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Details of House of Representatives inquiry (cont.)

• I ntroduction of a copy advice service by ASB for all outdoor advertising. • Annual random compliance surveys of outdoor advertising by ASB, as well as formal monitoring and self-initiated investigations by the Standards Board (these recommendations seem based on the UK’s ASA model). • Regular review of codes by AANA and also FCAI (regarding the motor vehicle code). • Inclusion of a provision in the Code of Ethics on sexual objectification.

• C  onduct of research by ASB every 2 years into community standards around sex, sexuality & nudity, health & safety, food & beverages, children and alcohol advertising (with ABAC also to conduct research every 2 years on community standards around alcohol advertising). • Inclusion of sports sponsorship as a form of advertising in the AANA Food & Beverages Code, as well as the AFGC’s RCMI and QSR initiatives. • Inclusion of outdoor advertising by AFGC in the RCMI.

• A  cceptance by ASB of telephone and email complaints, and anonymous complaints. • Regular awareness campaigns by ASB across all media. • Requiring AANA and OMA to have their members forward any complaints to ASB. • “Name and shame” strategies for advertiser non-compliance, and annual reporting to the Attorney‑General’s Department on non-compliance rates and steps taken to achieve compliance. • Strengthening of the Independent Review process.

Details of the Senate inquiry The Senate Legal and Constitutional Affairs References Committee – Inquiry into the Australian Film and Literature Classification Scheme (tabled 23 June 2011) • Th  is inquiry considered the possibility of including outdoor advertising, such as billboards, in the National Classification Scheme; and • The effectiveness of the National Classification Scheme in preventing the sexualisation of children and the objectification of women in all media, including advertising.

Review of Operations 2011

• W  hile this Inquiry applied more broadly to the National Classification Scheme, the report considers whether the National Classification Scheme should have a role in the regulation of advertising and makes several recommendations relevant to the ASB. • The Committee found that, subject to certain recommendations being followed, “the current complaints procedure for industries covered by a code of practice would remain largely in place”. • However, the broad recommendation of the Committee is an expansion of the

National Classification Scheme to cover all mediums, including advertising, with harmonised standards, consumer advice and oversight by the Classification Board. This effectively means including advertising within the classification system, although it is unclear how some of the recommendations aimed at achieving this objective would work in the advertising context. • However, the Government Senators on the Committee provided a dissenting report, noting that they cannot support many of the proposals in the committee’s report, in light of the ongoing National

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Advertising Standards Bureau - Review of Operations 2011  

The Advertising Standards Bureau (ASB) administers Australia's national system of self‐regulation in relation to both public and competitor...

Advertising Standards Bureau - Review of Operations 2011  

The Advertising Standards Bureau (ASB) administers Australia's national system of self‐regulation in relation to both public and competitor...

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