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Colg ate Rochester Crozer Divinity School | 2012 3-2014 5 Catalogue

Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School 1100 South Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14620 (585) 271-1320 www.crcds.edu Like us: facebook.com/crcds Follow us on Twitter: @crcds

CRCDS Colg ate Rochester Crozer Divinity School

2013-2015 Catalogue


Accredited by the Commission on Accrediting of the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada, and the following degree programs at CRCDS are approved: MDiv MA DMin CRCDS became a fully accredited member of the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada in 1938. The Commission on Accrediting of the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada can be contacted at 10 Summit Park Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15275; Tel: 412-788-6505; Fax: 412-788-6510; Web: www.ats.edu.


Our Mission Rooted in the biblical mandate for justice and mercy, CRCDS prepares women and men for ministry in the local church and beyond that is learned, pastoral and prophetic. We equip leaders for transforming ministry that speaks truth to power and stands among “the least of these.� We engage the theological disciplines in an ecumenical Christian community of teaching, learning and worship.

Thiscatalogueisnotacontractbetweenstudentsand/orapplicants. Theschoolreservestherighttoreviseitandpoliciesderivedfromitasdeemed appropriate.Consistentwiththerequirementsandoptionsunderapplicablelaw, theschooldoesnotdiscriminateonthebasisofrace,gender,age,religion, physicalability,sexualorientation,economicprivilege,ecclesiasticalstatus, oranyotherstatusprotectedbylaw. 10/2013


Contents Message from the President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Curriculum Preamble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Academic Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Degree Programs—12 MasterofDivinity–13  MasterofArts–19  DoctorofMinistry–20

Curricular Emphases—22 BlackChurchStudies–22  WomenandGenderStudies–23  AnglicanStudiesProgram–24 Continuing Education—26 GeneBennettProgramforLifeLongLearning–26  GraduateCertificateStudiesProgram–27

Academic Policies—28



 

RequirementsforGraduation–28 TransferofCredit–29 WithdrawalsandLeavesofAbsence–30


Academic Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Admissions & Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Admissions—68 Financial Aid—74

Campus Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 The Library—81 Multi-denominational Community—82 Placement of Graduates—82 Statement of Educational Effectiveness—82 Divinity School Bookstore—83 Other Campus Resources—84

Community Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 The Greater Rochester Area—88

Leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Board of Trustees—92 Administration—95 Faculty—96

Directions to Campus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100


Message from the President Welcome to Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School (CRCDS). This school has been training men and women for careers in ministry, public service, academic life and prophetic witness to our nation and the world since 1817. The roots of CRCDS reach back almost as far as the roots of this nation itself. At the same time, our life and work have always been on the cutting edge of progressive theological reflection and courageous and outspoken public witness on behalf of the needs of the poor, the marginalized and the forgotten persons of our society. When you come to attend CRCDS, you are not simply being trained to do a particular task with skill and efficiency. More importantly, you are being prepared to be leaders in the work of theological education and social transformation. CRCDS is a wonderful setting in which to study and learn. The campus is among the most beautiful in the country. The library resources both on our campus and in conjunction with the University of Rochester are second to none among other seminaries and divinity schools. Our faculty is world-class, our curriculum is challenging and engaging and our setting in western New York is as rich in cultural opportunities as it is in history. Walk along any street in Rochester and imagine that Frederick Douglass, the former slave and abolitionist leader once stood on that very spot. Walk a bit further and remember that Susan B. Anthony breathed life into the battle for the right of women to vote right here in Rochester. Come back to the campus and recall that Walter Rauschenbusch gave birth to the Social Gospel at this very school. Despite the past glories of our school, our city and our region, CRCDS is not inviting you into a walk along memory lane. It is true that Martin Luther King, Jr. was a 1951 graduate of Crozer. However, our challenge and our opportunity is to give shape and foundation to

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Message from the President

the next generation of pastors, prophets and transformative leaders in the church and society. There are significant questions that await people who are entering into ministry in any form in the 21st century. Is the Bible an authoritative text? Is the Christian church still relevant? Are the claims of universalism true that one approach to God is as good as another? Are the critiques of the secular cynics in our world equally true; that all talk of God is a waste of time? These questions are not to be ignored or minimized. They need to be answered with vigor and courage. Persons can be trained to do just that at CRCDS. While our beginnings were with the American Baptist Church, CRCDS is a thoroughly ecumenical community where over twenty different denominations are present within our faculty, staff and student body. What better way to be trained for ministry in a diverse world than to study at a school that reflects that very diversity. What better place to train for ministry in our global community than at a school and in a city where people from all over the world are living and working together. My own career in ministry was shaped by persons who studied at CRCDS. The effects the School had on them were passed on to me. Now I serve as president of the school where my own mentors once were students. I am hopeful that I can do all I can to be sure that those same values of academic excellence, social responsibility, personal piety and professional competence are passed on to every student who studies at and graduates from CRCDS. I hope you will come here and study with us. We will try to be a blessing to you, and I am sure that you will be a blessing to us.

Marvin A. McMickle, Ph.D. President

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History The personality and character of Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School grows out of its rich heritage. Through a series of unique unions and partnerships with several outstanding seminaries, the school’s family tree was formed. T he e STabliShMenT of S eMinaRy in a MeRiC a

The

o lDeST b aPTiST

In 1817, the Hamilton Theological and Literary Institute was founded in rural Hamilton, New York, with a concern to provide an educated clergy for the churches of early 19th-century America. The institute would become Colgate Theological Seminary when 13 men with $13 founded Colgate University. Its first graduate, Jonathan Wade, began a tradition of outstanding ministerial leadership when he conducted pioneering missionary work in Burma. Throughout its history, Colgate Theological Seminary was noted for its uncompromising commitment to academic freedom. William Newton Clarke (1840-1912), one of its faculty members, wrote An Outline of Christian Theology (1898) that became, in the words of a leading historian, “virtually the Dogmatik of evangelical liberalism.”

a n U Rban S eMinaRy b eginS

in

R oCheSTeR

An offshoot of Colgate Theological Seminary was planted in Rochester in 1850 by a group of Baptists who wished to remove both Colgate University and its theological seminary to an urban setting. The initial removal controversy failed in a legal dispute; however, a number of faculty and students came from Colgate to Rochester to help begin a new university and seminary. Consequently, the Rochester Theological Seminary was founded concurrently with the University of Rochester. The seminary soon distinguished itself for its combination of academic rigor and social witness, traits admirably combined in its most famous faculty member, Walter Rauschenbusch (1861-1918), the founder of the Social Gospel movement in the late 19th century. For 40 years, Augustus Hopkins Strong (1836-1921) served as president of Rochester Theological Seminary while producing theology that incorporated the new doctrine of evolution and the emerging practices of biblical criticism

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history

into his theological work. Like her sister school in Hamilton, Rochester Theological Seminary was ecumenical in its mission, enrolling seminarians from many denominations.

T wo S eMinaRieS U niTe In 1928, the Colgate and Rochester seminaries merged to become Colgate Rochester Divinity School, and as part of that merger, the present campus was built on one of the highest hills in the southeastern corner of Rochester, New York, thanks to funding from John D. Rockefeller, Jr. The joining of these two schools represented a distinctive blending Rochester Theological of roots and heritages. In time, it would Seminary serve as a precedent for other mergers by demonstrating that two distinctive institutions could strengthen their lives by becoming one.

w oMen ’ S S Chool M eRgeS D iviniTy S Chool

wiTh

C olgaTe R oCheSTeR

In 1961, the Baptist Missionary Training School joined the campus on the hill, adding another important branch to the school's lineage. The 19th century was a period of great ferment and social change. While the Social Gospel movement concentrated on the widening gap between the rich and poor, the Baptist Missionary Training School, founded in Chicago in 1881, was created to address another issue: the role of women in the Church. Its founder, Mrs. Rumah Crouse, possessed a vision both local and global. She created a community for women who were “responding to God's call as revealed in Jesus Christ,” even when the Church failed to recognize their call. Typical of its graduates was Joanna P. Moore, a graduate of its first class in 1881, who worked with African-Americans for more than 40 years, instituting “fireside schools” to teach literacy skills to women and children. To prepare its graduates for such forms of service, the training school innovatively combined classroom work with field education to equip its students to minister wherever the need was greatest.

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history

D R. M aRTin l UTheR K ing , J R.’ S a lMa M aTeR M oveS R oCheSTeR

To

In 1970, Crozer Theological Seminary affiliated with Colgate Rochester Divinity School to form Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School, bringing to the community on the hill Crozer's commitment to social justice and theological education oriented to the work of ministry. Crozer Theological Seminary was a result of the generosity of Baptist industrialist John P. Crozer. In 1867, he donated the building and land in Upland, Pennsylvania, that would become Crozer Theological Crozer Theological Seminary Seminary. His investment in the seminary paid great dividends. In 1951, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. graduated from Crozer. A few years later, he would put to use the social ethics he had been taught at Crozer and lead the emergent Civil Rights Movement that would change the character of American society.

C oll aboRaTive PaRTneRS b Ring e CUMeniC al R iChneSS To CRCDS SAINT BERNARD’S SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY AND MINISTRY

In 1893, St. Bernard’s Seminary was founded to provide education for Roman Catholic diocesan priests. Following the Second Vatican Council, the seminary turned its attention to educating men and women for lay ministry. In 1981, St. Bernard’s Seminary was closed, and St. Bernard’s Institute was born and entered into a covenant relationship with Colgate Rochester Crozer. It moved to the CRCDS campus, where it remained until recently. It was finally able to build a new campus nearby, and changed its name to St. Bernard’s School of Theology and Ministry. But through these changes it has remained in covenant partnership with CRCDS.

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history

BEXLEY SEABURY FEDERATION PROGRAM IN ANGLICAN STUDIES

Another educational institution more recently joined our ecumenical partnerships. Beginning in the fall of 2013, CRCDS, in collaboration with Bexley Seabury and the Episcopal Diocese of Rochester, initiated a program in Anglican Studies. This program provides a local and regional option for Episcopal students to prepare for ordination as students earn a Master of Divinity degree from CRCDS while concurrently earning a Certificate in Anglican Studies from Bexley Seabury.

C olgaTe R oCheSTeR C RozeR D iviniTy S Chool T oDay Through a series of unusual and even improbable unions and covenant partnerships, Colgate Rochester Crozer has emerged. The heritage of these schools now enriches a vital community of learning and worship.

CRCDS Today

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Curriculum Preamble

The academic programs at the divinity school are shaped by the vision of the faculty, articulated as follows: CONFESSING THAT JESUS CHRIST IS THE GOOD NEWS OF GOD WHO TRANSFORMS BOTH PERSONS AND SOCIETIES—

We are rooted in biblical faith, and in the lived traditions of the church. We are shaped by the witness of the Social Gospel movement, by the traditions of the Black Church, by the voices of women in church and society, and by Christian responses to religious pluralism and issues of gender, each as critically interpreted and embraced by those who both cherish the past and are open to the future. We are committed to ministry as we engage the theological disciplines in an ecumenical Christian community of teaching, learning and worship that prepares students for Christian ministries that are learned, pastoral and prophetic. We are committed to theological education that embodies acts of radical hospitality, in our classrooms and in chapel, in our churches and communities. We seek the integrity of living faith and intellectual inquiry by which women and men are prepared for local, national, and global Christian ministries dedicated to a life-giving future for all God’s people. RevisedSpring2012

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Academic Programs


Degree Programs Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School offers three degree programs. The faculty vision statement shapes all academic programs.

of D iviniTy DegRee (M.D iv.) is the most versatile, all-purpose degree. It is the primary degree leading to ordination for professional ministry. It may also prepare students for church administration, chaplaincy, youth work, teaching in colleges or theological schools, missions and evangelism, social work and more.

T he M aSTeR

T he M aSTeR of a RTS DegRee (M.a.) is to prepare students for advanced graduate study in a specific theological discipline or, alternatively, to educate laity who want a broad knowledge of the theological disciplines. T he D oCToR of M iniSTRy DegRee (D.M in .) is designed for experienced clergy and religious leaders who wish to enhance their skills as reflective practitioners.

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Degree Programs

M aSTeR

of

D iviniTy

The four curricular areas of the Master of Divinity program integrate the three emphases found in our mission statement: to educate men and women, lay and ordained, for ministries that are “pastoral, prophetic and learned.” Each curricular area may highlight one of these emphases. Pastoral theology (PT) emphasizes the “pastoral” arts. Christian Scriptures (CS) and Christian Faith (CF) emphasize a learned approach to the study of the Bible and our theological, ethical and historical heritage. The emphasis on ministry in a multicultural and multireligious world (MS) highlights the prophetic task of ministry in a new millennium. Yet, at a deeper level, each one of the four curricular emphases is “pastoral, prophetic and learned,” for each curricular area is taught in an integrative way that blends these three distinct emphases. To give an example, the study of Scripture is more than learned. A learned approach to the Christian Scriptures leads to a prophetic reading of the Hebrew Bible and the Christian Scriptures. In turn, we teach Scripture in ways that emphasize its use in the pastoral work of the Church. ELECTIVES IN THE CURRICULUM

The Master of Divinity is divided between required courses and electives. Of the 26 courses in the M.Div. curriculum, 18 are required and 8 are electives. Electives may be used to take denominational requirements, to pursue a concentration in a particular area of the curriculum or to pursue specific interests. DOUBLE DESIGNATION FOR ELECTIVES

Many electives carry a double designation to indicate the interdisciplinary nature of the course.

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Degree Programs

INSTITUTES, CONFERENCES AND LECTURESHIPS

In addition to the course requirements, Master of Divinity students are required to attend five conferences, institutes or lectureships during their program. This requirement includes the following: — One Stanley I. Stuber Lectureship — One Helen Barrett Montgomery Conference — One of the following Conferences: – J.C. Wynn Conference on Family Ministries – Gene Bartlett Preaching Conference — One African American Legacy Lecture — One LGBTi Lecture The purpose of integrating conferences, institutes and lectureships into the curriculum is to introduce students to the rich resources available to them outside of the classroom and thereby to encourage lifelong learning. TOTAL NUMBER OF COURSES

The total number of courses required for the Master of Divinity degree is 26 three-unit courses for a total of 78 units. They are divided as follows: 18 required core courses 8 electives DENOMINATIONAL REqUIREMENTS

The curriculum is taught by faculty members who are also multidenominational. Continual exchanges among students and faculty of different ecclesial memberships on issues of history, theology, and liturgy challenge seminarians to articulate their own particular visions of the Church. Thus, personal faith commitments are strengthened and clarified, and a new sense of denominational identity is confirmed, as appreciation of other traditions is also deepened. Core and visiting faculty offer courses required for ordination by many different denominations. Polity courses for American Baptist, Presbyterian, United Methodist, Episcopal, and Unitarian students are offered during the normal tenure of a Master of Divinity student.

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Degree Programs

In addition to courses in polity and history, students strengthen their ecclesial relationships through participation in regular denominational meetings on campus. The curriculum can be visualized on the following pages >

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Degree Programs

aRea

C hRiSTian S CRiPTUReS (CS)

C hRiSTian faiTh foRThe f UTURe (Cf)

aRea ReQUiReMenTS

(4)

(7)

Old Testament R CS 101

Faith Seeking Understanding

(18 full-credit courses)

One additional Re CS Old Testament Course New Testament R CS 112 One additional Re CS New Testament Course

Christian Belief Today One R CF 200 level course on a theologian One R CF 200 level course on doctrine Introduction to Christian Ethics Reformation and Modern Church History Early and Medieval Church History

Stuber

aTTenDanCe aT CRCDS ConfeRenCeS (Required for graduation, Not-forCredit)

oPen eleCTiveS (8 full-credit courses)

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Note:Appropriate electivesmaysatisfy denominational requirements.Some electivesmaybedoubledesignated(e.g.,PTMS), althoughonlythefirst designationlistedwill usuallycounttowardan areaelective.

Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School


Degree Programs M iniSTRy in a M UlTiCUlTURal , M UlTiReligioUS S oCieTy (MS)

T RaDiTional anD e MeRging P RaCTiCeS of T heology (PT)

(3)

(4)

Black Church Perspectives on Faith, Understanding, and Belief

Introduction to Pastoral Care

Women and Gender Perspectives on Faith, Understanding, and Belief

Supervised Ministry II

Introduction to Preaching Supervised Ministry I

Faith and Christian Perspectives on Pluralism

Helen Barrett Montgomery 1 LGBTi Lecture 1 African American Legacy Lecture

Any1ofthefollowing: J. C. Wynn Gene Bartlett

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Degree Programs

SCHEDULING COURSES

All required courses are offered, on alternating years, during the day and evening. Most divinity school classes meet once a week in a “block scheduling” format.

EVALUATIONS IN THE CURRICULUM

There are three major student evaluations integral to the curriculum: EvaluationIoccurs at the completion of the first year of study, or as

soon as possible following the completion of eight courses. The purpose of the first evaluation is to assess the context of year one, “texts and living traditions” and the competencies of “critical thinking and exegesis” further, to confirm whether Divinity School and ordination are still appropriate for the student. This evaluation also determines whether a student is prepared for a Supervised Ministry placement. EvaluationII occurs at the end of the second year of study after students have completed Supervised Ministry, or as soon as possible after the completion of 16 courses and Supervised Ministry. The purpose of Evaluation II is to determine whether the student is to be advanced to senior status, by assessment of year 2 content of “pluralism and Christian witness” and competencies of “interaction and interrogation” as well as to confirm the student is on the appropriate ordination and/or career track. SeniorEvaluationoccurs at the close of the fall term with students

who anticipate graduation in the following May. The goal is to determine whether the student has a plan to meet all requirements for graduation in the spring, and to assess year 3 content of “ministry and mission” and competencies of “leadership and engagement.” All evaluations have three dimensions: ecclesial assessment, curricular assessment and personal formation assessment. Each explores the relation of the curriculum to the practice of ministry and attends to the formation of the person of the minister.

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Degree Programs

CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION (CPE)

Since many denominations require the completion of one basic unit of CPE for ordination, Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School provides guidance for students who are interested in participating in a CPE program either in a local institution or one located elsewhere in the United States. The school will transfer the successful completion of one unit of CPE as the equivalent of one semester course.

M aSTeR

of

a RTS

The Master of Arts degree is designed to prepare women and men for advanced graduate study in a specific theological discipline, or alternatively, to educate the laity who want a knowledge of theological disciplines. The M.A. degree requires the successful completion of 16 courses with a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (B). Admission to the Master of Arts program requires a bachelor’s degree attained with a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (B). For students preparing for advanced graduate study, a curriculum is developed in consultation with their advisor, who is assigned according to the discipline in which the student will concentrate. Students are required to take seven courses in the area of their concentration, one course in each of the four curricular areas, two courses as thesis writing, with three open electives. All students preparing for advanced study must evidence competence in at least one theological language (usually Hebrew, Greek, Latin, German, French, Spanish) and to undertake research in this language as a constituent part of thesis writing. For students who want a more general knowledge, the M.A. curriculum includes three courses in Christian Scriptures (including at least one Old Testament and one New Testament), three courses in Christian Faith (including one Church History, one Theology and one Ethics), three courses in Multicultural Society (including one Black Church, one Women & Gender, one Interfaith), two Practical Theology as related to their ministry, and five open electives. Completion of the degree includes an integrative examination, both written and oral.

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Degree Programs

D oCToR

of

M iniSTRy

in

T RanSfoRMaTive l eaDeRShiP

The D.Min. in Transformative Leadership offers experienced clergy and lay practitioners an opportunity to develop their leadership in concert with the historical values and traditions of Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School, as those values and traditions set forth visions for the future. In integrative and interdisciplinary courses, leaders have the opportunity to strengthen their biblical and theological grounding for their leadership; to reflect on their leadership with reference to solidarity with persons who are poor, oppressed and marginalized; and to explore critical social issues that are the contemporary versions of the historical social and religious movements of Rochester and Western New York (evangelical revival, abolition of slavery and racism, and women’s suffrage and equality). DEGREE REqUIREMENTS

The Doctor of Ministry requires the satisfactory completion of nine courses. Of the nine courses, three are required (INT 701, 702, 703). Students are required to take two of the additional courses offered (INT 704, 705, 706, 707, or 711). Three courses are fulfilled by electives; and the final course is fulfilled by the actual writing of the thesis. OptionalConcentrationinPropheticPreaching Students who choose to concentrate in Prophetic Preaching are also required to take nine courses. Of the nine courses, two courses are required (INT 703 and 711), four must be approved preaching courses, two courses are free electives, and the final course is fulfilled by the actual writing of a thesis. The following courses are approved preaching courses that may count toward the Prophetic Preaching requirements: INT 715, 716, 717, 718, 719, 720, 721, 722, 723, 724, and 725. OptionalConcentrationinWesleyan/MethodistStudies Students who choose to concentrate in Wesleyan/Methodist Studies are also required to complete nine courses. Of the nine courses, three are required (INT 701, 702, 703). Students are then required to take two of the following additional courses offered: INT 704, 705, 706, 707, 708, or 711. The other four courses to be completed are fulfilled by three electives in Methodist/Wesleyan studies and the actual writing of the thesis.

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Degree Programs

Advising Each student will be assigned a faculty advisor upon admission to the program. By the beginning of the student’s fifth course, the student must identify and confirm a faculty mentor, who will serve as their advisor directing the student’s remaining course work and thesis writing. The faculty mentor may be the same as the faculty advisor, if appropriate. To assist in this selection, students will have the opportunity to meet all CRCDS faculty at a meal during each week of intensives; and all faculty will post office hours during some portion of the intensive weeks. LIMITED RESIDENCY

Courses are taught in an intensive format during the first two weeks of January and June. This schedule allows students to enroll in up to four courses each year. Courses include three elements: 1) readings and responses, completed before the course is taught; 2) residency; 3) a final course project. To facilitate the work that needs to be done before classes begin, students receive syllabi along with all required reading lists. Students can expect to receive course syllabi and reading lists no later than November 1 for the January residency, and April 1 for the June residency. Requirements for the Doctor of Ministry degree can usually be met within 36 months of enrollment. Students may complete program requirements over a longer time, provided all requirements are met within six years of first enrollment. ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE

No grade of less than “B” shall count for credit toward the D.Min. degree. “B-” is not an acceptable grade for the D.Min. program. Students receiving a “B-” are automatically placed on academic probation. Students who receive two grades lower than “B” are automatically terminated from the program. SUPERVISED DIRECTED STUDIES

Students may take one course as directed or independent study for the D.Min. degree if warranted by their program or circumstances. Directed or independent study may be taken only after the completion of at least three courses.

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Curricular Emphases b l aCK C hURCh S TUDieS

Consistent with the progressive traditions historically associated with the divinity school, the program features a critical methodology, spiritual depth, and social witness. Opportunities for the intellectual, professional, and inspirational development of transformational leadership in AfricanAmerican communities are offered through classes, lectureships, symposia, worship services, voluntary community services, and social gatherings and celebrations. In keeping with the long tradition of the school to provide ministers for the Black Church in the context of the universal Christian mission, the program seeks integration in all dimensions of the curriculum, as it prepares men and women, regardless of race or color, for professional ministry that appreciates the contribution of African-American religious experiences to the totality of Christian faith, life, and witness. The program emerged out of the vision and courage of students, faculty, and members of the Rochester community. Established in 1969, with the assistance of the Lilly and the Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Foundations, it is the oldest program of its kind in the nation. Alumni, who are among the most visible national leaders of African-American intellectual and ecclesiastical life, include Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Howard Thurman, Mordecai Wyatt Johnson, Joseph H. Jackson, and Samuel Proctor, to name but a few. Intended to give voice to the public and personal dimensions of black religious experience for emancipatory learning, living, and ministry, Black Church Studies has THREE MAIN CURRICULAR OBJECTIVES:

1— to develop a theological perspective attentive to relations of race, class, and gender that connects personal experience, professional ministry, and course offerings to the struggles of peoples of African descent, and; 2— to prepare students with language and critical skills of theological discourse, pastoral competencies and personal fitness for ministry in a pluralistic world and among peoples of African descent. 3— The Mordecai Wyatt Johnson Institute of Religion provides contexts in which students are exposed to leading scholars and practitioners of ministry in the Black Church tradition.

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Curricular emphases

w oMen

anD

g enDeR S TUDieS

The Program for the Study of Women and Gender is an integral part of the academic program and the support services offered by the divinity school to its students, faculty, administration, staff, alumni, churches, and to the wider community. The program is multicultural and multifaceted in its structure, staffing and activities. THE GOALS OF THE PROGRAM ARE:

1— to provide a program of rigorous critical studies focused on issues affecting the lives and work of women in Church and society, and on analysis of gender, race, class, age, and sexual orientation, in solidarity with communities of women worldwide; 2— to advocate and to provide methods and resources for the incorporation of these critical studies into all areas of the divinity school curriculum and services; 3— to provide personal and institutional support for women in ministry in multiple settings, including the seminary, churches, and the community at large; 4— to work in mutual cooperation with the Program of Black Church Studies at the divinity school; and, 5— to participate in related studies programs and disciplinary and ecclesial discussions nation- and worldwide. The programmatic focus on Women and Gender Studies represents a new faithfulness to a long-standing legacy integral to the unique character and calling of the divinity school, and most specifically to the agreement made when the Baptist Missionary Training School, a training school for women founded in 1881, came to Colgate Rochester Divinity School in 1961. The agreement called upon Colgate Rochester, “To provide and furnish Christian young women opportunity for higher education…so that Christian young women may receive instruction on a graduate level.” Thirty years later, the Program for the Study of Women and Gender was inaugurated and began to extend this legacy of training women for ministry with an unprecedented intentionality. The vision of the program embraces not only the inclusion of women into already extant offices and orders of ministry, but also the cultivation of

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Curricular emphases

women’s uniquely creative gifts for ministry. Taking these gifts seriously offers the opportunity to address fundamental questions about the nature of ministry in Church and society, as well as about the person of minister. The program as it is developed through curricula, colloquia, and collegial support groups attends to the implications of women’s uniquely creative gifts for the practice of ministry, for pedagogy, and for understanding what it means to be Church in and for the world today. The program is therefore carried out in close cooperation with laywomen leaders and clergy women in Greater Rochester. An advisory committee is composed of divinity school faculty and students and Rochester area women in ministry. Since 1995, the program has sponsored an annual Helen Barrett Montgomery Conference on Women in Church and Society to address contemporary issues. Topics have included violence against women; women as partners in the churches’ dialogue about sexuality; women and a livable economy; women, health, and healing; womanist-feminist conversation; and women in religious leadership. Prominent national and international keynote speakers have been Rachael Adler, Mary Daly, Toinette Eugene, Marie Fortune, Yvonne Haddad, Aruna Gnanadason, Beverly Wildung Harrison, Rosemary Haughton, Ada Maria Isasi-Diaz, Musimbi Kanyoro, Virginia Ramey Mollenkott, Mercy Oduyoye, Ofelia Ortega, Kwok Pui-lan, Rosemary Radford Ruether, Joyce Rupp, Letty Russell, Jane Smith, Renita Weems, Delores Williams, and Miriam Therese Winter.

a ngliC an S TUDieS P RogRaM The divinity school, in collaboration with the Bexley Seabury Federation Program in Anglican Studies and The Episcopal Diocese of Rochester, offers Episcopal students preparing for ordination the opportunity to earn a Master of Divinity degree from CRCDS concurrently with an Anglican Studies Certificate from Bexley Seabury. This unique partnership offers students preparing for ordained ministry in the Episcopal Church the extraordinary opportunity to combine the ecumenical theological education available at CRCDS with a strong program in Anglican studies and formation through Bexley Seabury. The Anglican Studies Certificate consists of six three-credit courses and one one-credit online course in canon law, for a minimum of nineteen credits, taken over the duration of a student’s M.Div. program at CRCDS. Areas of study considered particularly appropriate for the Anglican Studies Certificate

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Curricular emphases

include courses in Anglican/Episcopal church history, Anglican theology, Anglican ethics and spirituality, and courses in liturgy and worship. These courses fulfill the canonical requirements for pre-ordination education as stipulated in the Canons of the Episcopal Church and fit within the eight electives available to students enrolled in the M.Div. program. The program also offers opportunities for Anglican formation in the form of the daily offices of morning and evening prayer, the Eucharist, and ongoing spiritual and theological reflection throughout the student’s course of study. Students may access Bexley Seabury courses in various ways: online delivery methods, hybrid courses (half online and half in either Chicago or Columbus), one week intensives in January or June, or courses taught by CRCDS faculty associates or Bexley Seabury faculty on the CRCDS campus. Please note that applicants to the Anglican Studies Program must also sign a release form allowing CRCDS to share their admissions file with Bexley Seabury.

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Continuing Education The divinity school’s Life Long Learning programs offer opportunities for high-quality, purposeful, enjoyable and innovative exploration of contemporary issues of life and faith in the 21st century for the whole people of God. g ene b enneTT P RogRaM

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Participants may seek personal or professional enrichment. They may also earn Continuing Education Units (CEU’s). One CEU is granted for each ten hours of participation in a qualifying Life Long Learning program. There is a nominal fee of $20 for the issuance of CEUs for qualifying events. The Life Long Learning program includes long-established lectureships associated with the divinity school’s multiple histories, including the following lectures: the Stanley I. Stuber, the J.C. Wynn, the Martin Luther King, Jr., the Gene Bartlett, the Howard Thurman, the Mordecai Wyatt Johnson, LGBTi, and the Helen Barrett Montgomery. These lectures offer opportunities for students, alumni/ae, and community members to engage speakers who are at the forefront of contemporary theological and biblical scholarship, and who address pressing issues of the day. The Life Long Learning program also sponsors workshops, seminars, conferences and other educational events of interest to clergy and lay leaders on a variety of topics including leadership development, preaching, mission and outreach, liturgy and the arts, interfaith studies and dialogue and other issues of concern to the contemporary church. The schedule of the various lectures, together with all other Life Long Learning programs, is regularly posted on the website and events are also singly publicized. This schedule also includes information about lecturers and events sponsored by the Black Church Studies Program and the Program for the Study of Women and Gender in Church and Society. Many of the academic lectures are free and open to the public. Workshops, intensive courses, conferences and certificate programs require tuition or a registration fee.

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Continuing education

Partnership with local churches for ministry education includes offering some programs in the Rochester area churches. Attention to clusters of alumni/ae and friends in various geographical regions, as well as the use of educational technologies, makes events available to a wider audience. GRADUATE CERTIFICATE STUDIES PROGRAM

The Graduate Certificate Studies Program is also part of the Life Long Learning program. Students in the Graduate Certificate Studies Program take the standard three-credit graduate courses offered in the master’s level programs and complete all of the same work that is required of the degree students. Courses in the program qualify for continuing education units (CEUs). Each three-credit course earns 3.6 continuing education units (CEUs). The Graduate Certificate Studies Program requires the satisfactory completion of six graduate level courses taken in an area of concentration. The following areas of concentration are currently being offered: • • • • • • •

Social Change Transformation Ethics Preaching Black Church Studies Inter-Religious Dialogue Pastoral Care Women & Gender Studies

A student may also choose to design his or her own curriculum concentration in consultation with the Director of Life Long Learning. TransferofCourseworkinto DegreePrograms If a student enrolls in the Graduate Certificate Studies Program and later decides to apply for either the Master of Arts or Master of Divinity degree programs, she/he may transfer no more than three Graduate Certificate Studies courses for credit towards the degree. A transfer fee of $500 per course will also be charged to make paid tuition comparable to the rates paid by degree students.

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Academic Policies R eQUiReMenTS

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The Constitution and Bylaws of the school provide that the faculty shall certify to the Board of Trustees annually the names of students who have satisfactorily completed all courses required by the school’s curriculum and shall recommend them for the degrees they have earned. The faculty assumes that the completion of the requisite number of courses in each degree program, by and of itself, constitutes one of the adequate reasons to recommend conferral of the degree. Also considered are the balance and general adequacy of the program of study completed and, in the case of the professional programs, the student’s progress towards the development of abilities such as openness and teachability, historical appreciation and theological understanding, a sense of professional identity appropriate to his or her vocational goals, interpersonal skills, constructive work habits, and communication skills.

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REqUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER OF DIVINITY include successful completion of 26 courses, with a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.75. CANDIDATES FOR THE MASTER OF ARTS DEGREE must complete 16 courses, submit a master’s thesis or project, and pass an oral or written examination based on the thesis or project. Two courses of the total 16 required for the degree are awarded for satisfactory completion of the thesis project. A cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 is required for conferral of the Master of Arts degree. THE DOCTOR OF MINISTRY PROGRAM requires completion of the equivalent of a minimum of nine courses, one of which is awarded for the satisfactory completion of the thesis project, with a minimum grade point average of 3.0. Upon completion of at least five courses, and having prepared a thesis proposal, a Doctor of Ministry student undergoes a candidacy review with three faculty members. The purpose of the review is:

1— to evaluate the student’s progress through the program to that point in the program, 2— to approve the student’s thesis proposal, and 3— to make a recommendation to the full faculty concerning candidacy for the degree. Once a student becomes a candidate for the degree, he or she may begin writing his or her thesis. The thesis is approved by the student’s thesis project committee upon the successful completion of a public oral examination.

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Credits earned at other accredited seminaries may be transferred to the divinity school, pending review of course syllabi and an official transcript. Transferring credit into the Master of Divinity program requires course work with a grade of B- or higher and for the Master of Arts program requires course work with a grade of B or higher. Students may transfer no more than one-half of their courses for the Master of Divinity degree (13 courses) and the Master of Arts degree (8 courses). Normally, transfer credit for academic work completed at another institution more than 10 years prior to admission to CRCDS will not be granted. Requests for transfer credit should be made, in writing and with accompanying documentation, to the Vice President for Academic Life.

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academic Policies

w iThDRawalS

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Withdrawal terminates a student’s relationship with the school. Having withdrawn, a student will be readmitted only through the normal procedures of application required of all incoming students. A written notice of withdrawal from the school must be submitted to the Vice President for Academic Life. Failure to do so may result in the withholding of an honorable dismissal from the student’s record and may affect any future readmission to the school. A leave of absence is a temporary discontinuation of academic work at the school, with the permission and approval of the Vice President for Academic Life. Leaves may not exceed one academic term. If a student extends the leave of absence, the payment of student loans will begin. At end of a leave of absence, a student is readmitted, subject to the terms under which the leave was approved and without going through the process of reapplication.

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Academic Courses


Academic Courses Course numbers have been changed as a part of the 2012 Curriculum Review. R=coursesrequiredofallstudents Re=electivecourseswhichfulfillarequirement  withinthenewcurriculum e=openelectives 100 LEVEL COURSES shall be taken beforea student has completed

Evaluation I. 200 LEVEL COURSES shall be taken after a student has completed

Evaluation I. 300 LEVEL COURSES shall be taken aftera student has completed

Evaluation II. Theprofessorteachingaclassmaygrantanexceptiontothispolicy whenrequestedbyastudent.

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Master of Divinity and Master of Arts Courses C hRiSTian S CRiPTUReS R CS 101 IntroductiontotheOldTestament MarkBrummitt/GeorgeP.Heyman An introduction to the earlier literature and thought of the Old Testament with reference to its canonical and ancient Near Eastern contexts, concentrating on the Torah and Former Prophets (Genesis–2 Kings), but introducing the Latter Prophets in context. R CS 112 IntroductiontoNewTestament JinYoungChoi This course explores the documents of the New Testament in their literary, historical, socio-cultural, and religious contexts and develops students’ expertise in dealing with the materials and methods of critical study of the New Testament. Through this course students will not only gain a broad understanding of the growth and development of the early church but also be prepared to interpret the New Testament texts in their life and ministry contexts. e CS 108 BiblicalHebrewI JohnFadden/MarkBrummitt An introduction to the elements of classical Hebrew grammar and vocabulary. e CS 109 BiblicalHebrewII JohnFadden/MarkBrummitt Prerequisite: e CS 108 A continuation of Biblical Hebrew I focusing on basic grammar and chiefly irregular verbs. The course will include reading, translation and exegetical reflection on selected texts of both prose and poetry from the Hebrew Bible, as well as systematic vocabulary building.

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e CS 110 BiblicalGreekI RobertR.Hann Biblical Greek I is the first-semester introduction to the grammar, syntax and vocabulary of Koiné Greek. Using the classic grammar of Wenham, students will learn the fundamentals of New Testament Greek, mastering the tools prerequisite to accomplished reading of the Greek text, the focus of the second semester. e CS 111 BiblicalGreekII RobertR.Hann Prerequisite: e CS 110 Biblical Greek II builds on knowledge and understanding of the basic grammatical forms and constructions found in the Greek New Testament. Emphasis is also placed on examining the application of this grammatical understanding to actual New Testament texts, and on exploring how a particular grammatical form or usage can help the student in interpreting and understanding a specific text. Re CS 113 LettersfromPaultoChurchesinConflict:StudiesinActs, ICorinthians,andGalatians RobertR.Hann It has been suggested that Paul’s most creative theology emerged from the conflicts in which he and his churches were embroiled. This course will explore several critical conflicts which emerged in the first-century church, and Paul’s response to them especially in Galatians and in First Corinthians. The course method will emphasize a close reading of extended passages in these epistles and other New Testament texts. Our discussion will include the applicability of principles in Paul’s epistles to conflicts in the church today. e CS 200 TheGlobalReadoftheBible JinYoungChoi The Bible has been received and read not only in the West but also in the rest of the world. This course facilitates reading the Bible with others—global Christian communities in Africa and the Middle East, Asia and the Pacific, and Latin America and the Caribbean. The course helps students not only engage with other ways of reading in the global context but also recognize the contextual nature of their own readings. In so doing, students will embrace the face of global Christianity in the church and in their everyday lives.

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e CS 220 JesusandPaulinSecondTempleJerusalem JohnFadden In this course, Jesus and Paul will be examined as Jews within Second Temple Judaism. Students will engage primary texts from a historical perspective for the purpose of better understanding how Jesus and Paul are positioning themselves along the spectrums of Second Temple Jewish practice and belief. In the process, the course challenges us to consider the implications of our new understanding of the Jesus Movement and early Judaism for Christians and Jews and interreligious dialogue. Re CS 262 StoriesofCreationandtheOldTestament:Genesis,Isaiah,and OtherSelectedTexts MarkBrummitt A study of creation stories from the ancient world with special attention on those in the Old Testament. While the course is primarily exegetical—engaged in close reading of the Biblical text—there will also be time for comparative, cultural, and theological reflection. Re CS 272 Ruth,Jonah,andEsther:ReadingtheBiblicalNovella MarkBrummitt An exegetical study and study of exegesis, this course will not only study three texts from the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible, but also the reading strategies used to interpret them. As we read, we will take into account such things as narration, plot, characterization, and style, observing, too, the representation (and production) of ideologies relating to national and sexual identities. Re CS 292 TheBookofJeremiah MarkBrummitt An exegetical study taking into account the historical contexts of the Book of Jeremiah, theories of the book’s formation, and the history of its reception, whilst using a variety of interpretative approaches to negotiate this most tricky of biblical texts.

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Re CS 299 RecentInterpretativeApproachestotheOldTestament MarkBrummitt During the last two decades there has been a shift from the “historical-critical” methods that had previously dominated biblical criticism, to a sometimes bewildering variety of theoretical approaches to the text. This course will engage in a critical investigation of a number of such approaches, always with a view to aid creative, if not audacious, interpretation of the Bible. e CS 323 WarfareintheOldTestament MarkBrummitt Prerequisite: R CS 101 From Genesis through to the Prophets, the Old Testament presents YHWH as warrior (Ex 15:3). We shall examine this representation in its mythological and historical contexts, trace how it guides the business of theology both within and without the Bible, then place our findings alongside present day issues and concerns. e CS 324 TheBibleandFilm MarkBrummitt This will be a course in Bible and culture focusing specifically on the medium of movies and movie-making. Not simply an examination of screen representations of biblical stories, we shall at times juxtapose the biblical text with some surprising—even unlikely—cinematic choices. Under scrutiny, therefore, will be cultural self-representation and the part and place of the Bible in that. Re CS 343 Amos,Hosea,Micah:The8thCenturyMinorProphets MarkBrummitt Prophetic literature inspires and challenges societies both ancient and modern. This course is an in-depth exegetical analysis of Israel’s 8th century prophets with an emphasis on their historical and social location, as well as an exploration of current scholarly trends in reading prophetic literature.

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R CF 100 ChristianBeliefToday MelanieA.Duguid-May This course is designed to immerse students in the living stream of Christian theological thinking about God, as expressed in creeds—ecclesial and personal, ancient and new. We will wrestle with basic teachings about God, Christ, the Holy Spirit, Trinity, sin and salvation, the Kingdom of God, the Church, last things, and so on. Although systematic in scope, attention will be focused on the intersections of texts, contexts, and communities of faith through the centuries of world Christianity. At every point we will attend to learned, pastoral and prophetic aspects of Christian theology as language of the enlightened heart, articulated as credo. Students will be asked to articulate their own credo in conversation with Christian theological traditions, their ecclesial communities, and the realities of life in the 21st century. e CF 120 AmericanReligiousHistory JohnR.Tyson American Religious History is a survey course that introduces students to the development and transformation of religion in the United States. While the course concentrates on the history of American Christianity (with particular focus on the faith traditions associated with a variety of Protestant movements); it emphasizes how diverse religious traditions have influenced the historical development of the United States. e CF 121 TheTheoryandPracticeofEvangelism JohnR.Tyson This course is a study of the theological foundations of evangelism with a view to developing appropriate principles and strategies of evangelism in the local church. The purpose of this course is to give students an opportunity to develop, for their own ministries, an understanding of evangelism that meets the criteria of 1) charity, 2) fidelity, 3) depth, 4) sensitivity to issues of context and justice, and 5) applicability. R CF 129 ReformationandModernChurchHistory JohnR.Tyson This course examines the growth and development of Christianity by surveying its key periods, movements, and figures. Emphasis will be given to primary source readings and interaction with historical context. This section of the course begins with late-Medieval Christianity (ca. 1400) and moves toward the present day. Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School

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R CF 130 TheEarlyandMedievalChurch JohnR.Tyson This course is an introduction to the development of Christianity from the apostolic period to the Reformation. Emphasis is placed on the central historical figures, movements, social issues and theological issues, with attention given to their importance for Christian ministry today. Major texts and interpretive studies are read. R CF 160 FaithSeekingUnderstanding MelanieA.Duguid-May&GailA.Ricciuti To advance our mission to prepare women and men for learned, pastoral, and prophetic ministry, this tutorial for incoming students is designed to hone the specific skills of 1) careful reading of primary texts of the Christian tradition; 2) critical theological thinking; 3) the ability to integrate these in the task of faithful ministry in the church and world. The course will include work with key theological texts, faculty-led discussions, writing assignments, and the formation of cohort groups. e CF MS 202 Sexuality&Spirituality C.DeniseYarbrough This course will examine issues of sexuality as an expression of human spirituality within religious traditions around the world. We will study our own Christian tradition, its treatment of the human body and sexual behavior, paying particular attention to contemporary sexual theologies, drawing upon the Biblical and Christian theological traditions. We will examine the interplay and intersection of human sexuality and human spirituality, examining how these two aspects of the human condition are connected and contribute to mature and healthy spiritual formation and development. We will consider issues such as gender identity and expression, homosexuality, marriage, love and eros within our own tradition and in conversation with other religious traditions including Judaism, Islam, Buddhism and Hinduism. We will review texts from various mystical traditions in which eros and sexuality are integral to the mystical experience. We will read poetry and novels and view videos to explore this subject from affective as well as intellectual and theological perspectives. Re CF 203 LifeandThoughtofMartinLuther JohnR.Tyson This course offers an intensive study of the life and thought of the first Protestant Reformer. Luther’s life will be set in the historical and theological context of Late 38

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Medieval Catholicism. Many of Luther’s main writings will be read in chronological order to give a sense of the development of his theology as he gradually felt forced to leave the Roman Catholic Church. Luther’s career as a reformer will be highlighted, as will the salient themes of his “new” theology. Significant secondary sources will be read to help us interpret Luther’s life and thought from various stand points. The contemporary relevance of Luther’s life and theology will be explored. Re CF 204 TheLifeandThoughtofJohnWesley This course is intended to 1) provide students with the historical context for understanding John Wesley's significance as a church leader; 2) identify and explore major theological themes in Wesley’s thought; 3) assess Wesley’s significance in church/religious history; 4) explore Wesley’s legacy, in light of issues facing contemporary Christians; 5) provide modern Methodists (and others) with the theological resources necessary for doing theology and ministry in the Methodist mode. R CF 210 IntroductiontoChristianEthics DavidY.Kim This course offers an introductory survey of Christian ethics. It assumes no prior knowledge of the field and is appropriate for both those looking for a general introduction in preparation for ministry, as well as those contemplating future specialization in the field who want a bird’s eye view of the tradition. Specifically, we will track the changing configurations of four sets of relationships that resurface throughout Christian history: the relationship between faith and works, church and state, individual (rights) and community (responsibility), and love and justice. The overall aim is twofold: first, to cultivate a critical sense of the abiding power of, and objections to, Christian moral teachings, and secondly, to apply these teachings to concrete social practices. Re CF 212 AugustineandCalvin DavidY.Kim The purpose of this course is to explore themes uncovered with close and critical reading of Augustine and Calvin’s primary texts. Particular attention is given to Augustine’s Confessions, as well as the definitive 1559 edition of Calvin’s Institutes along with readings from various scholars. Attention will be given to the doctrinal themes as they emerge from the readings, as well as the cultural, philosophical, and ecclesiastical contexts out of which these themes developed.

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e CF 224 LoveandJustice DavidY.Kim This course examines the ongoing debate in theological and philosophical ethics about the relation between love and justice, equal regard and individual care, respect and compassion. The course takes up such questions as: Are justice and love distinct? Is love the basis of social justice? Is the distinction between love and justice gendered? Can we love the stranger and even the enemy as well as the friend? Which has priority: “impartial love” (agape) or love of particular persons (“special relations”)? What is the proper attitude toward the self in pursuing love or justice for the other? What informs love’s response in a particular context? What is the relation between “reason” and the emotions? We will focus on classical and contemporary voices in theological and philosophical ethics. e CF 230 ReadingsinChristianSpirituality JohnR.Tyson This course provides a chronological survey of the writings and practices which constitute and contributed to the formation of Christian Spirituality. Primary and secondary sources will be studied and evaluated. In addition to academic study, students will be encouraged to embrace the practices and disciplines of Christian Spirituality. Re CF 240 TheTheologyoftheHolySpirit JamesH.Evans,Jr. This course examines the history and development of the doctrine of the Holy Spirit in Christian theology. Among the major Christian doctrinal emphases, it has been the most misunderstood, neglected, and underappreciated motifs. In this course the student will read treatments of this doctrine by Karl Barth, Paul Tillich and others from the 20th century, as well as contemporary treatments of this doctrine by African American and feminist theologians. The goal of this course is to provide the student with the knowledge and critical awareness to be able to understand and assess how this important Christian doctrine functions in worshipping communities today. Re CF 257 TheologyandEthicsofJohnCalvin DavidY.Kim We will engage in a critical evaluation of the theology and ethics of John Calvin, especially in view of controversies and issues facing mainline Protestant churches today. We will read selections from Calvin’s corpus and analyze his ideas in 40

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conversation with seminal Christian thinkers like Augustine of Hippo, Martin Luther, Søren Kierkegaard, Karl Barth, and Alastair McIntyre. Special attention will be given to Calvin’s pastoral advice to ministers about church leadership, moral and spiritual formation, and mitigation of theological conflicts or disagreements. e CF MS 258 ComparativeReligiousEthics DavidY.Kim This course examines the ways of thinking and acting ethically within the framework of four religious traditions: Christianity, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Islam. Basic moral concepts in these traditions will be studied in relation to their cosmological, epistemological and theological (particularly soteriological) commitments. Specifically, the course will explore the concepts of self (and “otherness”), virtue, love or compassion, justice, and nonviolence in four distinct ways: 1) a general overview of the tradition; 2) consideration of representative thinkers (both classical and contemporary); 3) comparisons of how different traditions understand problems of social justice, war, gender equity, and the environment; and 4) consideration of current debates in religious ethics about the prospects for a common morality. Re CF 270 TheologyofBaptism JamesH.Evans,Jr. This course is designed to introduce students to the history and doctrine of baptism in the life of the Church. The course will examine the development of the practice and theology of baptism in the Bible and through the early centuries of the existence of the Church. Emphases will include the differences and similarities in the understanding of baptism in different faith communities. Course participants will study both historical and contemporary works on the topic. The objective is to gain a deeper understanding of the meaning of this ancient Christian practice for the Church today. e CF 278 ChurchintheDigitalAge DavidY.Kim TIMEMagazine refers to social media and the internet as having changed the way human beings relate to one another “on a species-wide scale.” In less than seven years, Facebook alone has connected more than a twelfth of humanity into a single network, creating new ways of negotiating identity, community, and communication. This course will explore the impact of social media and the internet on church and society. The course will combine “case explorations,” emphasizing the acquisition of practical skills for leveraging technologies to enhance ministry, community building, and education, combined with critical reflection on the impact of technology on spirituality and morality. The course will also examine contemporary working

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models, particularly in the Church, education, and politics, against the backdrop of history (i.e., the historical shifts in Church practices and theologies brought about by different technological advancements). This experimental course will entail a lot of online and small group cooperation. The intent of the course is to explore possibilities and limitations of carrying out the mission of the Church in a digital age. Re CF 320 AtonementandForgiveness DavidY.Kim This course examines ways in which the salvific work of Christ have been understood. Special attention is devoted to the question of Christ's atonement as understood by St. Athanasius, St. Anselm, Peter Abelard, St. Thomas Aquinas, John Calvin, and Immanuel Kant. Some consideration will be given to the themes of justice, retribution, mercy, and forgiveness as moral and theological themes. e CF 324 FaithandtheProblemofReligiousIntolerance DavidY.Kim This course examines the emergence of the principle of religious toleration in the Christian West. In particular, we will read through three early modern texts as resources for thinking about contemporary problems in religion and politics: A Letter Concerning Toleration by John Locke (1689), Philosophical Commentary by Pierre Bayle (1686-88), and The Bloodied Tenent of Persecution by Roger Williams (1644). All three texts were written in response to the long and bitter religious struggles that dominated post-Reformation life in colonial America (Williams) and Europe (Locke and Bayle). The goal of the course will be to draw upon the early modern Christian experience to identify constructive contributions religious actors might make in mitigating conflict and promoting peace. e CF 352 UnitedMethodistHistory&Theology JohnR.Tyson Prerequisites: Open only to Middlers or Seniors This course examines the development of United Methodist history and theology from the time of John Wesley to the present. In addition to acquainting the student with significant historical and theological movements within the United Methodist tradition, the course will increase student awareness of how these movements have impacted denominational identity at the close of the 20th century.

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Re CF 358 TheologyofKarlBarth JamesH.Evans,Jr. The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an opportunity to study critically and assess the theology of Karl Barth. The course will examine the nature of the theological task for Barth, his view of the history of modern theological thought, his exposition of major theological doctrines, and later reflections on his theological career. The issues and concerns expressed in Barth’s theology will be examined in light of historical and contemporary options. e CF MS 410 StudiesinContemporaryTheology JamesH.Evans,Jr. This is a reading course designed to guide students in the critical examination of key contemporary theological works. The texts for this course have been chosen because they reflect some of the thinking of the most influential theologians of our day. Through engagement with these texts students can observe how contemporary issues and historical theological affirmations are brought into conversation with one another, and thereby enhance their capacity to do likewise.

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e MS 121 LivingReligions:U.S.&GlobalPerspectivesandPractices C.DeniseYarbrough In a pluralistic and multicultural society, Christians no longer have the luxury of pretending that they are the “majority” religion. Doing ministry in today’s world requires knowledge and sensitivity to the other major world religions that are an integral part of American culture and of our interconnected global world. This course will introduce students to the fundamental precepts and practices of a variety of major religions that are important players in the world today, both in this country and abroad, including Buddhism, Hinduism, Sikhism, Jainism, Islam, Judaism, Bahá’í, Native American traditions, Neo-Pagan traditions, and Mormonism. Visits to places of worship in other world religions and/or guest speakers from these traditions are an integral part of this course. We will consider the challenges that pluralism poses for people of all faith traditions in a diverse society. We will examine how the various world religions are being lived out in this country and throughout the world. The intent of this course is: 1) to stimulate theological reflection about our own Christian tradition in light of the wisdom and insights of other world religions; 2) to provide a brief introduction to the beliefs and practices of the world religions as they are lived out in our modern American context; and

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3) to consider issues of globalism and pluralism in the context of Christian ministry and the relationship of religion to political and economic issues at home and abroad, considering issues of tolerance of other religions as each religion expresses or understands it. e MS CF 159 ChristianTheologicalResponsestoReligiousPluralism MelanieA.Duguid-May Christians live amid growing religious pluralism, here in the United States and around the world. This course explores ways in which Christians have responded to religious pluralism, primarily in contemporary contexts, but also with attention to biblical and historical perspectives. We ask questions such as: How do we understand religious pluralism? What challenges does religious pluralism pose for Christian theology (e.g., if God created all persons in God’s image, how do we as Christians understand God’s presence in the lives of all human beings, including those of other religious traditions)? What is the relation of God’s revelation in Jesus Christ to God’s activity as creator of the universe and to the ongoing work of God’s spirit in creation? What is faithful dialogue with people of other religious traditions? How are dialogue and mission related? The course also addresses issues of religion and global responsibility. These issues include religious nationalism, religious violence, ethnic cleansing, economic injustice, fundamentalism, religious movements for liberation, and models for being good neighbors with people of other living faith communities. Throughout the course, participants will consider the implications, pastorally and practically, of interreligious dialogue to the practice of ministry. e MS 160 InterreligiousDialogue Interreligious dialogue is one of the pressing challenges facing all religious traditions today. This course prepares students to engage in interreligious dialogue by attending to Christian theologies and practices of dialogue in a pluralistic world. Particular attention is also given to the perceptions of Christianity members of other religious communities have. e MS 169 Islam:AnIntroduction This course will be an introduction to beliefs and pillars of Islam, including topics on Shari`ah, theology and mystical tradition of Islam. Patterns of Muslims’ personal and community life will be considered, as well as Islam and Muslim in the contemporary world and issues of Jihad in Islam. Finally, there will be a selective study of the qur`an on topics such as the prophets of Islam, Mary and Jesus, heaven and hell, and issues of interfaith dialogue.

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e MS CF 201 WomeninAmericanReligion JohnR.Tyson This course analyzes gender in the Unites States from the 17th century to the present and the function of organized religion in creating, reinforcing and perpetuating gender roles in American society. It also traces the participation of women in various religious communities. e MS 202 WomeninMinistryintheWorldwideChurch MelanieA.Duguid-May The World Council of Churches study, “On Being the Church: Women’s Voices and Visions,” provides the frame for our focus on the place of women in the church, their ministries, their exercise of authority—including in ordained ministry. Historical and theological perspectives will be brought to an ecumenical exploration of women in ministry. The study also provides experiential perspectives on pressing issues faced by women in the worldwide church, e.g., violence against women and children, poverty, sexuality and racism. Throughout, course material will be related to students’ own practices of ministry in the church and the world of the 21st century. Re MS CF 202 Thurman&KingandtheLifeoftheSpirit JamesH.Evans,Jr. This course is designed to introduce the student to the major themes, motifs and ideas in the writings of Martin Luther King, Jr., and Howard Thurman. These two towering figures have helped give voice to communities seeking wholeness, liberation and reconciliation in the United States and throughout the world. Their influence is evident far beyond the African American communities which shaped them. This course will focus on the spiritual dimensions of their lives and thought as an avenue to understanding their significance for us today. This course will include lectures, class presentations, and small group discussions. e MS CF 203 ChristianFaith,theChurches,andLGBTiPersons MelanieA.Duguid-May Engaging what is perhaps the most debated and divisive issues within and among Christian churches today, this course will a) explore the teachings of Christian scripture and tradition, b) survey recent statements of Christian churches on human sexuality and homosexuality, c) read LGBTi biblical and theological scholarship both critically and appreciatively. Attention will also be paid to multi-cultural and inter-religious perspectives on sexualities, to legal issues related to sexualities and marriage, and to anti-gay hate crimes and sexualized violence around the globe. Issues raised will be related to the practice of ministry in the 21st century church and world. Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School

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e CF MS 203 WomeninChurchHistory JohnR.Tyson This course surveys representative female figures from the various periods of the history of the Christian movement. It seeks to explore the theological contributions of women in their historical context. Significant primary and secondary sources will be studied. Particular attention will be given to women’s various roles in the church and to gender related issues. e MS CF 204 Race,ReligionandPolitics JamesH.Evans,Jr. This course examines the relationship between race, religion and politics in America. In light the historic but disputed influence of the ideas of race and religion in the formation of the political life of the United States, and in light of the unique issues which have emerged during recent national and Presidential elections, this course will provide for students a unique opportunity observe and study these factors that continue to shape our lives together. Students will examine and evaluate policy statements, press releases, news stories and other sources to understand the ways that these ideas shape public perception and debate during these critical national moments. e MS CF 206 HistoricalandNormativeThemesinBlackChurchCulture–Part1 This course is constructed to emphasize the major events and personalities of the black church in America from approximately 1830 to 1940. Additionally, when necessary, discussion relative to the role of the church as participants in movements such as civil rights and black liberation will be included. Of importance will be profile studies of historic figures of the black church. Also included will be some discussions examining the various subjects of controversies, conflicts and doctrinal disputes of the church, including denominationalism and study of the National Baptist Convention, Incorporated. The unity question relative to black Methodism will also be explored. e MS CF 207 HistoricalandNormativeThemesinBlackChurchCulture–Part2 This second semester study of the black church in America will attempt to trace the major events and movements of that institution from the latter Eighteenth Century. Also examined will be some of the major personalities of the black church, women and men who have shaped its history.

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e MS CF 259 ReligionandAfrican-AmericanLiterature JamesH.Evans,Jr. This course is designed to introduce students to the field of study, which encompasses religion and literature. The course will examine religious motifs and themes in selected 20th-century novels and autobiographies. Emphases will include the impact of faith in the lives of authors as they find expression in their work. Course participants will study the works of Richard Wright, Toni Morrison, Maya Angelou, and Ralph Ellison, among others. The objective is to gain a deeper understanding of the interrelationship between African-American literary and religious expression. Re MS CF 260 IntroductiontoBlackTheology JamesH.Evans,Jr. The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the theological enterprise as it has developed in the African-American Christian community. This will be a lecture and discussion course, and each student will contribute to the learning and teaching process. The course will begin with an overview of the distinctive events and themes in the emergence of black theology in the United States. It will include an examination of the major systematic motifs in black theology. The course will conclude with a discussion of current themes and emphases in black theology. e MS CF 279 AfricanReligions This course examines the worldview and religion of the peoples of sub-Saharan Africa. It will address the components, theology, rites and rituals of African Traditional Religion (ATR), its past and present interactions with other faiths and its place in interreligious dialogue. Special attention will be paid to the modern practice of ATR in Africa and in the Diaspora, and to the responses of ATR to modern social issues. R MS CF 280 Women&GenderPerspectivesonFaith,Understanding&Belief MelanieA.Duguid-May This course will feature women’s contributions to Christian faith, understanding & belief, and women’s participation in the life of the Christian church. We will read writings by women, from the earliest Christian centuries through the present, including global perspectives. As we read, we will pay close critical and contextual attention to the obstacles and opportunities women encountered, and still encounter, and the ways in which Christianity has both affirmed and hindered women’s lives and faith. The course will also engage an interdisciplinary analysis of gender, highlighting the dynamics of class, race, and sexualities in the lives of

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women cross-culturally, and consider the relevance and impact of gender and gender-related issues to church and society. Attention will also be given to women’s leadership, the ways women have organized for social change, and women’s roles in Christian ministry and mission. e MS CF 281 African-AmericanPhilosophy JamesH.Evans,Jr. The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the major themes, methods, and motifs in African-American Philosophy. We will read selected texts in light of the Western philosophical tradition and attempt to critically assess the resources that these texts may provide for contemporary theological understanding. Special attention will be paid to the notion of “Africa” as a central concept and to the contribution of African-American philosophy to the development of AfricanAmerican theology. Sessions will focus on thinkers, themes or both. R MS BC 290 BlackChurchPerspectivesonFaith,UnderstandingandBelief This course examines what it means to have faith or to be a part of a faith community; to the pursuit of a critical understanding of that faith; and to reappropriate that faith in the form of belief, with a focus on the church in the African Diaspora. Faith is the experience of being grasped by God’s love and presence. Understanding involves critical reflection on that experience so that its truth and meaning is clearly and convincingly articulated and communicated. Belief is the moral, ethical and existential obedience to this critically examined faith in one’s life and practice. Therefore, faith, understanding and belief operate in an ever generative cycle of prayer, study and action. This course examines these factors in light of the history and contemporary experience of the black church in the U.S. and beyond. e MS CF 301 Religion:MakingWar,MakingPeace MelanieA.Duguid-May This course explores the range of Christian and other religious responses to war and violence, together with traditions of Christian and other religious teachings about peacemaking, both in historical and in contemporary ecumenical and global contexts. Attention will be given to war and peace in biblical traditions, to war and peace as themselves conflictive issues within religious traditions, to statements made by Christian churches on war and peace in the last thirty years, and to the current World Council of Churches Decade to Overcome Violence. Attention will also be given to analyses of structural violence—including gendered perspectives and exploration of ethnic and racial construals of violence—and to various faces and forms of religious extremism. This exploration will aim to articulate new paradigms for Christian peace witness in ecumenical and interfaith dialogue. 48

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e MS PT 303 NativeAmericanSpirituality StephanieL.Sauvé This course will explore some aspects of Native American Spirituality. We will look to the four directions, seeking as we strive to gain wisdom, insight and appreciation. This course will be an opportunity to learn of the ways of the First People of this continent, called Turtle Island. As we begin to honor these Sisters and Brothers we will come to understand that “spirituality” is part of everyday life, it cannot be separated out. When Native people cook, dance, do beadwork, hunt, gather food or herbs for medicine, they are praying. e MS CS 312 Gender&SexualityinEarlyChristianLiterature This course introduces students to some of the diverse representations of gender and sexuality within early Christian writings. Students will analyze the different social and historical conditions that gave rise to the representations of both males and females within the ancient world as a springboard for assessing how early Christian authors developed discourses about gender and sexuality. Throughout the course, students will compare and contrast the different roles of females and males, and the various power relationships that existed within early Christian communities. This course will also provide students an opportunity to analyze and evaluate contemporary discussions about sexuality within mainline denominations. e MS CF 315 TheChurchintheWorldofChristianities MelanieA.Duguid-May What does it mean to be the church? This course addresses this issue for students preparing for ministry in the early years of the 21st century. Particular attention will be paid to new ecclesial realities, e.g., the emergent church, Pentecostal movements within and outside the U.S., African immigrant churches in the U.S., an explosion of Christian populations in southeast Asia, the dramatic exodus of Christians from west Asia, “base Christian communities” in Latin America and the church as “family” in Africa, the preaching of the prosperity gospel in Latin America and in Africa, the confrontation of Islam and Christianity in Europe, southeast Asia, the U.S., and northern Africa, the overall demographic shift of the Christian heartlands from north to south and from west to east. Issues of globalization, culture and inculturation, migration and immigration, colonialism and neo-colonialism will, therefore, be featured. At the same time, discussion of these new global ecclesial—as well as cultural, political and economic—realities will be grounded in critical and creative reflection on local ecclesial communities in upstate New York and across the U.S. In the 8th century of the Christian era, the Venerable Bede wrote that “every day the church gives birth to the church.” This course will seek to equip students to engage new ecclesial realities as learned, pastoral, and prophetic leaders. Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School

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e MS PT 324 GenderIssuesinPastoralTheology The psychology of women, the men’s movement, the politics of homophobia, issues of sexual abuse and harassment, new understandings and practices of pastoral care for women and men, re-imaginings of God and the church will be engaged. Women and men are both welcome! e MS PT 333 DanceofWomen’sSpirituality StephanieL.Sauvé The course is designed to invite students to explore, develop, stretch and enhance spiritual knowledge and practices. This course will offer students a variety of tools, approaches, methodologies and practices to engage as dance partners for their life journey. It is impossible to exhaust this topic in one threecredit course. Therefore, the intent of this course is to lay a foundation and to invite students to continually and proactively fill the well of their spiritual self. e MS CF 362 Pornography,Prostitution,andanIconographyofWomen inChristianity MelanieA.Duguid-May Prerequisites: Open only to Middlers and Seniors An exploration of pornography and prostitution—in various historical and contemporary settings—in order to clarify and critique ways in which women have been and are represented in some strands of Christian tradition. With Mary Magdalene as companion, this course will address theological understandings of the body, sexuality, and power. The course will also address the ever more urgent issues of poverty and violence against women, asking about the role and responsibility of the churches. Throughout, students will engage the implications of these issues for ministerial practice. e MS CS 372 EthnicDiversityinEarlyChristianity Early Christian writings were produced in a rich context of religious and ethnic diversity. This course will examine how ethnic diversity is represented in early Christian writings and explore the various social, political, religious and cultural factors that gave rise to such representations. Utilizing ancient ethnographic theory, students will be given an opportunity to assess how ethnic discourse influenced the construction of the New Testament and other early Christian writings. Students will be encouraged to explore how ethnic diversity within early Christian writings raises questions about how we handle diversity in the contemporary Church and society. 50

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TRaDiTional & eMeRging PRaCTiCeS of Theology e PT 201 PowerofSmallChristianCommunities BarbaraA.Moore From the beginning of the new Christian community, the power and influence of this small sect within the Jewish tradition held a power and promise that changed lives. This has been true throughout Christian history. This class will explore a sampling of these communities and reflect on their importance and influence until the present day. R PT 202, 212 SupervisedMinistry StephanieL.SauvĂŠ Prerequisites: Attendance at the Site Fair, Evaluation I and Completion of all paperwork by June 1, the spring before participation in Supervised Ministry, and a background check. Supervised Ministry 202 and 212 must be taken in the same academic year. The Supervised Ministry experience involves both practicum experience and an integrative class. In this experience students will: 1) Practice the various arts and skills of ministry, in consultation with the supervisor; 2) practice doing theology inductively and analogically; 3) think critically about ministry in a way that relates to the context; 4) develop an integrated theology of ministry that uses the range of subjects taught in the theological curriculum; and 5) develop the habits of learning in and from the community of ministry and of engaging in ongoing selfevaluation of his/her own work. e PT 203 CommunicatingtheGospeltoChildrenandYouth StephenM.Cady This course is meant to enable students to reflect critically and theologically upon the discipleship of children and adolescents, both in the methodology of spiritual formation and in the content of Christian education. It will examine both the formal and informal ways that the gospel is communicated to young people in practices both within and without of the church. It is assumed that understanding developmental aspects and considering cultural context are crucial for engaging in and evaluating the ministry of discipleship. Theological reflection will dictate both material and formal consideration of spiritual formation and Christian education.

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R PT 217 IntroductiontoPastoralCare StephanieL.Sauvé/RobinY.Franklin&WilliamB.Reynolds Prerequisites: Open only to Middlers and Seniors This course will focus on the most common emotional and spiritual issues that pastoral ministers are likely to encounter as they journey with others. We will look at the unique role of the Pastor in the life of the faith community and in the most intimate moments in the life of the people of that community. Case studies will provide student with practical experience dealing with life’s wonder-filled and awe-filled moments. R PT 218 IntroductiontoPreaching GailA.RicciutiandBarbaraA.Moore What distinguishes preaching that is pastoral, communicative of the Gospel, scripturally rooted, and spiritually liberating? Exploring these questions, the course will address sermon preparation and delivery, with opportunities for students to integrate theory and practice by preaching in class. Attention will be given to the use of language, metaphor and imagination, and responsible encounter with the biblical text. e PT 227 PreachingtheLiturgicalSeason:Lent,Easter,Pentecost GailA.Ricciuti This introductory preaching course will focus upon interpreting homiletically the biblical/theological themes of Lent, Easter, and Pentecost, following the Revised Common Lectionary. The course will address sermon preparation and delivery, with opportunities for students to integrate theory and practice by preaching in class. Attention will be given to the use of language, metaphor and imagination, as well as communication of the Gospel to contemporary congregations. e PT 242 ChurchAdministration GailA.Ricciuti Prerequisites: Open only to Middlers or Seniors The day-to-day and cyclical administration of the local church is influenced by a multiplicity of factors—among them, size, congregational makeup, leadership styles and expectations, gender issues, staff relationships, denominational and congregational understandings of leadership, decision-making style, communication, and community context. This course will explore these issues in relation to administrative styles and approaches that may borrow from the best

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wisdom of the corporate world but are specifically congruent with the Christian faith. Varied formats will be used for the class: role plays, case studies, discussion of readings, lectures, and use of evaluative tools to assist students in identifying their own leadership style and envisioning effective styles appropriate to the Church. Guests from fields of pastoral ministry and organizational administration and finance will regularly visit the class to speak about their own leadership values and administrative work with regard to specific daily course foci. e PT 246 MinistryontheMargins BarbaraA.Moore The vision of this course lies in the promise and transforming power in the art of conversation with men, women and children who in some way differ from us, and often find themselves on the edges of life. Conversation implies the capacity and effort to develop a listening heart, and the willingness to explore the directions into which such conversations may lead the class in exploring pastoral directions and creative actions. e PT 275 TheArtfulPreacher:PreachingwithArt,PreachingasArt GailA.Ricciuti The course will examine how it is that preaching is an art—and preachers, artists— by exploring what characterizes the human endeavors routinely identified as art, and subsequently the affinity between preaching and other arts. Along the way, we will explore the biblical roots of the creative act, consider the artistic value of ambiguity, and compare the approaches of other artists with the task of sermon preparation, identifying practices that might be adopted intentionally by preachers in their own “studios,” while searching for a consequent artistic spirituality for the homiletician. Students will have the opportunity to craft sermons flowing from this sensibility with a goal of understanding the difference between artful preaching and that which is cheaply sentimental—and by what means preachers can avoid falling into that morass. e PT 282 TheMinistryofTeaching An introductory course in religious education, focusing on theological understandings of religious education, the dynamics of how cultural and congregational life educate people, and the ways in which one is simultaneously “pastor,” “teacher” and “learner.” Through site visits, interaction with practicing religious educators, and the use of and creation of Web resources, the course will strive to be practical as well as theoretical.

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e PT 301 End-of-LifeIssuesinPastoralMinistry BarbaraA.Moore With the advances in medical procedures and treatments, pastoral leaders are finding themselves faced with families and individuals who are looking for answers, approaches, and directions as they address “end-of-life” issues for themselves and those they love. This three-week course will address not only contemporary medical and pastoral care approaches, but the practical community helps that are available when these issues are addressed. e PT 310 LiturgyfortheSacramentalLife:Font,Table,Covenant,Fulfillment GailA.Ricciuti This course addresses worship creation and practice through the lenses of sacrament, marrying, and burying; including exploration of pastoral and theological implications for preaching. The course takes a closer, more detailed look than the basic worship course (Arts of Liturgy) at the structure and theological content of liturgy and preaching for “sacramental” occasions. e PT 312 PreachingintheAfrican-AmericanTradition MarvinA.McMickle This course is designed to introduce the persons, contexts and themes of AfricanAmerican preaching from the antebellum period to the present time. Through readings, videos and class discussions, students will be exposed to a wide array of preaching styles and content. The intentional will always be to “hear” those sermons and understand those preachers in the socio-political context in which they lived and worked. The course is intended to draw the lines of continuity in black preaching during this period, and to point out the ways by which this art form has been altered and appropriated by successive generations of practitioners. e PT 314 SexualityandPastoralCare Information, experiences abound related to sexuality. Our denominations and churches spend a great deal of time on issues related to sexuality. But are pastors prepared for dealing with the wide array of the ramifications of sexuality? This course will consider some of the issues that pastors will meet on a daily basis and some that will come as a surprise. Biblical, theological, and psychological background will be discussed. Practical pastoral tools such as Bible Student, sermons, counseling, and case studies will be presented by the professor and students.

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e PT 324 PastoralCarethroughGriefandLoss RobinY.Franklin/WilliamB.Reynolds This course will explore pastoral care in response to loss and grief using perspectives from Biblical texts, theology, psychological theory and cultural studies. Specific attention will be given to death and dying. e PT MS 325 AdvancedFeminist/WomanistPreaching GailA.Ricciuti Prerequisite: PT 218 This course will familiarize students with the evolving body of thought on homiletics from both feminist and womanist hermeneutical perspectives and the theologies that undergird such preaching. Particular attention will be given to reading strategies (such as gender reversal, analogy, and women as exchange objects), and to preaching on issues directly related to women’s lives in contemporary society. Students will have opportunities to practice these methodologies by preaching in class. The course is for those willing to consider theological approaches that challenge the traditional, and willing to stretch themselves in engaging feminist and womanist points of view. e PT 326 PreachingonContemporaryQuestions:FromSocialIssues toPublicPolicy MarvinA.McMickle This course will focus on the ways in which preaching becomes the context within which to address and analyze many of the cutting edge, and even controversial issues facing both church and society in the twenty-first century. How can scripture be used to inform the ways in which preachers help people better understand contemporary issues? Then how can sermons help them fashion their response to such issues in ways that are informed by their faith as Christians? This course will be focused around the biblical/theological concept of Mark 1:15 and the emergence of the reign of God on earth. The terminology in the text speaks of “kairos time� when the Church seeks to discern how God is breaking into time and history. e PT MS 330 LiberatingLiturgy:WomenasCelebrants GailA.Ricciuti The course will explore, from a feminist perspective, the various modes of liturgy and ritual used in corporate worship and their history, theology and practice. Trinitarian formulations and alternative forms Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School

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of corporate prayer will also be examined. Students will compose original prayers and experiment with creative rituals and liturgies addressing and expressing women’s experience of the Holy. e PT 336 PilgrimagetoIona:LivingSpirituality StephanieL.Sauvé Prerequisites: Acceptance by Cross-Cultural Experiences Committee; Valid Passport, Documentation of required vaccination. Pilgrims will prepare through the Spring Term for the journey to Iona Scotland and interaction with the Iona Community in Glasgow Scotland and on the Isle of Iona. We shall explore the rich history of the faithful who have called the Isle of Iona their home and spiritual touchstone, as well as garner the wisdom of the Iona Community of this day. The Iona Community, that is at home in the Isle and in the world, seeking to do justice, to love kindness and walk humbly with our God. e PT 352 PreachingtheSocialGospelToday GailA.Ricciuti This course will look back at the last century’s Social Gospel legacy of Walter Rauschenbusch and others, and then interpret and project identified principles of that legacy into our current and future 21st-century context for ministry. Students will be challenged to explore and create ways of addressing concerns of postmodern cultural and political contexts through various approaches of prophetic preaching. e PT 357 ArtsofLiturgy GailA.Ricciuti The course examines theology and praxis of sacramental and liturgical occasions and events in the life of the church, incorporating perspectives of various traditions on baptism, Eucharist, weddings, funerals. Included are the structure and flow of the liturgical year; theology of worship space; rudimentary understanding of church music, hymnals, and music theory for non-musicians; and construction of the order of service for the Lord’s Day. The approach is both theoretical and practical, to equip students with the basic tools needed by worship leaders. e PT 358 Faith&LifeoftheBaptists This course examines aspects of ministry as practiced by pastors within the Baptist traditions. Building upon the history, principles, and practices, which are common among Baptists, special attention will be paid to pastoral leadership with the 56

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American Baptist Churches, USA and to the leadership practices of Black Baptist traditions. Students will receive practical instructions in the pastor’s administrative role, current governance practices in the Baptist churches, the ordinances of Baptism and The Lord’s Supper, and issues facing pastors in the post-modern Church in American society. The goal is to explore the tension between freedom and responsibility. Primary attention will be given to course members’ needs in the ordination process. e PT 359 UnitedMethodistPolity JohnR.Tyson Prerequisites: Open only to Middlers and Seniors This course will examine the development of United Methodist polity from a historical and theological perspective. Students will become familiar with the nature and implications of connectionalism, studying The Book of Discipline of The United Methodist Church, as well as supplemental readings. Attention will be paid to how United Methodist polity relates to contemporary issues of ministry and mission. e PT 360 PresbyterianConfessions&Worship GailA.Ricciuti/RobertR.Hann Prerequisites: Open only to Middlers and Seniors An examination of the Reformed theological traditions and biblical principles that form the foundation of the Book of Confessions. This course is open to all students, but is required for Presbyterians preparing for the theology exam in the Presbyterian Church (USA). e PT 364 UnitarianUniversalistandLiberalTheologies PeggyMeeker This course will focus on 20th and 21st century Unitarian and Universalist theologies, and will also include recent liberal Christian theology. It will be a seminar course, with emphasis on reading and discussion, presentation of papers, and shared leadership. Course objectives are to become familiar with UU and liberal theology; to understand and begin to participate in current theological dialogue; to practice theological reflection; to practice integrating theology into sermon-writing; and to articulate a personal theology.

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e PT 365 PresbyterianBookofOrder GialA.Ricciuti/RobertR.Hann Prerequisites: Open only to Middlers and Seniors One of the questions for ordination of Presbyterian ministers of Word and Sacrament, elders, and deacons, to which an affirmative answer is required, reads “Will you be governed by our church’s polity, and will you abide by its discipline?” The course is designed to equip students seeking leadership positions in the Presbyterian Church USA (specifically, but not exclusively, those preparing for ordained ministry) to answer in the affirmative, familiarizing them with the constitutional policies and procedures of the denomination as delineated primarily in the Constitution of the PC (USA) Part II. Primary attention will be devoted to the Form of Government in depth and to the Rules of Discipline. Course methodology includes lecture, class discussion, role play, Biblical and theological reflection, research, and development of skills in listening, communication, procedural negotiation, rules of order, and ability to apply the polity of the church in a practical and helpful manner. e PT MS 369 IntermediatePreaching GailA.Ricciuti Prerequisite: PT 218 Beyond the basic approaches and skills for sermon development and preaching, a number of deeper questions and issues face the preacher in a parish context. Among them are: —problematic biblical perspectives (and/or conundrums) appropriate to ancient peoples but begging reinterpretation for contemporary believers (including the meaning/use of myth, standpoints on violence, misogyny, universalism and particularity); —the challenge of intracongregational situations, frictions and attitudes; —pastoral occasions related to significant rites of passage in life (baptism, confirmation and profession of faith; weddings; funerals); —the task of addressing Christian social responsibility in the face of societal and global issues particular to our day (including domestic violence; militarism, war and peace; and issues of diversity); and —ways to make preaching vital, engaging and compelling in a mediasoaked world. While exploring and addressing these issues, the course will also work with other specific homiletical/contextual problems and predicaments brought to the table by students from within their current settings in ministry, including funeral

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practices, miscarriage and perinatal loss, relational loss, disenfranchised and complicated grief, and loss issues across the life span. Students will also reflect on the relationship of their experience of loss as a resource for pastoral care. A variety of pastoral, ritual, congregational and community resources for responding to and caring for persons facing loss and grief will be considered. e PT 375 PreachingandtheArts GailA.Ricciuti Prerequisite: R PT 218 The course explores how preaching constitutes an art, and transforms its practitioners into artists, by exploring the characteristics of other “fine arts” and the biblical roots of the creative act. The artistic value of ambiguity, approaches of artists in other fields, identification of artistic practices for preachers, and avoidance of “kitsch” in the pulpit are also addressed, and in-class sharing of preaching artistry is included. e PT 380 ConflictTransformationinFaithCommunities StephanieL.Sauvé The course is designed to teach skill and approaches for managing, resolving or transforming conflict. Preliminary to utilization of this process is a clear understanding of conflict, its causes and consequences, and the usual societal response.

Master of Divinity INT 653, 654 SpecializedDirectedStudy(fall,spring) INT 655, 656 SpecializedDirectedStudy(Januaryterm,Juneterm)

Master of Arts INT 651, 652 Thesis/Project(fall,spring)

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Doctor of Ministry Courses INT 701 DiscerningtheContextforMinistryinthe21stCentury DavidY.Kim Beginning with a historical and theological study of how the Church was at first active across the full range of human concerns, but in later centuries reduced its arena of concern to the "spiritual," this course then suggests a future for ministry that envisions a call once more for the practice of faith across the widest spectrum of social expressions. A biblical theology of creation-shalom will be explored as a resource for revisioning ministry in the context of contemporary postmodern culture. INT 702 PracticingTransformativeLeadershipintheCRCDSTradition JamesH.Evans,Jr. This course will provide students opportunities to reflect on the distinctive legacy of Colgate Rochester Crozer as a starting point for developing relevant and healthy Christian ministries for the early 21st century. Students will engage in congregational and cultural analysis, discuss contemporary theological issues in relation to these analyses, discuss the evolving role of ministries in their communities and explore the changing role of leadership. A goal of the course is to enable students better to contribute to the development of life-bringing ministries that effect renewal within the tradition of Evangelical Liberalism and the Social Gospel tradition. INT 703 ThePropheticTraditionThenandNow MarkBrummitt Beginning in the Bible, we shall consider the texts and genres (often surprisingly) described as ‘prophetic’ before tracing something of the history of the term. The course will reach its journey’s end in critical reflection on understandings of prophecy and the role of the prophetic today. INT 704 TheGlobalEconomy:Theological&Biblical PerspectivesonWealthandPoverty MelanieA.Duguid-May/AnthonyJ.Ricciuti Today’s global economy operates with economic assumptions and values that differ from and conflict with biblical and theological understandings of economy. This conflict often leads congregations and denominations into 60

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preaching a theological message of caring for the poor, marginalized and dispossessed, while engaging in practices that are said to create poverty, marginalizations and dispossession. After exploring various theological interpretations of the present form of globalization and engaging in Bible study, the course will focus on concrete issues around which the conflict in world views leads individual Christians and the Church into areas of ambiguity and concern. Course participants will then discuss individual and corporate strategies for practice that will help close the gap between what we preach and what we practice. INT 705 GenderAnalysisforTransformativeLeadership The psychology of women, the advent of men’s studies, the politics of homophobia, new pastoral understandings of women and men, issues of sexual abuse and harassment, an emerging appreciation of gender myths and the escalation of violence, and new appreciations of different styles of knowing have all transformed pastoral care and pastoral theology. This course will examine the voices and challenges. It will enable students to: 1) become acquainted with some of the most influential literature in the area of gender studies as it impacts pastoral theology; 2) reflect on how pastoral care and pastoral theology have been transformed by awareness of gender issues; and 3) reflect critically on how issues of gender enter/ will enter into participants’ exercise of pastoral ministry and transformative leadership. INT 706 DoingRacialJustice:TheologicalandStrategicResources This course is designed to help students develop their ability to discover resources for combating the problem of racism. Students are expected to engage in reading, research, discussion, self-examination and prayer. Assignments are designed to reveal hidden perspectives, agendas and knowledges. The practices of systems and organizations will be examined to understand better how racism functions as a mega-system, social morality and political fact in the modern world. The goal of this course is to discover the extent to which racism reigns in the lives of the participants, and how it can systematically be dethroned. INT 707 TheologicalPracticesofPoliticalAdvocacy,CommunityOrganizing andSystemsAnalysis BarbaraA.Moore As more and more ministers are responding to the call to public witness and public service, this course helps students to: 1) “exegete” the context in which their ministry takes place; 2) articulate theological images, themes and traditions to support public and community ministries; and 3) identify appropriate, effective, prophetic strategies for change. The course will include field visits and sessions with community and political activists and officials, as well as careful attention to theological reflection. Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School

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INT 708 TheologicalPracticesofPoliticalAdvocacy,Community TransformativeLeadershipinAfrican-AmericanCommunities JamesH.Evans,Jr. This course is designed to provide the student with a solid grasp of the major models and methods of transformative leadership which have emerged in African-American Communities. Particular attention will be paid to the religious, cultural, and theological dimensions of leadership in this context. The goal of the course is to equip the student with a set of intellectual resources that are useful in developing a transformative ministry. INT 710 TheGlobalReadoftheBible JinYoungChoi The Bible has been received and read not only in the West but also in the rest of the world. This course facilitates reading the Bible with others—global Christian communities in Africa and the Middle East, Asia and the Pacific, and Latin America and the Caribbean. The course helps students not only engage with other ways of reading in the global context but also recognize the contextual nature of their own readings. In so doing, students will embrace the face of global Christianity in the church and in their everyday lives. INT 711 ThesisSeminar PatYoungdahl Students will sharpen their research skills and hone the writing and editing abilities necessary to write a doctoral-level thesis or ministry project. Each student will develop a model thesis proposal. INT 712 TheDynamicWorkofBeingTransformedandTransforming MarciaBailey The purpose of this course is to deepen students’ understanding of the dynamics at work in the church and in themselves as we seek both to transform and to be transformed. Together we will ask the questions: How do I experience God’s Spirit at work to revive my place of ministry? How do I experience God’s Spirit at work to revive myself? This class will be experiential. We will focus on our own transformation as we talk about the transformation process possible around us.

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INT 715 PreachingtothePowers BarbaraA.Moore Transformational leaders are being asked to find creative ways to apply the Gospel message to the contemporary issues that Christians face. Preaching God’s Holy Word cannot ignore the impact that institutions and systems have on the lives of men, women and children in general, as well the members of our congregations. This class will address the appropriateness and the techniques that preachers can use to “speak truth to powers.” INT 716 PreachingthePowerandPromiseoftheHebrewScripture MarkBrummitt Recognizing that the Old Testament—the whole Old Testament—is no less ‘Scripture’ than the New, we shall engage with a wide selection of texts, both the well-known and otherwise, and consider how they might function in preaching and the pastoral setting. Chosen passages will include narratives, prophecies, and Psalms, and these will be read in dialogue with commentators, theorists, and theologians. INT 717 PreachingthePowerandthePromiseoftheNewTestament JinYoungChoi The New Testament is itself the proclamation of the gospel—a powerful witness to God’s reigning in the past, present, and future. When the gospel is proclaimed in the pulpit, therefore, its power should manifest, challenging the power of death and generating hope for the present and future of God’s just reign. While exploring the hermeneutical, theological, and practical dimensions of prophetic preaching in the New Testament, this course focuses on topics regarding the transformation of persons, communities, and society based on the power and promise in the New Testament. INT 718 PreachingforSocialChange BarbaraA.Moore Preaching is more than a reflection on the Word. It is, in addition, a challenge to the preacher and the listener to transform their lives and the structures in which they find themselves. Prophetic preaching is a critical art in our day as we address the “Powers” that surround and impact us.

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INT 719 TheArtofCreativePreaching MarkBrummitt/GailA.Ricciuti To minister in our time, proclamation must be not so much telling the Gospel as revealing it to our hearers. With that goal in mind, this course is designed to develop the craft of homiletics by exploring the interface between the arts and the pulpit. A number of creative approaches to engage the imagination will be cultivated, including the use of narrative, autobiography, and multimedia in preaching. INT 720 PreachingintheAfrican-AmericanTradition MarvinA.McMickle The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the basic features of preaching in the African-American tradition. The course will consist of lectures, group discussions, actual preaching services led by distinguished area pastors, and guest presentations. Students will have the opportunity to study the diverse styles and approaches that make up the African-American preaching tradition. INT 721 WomanistPreaching GailA.Ricciuti INT 722 EthicalIssuesinthePulpit INT 723 TheSpiritualDisciplineofPreaching INT 724 SpecialTopicsinPreaching INT 725 PreachingtheGospelinaReligiouslyPluralisticSociety C.DeniseYarbrough Christian preachers in our pluralistic and multicultural/multi-religious society are presented with challenges that did not exist when our world was more homogenous. Now our listeners are hearing the gospel in a context where they work and live with people of many world religions. How does a preacher proclaim the gospel with integrity while respecting the traditions and commitments of people of other world religious faiths with whom her

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parishioners live and work? This course will introduce students to the Christian theological responses to religious pluralism as they have been articulated in the tradition. From that foundation students will then write sermons on various texts from the Revised Common Lectionary that pose challenges with respect to religious diversity. We will also lift up texts from the RCL that offer special opportunities for a pluralistic preacher to celebrate religious diversity. INT 727 ChristianFaith,theChurches,andLGBTiPersons MelanieA.Duguid-May Perhaps the most debated, and divisive issue among Christian churches today is human sexuality, specifically same-sexuality. Heated discussion and exclusionary practice within and among churches is matched by homophobia in the society. While there is an overall rise in the number of hate crimes, this is markedly higher for anti-gay hate crimes, as well as for hate crimes based on religion. Anti-gay violence is endemic not only in the U.S. but around the globe. Engaging this conflictive context, this course will explore the teachings of Christian scripture and tradition, as well as recent states of Christian churches on sexuality and same-sexuality, as well as on marriage equality, ordination of LGBTi persons. Attention will also be paid to the construction of sexuality, to legal issues related to marriage equality, to hate crimes and sexualized violence. Finally, we will engage LGBTi perspectives on scripture and Christian theology. Throughout the course LGBTi voices will be privileged. At every point, issues raised will be related to students’ practice of ministry in Christian churches and in other settings in church and society. INT 728 Kairos: CalltoRepent,CryofHope MelanieA.Duguid-May The Greek word kairos means the right moment, the decisive moment; kairos is God’s timing breaking into our chronos timing as a moment of truth-telling, and a moment of great opportunity. Jesus proclaimed: “The time is fulfilled and the kingdom of God is at hand; repent and believe in the gospel” (Mark 1:15). In this course we will engage the realities of the 21st century world—for example, the growing gap between rich and poor, mass incarceration, endemic violence and drone warfare, human trafficking and the new slavery, the degradation of the earth—and “interpret the present time” (Luke 12:54-56) as our kairos time. We will think critically and creatively about our kairos time at the intersection of texts— scripture and tradition—and contexts—contemporary situations of struggle for justice, freedom, and human dignity. Standing at this intersection, we will discern

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the mission and witness of the churches the churches in solidarity with persons and communities. Students will be asked to “interpret the present time” in their own places of ministry and bring these for ongoing discernment and critical reflection during the course. INT 730 ReadingsinJohnWesley RichardHeitzenrater INT 731 TheLifeandThoughtofCharlesWesley JohnR.Tyson An in-depth study of the life and thought of the younger Wesley brother, and co-founder of the Methodist tradition—Charles Wesley. Charles’ role as an evangelist, hymn writer, theologian and parent will be highlighted through the reading of primary and secondary sources. Charles Wesley’s distinctive contributions to the Methodist movement and Wesleyan tradition will be explored. INT 735 WesleyanSpirituality&theMissionalChurch ElaineHeath INT 736 JohnWesley’sTheologyandEthics JohnTyson This course concentrates upon the reading of John Wesley’s sermons on Our Lord’s Sermon on the Mount, as well as his various treatises on themes from the field of Christian Ethics. Significant primary and secondary sources will be studied. Topics such as stewardship, abolitionism, slavery, and economics will be examined at length in order to develop a Wesleyan posture on theological ethics and ethical issues.

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Admissions & Financial Aid


Admissions The Admissions Office is available to assist prospective students with information regarding the application process, degree programs, distinctives of the school and aspects surrounding student life. P RoSPeCTive S TUDenT The divinity school encourages and invites all prospective students to visit campus. Opportunities will be provided to observe classes, tour the facilities, meet with faculty and students, and worship in chapel. The divinity school can provide those visiting from out of town up to two nights of lodging on campus during their visit. Those wishing to visit campus should contact the Admissions Office regarding appropriate times to visit. Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School does not discriminate against any qualified student on the grounds of age, gender, race, color, ethnic or national origin, sexual orientation or on the basis of physical disability in the administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarships and school-administered programs.

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a PPliC aTion

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a DMiSSion

Prospective students who plan to begin a master’s degree program in the fall must submit all application materials by July1, and December1 for the spring term. Prospective Doctor of Ministry students should have all necessary application materials to the Admissions Office by August31 for the January term and January31 for the summer term. Exceptions to these deadlines may be granted on a space available basis. Please contact the Admissions Office for further details. Generally, admission to the Master of Divinity or Master of Arts program requires a completed four-year degree from a regionally accredited college or university. In addition to a completed and signed application, the applicant must meet the following criteria: NOTE:Recordssubmittedintheapplicationforadmissionarenotreturned andmaynotbecopiedorreleased.

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1—Completed application. 2—Official academic transcripts from all post-secondary educational experiences. 3—A cumulative undergraduate grade point average of at least 2.75 based on a 4.0 scale for the M.Div. and 3.0 on a 4.0 scale for the M.A. 4—Recommendations from four persons who are in a position to evaluate the applicant’s ability and promise, such as former professors, supervisors, pastors, or professional colleagues. Recommendation forms are provided in the application packet and on our website. 5—A five- to six-page personal statement responding to the specific questions outlined in the application packet. 6—A nonrefundable application processing fee of $35. 7—Proficiency in written and spoken English. Persons whose native language is not English should furnish evidence of a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score. 8—Maturity of character and purpose, and a religious commitment appropriate to the applicant’s vocational objectives. 9—The Admissions Committee may request the applicant to submit additional materials and/or schedule an interview with a representative of the seminary. Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School

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The following are required for application to the Doctor of Ministry Program in Transformative Leadership: 1—Completed application. 2—Official academic transcripts from all post-secondary educational experiences. 3—A Master of Divinity degree or its educational equivalent with at least a 3.0 average based on a 4.0 scale. Ministerial experience is not considered the equivalent of or a substitute for the Master of Divinity degree. 4—A minimum of three years of ministerial experience after completion of the M.Div. degree or first graduate theological degree. 5—Recommendations from four persons who are in a position to evaluate the applicant’s performance, ability and promise, such as former professors, supervisors, pastors, or other professional colleagues. Recommendation forms are provided in the D.Min. application packet and on our website. 6—A five to six-page personal statement responding to the specific questions outlined in the application packet. 7—A résumé or statement of experience. 8—$35 nonrefundable application processing fee. 9—A recent writing sample demonstrating ability to produce doctoral-level written work. 10—Proficiency in written and spoken English. Persons whose native language is not English should furnish evidence of a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score. 11—Maturity of character and purpose, and a religious commitment appropriate to the applicant’s vocational objectives. 12—The Admissions Committee may request the applicant to submit additional materials and/or schedule an interview with a representative of the seminary.

C RiTeRia foR g RaDUaTe C eRTifiC aTe S TUDieS P RogRaM a PPliC anTS Admission to the Graduate Certificate Studies Program requires a completed four-year bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited college or university with a minimum GPA of 2.75 on a 4.0 scale. Applicants should submit the following documents: 70

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admissions & financial aid

1—Completed application. 2—Official academic transcripts from all post-secondary educational experiences. 3—Recommendations from two (2) persons who are in a position to evaluate the applicant’s ability and promise. Recommendation forms are provided in the application packet and on our website. 4—A nonrefundable application processing fee of $35.

n on - DegRee S TUDenT Any person wishing to take course work apart from a specific degree program may apply for admission as a non-degree student. This status is open to persons who wish to take occasional course work as a form of continuing education or would like to explore theological studies by taking a couple of classes. Non-degree students are not eligible to receive financial aid and may enroll in courses only on a space-available basis. Students may take a maximum of three courses per year. Non-degree status is conferred for one year. While non-degree status does not constitute a commitment to future admission to a degree program, a student may request that work taken while a non-degree student be applied to a degree program, if admitted. The non-degree applicant must follow the application procedures outlined in the criteria for Master of Divinity and Master of Arts applicants but may omit the five- to six-page personal statement and submit only two (2) references.

T RanSfeR S TUDenT Students seeking to transfer must follow and meet the requirements for admission outlined in the criteria for Master of Divinity and Master of Arts applicants. In addition, the applicant must have the Chief Academic Officer from the transferring school provide a letter discussing the applicant’s academic ability, character and personal development, and readiness for graduate theological work. Transfer credit will be approved on a course by course basis, upon receipt of an official transcript and review of relevant syllabi.

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v iSiTing S TUDenT

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o TheR S eMinaRieS

Students from other accredited seminaries are welcome to study on a limited basis. A visiting student may not become a degree student unless she/he meets the requirements of a transfer student. Admission policies for a visiting student are as follows: 1—Submit a completed and signed application along with the $35 nonrefundable application processing fee. 2—Have the Chief Academic Officer from your seminary submit a letter indicating that you are a student in good standing and giving approval of the courses in which you desire to enroll. 3—Visiting students may enroll in only one semester and will need to reapply for subsequent terms.

a UDiToR Any person wishing to study for no credit may apply for admission as an auditor. Auditor status is conferred for just one term and individuals must reapply for subsequent terms. Credit may not be received at a later date. Auditor hours are recorded as permanent records. Registration is dependent on space available in the class and permission of the instructor. Admission policies for auditor status are as follows: 1—Submit a completed and signed application. 2—Have your undergraduate institution send an official transcript verifying the completion of an undergraduate degree.

R eaDMiSSion Former students who have not been enrolled for one calendar year or more and desire to enroll in the same degree programs must apply for readmission through the Admissions Office. Students who have not been enrolled for more than one year must meet the degree requirements current at the time of readmission.

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i nTeRnaTional S TUDenT The seminary welcomes inquiries from international students who wish to pursue a degree program at Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School. In addition to the normal admission requirements, an international student must comply with the following: 1—An applicant’s admission material must be received five months prior to the fall term. 2—An international student must have completed either a bachelor’s degree from a U.S. post-secondary institution or the equivalent degree from a foreign institution. 3—All foreign language documents must be accompanied by an official translation into English and a credential evaluation from an NACES® accredited agency. 4—Applicants whose native language is not English must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and score at least 600 on the paper-based test, 237 on the computer based test, or 93 on the internet-based test (minimum of 23 in each section). The test should also include the Written Test (TWE). Test scores should be submitted to code 2085. An international student who successfully completes at least two years at another accredited college/university in the United States may be allowed to waive these tests. 5—Each recommendation should include an assessment of the applicant’s English-language ability. CONDITIONS FOR ISSUING A FORM I-20

The following conditions must be met before the Form I-20 can be issued to an applicant: 1—Acceptance to Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School. 2—The applicant must present evidence that he/she has funds to meet all expenses for the entire period of study: round-trip transportation, living costs, health insurance, fees, tuition and books. Applicants with financial need in the M.A. and M.Div. programs may apply for a Divinity School Grant. 3—A deposit is generally required of applicants currently residing outside of the U.S. The amount of the deposit varies depending on the seminary’s assessment of the applicant’s ability to meet the financial obligations as a student.

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Financial Aid Financing a seminary education is possible, so do not be intimidated. Some simple planning can ease the transition to seminary.

f inanCing

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The Financial Aid Office is happy to provide ideas to assist you with your planning. Allocation of financial resources can be creative, and most budgets have surprising flexibility. You should also seek financial assistance from denominational agencies, local churches, regional and national scholarship programs and secular organizations. Students are encouraged to work during the summer and part-time during the academic year. Earnings from employment, as well as assistance from family, can ease some of the financial burden. There are merit- and need-based sources of aid available from the seminary for full-time study. Each academic year, the President of Colgate Rochester Crozer gives the Presidential Scholar Award to a select number of new students demonstrating high academic achievement. The Divinity School Grant is awarded to students with demonstrated financial need. Students with documented disabilities that make full-time study impossible can request a Presidential Scholar Award or Divinity School Grant for part-time study. The awards and grants are made possible through a large number of endowed scholarship funds and from money designated from the annual operating budget. To make the M.Div., M.A., and D.Min. programs financially feasible for Canadian students, Canadian dollars are accepted at par for tuition and fees. The school participates in the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program. Part-time or full-time students in the M.Div., M.A., or D.Min. programs may ask the school to certify an application for a Federal Direct Loan if they fulfill the regulations of the program. Only unsubsidized loans are available as of July 1, 2012 per U.S. Department of Education

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regulations. If a student receives Title IV money from the Federal Direct Loan Program and withdraws from school, federal regulations require the school to calculate refunds due to the lender. Due to constantly changing government guidelines, loan information may be revised at any time. More information about the Presidential Scholar Award, Divinity School Grant, external grants, denominational financial aid programs, the Federal Direct Loan Program, the satisfactory academic progress requirements, and consumer information regarding financial aid may be found in the office of the Financial Aid Director. The publication CampusLife:APolicyHandbook contains detailed information about the school’s financial aid program and policies. The handbook is available on the school’s website at www.crcds.edu. Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School coursework is also approved by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Students eligible for VA education benefits should contact their VA representative for more information. Please contact the Director of Financial Aid at (585) 340-9632 or financialaid@crcds.edu with any questions related to financing a seminary education.

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TUiTion

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2013-2014 aCaDeMiC yeaR*

TUiTion ChaRgeS Cost Per Course

$1,695

Full-time Course Load: (fall/spring)

6 courses 8 courses

Graduate Certificate Studies Program (per course)

$10,170 $13,560 $750

feeS Student Activities Fee (per course)

$5

Academic Lecture & Conference Fee (M.Div. Students Only)

$50/year

Technology Fee

Full-time students (per year) All Other Students (per course)

$175 $30

Audit Fee

For clergy and CRCDS alumni/ae All Others

$150 $300

D.Min. Lunch Fee

$40/week

Late Registration Fee Graduation Fee (seniors only)

$50 Degree Students Certificate Students

M.A. and D.Min. Maintenance (extension to complete thesis) Per Year D.Min. Active File Fee

$225 $125 $1,695 $500/term

M.A. and D.Min. Thesis Binding Fee

$150

hoUSing Apartments (includes utilities)

One-bedroom (per month) $700 Two-bedroom (per month) $780

*All costs are subject to change

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h ealTh i nSURanCe Students are strongly encouraged to carry health insurance. Current information about the student health insurance plan, including rates, is available on the School’s website. The real cost of the health insurance is included in the student’s financial aid budget.

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Students may make cash or check payments on their account in person at the Bursar’s Office in Strong Hall. Personal checks may be mailed to the Bursar’s Office and must include the student’s ID number. Checks should be made payable to Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School. Payments may also be made by credit card (MasterCard, Visa, Discover, or American Express) either in person or by phone to the Bursar’s Office. In the fall and spring semesters, one half of all tuition and fees must be paid by the first day of classes. The balance of tuition and fees or an extended payment application is due five weeks after the first week of classes. All January and June terms tuition and fees are to be paid at the time of registration. No extended payment plans are available for these terms. Late registration will be subject to a $50 fee. Registration for course work is not complete until students have paid the necessary tuition and fees or made a satisfactory alternative payment arrangement with the Business Office. When delinquent, a penalty of $50 per month will be added to the student’s account. If a balance is owed on a previous term when registering for the next term, the student’s registration will be held or voided until payment is received. All financial aid forms should be completed one month before the payment due date to ensure that all funds are received on time. A late fee may be assessed to those who have not completed the financial aid forms by this time. Financial aid from the school is applied toward tuition due. Students who have been awarded scholarships, loans, or other grants from agencies outside the school, who do not have the funds in hand by the first day of each new term, must present confirmation from the agency from whom payment will be received, including the anticipated disbursement date, to avoid a late fee. In the absence of such confirmation, payment will be expected from the student while they await the agency payment. If no payment is made to cover the awarded scholarship, loan, or grant, a late fee may be assessed. Housing charges are billed by semester during the academic year and on a monthly basis during January and the summer months of June, July, and August. Arrangements may be made for a monthly payment Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School

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schedule of apartment rent by written agreement with the Business Office. Rent is due the first of the month for January, June, July, and August. Delinquent housing charges are subject to a $50 per month late fee. Bookstore charges are due within 30 days, or a late fee of two percent is charged. These charges may be deducted from the proceeds of a student loan. The school will not release grades and transcripts to students, accept registrations for the next term, nor grant credit for course work completed, until all amounts owed to CRCDS are paid in full. Degrees are granted and official transcripts released only when the student is in good standing regarding all financial obligations to Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School. Students may participate in graduation ceremonies when all accounts are paid in full.

R efUnDS A student may withdraw from a course without transcript notation and with full refund of the tuition for that course up until the completion of the second week of the semester. A student may withdraw from a course up until the eighth week of the semester. If this withdrawal takes place between completion of the second week and the eighth week of the semester, a W (Withdrawal) will be noted on the student’s transcript. Students who fail to complete a course and fail to drop the course will receive a grade of F (Failing). Students who withdraw from a course after the fourth week will receive no refund of tuition or fees. Students who withdraw between the second and fourth week will receive a refund of one-half tuition for the course. If a student has a Title IV loan, the school will determine the withdrawal date and calculate, according to federal regulations, the amount of the loan that must be returned by the student and or the school. After the student has completed 60% of the semester, the student has earned 100% of the loan money, and no money will be returned. School fees are non-refundable.

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Campus Resources


Academic Resources Preparing for ministry involves the sum of many experiences that stretch and challenge our whole selves. In the chapel and refectory, in meeting rooms and lounges, in Highland Park and the greater Rochester area, students, faculty and staff gather to pray, talk, laugh and work together. Our interaction with one another in this common life shapes our minds, bodies and souls.

These interactions occur in the context of a richly diverse community. The school draws individuals from many states and Canada. CRCDS students include graduates of nearly 100 different colleges and universities. They represent more than 20 Protestant denominations, as well as the Anglican and Roman Catholic Communions. They come to seminary at many different ages, bringing a vast array of professional backgrounds and life experiences. The experience of living and studying as part of this diverse community offers opportunities for exploring new concepts and encountering oncein-a-lifetime experiences. It challenges us to live in ways that respect all with whom we come in contact. Community life grows within both formal and informal settings. Students, faculty and staff are encouraged to attend community gatherings to discuss issues of interest and share in refreshments and fellowship. Worship draws people together in the chapel. After a service, the refectory becomes a gathering place, abuzz with conversation. Groups small and large also meet in the lounges and community rooms in the buildings and student apartments around campus.

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T he l ibRaRy The Ambrose Swasey Library at Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School maintains a 30,000 volume collection and reading room to support academic programs of the school. Ambrose Swasey Library is also affiliated with Rush Rhees Library at the University of Rochester, which maintains a three million volume collection less than two miles from the CRCDS campus. Divinity school students, faculty, and staff have access to the full collection and services of the Rush Rhees Library through the Voyager online catalog using a student ID number and materials can be delivered directly to Ambrose Swasey Library within 48-72 hours. Parking arrangements are available for students wishing to use Rush Rhees library directly, at no additional cost to them. Internet access is available at computer workstations in the Ambrose Swasey Library reading room during library hours, as well as wireless internet access, and electric outlets for laptop use. Students also have on-campus access to the online electronic databases provided through Rush Rhees, including the ATLA Religion Index.

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Campus Resources

M UlTi - DenoMinaTional C oMMUniTy Standing firm in its prophetic Protestant tradition, the school strives to include new voices and visions in its perspective on the Church and the world. In addition to Baptist and Episcopal students, the student body includes members of Presbyterian, United Methodist, United Church of Christ, Unitarian Universalist and Roman Catholic churches, to name but a few of the more than 20 denominational affiliations represented. Affirming the unique gifts of these various traditions at the divinity school, each student is encouraged to develop his or her own sense of theological identity. Distinctions of traditions are celebrated, not watered down or ignored.

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The Office of Enrollment Services assists students by arranging information sessions with denominational executives and military chaplain recruiters who visit the campus. Current job openings are also emailed to current students and then posted on the divinity school website for students and alumni/ae. In all placement procedures, the students are encouraged to work within the patterns and guidelines established by their respective denominations.

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Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School is committed to effective education and preparation for a variety of Christian ministries in the Church and justice work in society as well as preparing future scholars and leaders in academia. As a measure of educational effectiveness, recent master’s level graduates (2005-2011) have the following placement rates: 52% 6% 9% 10% 7% 2% 13%

Parish Ministry Chaplaincy Nonprofit/Social Work Pursued additional Advanced Degree Higher Education Teaching/Administration Denominational Administration Unknown/Miscellaneous (SOURCE: ALUMNI/AE RECORDS)

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D iviniTy S Chool b ooKSToRe As an educational resource for students, faculty and staff, the Divinity School Bookstore carries theologically related text and trade books appropriate to an ecumenically inclusive school. Books are related to topics such as theology, biblical studies, church history, parish ministry, pastoral counseling, Black Church studies, liberation theology, women’s studies, religious education, spirituality, homiletics, ethics, peace and justice. The store offers special discounts to students for the purchase of their textbooks. There is also the convenience of ordering texts for the upcoming semester by e-mail and having them shipped directly to the student’s home. Textbooks can also be set aside and picked up directly from the store. Books can be charged to the student’s account.

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Other Resources w oRShiP Worship is central to the life of the seminary. Through worship, we celebrate our Christian faith. Most of all, we give thanks to God and nurture the spirituality needed for authentic personal and institutional life and witness to the Gospel. Worship takes place Tuesdays and Wednesdays at 11:20 a.m. in the Samuel Colgate Memorial Chapel, directly after morning classes.

Worship is coordinated by the divinity school’s Worship Committee in conjunction with denominational caucuses and the Black Student Caucus. Services express the treasures of specific ecclesial traditions, while at the same time extending hospitality to all members of the school community. Through the experience of integrating many denominations into its community life, the school has affirmed its commitment both to nurture the integrity of particular traditions and to engage ecumenical forms of worship.

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a ll- SChool C elebRaTionS

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P RogRaMS

Special events punctuate the calendar throughout the year, enlivening and enriching the seminary experience. Each September, Opening Convocation marks the beginning of the academic year, and is followed by the Terrace Luncheon. During the term, the school welcomes renowned theologians and biblical scholars for special lectureships and conferences. Community forums, lectionary study groups, round table discussions, and other programs are scheduled to provide opportunities for student and faculty presentations, discussion, and programs of special interest or concern. In December a noontime Christmas celebration called “Christmas by the Hearth� provides an opportunity for mealtime fellowship and caroling. Each January and into early February, the school takes a leadership role, as it joins the greater Rochester community to commemorate the life and ministry of alumnus Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Special services include the Martin Luther King Gospel Songfest and participation in a community-wide service held at the Eastman Theatre each year.

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Denominational organizations such as the Baptist Alliance, the Wesley Society, the Unitarian Universalist Caucus, the Anglican Student Guild, and the Reformed Fellowship provide students and faculty with opportunities to discuss issues of local and national importance and to meet with regional and national church leaders. Social gatherings that include families and friends of students, faculty and nearby clergy are part of the life of these denominational organizations. The Black Student Caucus plans and implements several events throughout the school year. The Caucus also plans all-school worship services in the Black Church tradition on a regular basis. It works closely with the Black Church Studies Program to maintain important ties with black churches in Rochester and throughout the country. Other student-initiated organizations currently include the Student Cabinet, the Open and Affirming Student Caucus, and the Social Justice Committee. Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School

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o PPoRTUniTieS

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S TUDenT S PoUSeS

Since a significant percentage of the divinity school’s students are married, the school recognizes the importance of including student spouses in the life of the community. Most courses are open to audit by spouses of full-time students with application and permission of the instructor.

h oUSing Living on the “Hill” is a very special part of the student experience at Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School. Sitting high on a hill in a serene, park-like setting, CRCDS provides a panoramic view of the surrounding countryside. The beautifully landscaped Highland Park, which hosts the nationally attractive annual Lilac Festival, is located directly across the street. The Saunders Hall apartment building is located on campus and is just a brief walk from Strong Hall, the main building which houses classrooms, the library, chapel, refectory, faculty and administrative offices. The majority of apartments are one-bedroom, with some twobedroom apartments available. The rent covers all utilities except telephone and internet access. The apartments share a lawn, basketball court, grill and other picnic necessities, with adjacent parking. Each apartment is equipped with a kitchen. Occupants provide their own furnishings, dishes, linens, etc. Coin-operated laundry facilities and a common social area are also available. The school’s campus is on a bus line and is centrally located for easy access to shopping, banking and recreation. We are minutes away from several museums, local restaurants, Geva Theatre, Eastman Theatre, and the Rochester Public Market. For further information, please go to our website www.crcds.edu or contact the Housing Director at (585) 340-9637.

i nSTiTUTional S eCURiTy P oliCieS & C RiMe S TaTiSTiCS The Director of Facilities will provide, upon request, all campus crime statistics as reported to the United States Department of Education. This report is also available on our website at www.crcds.edu or you may request a hard copy of the report by contacting the Director of Facilities at (585) 340-9501.

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Community Life


Greater Rochester

Upstate New York is a vibrant context, rich in American religious history, in which to prepare for ministry. The names of Frederick Douglass and Susan B. Anthony, for example, have profoundly marked the identity of the area and continue to inspire commitment to civil rights and women’s issues.

The region was also shaped by the Great Lakes and the Erie Canal into a pioneering, commercial and industrial center. The presence of international headquarters for Eastman Kodak Company, Xerox, Bausch and Lomb and related corporations has established Rochester’s reputation as the “world imaging center.” Outstanding educational institutions abound at both the collegiate and graduate levels, including the University of Rochester, Rochester Institute of Technology, Nazareth College, and St. John Fisher College. The Rochester Philharmonic, a worldrenowned art gallery, and outstanding museums, such as the Strong National Museum of Play and the International Museum of Photography, together with the world’s most extensive film archives and cinema at the George Eastman House, distinguish the city’s cultural life. The area’s lakes, vineyards, hills, orchards and fields offer stunning beauty throughout the seasons and provide unmatched recreational opportunities.

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Community life

C hURCheS Rochester area churches and church-related agencies are partners in the educational programs of the school, most especially through supervised ministry and other experience-based programs. In addition, churches participate in the school’s Life Long Learning programs. These partnerships are a source of strength and integrity, as the school seeks to fulfill its mission.

U niveRSiTy

of

R oCheSTeR

Since the time of their concurrent founding in 1850, the University of Rochester and the Rochester Theological Seminary (one of the schools that

merged to form the divinity school) have shared resources. In particular, this affiliation provides divinity school students with access to exceptional library resources; and divinity school students are able to cross-register at the University of Rochester for graduate-level course credit. Another distinctive resource for divinity school students is the University’s Eastman School of Music. The largest collection of music literature and source materials of any music school in the Western Hemisphere is housed at Eastman’s Sibley Music Library and is available to divinity school students and faculty. For those who simply enjoy music, the Eastman School provides a wide array of musical events, including chamber, orchestral, and opera performances, at little or no cost.

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Community life

S T. b eRnaRD ’ S S Chool

of

T heology

anD

M iniSTRy

Students enrolled in the M.Div. and M.A. programs are allowed to take courses at St. Bernard’s School of Theology and Ministry through our cross-registration agreement. Only courses at the graduate level may be applied toward a CRCDS degree.

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Leadership


Board of Trustees C haiRPeRSon Stuart J. Mitchell

v iCe C haiRPeRSon Joseph R. Kutter

T ReaSUReR Gerald Van Strydonck

S eCReTaRy Susan Scanlon

2013-2014 C oMMiTTee C haiRPeRSonS EXECUTIVE

Stuart J. Mitchell INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT

Richard DiMarzo FINANCE & AUDIT / PROPERTY

Paul A. Vick & Emerson Fullwood MISSION & PROGRAM / STUDENT LIFE & ENROLLMENT

Joseph R. Kutter BOARD PRACTICES

Peter H. Abdella INVESTMENT SUBCOMMITTEE

Gary A. DeBellis STRATEGIC PLANNING

Susan Scanlon 92

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2013-2014 g oveRning b oaRD

of

T RUSTeeS

Peter H. Abdella Judith B. Bryan CRDS ‘03 James L. Cherry, Sr. Gary A. DeBellis Richard DiMarzo Emerson Fullwood Amy Williams Fowler, Ex Officio William A. Johnson, Jr. Joseph R. Kutter CTS ‘71 J. Wendell Mapson, Jr. CTS ‘71 Jack M. McKelvey Marvin A. McMickle, President James C. Miller Stuart J. Mitchell III CRDS ‘70 Alan Newton, Ex Officio James A. Pollard, Ex Officio Alan V. Ragland Albert P. Rowe Susan Scanlon Prince Singh, Ex Officio Leonard Thompson, Sr. Frank D. Tyson CTS ‘69 Gerald Van Strydonck, Treasurer John Urban Paul Vick CRDS ‘71 Aidsand Wright-Riggins III

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leadership

l ife T RUSTeeS Raymond N. Bligh

James R. McMillen

Colby H. Chandler

James G. Miller

Margaret Cowden

Virginia S. Pacala

Nancy Abrams Gaess

Marilyn J. Partin

Calvin S. Garber

Thomas S. Richards

Alfred O. Ginkel

Granville A. Seward

Preston T. Henderson

J. Raymond Sutcliffe

Curtis L. Hoffman

Dorothy R. Tasker

Jay T. Holmes

Brian J. Thompson

Jeanne B. Hutchins

Thomas A. Tupitza

John (Jack) F. Kraushaar

Carrol A. Turner

Gloria M. Langston

W. Kenneth Williams

Annie Marie LeBarbour

Marcus G. Wood

Archie LeMone Jerry W. Ligon Winfield W. Major

2013-14 C o - oPT C oMMiTTee M eMbeRS John A. Anderson

Edward Maybeck

Kenneth V. Dodgson

Barbara Purvis

Darrell E. Geib

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leadership

Administration AndreaL.Mason

MarvinA.McMickle

President, Professor of Church Leadership

Registrar and Director of Financial Aid

StephanieL.SauvĂŠ

LisaA.Bors

Vice President for Academic Life, Dean of Faculty, Associate Professor of Practical Theology

PatriciaR.Keenahan

Director of the Annual Fund

MelissaM.Morral

Director of Accounting and Financial Reporting

Vice President for Enrollment Services

MarkA.DeVincentis

ThomasMcDadeClay

Director of Facilities

Vice President for Institutional Advancement

ToddW.Overfield

GeraldVanStrydonck

MargaretA.Donovan

Director of Technology Services

Vice President Finance, Treasurer

Director of Housing

BarbaraA.Moore

JamesA.Reynolds

Director of the Women and Gender Studies Program

Director of Food Service

WinifredCollin

Director of Anglican Studies JohnR.Tyson

Director of United Methodist Studies MargaretA.Nead

Director of Theological Library Services and Divinity School Bookstore ShirleyRicker

Religion and Classics Librarian (Rush Rhees)

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Faculty MarkBrummitt

Assistant Professor of Old Testament Interpretation (2007) King’s College (London), B.A.; Union Theological Seminary, S.T.M.; King’s College London and the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts, M.A.; University of Glasgow, Ph.D. JinYoungChoi

Assistant Professor of New Testament and Christian Origins (2013) Ewha Womans University (Seoul), B.A.; Presbyterian Theological Seminary, M.Div.; Graduate School of Ewha Womans University, M.A.; Emory University, Th.M.; Vanderbilt University, M.A & Ph.D.; Louisville Institute Postdoctoral Fellow (2013-14) MelanieA.Duguid-May

John Price Crozer Professor of Theology (1992) Manchester College, B.A.; Harvard Divinity School, M.Div.; Harvard University, A.M., Ph.D. JamesH.Evans,Jr.

Robert K. Davies Professor of Systematic Theology (1980) and Past President of Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School (1990-2000) University of Michigan, B.A.; Yale Divinity School, M.Div.; Union Theological Seminary, M.Phil., Ph.D.; Colgate University, D.Litt.

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leadership

DavidYoon-JungKim

Assistant Professor in the Arthur J. Gosnell Chair for Christian Ethics (2009) University of California, Los Angeles, B.A.; Harvard University Divinity School, M.T.S., Th.D. MarvinA.McMickle

President, Professor of Church Leadership (2012) Aurora College, B.A., D.D.; Union Theological Seminary, M.Div.; Princeton Theological Seminary, D.Min.; Case Western Reserve University, Ph.D.; Payne Theological Seminary, L.H.D. GailA.Ricciuti

Associate Professor of Homiletics (1998) University of Puget Sound, B.A.; Princeton Theological Seminary, M.Div.; Keuka College, D.D. StephanieL.SauvĂŠ

Vice President for Academic Life, Dean of Faculty, Associate Professor of Practical Theology, and Director of Supervised Ministry (2001) Carroll College, B.A.; Yale Divinity School, M.Div.; Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School, D.Min. JohnR.Tyson

Visiting Professor of Church History and Director of United Methodist Studies (2011) Grove City College, B.A.; Asbury Theological Seminary, M.Div.; Drew University, M.Phil., Ph.D.

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leadership

faCUlTy a SSoCiaTeS

faCUlTy e MeRiTi

RobertR.Hann

W.KennethCauthen

Faculty in Biblical and Cultural Studies B.A., M.A., M.Div., Ph.D.

Professor Emeritus of Theology A.B., B.D., M.A., Ph.D.

BarbaraA.Moore

Faculty in Practical Theology B.A., M.A., M.Div., D.Min.

Professor Emeritus of Old Testament B.S., B.D., Ph.D.

C.DeniseYarbrough

H.DarrellLance

Faculty in Interfaith Studies B.A., J.D., M.Div., D.Min.

Professor Emeritus of Old Testament Interpretation B.A., B.D., M.A., Ph.D.

RichardAurelHenshaw

RichardM.Spielmann

Eleutheros Cooke Professor Emeritus of Ecclesiastical History B.A., S.T.B., Th.D.

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Directions to Campus FromSyracuseandtheEastviaI-90

Exit 45 to I-490 West (Exit 17 Goodman St., turn left at top of ramp, go less than one mile, turn left into campus) FromtheGreaterRochesterInternationalAirport

I-390 North to I-490 East (Exit 17 Goodman St., turn right at top of ramp, go less than one mile, turn left into campus) FromBuffaloandtheWestviaI-90

Exit 47 to I-490 East (Exit 17 Goodman St., turn right at top of ramp, go less than one mile, turn left into campus) FromtheSouth

I-390 North to I-590 North to I-490 West (Exit 17 Goodman St., turn left at top of ramp, go less than one mile, turn left into campus)

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Accredited by the Commission on Accrediting of the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada, and the following degree programs at CRCDS are approved: MDiv MA DMin CRCDS became a fully accredited member of the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada in 1938. The Commission on Accrediting of the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada can be contacted at 10 Summit Park Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15275; Tel: 412-788-6505; Fax: 412-788-6510; Web: www.ats.edu.


Colg ate Rochester Crozer Divinity School | 2012 3-2014 5 Catalogue

Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School 1100 South Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14620 (585) 271-1320 www.crcds.edu Like us: facebook.com/crcds Follow us on Twitter: @crcds

CRCDS Colg ate Rochester Crozer Divinity School

2013-2015 Catalogue


CRCDS Catalogue 2013-15