two main presenters appearing throughout the series with different interpretations, as well as a third guest professional chef personality: the experienced - a professional Bar owner/Mixologist; the layman - a social drinking enthusiast/Limer; and the Chef - the guide to lead us through a smorgasbord of rum-inspired delights. Also included is a Tour Guide: a narrative personality that takes viewers through the history of rum and the future incarnations. This will be a female personality who will bring balance to a mainly male dominated market. Ladies do have a presence with Rum and they represent an important unexplored market. Distinctive Features: The following features will dictate the entertainment and educational experience of the series. The integration of a professional production team (lighting, camera angles, shot selection and shot sequences) with a relaxed Caribbean feel (dialogue, acting, set design and location). Information on the history will be entertaining and informative with information not commonly known about world history. It will paint an exciting picture of Caribbean history and the surprising level of impact it had on world history.

• History of Rum (from it’s birth and early Explanations as to why the great variety of evolution - Buccaneer era) rums taste the way they do and all the • Types/Classification of Rum parallels to wines (i.e. the culture of the region, French Rums tend to taste more like • Distilling techniques and variations Cognac, etc.) • Cultures of Rum (Rum shop, Sports Bar, Unique Cocktails): a cultural exploration of the unedited culture of the Caribbean www.creativeindustriesexchange.org

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The Rum in environments will appeal to everyone in the Caribbean as it will show our great similarities co-existing with subtle differences in our social cultures and behaviours. We are truly one Caribbean, each with separate personalities. The future of Rum will be the introduction to future series showing the global location of Rum in environments. Rum’s impact on professional groups and the accreditations throughout the world can then be explored. Viewers will have an understanding and appreciation of the artisans that created and continue to blend the incredibly versatile Rum. Production Budget: The production cost is $US 80,000.

Andre Crichlow, Director - Rum the Concept Founder of Pudgy Production Ltd., André Crichlow, to some appears as an unlikely candidate with such a passion for video production. A versatile individual, evident in his undergraduate background in Aeronautical Engineering and a BBA in business administration with a focus in marketing. André’s first love is rooted in the roar of an engine. He has raced cars, power boats, motor cycles, and even flew light aircraft. He was able to channel and fuse this passion for life and motor sports into a symbiotic relationship and further expressed it through video production. As a youth, he exhibited an uncanny ability to recite almost word for word the dialog and description of scenes of choice movies with remarkable detail. This skill translated into an analytical approach to experiencing movies. His first taste of video production was as a freelance associate producer and director of the first ever Drag Racing program in Trinidad & Tobago. Andre now produces the longest running Caribbean motor sports program “Paradise Motorsports” featuring events and lifestyles in the region. His passion also extends to music, and is evidenced by his production of a series of short clips called “Postcards from Paradise”. This covers live performances by “not yet discovered” artists and musicians. The latest creation from this Producer / Director is “Rum the Concept”; one would say an expression of another passion… for local rums. Andre’s love for the Caribbean, his innate ability as a storyteller and his keen eye as a producer fuels his drive to be a major force in the Caribbean film industry. Contacts: Dr. Cherly-Ann Wharwood Mr. Andre Crichlow Mr. Curtis Crichlow Email: andrecrichlow@gmail.com

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FREEDOM RUN Freedom Run is a Drama/Thriller based on a true story. Police and armed forces of Barbados, Trinidad and St. Vincent converge on the scene of a high profile secret meeting of a sting operation to bring down Winston Leroy Hall, Barbados’ most wanted man. Having been raised by his single parent mother, Winston’s life had been shaped more by the criminal culture of Barbados than by his upbringing at home. With an absentee father in the mix he has grown to run with a bad crowd, in an atmosphere filled with alcohol and drug abuse. One night, in an attempted robbery, Winston and two other young men, Peter Bradshaw and David Oliver, shoot and kill a white plantation owner and are later picked up by Sergeant Jeffrey Grimes of the Royal Barbados Police Force. After six days of interrogation and torture, Oliver confesses to the crime and is taken to court with his accomplices to be charged, along with Bradshaw’s brother Errol, implicated as an accessory to the crime. Justice is delayed as the young men escape from the court’s compound. The police and armed forces of Barbados hunt them relentlessly. Twenty-one days later, a tip to the police results in Errol’s apprehension. However, Winston remains at large. Four years pass and it seems as though Winston has dropped off the planet. The police have no new leads even after beating and interrogating his fifteen-year-old brother, outraging the citizens of Barbados. Just as the case grows cold and the Barbadians lose interest, Winston is caught as he tries to stowaway onboard a ship called the Pacific Princess, which is en route to an island called Mayreau. Winston is returned to Barbados, convicted and sentenced to hang for murder along with his other two cohorts, but has other plans for his own future. The three condemned murderers once again escape, this time from maximum security one dark, rainy night that put all of Barbados on edge. The Armed Forces of Barbados once again combine to catch Winston Hall who remains elusive and at large, as the other men are rounded up. Police attempts fail to bring him in and cause even more unease in Barbados as they bomb and tear gas local caves. Close behind Winston, the police are constantly frustrated by his wit and cunning as he reaches iconic status in Barbados. Further complicating matters, a sympathetic public interferes with justice and confound police, aiding Winston by keeping him hidden. Six years pass and Winston becomes a constant topic of conversation as many are convinced that the police have killed him and dumped his body at sea. However, this notion is soon proven false as a newsflash puts all Barbadians on alert, when Winston is arrested on the neighboring island of Trinidad. The now Commissioner Jeffrey Grimes returns Winston to Barbados amidst a heavy police presence that causes a media frenzy. And Winston is once again incarcerated, spending a year in jail, until one sunny day he makes yet another daring escape. Winston’s freedom however remains elusive for he is once again goes into hiding, until tracked down by police who eventually end his life. It is perceived that Freedom Run will: • Accelerate the development of the local and regional film industry, creating a Caribbean product to international standards. • Earn the region foreign exchange through international distribution • Highlight the Audio-Visual industry as an alternative export industry for Barbados and the region • Facilitate a transfer of skills from highly skilled persons from outside of the Caribbean working with locals

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• Generate employment within the fledgling film industry in the Caribbean

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Danielle Dieffenthaller (Director and Line Producer of Freedom Run) is a graduate of Ryerson Polytechnic University • Promote the Caribbean internationally as a and is the co-founder of the television tourism destination using the powerful production company Earth TV. As part of medium of film Earth TV, she has produced and directed several music videos (Big Truck - Machel • Promote Caribbean music and culture Montano, Wham Bam - David Rudder, How Many More -John King and many others).She • Promote Caribbean integration since cast and crew will be drawn from different parts has also written and directed several programmes including a television of region environmental series, Carnival features for • Promote the adage that crime does not pay pay-per-view television, as well as several documentaries including features for the • Allow the world to see a true Caribbean Special Olympics Caribbean Team. Danielle is story the producer, director and co-creator of the popular Trinidadian series Westwood Park, • Share a piece of modern Caribbean history which ran for an unprecedented six seasons throughout the region and is in international Primary Target Audience: The biggest cinema going audience - 15 - 30 syndication.   She has since founded another years old is the primary target audience but production company, Diefferent Style Flims, the film will also have appeal for older adults. and has released her second series The Reef in 2008, which is about to be distributed Georgiana Adams throughout the Caribbean and in North (Screenplay Writer of Freedom Run) is the America.  author of two books Winston Hall, guilty or innocent? A True Life Story which was based CORENTYNE THUNDER on the story of Winston Hall, a convicted murderer, who escaped from police custody three times and Glory to Glory which is an Set in countryside of British Guiana in 1940, an inspirational and motivational book about the affair with an ambitious young man from the fall and redemption of mankind. She is the city forces an impressionable young woman to recipient of four National Independence confront the possibility of a new life for herself Festival of Creative Arts (NIFCA) Bronze out from under the grip of a family bound Awards for Literary Arts. She is the co-writer together by the wounds of the past. with Kelvin Mason of the script Freedom Run Corentyne Thunder is a film adaptation of the which is based on her book about Winston groundbreaking novel by Edgar Mittelholzer. Hall. She has also written a small booklet The screenplay follows the story of Kattree, called Asthma - A Mother’s Nightmare which is Beena and their father Ramgolal, a tightly knit about the devastating fight with asthma, family who scratch out a simple life in the allergies and eczema that became a huge part Corentyne region of Guyana. Kattree and Beena make very different decisions that of her life through her daughter’s sickness. change their lives forever. At its core Corentyne Thunder is very much about the Alison Saunders (Producer of Freedom Run) is the Writer- human question of what to hold on to and Director-Executive Producer of the award- what to let go of, as we move through our winning, Hit For Six!, the first film to be lives. Does our past define us? Or do we have commercially exported from Barbados. In the ability to create a future for ourselves, in 2005, she founded SFA Communications and spite of our past? On a broader canvas, the ten years later she started a film and video story parallels the birth of Guyana’s production company, Blue Waters Productions consciousness as a nation breaking the bonds Inc. Alison has written, directed and produced of its colonial beginnings. countless television PSA’s, programmes, documentaries and dramas with an The Vision: educational focus over the last twenty years. The inspiration for this film comes from the These have covered a range of issues including need to have a Caribbean cinema that can step youth oriented issues such as HIV/AIDS, into the spotlight. That need is also fired by a violence, gender, sexuality and other social desire to share with audiences around the issues. She is a Barbadian/Trinidadian with a world, not just the superficial beauty of Masters in Television Production and PR from Guyana and its people, but something deeper Syracuse University and an MBA from the as well…to share our passion, our humor, and University of the West Indies.  In 2004 Alison our unique preoccupation with language. In wrote, produced and directed a 13-minute other words, the film would share with the drama, The Second Innings in London while she world the humanity of these characters and hopefully, to have the world find their attended the Metropolitan Film School. humanity in them. Volume 1 September - November 2010

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Financing: The strategy for financing the film is to mobilize private equity investors in Guyana and also from the Diaspora around the world: Canada, USA and Europe. We have created a tight but realistic budget and shooting schedule, the plan is to bring a financially viable film to the international film markets. The foundation of this strategy is one that boasts a core production team with over 40 years of experience in independent filmmaking and alliances of support spread across the Caribbean. The film project was one of eight chosen recently by UNIDO for the CEMA award and will represent Guyana from the Caribbean region, to an international audience. The cash budget of the film is US $800,000 Marketing Plan: Strong relationships with radio programs, newspapers, and internet channels that cater to the Caribbean Diaspora will give Corentyne Thunder an edge in reaching the millions of Caribbean people around the world. This initial grass-roots roll out will give the film the opportunity to build momentum by word-ofmouth. This proven marketing plan is one that was used with great success most recently for Slumdog Millionaire and Once. We also intend to capitalize on the director’s fan base from his over 40 plus television series and movies, as well as his notoriety within the Caribbean community to provide an excellent platform to launch our promotional campaign. In addition, an impressive lineup of artists for the World Music soundtrack will give a boost to the film’s awareness and have a strong impact on the overall revenue stream.

Marc Gomes, Director - Corentyne Thunder Actor/director Marc Gomes has had a prolific career on television and beyond. Born and raised in Guyana, Marc Gomes immigrated to Canada at the age of 11 and attended high school and university in Toronto. He graduated from The Ryerson University Theatre School with a BFA in TheaterPerformance, and went on to critical acclaim at several of Canada’s most esteemed theaters in notable productions of, As You Like It, A Slow Dance On the Killing Ground, Edmond, A Taste of Honey and the North American premiere of Ryszard Kapuscinski’s The Emperor. Continued on page 19 17


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CaribbeanTales Worldwide Distribution takes Caribbean Films to Toronto CTWD Celebrates its International Launch by bringing 25 Top Producers to the Toronto International Film Festival CaribbeanTales Worldwide Distribution Inc, the first ever film distribution company of its kind in the English-speaking Caribbean, will bring twenty-five (25) top Caribbean producers and filmmakers to Toronto this fall, to take part in its unique Market Development Program and participate in the 2010 Toronto International Film Festival 2010.

The United Nations Industrial Development Organisation (UNIDO) will fund the participation of six established regional producer, all of whom are recipients of the 2009 UNIDO Cinematic & Entrepreneurship Motivation Awards (CEMA). They are: wellknown producer/director Alison Saunders (Hit for Six) from Barbados, filmmakers Che Rodriguez, and Rubadiri Victor from Trinidad, Clement Richards from Dominica, St Lucian music video director Davina Lee, and L.A.-based Guyanese filmmaker and actor Marc Gomes.

Launched regionally in Barbados in May 2010 with the Vision Statement “Taking Caribbean Films to the World”, CTWD aims to be the “go to” solution for Caribbean filmmakers seeking to penetrate the international marketplace, and international buyers looking for quality UNIDO is also funding the participation of Caribbean-themed content. four outstanding producers selected for the exceptionally high quality of their submitted “There is an explosion of content coming out projects. They include: celebrated Trinidadian of the Caribbean and a need for a focused writer /producer Tony Hall, accomplished distribution strategy to ensure that this gets Jamaican film and television director/ the best deals on the international market.” producer Mary Wells, and Kirk Buchanan, said CEO and accomplished award-winning Deputy CEO of the Creative Production & Canadian-Trinidadian filmmaker Frances- Training Centre Ltd & CTV Cable Channel. Anne Solomon. Already the company boasts Innovative Montreal-based Canadian a distribution catalogue of over 50 films and animation company Toon Boom and UNIDO television programs by some of the finest will jointly support the participation of awardfilmmakers from the Caribbean and its winning animator Camille Selvon Abrahams Diaspora. from Trinidad and Tobago. The classy inaugural Catalogue will be unveiled in September when the company hosts a Market Development Program for the selected Caribbean producers, aimed at supporting the growth of a vibrant worldclass Caribbean film and TV industry. This will include an intensive 3-day Market Incubator (September 6-9th), a Caribbeanthemed Networking Launch Party on September 7th, and a Marketplace Brunch (September 13th). Participants will hone their project proposals through intensive analyses and interventions with international consultants, that will prepare them to participate in the Toronto International Film Festival, where they will take advantage of many networking opportunities with Canadian and international partners and buyers. More than fifty (50) producers applied to this year’s CTWD Market Development Program. The final list of participants represents a Who’s Who of Caribbean filmmaking. 18

Invest Barbados will support five established Barbadian producers : Penelope Hynam from Caribbean Island Film, Mahmood Patel (Bridgetown Film Festival/the Film Group), Cabral Trotman (Skylarc Pictures), Rommel Hall (Jesus Army Productions) and producer Lisa Harewood. The Canada Council for the Arts is supporting five accomplished independent Canadian filmmakers to participate in the CTWD Program: award-winning filmmaker Dawn Wilkinson, celebrity presenter and director/ producer Sharon Lewis, NYU graduate Ian Harnarine, talented writer/director Louis Taylor, and prolific documentary maker Lana Lovell. Finally CTWD is proud to announce partsubsidies for attendance by three Diaspora producers: Mariel Brown (The Solitary Alchemist), from Trinidad, and US-based directors Vashti Anderson (Jeffrey's Calypso), www.creativeindustriesexchange.org

and Melisssa Gomez (Share and Share Alike). The CTWD Market Incubator Program will be led by respected international consultants including NY-based Marketing and Distribution specialist Michelle Matterre, and Tanya Mudaly, who is Commissioning Editor for Drama at the South African Broadcasting Corporation. Their participation is made possible through grants from the Caribbean Export Development Agency, and the Commonwealth Foundation. CTWD is founded by award-winning Canadian-Trinidadian producer/director Frances-Anne Solomon. Other principals of the company are economist and CTWD Board Chair Dr Keith Nurse who is also Director of the Shridath Ramphal Center at UWI’s Cave Hill Campus in Barbados; international media personality, producer and marketing specialist Lisa Wickham, and talented Jamaican-American producer/director Mary Wells. CTWD is a member of the Barbados Business Enterprise Corporation that provides Seed and Venture Capital Services

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continued from page 17

His work in the theater led to appearances in leading roles in many TV movies and series. He then moved on to star in several television series including Lightning Force, The Crow: Stairway to Heaven, Sue Thomas: FBeye and ABC’s Commander in Chief. Recently he has been seen on Criminal Minds for CBS, Detention for Lifetime and Medium on NBC. He was the recipient of the 2008 Guyana Independence Day Award of Excellence for his body of work as an actor, and a role model and inspiration to the Guyanese Diaspora. Gomes has directed several plays and wrote and directed the short film, Stir Crazy, which made film festival appearances in the U.S. and abroad in 2002 and ’03. As a guest teaching-artist member of The Unusual Suspects Theater Company, Gomes volunteered with underage offenders in the Los Angeles penal system. The company works with at risk youth, using aspects of theater; writing, staging and performance, as a means to foster pride, self-confidence and racial tolerance. He has also been teaching and coaching actors and directors, utilizing the basics of Kristin Linklater’s work, which emphasizes attaining a free body and voice as the foundation for the actor to be grounded and fully expressed. He works with actors, Roma Maffia (Nip Tuck, Internal Affairs,), Taylor Nichols (Barcelona, Mind of the Married Man) among others, and directors such as Bryce Zabel (Poseidon Adventure, Dark Skies,) and Ken Haines (Sue Thomas: FBeye, ‘Til Death Do Us Part) Marc is a long standing member of Angel City TryWorks, a writing and performance collective that counts Taylor Nichols, Raymond Barry and Gary Bairos among its members. Marc is currently fine-tuning a big screen adaptation of the classic Caribbean novel Corentyne Thunder, which he also plans to direct on location in Guyana and Trinidad. The project is a recipient of the CEMAward, a UNIDO initiative, which facilitates technical and development assistance to a select group of film projects from the Caribbean Region. He is now in the process of financing the project through various corporate, government and private equity sources in N. America, Europe and the Caribbean

UNIDO/CEMA Awardees to participate in CaribbeanTales Incubator in Toronto CaribbeanTales Worldwide Distribution Inc (CTWD) is partnering with the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), Caribbean Export and the Canada Council for the Arts to hold the First CaribbeanTales Film and Television Market Incubator scheduled to take place from September 7-9. Six recipients of the UNIDO-funded Cinematic Entrepreneurship Motivation Awards (CEMA) have already been confirmed to attend. The primary objective of the awards is to help promote and stimulate creative industries in the Caribbean region. Through the CEMAs UNIDO has responded to initiatives by the CARICOM Secretariat and the Caribbean Export Development Agency (Caribbean Export) to pilot an innovative system of sector specific development.

The CEMAs, which also involve business linkage inputs, are provided over an 18 month period to inter-country production teams with a regional outreach during a phased programme corresponding to the main stages of the filmmaking process. The goal is to facilitate the development of film producers to whom direct help will be given in their collective work of transforming their creative ideas into finished products as benchmarks for meeting global standards. This project is unique in the UN system because it is based on an innovative concept of channeling technical assistance to award "special target groups" with initiatives for "cultural-industrial entrepreneurship"

The CEMAs are non-monetary awards that are given solely in terms of technical assistance interventions, thus specifically adding value to the chain of production involved in filmmaking.

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SRC releases survey results on Regional Audiovisual Sector This article presents the key findings of two (2) surveys conducted by the Shridath Ramphal Centre for International Trade Law, Policy and Services (SRC) at the CaribbeanTales Film Festival, Symposium and Marketplace which ran from February 24, to March 02, 2010. The surveys gathered information from participants from the audiovisual sector as well as the wider group of visitors that came to Barbados for the festival. The goal of the latter was to estimate the economic impact of the festival. The audiovisual producers survey aims, on the other hand, to give some perspective on the business operations of firms in this sector. Participant/Visitor Results Amongst the 27 respondents to the visitors survey at Caribbean Tales, 70% were female and the majority was between the ages of 34-41. The occupation of most respondents was audiovisual producers (42%) while others were film buyers/distributors and cultural managers/administrators. The other occupations represented at the festival were festival managers, film commissioners, music industry personnel, media, tourism, academic, and students among others. Approximately 90% of the visitors that participated in the festival travelled to Barbados specifically to attend the film festival. The extra-regional visitors were mainly from Canada (18%), US (15%), South Africa (7.4%) and the UK (4%). The bulk of visitors were from the Caribbean, namely Trinidad and Tobago (25%), Jamaica, the OECS and the French Caribbean all at 4%. Figure 2 depicts the country of residence for the participants of the survey. In terms of airlift, 29% of the participants travelled on Caribbean Airlines, 15% on American Airlines, 11% on LIAT and 7.4% on each of British Airways, Jet Blue, and Virgin. Over 50% of the visitors to the festival stayed at the Savannah Hotel and most visitors had an average stay of five (5) nights. Approximately 30% of the respondents’ daily expenditure was between US $ 25 – 40, 26% spent less than $25, while 22% spent between $40 - 60, excluding the cost of accommodation. When accommodation is factored in the average expenditure would fall between $175 to $210 making the total expenditure per person close to $1,000. The length of stay and the average expenditure for the festival compares favourably with the annual averages for the tourism sector. The results indicate a substantial economic impact for the hotel and airline industry relative to the number of visitors for the Caribbean Tales Film Festival. Volume 1 September - November 2010

Photos from The Best of CaribbeanTales Networking Event hosted by the Commonwealth Foundation

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Figure 1: Occupation of participants

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Figure 2: Country of Usual Residence

Audiovisual Producer Results Twenty five individuals from the Caribbean Tales Film Festival participated in the AV producer survey. Most businesses were registered in Barbados followed by Trinidad and Tobago which had the most visitors from abroad at the festival. Thirty percent (30%) of the businesses were registered in Barbados while 23% were registered in Trinidad and Tobago. Figure 3 demonstrates that the majority (50%) of the participants were engaged in the audiovisual sector as independent producers followed by 15.4% of the participants who were broadcasters. Figure 3 highlights the occupation of the participants. The results showed mixed years of experience for the producers from two (2) years in business to thirty five (35) years. Amongst 14 respondents from Barbados and Trinidad, the Trinidadians had on average, 23 years of business while the Barbadian participants had approximately 15 years. These results may reflect the presence of an older film industry in Trinidad than in Barbados. Over 45% of participants identified feature films as the majority share of income for their business. The survey sought to gather the sources and share of incomes for the producers. Interestingly, sale of producers’ merchandise is successful within their country, less successful regionally but most of the income is from international clients. Only three (3) participants claimed intellectual property, or the collection of royalties, as a source of income.

Figure 3: Aspects of participant involvement Governments and other institutions are making attempts to increase financing, however, the results of the sample survey highlights the countless numbers of entrepreneurs that continues to utilize their personal savings as start-up capital.

The results may indicate that there are not sufficient export activities occurring; the largest share of income is earned from local clients. Export should be a prime source of income and entrepreneurs should therefore take full advantage of the trade and export facilitation available regionally. Secondly, the absence of intellectual property as a source of income may be as a result of poor copyright management or collection. Six participants launched their businesses with 100% personal investment while others received funding from venture capital in addition to their equity. The limited financing available in the Caribbean to fund the creative industry is a common outcry and a critical challenge that needs to be overcome Volume 1 September - November 2010

Figure 4: Country of Registration

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The Bigger Picture: A way forward for film in the Commonwealth Film is a growing and vibrant means of expression in the Commonwealth. All over the Commonwealths 54 countries people are watching and making films, and in some cases, local productions are competing head-to-head at the box office with foreign imports, largely from Hollywood.

cultural expressions and to develop their creative industries. The Convention is gaining acceptance, with 99 signatory countries as at June 2009, albeit only 19 of them from the Commonwealth.

Summary and Recommendations

Since the inception of cinema, film has been dominated by a handful of countries, with the market controlled largely by American companies and their subsidiaries, and to a lesser extent European industries, leaving the cinema of many developing countries on the periphery. People in developing countries have struggled to see their own stories on the cinema screen, and to take those stories to a wider world. Meanwhile, people in developed countries have been denied knowledge of other cultures that could enhance their understanding of the world. There are signs that the picture is changing, not least with technological changes reducing entry costs for filmmaking and offering alternative platforms for distribution. It is worth noting that while the global value of the film industry is US$75 billion, US$55 billion comes from the production and sale of DVDs. While more films than ever are being made, people are increasingly seeing them in places other than a conventional cinema. Rapid technological change is altering the filmmaking and viewing environment. A growing variety of international film festivals has widened the potential for distribution and exhibition, offering a key medium for filmmakers from developing countries to see their work recognised. However, plurality of access remains a challenge, and additional measures are needed to ensure that films reach audiences beyond the professional circuit and the urban centres.

There are already notable Commonwealth success stories, such as Bollywood, which is now producing the highest number of feature films in the world. More recently Nigeria has seen the rapid development of its video industry, serving demand at home and increasingly in international and diaspora markets. There is now greater recognition of the possibilities offered by film as a creative industry, particularly in the context of a digital environment. Yet while some countries recognise the value of supporting and nurturing their film industries, in others its status remains low. The challenges and issues vary from region to region and country to country, reflecting in part different stages of development in film industries. In some countries, there is still a need to promote the value and nurture an appreciation of film. In many Commonwealth countries the challenge is to have films made; in others, films are being made but the challenge is to have them screened for national, regional or international audiences. Additionally, many countries face skills and infrastructure shortages. Almost everywhere, developing country filmmakers struggle to make a living, not least because of the lack of adequate regulatory structures to control copyright and to remunerate artist properly Excerpt from The Bigger Picture: A way forward for film in the Commonwealth, p. 8-9. Š 2009 Commonwealth Foundation. http://www.commonwealthfoundation.com/LinkClick.aspx? fileticket=lPxy-1mUjwM%3d&tabid=313

Meanwhile a significant international instrument in culture, the 2005 UNESCO Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions, has altered the context. The Convention affirms the right of countries to use cultural policy to safeguard the diversity of

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Caribbean Export Development Agency Facilitating the Regional AV Sector Summary and Recommendations The Caribbean Export Development Agency, through support from the EU funded Caribbean Trade and Private Sector Development Program, has been supporting over the past three years the development of the regional audiovisual sector and other “new sectors� which have the potential to propel the region’s economic diversification. These new sectors are principally service and intellectual property industries that are innovation and creativity-intensive. They include spa and wellness, professional services and naturally, the creative industries (e.g. music, audiovisual and fashion). Caribbean creativity in itself is undisputed - the region is recognized as a space rich in cultural heritage, artistic expression and openness to new influences and experimentation. However, there is a very low rate of economic conversion into intellectual capital and net foreign exchange earnings. It is industrial upgrading and the provision of business support mechanisms that will determine the extent to which the region will become truly competitive in the creative industries. This process requires a higher degree of regional, organization and institutionalized support. Caribbean Export therefore has focused most of its attention on the development of regional business support networks (e.g. the Caribbean Audiovisual Network Caribbean Music Industry Network Organization and the Caribbean Fashion Industry Association) which have as their major objective the generation of increased

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export opportunities through regional collaboration. Such collaborative efforts include joint participation in international trade fair events like the Toronto International Film Festival, hosting of regional conferences, training initiatives, lobbying and advocacy, and public education. A major focus will be on building business capacity and providing mechanisms to better facilitate intraregional and international co-productions. As a result of closer collaboration in the creative industries at the regional level, the region has seen an explosion of productivity, political will and institutional developments. Creative industries, especially the audiovisual sector, now feature in the national export strategies of most Caribbean countries. From smaller economies like the Eastern Caribbean states, to larger countries like Dominican Republic, there are now vibrant film producer associations, film commissions/ film offices and even film laws. These are exciting times for the Caribbean audiovisual sector and Caribbean creativity in general and through the 10th European Development Fund and other partnerships Caribbean Export will continue to support these networks and associations as a mainstay of its strategy for the sustainable development of the Caribbean creative industries For more information, please contact the sector specialist and networks facilitator at Caribbean Export, Tonika Sealy: tsealy@carib-export.com

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Yes We CAN The Caribbean Audiovisual Network The scene is a crowded cafeteria at “FEMI”, the Guadeloupe International Film Festival. The air is thick with anticipation and animated conversation in French, Spanish, English, Portuguese, Creole and even Dutch. In February, 2010 members of the Caribbean Audiovisual Network CAN, the newly formed Caribbean Audiovisual Network, spanning 18 countries and 5 language groups, convened the first Annual General Meeting in Guadeloupe.

What is in it for Members? CAN will: • support the professional development of members (Industry professionals) by providing training sessions & workshops

Summary and Recommendations

For years, many passionate individuals and organizations have been lobbying for the creation of a regional body that could be a champion for the industry. In March 2009, a group of stakeholders wrote “The Declaration of Santo Domingo”, declaring the mission of the organization. Today, CAN is a diverse and growing network of stakeholders including producers, distributors, educators, broadcasters, film festivals and film commissioners. CAN’s goal is to promote and strengthen the audiovisual industry in the Caribbean and to provide services and support to members. It is a non‐profit trade association incorporated in Barbados. If you would like to become a member, join the online Google group (link below). Mission: To facilitate business and export development of the regional audiovisual industry and the promotion of Caribbean culture through advocacy, networking and strategic partnerships.

• provide exclusive on-line resources & promotional tools to members • advise members on important issues in the Industry • lobby governments, regional bodies & interest groups to help ensure that legislation is favorable and in the best interests of our industry • seek out institutional support and funding opportunities for members • promote institutional members’ events; initiatives from film festivals, film school programs, etc. • represent members at international industry events Caribbean Export Development Agency (CE) has provided CAN with foundation-building support, and is a collaborating partner in the development of this regional network. Feel free to join the online discussion group at: http://groups.google.com/group/ caribfavsteering?lnk=srg For further information contact Jessica Canham, CAN Representative: jessica@earthbook.tv

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The EPA and the Audiovisual Sector One of the innovative features of the CARIFORUM-EU Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) is the level of market access obtained for the entertainment, cultural or creative industries. The EPA is the first trade agreement from the EU that fully liberalizes trade in creative goods (i.e. Duty Free Quota Free (DFQF) access) and services to a significant extent. The services chapter of the EPA provides market access for CARIFORUM (CARICOM along with the Dominican Republic) firms and professionals in terms of cross border trade, investment, consumption abroad and temporary movement of persons. It also deepens the scope for cultural cooperation under the Cultural Protocol which is premised on the UNESCO Convention. The first key element of the EPA from the perspective of the cultural sector is the level of trade liberalization between the CARIFORUM countries and the EU where for the first time the EU has made a comprehensive offer in the liberalization of entertainment services (CPC 9619) other than audio-visual services.

groups: (a) those involved in the shooting of cinematographic films or television programmes, and (b) a broader list of entertainment services providers involved in cultural activities such as, for example, the recording of music or contributing an active part to cultural events such as literary fairs, festivals, among other activities. From a Caribbean standpoint an important addition is the mention of ‘mas performers and designers’ as a category of service providers. The third key element, which can be considered the main achievement of the Protocol, is the inclusion of Articles 5 and 6 which focus on the audio-visual sector. The provisions of these articles allow for coproductions between producers in the EU and CARIFORUM countries. The co-produced works are to qualify as European works within the EU and as CARIFORUM works where preferential schemes for the promotion of local and regional content are established. This preference is subject to ownership and nationality requirements as well as financial contributions on an 80/20 split for both Parties.

It is in the Protocol on Cultural Cooperation (Annex I to the EPA) which provides the framework within the interest of the audiovisual sector are realized. The Protocol states that the Parties shall cooperate for facilitating exchanges of cultural activities, goods and services, including inter alia, in the audiovisual sector. In addition the Protocol aims to facilitate the implementation of cultural policies that protect and promote cultural diversity, collaboration with the aim of improving the conditions governing exchanges of cultural goods and services and to redress the structural imbalances and asymmetrical patterns which may exist in such exchanges.

The inclusion of the audio-visual sector in the Protocol represents an area of preference for CARIFORUM countries given the sensitivities and the usual exclusion of the audio-visual sector from multilateral and bilateral agreements by the EU and other developed countries. In this sense the Protocol is a complement to the market access commitments under entertainment services because it includes the audio-visual sector which is excluded under the services commitments. From the standpoint of the EU because of the nonbinding provisions on cultural cooperation the inclusion of the audiovisual provisions under the Protocol serves to preclude third countries from using the MFN provision to claim that their own service supplier The Protocol also aims to put into practice the UNESCO Convention. are entitled to equal treatment. Indeed, the preamble of the Protocol states that it intends “to effectively implement the UNESCO Convention and to cooperate From this standpoint the EPA offers a strategic opportunity to the within the framework of its implementation, building upon the regional AV sector once co-productions have been negotiated and principles of the Convention and developing actions in line with its implemented. The key benefits for CARIFORUM countries are that the provisions, notably its Article 14, 15 and 16.” Cultural Protocol: (1) allows access to funding for the AV sector; (2) cooperation on standards to ensure compatibility & interoperability of In summary, the Protocol has three key components. The first relates technologies; (3) facilitates rental & leasing of technical material & to articles in the Protocol that concern issues of exchanges, training equipment; and (4) facilitates the digitalisation of audio-visual and collaborations. The second key element of the Protocol involves archives the temporary movement and entry of artists and other cultural professionals and practitioners. It relates to the movement of two

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AV Sector Groupings and Contacts in the Caribbean Commissions Anguilla Anguilla Tourist Board Twyla Richardson (Ms.) Marketing Officer 264. 497. 2759 twylarichardson@gmail.com www.anguilla-vacation.com

Bahamas Bahamas Film and Television Commission Craig Woods (Mr.) 242.322.8744 (p) cwoods@bahamasfilm.com

Belize Belize Film Commission Office Nigel Miguel (Mr.) 501.663.0110 (p) 501. 610. 3661 (m) 501.227.0102 (f) 310. 210. 2796 (U.S. p) 818. 834. 4515 (U.S. f) nigelmiguel@gmail.com www.nichbelize.org

British Virgin Islands B.V.I Film Commission & Events (Tortola) Rhodni skelton (Mr.) 284. 494. 4119 (Direct Line) 284. 494. 3134 (Main Office) 284. 541. 1941 (mobile) rskelton@bvitourism.com www.bvitourism.com/ FilmCommission.aspx

Cayman Islands

Jamaica

Cayman Islands Film Commission Lesley Thompson (Ms.) 345. 945.0943 (p) 345. 945. 0941 (f) lthompson@dci.gov.ky info@cifilm.ky www.cifilm.ky

Jamaica Film Commission Gillian Mc Donald/Kamesha Turner 876.978.7755 (p) 876.978.3337 ext. 2234 876. 383. 1786 gmcdaniel@jamprocorp.com film@investjamaica.com www.filmjamaica.com

Dominica Dominica Film Commission Anita L. Bully (Ms.) 767. 440. 7028 (p) 767.448.2045 (p) 767.267.7584 (m) 767.448.5840 (f) filmdominica@dominica.dm kaibully@hotmail.com www.discoverdomonica.com

Dominican Republic Dominican Republic Film Commission: The National Film Office (DINAC) Marlon Soto (Mr.) 809. 664. 0004 dinaccultura@yahoo.com mzoto1517@yahoo.com

Guyana Guyana Tourism Authority Carla James (Ms.) Senior Statistics & Research Officer 592. 219. 0094-6 592. 219. 0093 (f) info@guyana-tourism.com www.guyana-tourism.com

Puerto Rico Puerto Rico Film Commission Mariella Pérez Serrano Executive Director 787.758.4747 (p) mperez@puertoricofilm.com www.puertoricofilm.com/en/

St. Vincent & the Grenadines The Ministry of Culture, Urban Development and Electoral Matters Renee’ Baptiste (Minister) Ministry of Culture, Urban Development and Electoral Matters 784.451.2180

Trinidad & Tobago The Trinidad and Tobago Film Company Ltd. Carla Foderingham 868.625. (FILM) 3456 (p) 868.624.2683 (f) cfoderingham@ttfc.co.tt info@trinidadandtobagofilm.com www.trinidadandtobagofilm.com

National Organizations Antigua & Barbuda

Cayman Islands

Jamaica

Motion Picture Association of Antigua and Barbuda Howard Allen (Chairman) hamafilms@gmail.com

Cayman Islands Film & Media Association (to be launched) TBA

Jamaica Film Producers Association Brian St. Juste 876. 381. 0126 timecode@cwjamaica.com

Bahamas

Dominica

Bahamas Film Society www.bahamasfilmsociety.org/

Barbados Barbados Film and Video Association 246. 228.9033, 246.234.3730, 246.429.5357 246. 429.5352 (f) admin@barbadosfilmvideo.com www.barbadosfilmvideo.com

Visual Arts Society of Dominica 767. 245. 5900 767. 616. 8150 767. 448. 4707 info@vosad.org, vosad@gmail.com

Dominican Republic

Belize

Asociacion Dominicana de Profesionales de la Indusries del Cine, Inc (ADOCINE) 809. 299. 3343 peyiguzman@yahoo.es

Film and Media Arts Unit (ICA, NICH) dicarhay@yahoo.com, suzette@nichbelize.org

Guadelope

National Institute of Culture and History (NICH) president@nichbelize.org

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Guadeloupe Cinematographic and Audiovisual Producers Association Dimitry Zandronis (Chairman) Kontras.prod@gmail.com

www.creativeindustriesexchange.org

Puerto Rico Puerto Rico Film Commission Mariella Pérez Serrano Executive Director 787.758.4747 (p) mperez@puertoricofilm.com www.puertoricofilm.com/en/

St. Barthélemy Association Ciné Barth 0590. 27. 80. 11 (p) 0590. 29. 74. 60 (f)

Suriname Suriname Film Academie 00597. 864. 7850 sfa@parbo.net

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Film Schools Barbados

Jamaica

The University of the West Indies: The Errol Barrow Centre for Creative Imagination 246. 417. 4667 (p) 246. 416. 8903 (f) ebcci@cavehill.uwi.edu www.cavehill.uwi.edu/ebcci/

The University of the West Indies: Caribbean Institute of Media and Communications 876.927.1481 (p) 876. 927.0997 (f) www.mona.uwi.carimac.com carimac@uwimona.edu.jm

Cuba

Northern Caribbean University 876.962.2204 (p) ewiles@ncu.edu.jm www.ncu.edu.jm

Cuban Film Institute (ICAIC) www.cubacine.cu Escuela International de Cine y Television www.eictv.org

Dominican Republic Universidad Autonoma de Santo Domingo: Escuela de Cine y Televisi贸n de la AUASD 809.535.8273 (p) viceacademica@uasd.edu.do www.uasd.edu.do

Media Technology Institute 876. 922. 9214-6 (p) 876. 924. 9432 (f) www.mti.edu.jm

Trinidad & Tobago The University of the West Indies: St Augustine 868 622. 2002 ext.3980 / 3981

The University of Trinidad & Tobago 868.642.8888 ext.1605/1170 www.u.tt/media/animation Institute of Broadcasting Careers 868. 624.6615, 781.3561, 680. 3145, 789. 7143,624. 6615/7 (p) Caribbean Film and Media Academy Suite 3, #9 Avenue First, Mucurapo, St James 868.628.5797 http://www.facebook.com/pages/CaribbeanFilm-Media-Academy cfma@gmail.com School of Business & Computer Science Ltd. (Port of Spain) 868. 663. 7227 (p) 868. 663. 1813 (p) 868. 645. 3875 (f) sbcs@sbcstnt.com www.sbcstnt.com

Film Festivals Bahamas

Bahamas International Film Festival 242. 356. 5939 leslie@bintlfilmfest.com programming@bintlfilmsfest.com www.bintlfilmfest.com

Barbados

Havana Film Festival NY +34. 959. 21. 170 festival@festival.icaic.cu www.habanafilmfestival.com www.hffny.com

Dominican Republic

Barbados International Film Festival David Bryan (Mr.) 246. 231.2388 info@barbadosfilmfestival.com

Dominican International Film Festival 212. 627. 3439 ext. 409 info@dominicaninternationalfilmfestival.com www.dominicaninternationalfilmfestival.com

AnimaeKon (features graphic arts and anime films) Melissa Young (Ms.) Omar Kennedy (Mr.) 246. 243.1689 www.animekonexpo.com melissayoung@live.com

La Muestra Internacional de Cine de Santo Domingo 809.561.7718 muestradecine@yahoo.es www.muestradecine.com

Festival of African and Caribbean Film The University of the West Indies: Cave Hill Humanities Department www.humanities.uwichill.edu.bb/filmfestival/

Belize

Belize Film Festival 501. 227. 2110 www.belizefilmfestival.com

Bermuda

Bermuda International Film Festival + 441 293-3456 (p) + 441 293-7769 (f) inf@biff.bm www.bermudafilmfest.com

Cuba Festival Internacional del Nuevo Cine Latinoamericano festival@festival.icaic.cu habanafest@festival.icaic.cu

Volume 1 September - November 2010

Festival de Cine Global Dominicano 809. 685. 9966 o.delacruz@funglode.org t.rodriguez@funglode.org

Guadeloupe

Guadeloupe International Film Festival +590 590 99 05 98 (f) +590 590 99 18 11 (p) +590 690 44 13 62 (p) festivalfemi@live.fr www.lefemi.com

Haiti

The Montreal Haitian Film Festival now called the Montreal International Black Film Festival info@fondationfabiennecolas.org www.festivalfilmhaitien.com

Martinique

Caribbean Film and Video Festival 596-70 23 81 (p) 596-63 23 91 (f)

St. Barth茅lemy St. Barth Film Festival 212. 989. 8004 (p) NYC 212. 727. 1774 (f) NYC 590. 590. 27. 80. 11 (p) St. Barth 590. 590. 29. 74. 70 (f) St. Barth staff@stbarthff.org www.stbarthff.org

St. Kitts & Nevis Nevis Film Festival 869. 776. 2169 info@nevisfilmfestival.com www.nevisfilmfestival.com

Trinidad & Tobago

Trinidad & Tobago Film Festival www.trinidadandtobagofilmfestival.com

Turks & Caicos

Guyana

Guyana Folk Festival Film & Video Festival Guyana Cultural Association of New York 718.209.5207 (p) 718.209.6157 (f) info@guyfolkfest.org www.guyfolkfest.org

www.creativeindustriesexchange.org

Turks and Caicos International Film Festival Jasmine Guy & Terrence Duckette 866- 708-2433 (p) 310-915-7317 (f) Terrence@turksandcaicosfilmfestival.com http://www.fest21.com/en/festival/ turks_caicos_international_film_festival

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For additional information visit our website www.shridathramphalcentre.org Ground Floor CARICOM Research Building University of the West Indies Cave Hill Campus, St Michael, Barbados Telephone: 246.417.4805/4533 Fax: 246.417.4058 Email: src@cavehill.uwi.edu

We are very interested in your feedback. Please email you comments to: src@cavehill.uwi.edu. Visit our website: www.creativeindustriesexhange.org

The production of this magazine was made possible through support from the Caribbean Export Development Agency and funding from the European Union 9th EDF Caribbean Trade and Private Sector Development Program

www.creativeindustriesexchange.org

Caribbean Creatives - Issue 1; Volume 1: September - November 2010  

This inaugural issue of Caribbean Creatives, sponsored by the United Nations Industrial Development Organisation (UNIDO), UNESCO and the Car...

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