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FALL 2010

VO L . 1, NO. 3

ASIA

Make a

racing game

with coconuts

compassion.com

WE LCO ME TO MY WO RLD !

Bangladesh


ILLUSTRATION BY JOSH LEWIS

Welcome!

Compassion Explorers love to learn about the world and help others whenever they can. In this issue, you can check out the fun crafts, cook a yummy dessert, learn about weather with a muddy experiment, and more. Come on, let’s go! COUNTRIES IN ASIA WHERE COMPASSION WORKS

Departments

Welcome to My World! Read how God provided for Komola, a girl who needed surgery so she could walk. PAGE

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Rice Night! Read how the Motschall family has a unique way to remember kids who are poor. PAGE

Compassion Explorer Magazine is published by Compassion International. © Compassion International 2010. All rights reserved.

EDITOR Leanna Summers

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Working in Trash

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Science Is So Fun!

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Welcome to My House

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Living on Less Than $3 a Day Crafts, Recipes and Projects

What Does God Say About … ? Just for Grins and Giggles

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Scripture taken from the HOLY BIBLE, NEW INTERNATIONAL VERSION ®. Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984 by International Bible Society ®. Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved.

Compassionate Kids

PROOFREADING AND EDITING Colleen Keeffe and Suellen Wenz

PRINTING Michelle Dana

DESIGNER Josh Lewis

QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS? E-mail us at compassionkids@us.ci.org or write to Compassion International, Attn: Compassion Explorer Magazine Editor, 12290 Voyager Parkway, Colorado Springs, CO 80921.

PHOTOGRAPHERS David Adhikary, Ben Adams and Edwin Estioko WRITERS Leanna Summers and Lorie W. Barnes


Birthday Party Blessings

David, Age 6, and Ashleigh, Age 9, from Texas Ashleigh and David wanted to have their birthday party at Skate City, and they wanted to do something special. These caring kids decided they didn’t want any presents. Instead, they asked their friends to donate to Compassion to help kids who are poor. Thanks, and what an awesome idea!

Karibu kids,

I’m so happy you’re here! Karibu means “welcome” in the African language of Swahili. This is a language spoken in many countries in eastern and central Africa. In this issue of Compassion Explorer Magazi you’ll get to make African crafts, food, and learn about life in an African village! So come with me. I can’t wait to show you around!

A Yard Sale for Haiti

Isobel, Age 12, from California Isobel organized a yard sale to help people in Haiti. Her teachers, counselors, parents and classmates helped. She asked for donations, and people gave toys, TVs and more! The sale raised $568.68! Thank you, Isobel! Many kids in Haiti are still homeless after the earthquake. You are helping them get medicine, food and clean water.

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What kinds of chores do you do? In Asia many kids who are poor live near their neighborhood dump and work in it. They find plastic and tin to recycle and even food to eat. This is how Compassion-sponsored kids Florence and Hannah Rojo live. They live in Iloilo City, in the Philippines. Florence is 16 years old, and her sister is 12. They have five sisters and one brother. Their father is a taxi driver and only earns $6.60 a day. Their mom earns about $5 a day working at the dump. Sometimes before school Hannah and Florence go with their mom to work in the dump. They try to earn enough money to eat lunch and pay for a taxi ride to school.

1

Florence looks through the trash for food. She will feed the family’s pig. If any food is not rotten, she will clean it so she and her family can eat it.

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compassion explorer


About 158 million children around the world work to help their families survive.

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Florence and Hannah take the bags of plastic and tin they collected to a conveyor belt at the dump so the trash can be sorted and re-bagged.

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Next, Florence places the bags on a scale. The heaviest bags are worth more.

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Hannah holds up their receipt. She and Florence worked four hours and made $1.44.

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What’s life like for a girl with special needs in Bangladesh? Read on to see! What if you couldn’t run or even walk very far without hurting a lot? You would know how 8-year-old Komola used to feel. She was born with a twisted right foot.

Where Komola lives ...

Each day after school Komola’s friends ran home, but Komola had to wait for her mom to carry her home. They couldn’t afford a wheelchair and the roads there aren’t smooth enough for wheelchairs. Then Komola became a sponsored child and Compassion gave her a wonderful gift: surgery to fix her foot! Now Komola walks and runs just as much as the other kids in her village! She can even help her mom, Sarothi, get water for cooking.

Komola’s mom works hard.

CAPITAL CITY CURRENCY POPULATION RELIGIONS

LANGUAGES

Dhaka Taka 158 million Islam 89.5%, Hinduism 9.6%, other 0.9% Bangla, English

Sarothi is a widow. She picks tea leaves and makes only 60 cents a day. This is barely enough to feed Komola and her sister.

The LORD … sustains the fatherless and the widow. — Psalm 146:9

Meet my family! This is my family in front of our old house. Turn the page to see my new house!

In Bangladesh it rains from June to September. Most of the country floods because 75 percent of Bangladesh is barely above sea level.

TURN PAGE FOR MORE

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The Compassion Center At Compassion’s child development center Komola eats rice and meat with curried* vegetables. Meat is a special treat since her mom cannot afford it.

School Studies Komola does homework at Compassion’s center. Some kids in Komola’s village have to work instead of going to school. Their parents can’t afford to pay for school fees and supplies. But Compassion pays for Komola’s school. With an education Komola can get a better job when she grows up. *Curry is a mix of spices popular in Asia. Spices include ginger, cardamom, coriander, cumin, turmeric and hot chili powder.

Language Lesson

This is how you write “Hello” in the Bangladeshi language of Bangla. It is pronounced “Namashkar.”

When Komola, right, gets home from school she likes to play house with her friends. They use coconut shells for bowls.


How much do you get for allowance? What do some of your favorite things cost? Compare them to what poor families in Thailand can buy. AVERAGE INCOME

The poor in Thailand DAILY

About $2.50

YEARLY

About $900

$350 Thailand

A family living in a city in Thailand could buy the materials to build an entire 16’x13’ house!

ILLUSTRATIONS BY LUKE FLOWERS

United States DAILY YEARLY

$350

$127.12

United States

$46,400

One gaming system plus two games and an extra controller

$3 75

$4

Thailand

United States

Rice, chili paste, salt and dried fish

A sandwich, fries, a drink, and a toy

This will feed a small family for three days. Families in the country also collect vegetables to eat.

$15

United States

A movie ticket, popcorn and a drink

$14

Thailand

School supplies and a school uniform for the school year

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Thai Sticky Rice and Mangoes In Thailand, sticky rice with mangoes is a special sweet treat for parties! Ingredients 2 c. sweet rice, uncooked (Also called glutinous rice or sticky rice. Find it at your health food store or Asian market.)

3½ c. water 1 tsp. salt 2 tbsp. brown sugar 1 c. coconut milk 2 tbsp. toasted sesame seeds 1 fresh mango or 1 c. frozen mango, thawed, cut into pieces

Directions 1

Place the rice in a pot and pour water over it. Let it soak for 1 hour.

2

Add salt to the rice and cook on high until it boils.

3

Reduce the heat to low and place a lid partially on the pot. Cook about 10-20 minutes, checking occasionally until the water is absorbed and the rice is soft. When the rice is done, set it aside.

4

Pour the coconut milk into a pot and bring it to a boil.

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Add the brown sugar and stir thoroughly.

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Remove from the heat and pour the mixture onto the sticky rice.

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Put some rice on a plate, sprinkle with sesame seeds, add some mango, and dig in!

Coconut Racers

Instructions

In Thailand kids play Dern Kala, a game where they race on coconut shells!

1

Ask an adult to use the blunt side of a kitchen knife to tap the seams of the coconuts until they split open.

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Scrape out the coconut.

2 coconuts

3

Use a nail to make a hole at the top of each shell.

1 nail

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Pull one end of the string through the hole of one shell, then the other end through the hole on the other shell.

Safety scissors

5

5 feet of thick string

Tie a large knot or make a knot with a pencil stub at the ends of the string to hold it in place when pulled.

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Place one foot on the outside of each shell, grab the string, and race away!

Supplies

1 kitchen knife

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compassion explorer


Lunch Bags

BY LORIE W. BARNES

It’s in the Bag! Poor families in Indonesia and the Philippines recycle juice boxes to make bright, fun bags, like this one. Then they sell the bags to make enough money to feed their families. You can make a cool lunch bag, too! Just follow these simple instructions.

Supplies 14 empty, clean juice pouches

(like Capri SunÂŽ)

1 roll of brightly colored duct tape

(find at your local craft store)

Scissors 20-inch strip of 2-inch-wide sturdy ribbon

Instructions

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1

x2 To make the front of your bag, lay four pouches facedown and overlap them. Tape the pieces together. Repeat this step for the back.

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Turn your taped panel over, faceup. Overlap the edges of each end to form your bag. Tape this seam together on the inside. It will look like a tube.

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x3 To make one side of the bag, lay two pouches facedown, overlap them, and tape together. Repeat for the other side and the bottom.

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Now for the bottom of your bag! Tape the last piece to the inside sides of the bag. To make the bottom stronger, tape along the outside bottom edges of the bag.

Place your panels next to one another facedown. Cover each seam with tape. Then cover the entire panel with tape.

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To make two handles, cut the ribbon in half. Place tape on each end of the ribbon and tape the ends to the inside of the bag. Add extra tape to make it sturdy.

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Workers in a rice paddy in Indonesia.

Thanks to a child they sponsor, the Motschall family has a new tradition. There are four kids in the Motschall family: Teagan, 13, Taylor, 12, Kaitlyn, 9, and Alexa, 5. They live in Colorado. About a year ago they started sponsoring Jyothi. She’s from India. Their mom, Christine, had an idea to help the family remember Jyothi and other poor kids. And that’s how their tradition started. Every Monday for dinner the Motschall family eats only rice with vegetables. “At first I wasn’t very excited because I don’t really like rice,” Kaitlyn says. “Then I noticed what it does. It helps us learn to serve those people who don’t have food.”

He who is kind to the poor lends to the LORD, and he will reward him for what he has done.

They now sponsor two kids and know that their kids and other poor kids don’t usually get to eat big breakfasts, so they are thankful they can remember them and help. “The best part about sponsorship,” says Taylor, “is getting to serve the Lord and knowing our sponsored kids are safe and that we can help them out.” Rice night is an important part of all this for the Motschalls!

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compassion explorer

God wants us to pray for others who don’t have as much as we do. Proverbs 19:17 says that God rewards those who are kind and remember the poor. Every Monday, before they eat their rice, the Motschalls remember the poor with these prayers. Can you think of other prayers to say? “When I pray I thank God for blessing us with food we can eat, and I pray that the poor kids will have food in their bellies and a place to stay.” — Taylor “When I pray for my sponsored children, I pray that God will keep them safe and give them food.” — Kaitlyn “I pray that kids will have full bellies.” —Alexa

Rice Is Nice! Rice is the main food for half the population of the world. Asians grow and eat the most rice. Asians also use rice to make paper, rope, packing material and even toothpaste!

©iStockphoto.com/joxxxxjo

— Proverbs 19:17

Taylor adds, “I like doing it. I’m glad we can feel how other children feel. I didn’t know how they felt before.” Sometimes after rice night the kids get hungry. But they can eat a big breakfast on Tuesday morning.

Powerful Prayers


BY LORIE W. BARNES

Š STEVE GRAY

Supplies

How to Do the Experiment Hi, Compassion Explorers! Have you ever played in the mud? Or made mud pies out of dirt and water? It rains a lot in Asia and families there make mud into bricks and cooking pots. 2 COOKIE SHEETS

Sometimes mud can be dangerous when a lot of it slides down hills and into homes. Mudslides can damage or even destroy homes that are made out of scraps of cardboard, straw and trash. Try this experiment outside to learn more! 1

Lay the cookie sheets on the ground near each other and ask a friend to help you prop up one end of each sheet about 2 inches. Or find some small boards and prop them up.

2

Cover each sheet with 1 inch of soil.

3

Place the rocks and grass in the soil of one sheet.

4

Hold your pitcher about 5 inches from the top of the first sheet; pour water slowly so that it runs downhill onto the soil. Watch what happens, and repeat for the other sheet.

SOIL

A FEW SMALL CLUMPS OF GRASS

A HANDFUL OF SMALL ROCKS

PITCHER FILLED WITH TAP WATER

Which sheet had more of a mudslide? Why? Do you think planting trees and plants can help prevent mud from sliding too much? Do you think families with sturdier homes are safer during mudslides?

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We don’t have running water, just a water container to fill.

Our food shelf is empty.

Our floor is made from scraps of trashed wood.

This lid keeps flies out of our food.

We don’t have a dishwasher or sink for dirty dishes. We wash them outside instead.

Here’s a lamp to light our house.

It is hot here in Indonesia. I live in a wooden house on top of a pond. The pond will dry up during the hot season but will fill with water during the rainy season. When it rains too much, it floods. It happens every year.

Ester Agrevina,

My house has two small rooms. My two sisters and me share a bed, and my age 10, parents sleep on the from Indonesia floor. I would like to have a bedroom for my parents so they don’t have to sleep on the floor anymore.

This container holds gas for our cooking stove.

My family doesn’t have enough money to eat meat often, so we eat a lot of rice to stay full.


Start Exploring!

BY LORIE W. BARNES

Compassion Explorers are always discovering what God says in His Map for Life: the Bible! Have you ever played the game “Hide and Seek”? Remember when you had to run to home base to be safe? In 2 Samuel 9:1-13 discover a great story about Mephibosheth (Meh-FIB-o-sheth), a young man with special needs who couldn’t walk. This story has some locked-up Keys to Kindness.

Find the keys to unlock some Bible truths you can use! Write your thoughts in the Keys to Kindness below. 1

Why did Mephibosheth need some help and kindness?

2

Who was the safe and kind person God provided for Mephibosheth? Why was he so kind?

Dear Jesus, Thank you for being my safe home base because I know you love me and are with me all of the time. Please help children all over the world who need a safe home base, especially kids in poverty who need people to take care of them and safe places to live. Be with the kids in Asia who need to see how you care. Show me how to be a nice friend and safe home base for others, too! In Jesus’ name, Amen.

3

Where was the safe “home base” for Mephibosheth for the rest of his life?

Now it’s your turn to be God’s servant like King David. Unlock God’s plan for you! Who do you know who looks different from you and needs your kindness? Write his or her name here.

2

How can you be a friend to someone who is different from you?

ILLUSTRATION BY JOSH LEWIS

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Compassion International 12290 Voyager Parkway Colorado Springs, CO 80921-3668 (800) 336-7676

Compassion helps feed hungry kids! Animals like goats provide milk and meat. Waljiang is a sponsored child from Bangladesh. His goats not only give him milk, but they are tons of fun, too!

Can you write a caption for this picture? Send it to: Compassion International, Attn: Compassion Explorer Magazine Editor, 12290 Voyager Parkway, Colorado Springs, CO 80921. Or e-mail it to compassionkids@us.ci.org.

Remember this picture from the Summer 2010 issue of Compassion Explorer Magazine? Here are some of your great captions!

Time to play!!! Victoria, 11 Oklahoma City, Okla.

Hmmm, I wonder if cat treats would fit in the envelope? Maggie, 10 Roscoe, Ill.

I’m glad I kept these! Meow, meow. Noah, 10 Hillsboro, Kan.

Hey, what’s for lunch? I’m hungry! Holly, 6 Colfax, Calif.

Can I have one little tiny peek? Pretty please, with a cherry on top? Andie, 10 Everest, Kan.

Check out Compassion’s website for kids:

.org IN236 (9/10)

Compassion Explorer - Fall 2010  

Destination: Asia

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