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CRA ZE AROUND THE WORLD ISSUE CRAZE VOL 5 | ISSUE 1 | SEPTEMBER 2013


TABLE OF

CONTENTS design by Eva Phillips, photos by Ally Stark and Estella Fox

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introduction

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foreign films

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away from home: germany

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tour of 24th street

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snapshots: mexico

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world sports obsessions

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westside diversity

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away from home: africa

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DIY: henna

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calendar

Craze Vol 5 | Issue 1 | Sept 2013 Omaha Westside High School 8701 Pacific Street Omaha, NE 68114

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CONTRIBUTORS TO THIS ISSUE

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EDITORS

STAFF

9. Camile Messerley

1. EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Eva Phillips

5. Abegale Headlee

10. Sarah Lemke

2. MANAGING EDITOR Lia Hagen

6. Jenna Hynek

11. Tom Schueneman

3. DESIGN EDITOR Allie Laing

7. Kirsten McCormack

12. Estella Fox

4. PHOTO EDITOR Ally Stark

8. Tommy Huerter

ADVISER Jerred Zegelis

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A NOTE FROM THE EDITORS... This year, Craze welcomes you back with a warm smile... and a panicked, stressed sigh. With a new advisor, almost all-new staff, and less than half of our original class time, we’ve certainly had our work cut out for us. Still, there’s a certain power to inexperience. With new people comes new quirks, new dynamics, and a new way of thinking about our magazine and our school. While this issue began with

Craze’s broadest theme yet, it became perhaps our most focused issue ever. Much like your travel guide, it’s become a collection of snapshots- an all-encompassing, increasingly powerful vision of the individual and the things that make us and our environments unique. So sit back, relax, and take a look around you. Venture to new parts of Omaha, and embrace what cultures you find there.


FILM

FILMS

get a peek at movies from around the world

design by Eva Phillips, story by Tom Schueneman, Eva Phillips, and Lia Hagen *ratings according to Rotten Tomatoes

A woman once said: “Don’t review foreign films. Americans are lazy. We don’t want to read our movies.” However, we here at Craze are not easily discouraged. We heard that woman’s challenge and took it one step further. We’d review

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foreign films so interesting, students would not only read our reviews but also go so far as to watch the movies, even knowing that they’re subtitled! So, without further ado, enjoy Craze Magazine’s top picks for foreign films.


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FILM

The Hedgehog

The Intouchables

“L’Élégance du hérisson”

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“Intouchables”

7.0/10

6.7/10

DIRECTED BY Mona Achache LANGUAGE French, English subtitles RELEASED 2011

DIRECTED BY Roland Emmerich LANGUAGE French, English subtitles RELEASED 2009

Eleven-year-old Paloma considers adulthood to be as meaningless as that of a goldfish–confined, routine, and vacuous. Using her father’s old videocamera, she documents the hypocrisies of the lives of those around her and the trivial things that consume them. Determined to avoid the life that lays ahead of her, Paloma decides she will kill herself on her 12th birthday. After forging an unexpected friendship with her grumpy apartment concierge, Paloma realizes people aren’t as they seem and begins to question her pessimistic outlook on life. Freely adapted from Muriel Barbery’s best selling novel, The Hedgehog is complex story dealing with the power of life, death, and the people we meet in between.

In general, film critiques tend to look down on “feel good” movies. They’re often accused of lacking depth or seriousness, but these flaws aren’t inherent to the genre so much as a symptom of poor execution. There’s no rule that says that a feel-good film can’t be good, and this is the case with The Intouchables. The premise isn’t hugely original. It’s a fairly basic odd-couple story — poor immigrant gets a job taking care of a wealthy, cultured quadriplegic - but the characters and the relationship between the couple are so well thought out that it doesn’t detract at all. The film is very much a study of this relationship, and there’s no real plot to speak of, but additional conflict would just seem gratuitous — that’s not the point. It’s a well-crafted and endearing examination of an interesting relationship.


Spirited Away

A Hijacking

“Sen to Chihiro no kamikakushi”

“Kapringen”

8.5/10

7.9/10

DIRECTED BY Hayao Miyazaki LANGUAGE Japanese, English subtitles RELEASED 2001

DIRECTED BY Tobias Lindholm LANGUAGE Danish, English subtitles RELEASED 2013

Hayao Miyazaki’s critically acclaimed masterpiece begins with a poignant, borderline disturbing lesson. Ten-year-old Chihiro and her parents are moving when they come across an abandoned amusement park. The family wanders through the scene for a few minutes before her parents find the food. As they eat, they grow more and more gluttonous until they transform into large, disgusting pigs. When Chiriho runs from them in fear, she finds herself in a new world. She begins work at a bathhouse for the strange and other worldly, ruled over by the land’s peculiar laws. The movie tells the tale of her struggling to retain her individuality and identity under the moniker Sen. Powerful and densely packed with gorgeous imagery, Spirited Away’s messages will stay with you long after its end.

Piracy has held a morbid place in the popular psyche for centuries, and with the recent rise of piracy off the Horn of Africa, pirates are once again capturing the public’s attention. Big-budget Hollywood movies about it are already starting to occupy commercial breaks. But a much smaller Danish film dealing with piracy is making waves of its own. The premise of A Hijacking is fairly simple, revolving around the hijacking of a small Danish merchant vessel, but rather than focusing entirely on the crew and the hijackers, it casts its attention on the negotiations between the pirates and the shipping corporation over the ransom payment, and the effects these negotiations have on the crew and their relationship with their captors. It’s offers a candid view of a situation that is at once foreign and familiar.

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“I’m trying to cling to everything I can that’s German.” - Maddy Witte


AWAY FROM Maddy Witte on her year in Germany There’s always something to be said for a smile. It’s warm, inviting. Her bright blue eyes crinkle and dance like her thick, bouncing curls. Maddy Witte oozes positivity, lightening up a room with her mere presence. She’s full of small favors and friendly compliments. They’re all lilting and just a bit off; her tongue is still heavy with the sound of another language. For the past year, Witte’s been far away from our small city. This modern-day Goldilocks spent her junior year in Hessen, Germany. Still, her world-wide tale began closer to home than would be expected. As a sophomore, Witte made friends with a German foreign exchange student named Lina Neugebohren. Though Witte had always wanted to do an exchange program, it was her close friendship with Neugebohren that brought her to the idea of travelling to Germany. In fact, she went to visit her friend several times while she lived in the country. However, Witte’s

relationships in Germany spanned far past those she made at home. “I made friends with three really cool people,” Witte said. “We went to carnivals, hung out on the weekend ... We chilled, we travelled, and we went to concerts.” Witte also grew extremely close to her host family. However, her interactions with them were of a somewhat different nature. “At the beginning it was a lot of watching cartoons with the younger host brother,” Witte said. “When I first got there, I’d never had German before so it was a lot of ‘let’s play charades to figure out what Maddy means’ and ‘let’s watch cartoons to teach her German.’” Though the idea of moving to a new country with no knowledge of the language is daunting, Witte’s cartoons clearly did her good. The blonde did more than just adapt; she integrated into the culture and the communities that she had joined. You can hear it in more than just her tone. It’s her word choice, the way she pronounces ‘also’ with a harsh z sound- exactly

the way a German would. Unfortunately, this thorough integration has made it difficult for Witte to come back to America. “I’m still adjusting,” Witte said. “My phone’s still in German, and I still have military time on it. I’m trying to cling to everything I can that’s German. For the first three weeks, my English was terrible. I said things like fire oven instead of stove, but it’s getting better.” Even as Witte’s transition is coming to an end, her love for Germany and for her experience remains. If anything, leaving the country has made her appreciate it all the more. “I definitely miss the people and the relationships I made ... I didn’t realize how much I’d gotten attached to them,” Witte said. “As soon as I got back to the US, I really realized how much I missed them. Because not only were there a lot of tears at the airport, but there was skyping, there was plans to visit ... I still talk to most of them on a weekly basis or a couple times a day… it’s great but it’s not the same.”

story and design by Lia Hagen, photos by Ally Stark

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TOUR OF

24TH STREET story by Ally Stark, photo by Estella Fox, design by Jenna Hynek

For Westsiders, most of us have lived in Omaha our whole lives. Most of us travel hundreds of miles to get exposure of different cultures, when in reality, all we have to do is drive a little ways away. 24th Street, from North to South, gives you your daily dose of culture. South 24th hosts little Espa単a while North 24th showcases the swing of Motown. All in one street. Next time you find yourself aimlessly wandering the streets in search for authentic tacos, or are in the mood to channel your inner Fred Astaire, check out 24th Street and get your cultural fill.


24TH STREET

A BRIEF

HISTORY story and design by Estella Fox

1850’s

African-American’s come to Omaha to find land and jobs.

The original Hispanic settlers come from Mexico. The first Mexicans come to Omaha to work on the railroads, often living in boarding houses or boxcars. Their intent was to come to the United States to flee from political unrest.

1860’s 1860’s 1860’s

African-American settlers worked jobs such as laborers, railroad workers, and cowboys. The first African-Americans lived on the south side of downtown Omaha. Businesses moved north of Cuming Street to Lake Street, between 24th and 30th Streets. Almost immediately, the neighborhood evolved into the center of the black community.

1890’s

From the late 19th century to the 1970‘s, many Mexicans found jobs in the growing meatpacking industry. Immigrants lived near the packinghouses around Q Street from 24th to 32nd Streets. Due to the settling of immigrants near this area, a business district of Mexican restaurants and stores developed.

1919

Migration from the South during World War I tripled the number of African-Americans in Omaha. On September 28-29, the Omaha Race Riot occurred on 24th Street. An African-American man, William Brown, was accused of raping a Caucasian woman. A group of young white males lynched Brown, as well as the mayor of Omaha. They set the Douglas County Courthouse on fire.

1950’s 1860’s 1966 1966 2000 14

North 24th Street became the center of African-American culture in Omaha as businesses began to thrive.

A group of African-Americans gathered at North 24th and Lake Streets. When police ordered their dispersal, the group rioted for three days. They ruined storefronts and set many buildings on fire, resulting in millions of dollars worth of damage. One month after, riots broke out when a 19-year-old was shot by an off-duty white cop during a burglary. 190 riot police were involved. Another riot broke out after an African-American teenager named Vivian Strong was killed by police officers on North 24th Street. Eight businesses were destroyed in this incident.

There was a 174% increase in the Hispanic population in Omaha from the last decade, from 10,729 to 29,434 people.


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24TH STREET

MARIA BONITA FOOD TRUCK LOCATION Mon. Wed. Fri. - 15th and Capitol St. Tues. Thurs. - 13th & 14 Harney Sat. Sun. - 50th & G St. PRICE 3-10 dollars

Vibrant flowers, plants, and people cover every side of this “mural on wheels” which stations itself on 24th Street and many other parts of Omaha. The food truck, Maria Bonita, varies its locations depending on the day and their location can be found on www.mariabonitaonline.com. They always offer fresh, authentic “casero style” Mexican food straight from Hidalgo, Mexico. Their homemade Mexican food is full of vibrant colors –– green, yellow, and red peppers make the food appear as tantalizing to the eyes as to our tastebuds.

EL RANCHITO LOCATION 4318 S 24th St, PHONE (402) 731-9717 PRICE 2-10 dollars

On the outside, there isn’t much to see. El Ranchito’s exterior walls are worn down, and the letters on the sign need a new paint job. However, once you open the door and the bell rings, you notice that the restaurant has more to offer than its shabby appearance. The aroma of warm homemade tortillas and freshly cooked meat hits you, and before you can even take your first bite, the smells alone create a sense of the authentic Mexican food melting in your mouth. El Ranchito is located on South 24th Street, surrounded by other worn down buildings. Still, don’t let that fool you. The staff is friendly, full of warm smiles and a comforting welcome. The food is delicious; it has just the right amount of seasoning and the perfect homemade touch. There’s a variety of choices. The menu has everything from tacos to fajitas or, if you’re feeling adventurous, brains or beef tongue. The prices are very affordable, and the taste won’t let you down.

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CHURRO CARTS LOCATION up and down 24th HOURS varies, typically afternoon PRICE 1-3 dollars

You can spot people with carts filled with fried pinwheels on almost any corner while walking around the Hispanic side of the street. Chicharrones de Harina, or “rinds of flour”, have become increasingly popular in Mexican culture. The vendors always come with a large cart filled to the brim with fried Chicharrones de Harina pinwheels. Antojo de calle, literally “whims of the street”, were invented to kill the 2 pm hunger so you have something to munch on before dinner. They are typically served with chile sauce on top. For the do-it-yourselfer, you can typically find non-fried chicharrones at any local Mexican grocery store, and all you need is some oil and hot chile sauce to make this authentic treat.

LOVE’S JAZZ AND ARTS CENTER LOCATION 2510 N 24th St. HOURS 11am-pm PRICE 5 dollars

You hear something in the distance. When you walk closer, you realize it’s a saxophone. The sound flows in one ear and out the other. Between the early 1920’s and the 1960’s, North 24th Street was a huge jazz hotspot. The streets were booming with music and culture. Famous musicians such as Preston Love, Louis Armstrong, Lionel Hampton, and Dinah Washington performed at places such as the Blueroom, the Showcase, and the Dreamland Ballroom. These buildings were the most popular and were all located near each other. For that reason, people would travel from place to place to hear the live music. Although these buildings are no longer jazz venues, the Love’s Jazz and Art’s Center, dedicated to jazz legend Preston Love, is still open for live jazz performances.

story by Estella Fox and Kirsten McCormack, photos by Ally Stark and Estella Fox

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“Y’all stay safe ‘round here, you know that, right?”


A SECOND LOOK casting light on the ignored issues in our city story and design by Lia Hagen, photos by Estella Fox

“Y’all stay safe ‘round here. You know that, right?” The words ring, bounce around in our heads as we walk towards our car. They echo with every footstep. It’s easy to imagine them spray painted across every shabby building, every questionable shadow. These are words spoken to us, three white girls from West Omaha, by people we’ve been told to be afraid of all of our lives. Everyone knows that this isn’t the ideal part of town. It’s the inner-city, far removed from Westside’s cozy corner of suburbia. The woman speaking is young, but she and her family have clearly known struggles far beyond their years. The family stands on every corner of 24th and Lake. The street is run down, its architecture calling back to its 1950s hey-day. Some of the family members are children, some are older. They are all black, and they all hold brightly colored posters. For this family, their highest priority isn’t purchasing the newest iPhone. It’s raising enough money to bury their recently deceased grandmother. We hear them from down the street. They’re shouting, pleading for donations. A few children run excitedly from corner to corner as cars approach; they hold out their collection cups and tell the

strangers about their loved one. Their adult supervisors are all women. When they tell us about their grandmother’s recent death and their struggle to bury her, there’s no doubt in our minds that they’re telling the truth. This is something that isn’t seen very often in the Westside Community. Someone begging on the street corner is a rarity, often considered an impossibility. On 24th Street, almost everyone who stops at that intersection hands over a few dollars. On a street full of run-down buildings and long-closed stores, they still make room for a little charity. As an elementary schooler holds out a collection cup in front of the MLK memorial, her mother asks us to be safe. In West Omaha, these issues are rarely discussed. In West Omaha, our society has been built so we don’t have to know about the problems of those a few streets north of us. According to the Omaha World Herald in , Omaha has the third highest black poverty rate in America. Even worse is the percentage of black children living below the poverty line. In our city, six out of ten black youth are poor. On that front, we are the worst in the nation. In fact, there is only one other city in the US with a wider economic disparity between blacks

and whites, and it’s Minneapolis. Many of us here at Westside never see this side of our city. While it’s true that many students at our school live under the poverty line, this is easily ignored behind the rich, the massive houses, and the white majority. Much of this is due to the racial segregation in Omaha. According to the same article, over half of the poor black children in Omaha live in the same six square-mile area. North 24th Street sits in the middle of that area, bound by 16th, 48th, Cuming, and Fort Streets. Despite this, North 24th Street is often beautiful, often inspiring. It reminds you that you live in the city where Malcolm X was born, a city with a rich and interesting history. North 24th Street can also be heartbreaking. It can be dangerous. It can show you once and for all how truly privileged you are to be here, in Omaha’s richest district. Even if not all of us have the same amount of wealth, we do all have access to educational opportunities North 24th Street lacks. As we stood on Mildred Brown Street, a road named for the founder of Nebraska’s only African American owned newspaper, a black man at a stop sign asked us how we were doing. When we returned the question, he sighed. “Just trying to live,” he said. “Just trying to live.”

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MEXICAN INDEPENDENCE DAY story and design by Lia Hagen, photos by Ally Stark and Estella Fox

As every good journalist knows, research is everything. We’re told to dig deep into every event, find every possible angle, and report the best possible story. As every great journalist knows, research means nothing without some luck. And so, despite our team of five knowledgable journalists, it wasn’t until we were in the midsts of the celebration that we realized that day, Saturday, September 14, was the day South 24th Street celebrated Grito de Delores, or Mexican

Independence Day. This holiday marks the beginning of the Mexican War of Independence. It is typically celebrated on Sept. 16, the same day Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla pronounced the war’s beginning in 1810. On 24th Street, this historic event was celebrated with a parade, a carnival, and copious amounts of music. This photo essay shows some of the most interesting (not to mention adorable) events of the day.


SPORTS

THE

FOOTBALL

america’s favorite sport.... and why it’s no one else’s story by Tommy Huerter, design by Allie Laing and Lia Hagen, photos by Sarah Lemke

Chants fill the air. An ecstatic energy sweeps across the entire crowd as The Cornhusker Marching band descends upon the field. Excitement erupts as the band plays “Hail Varsity,” the Nebraska fight song. A moment of American pride takes over the stadium during the national anthem as F-16 fighter jets roar overhead. Then comes the first kick-off. All of this energy is released as the Nebraska Huskers begin another game of the most popular sport in America- football. Step off American soil, however, and suddenly football is a rarity. It’s the culture that makes it this way. Westside senior Dilnoza Inoyatova was born in Fergana, Uzbekistan and came to America on Sept. 1, 2005. Inoyatova was an avid and talented tennis player in Uzbekistan. “The most popular sports were definitely soccer and tennis,” Inoyatova said. “People always celebrated when the Uzbekistan teams won.” The organization of the entire sports world is drastically different than what an American might expect.

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“We didn’t have organized sports in schools,” Inoyatova said. “The only way you could play was through clubs.” Club sports are a private and exclusive way to have sports teams. Not only do you have to make the team, you also have to pay. This is much different than the school sports system in America. Here, it’s almost impossible to picture schools without sports teams. Junior Oleg Biletsky was born in America, but he lived in the Ukraine for two years and visits often. He returned to America when he was ten. According to Biletsky, soccer is the most popular sport in the Ukraine. Soccer to the Ukrainians is “a really big deal,” as Biletsky said, especially when it’s the Ukrainian soccer team. The pride Ukrainians feel about their soccer teams is just as intense as the pride of Americans watching their favorite football teams. In fact, Biletsky called the cultures “very similar.” Junior Patryk Bogdanski and his family moved to the United States in 2001 from Poland. “The number one sport is

soccer,” said Bogdanski. “Then it’s men’s volleyball, women’s cross country, skiing, and hand ball.” According to Bogdanski, sports in Poland are much more important than they are in America. “Life in Poland is categorized into three categories: sports, sports, and drinking,” Bogdanski

“Life in Poland is categorized into three categories: sports, sports, and drinking.” - Patryk Bogdanski

explained. “You live for the team you represent. It’s like a permanent tattoo that will always be part of you, if not the most important and loyal thing about you.” Clearly, America is not the only country that cares about sports. Countries from all over the world

have their own personal favorite sport teams that become their obsession. Having something to rally around brings people together. Win or lose, the party is what keeps the spirit going. Most Husker fans would be more than a little disappointed if they were told Lil Red wasn’t coming or the tunnel walk was off. What warrior wouldn’t be a little disheartened if, on a Friday home game, the band had the night off and the dance team quit? All of these festivities have transformed these sporting events into social events, less about the game, more about the party. In fact, 80% of the 42 Westside students polled admit that they attend football games for the social aspects rather than the actual game of football. Whether you think of it as a social event or sporting event, football blood runs deep in the veins of this country. No sport can beat the passion in the hearts of football fans across the country. It’s not the game; it’s the culture that make football America’s favorite.

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SNAPSHOTS

WITHIN WESTSIDE Whether its your heritage or hair color, skin tone or religion, we each have something that makes us unique. Walking through the halls of Westside, we see diversity in all its physical forms. From fowhaks to hijabs, nose piercings to clothing style, there are obvious things that set us apart from one another; but diversity goes beyond these apparent differences. This photo essay illustrates Westside’s complex student body, highlighting just a few students who bring truly diverse backgrounds to our halls. story and design by Eva Phillips, photos by Ally Stark

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JOWE

TOMBI GRADE: Sophomore ETHNICITY: South Sudanese BACKGROUND? “I was born in South Sudan. I was about two when we started moving, which was a long process. My mom tells us stories about it. There was a civil war going on at the time, and so we left and went looking for prosperity in America.” CULTURAL DIFFERENCES? “If you go to a funeral in America, it’s a lot of sadness and condolences, but when you do funerals in Africa, it’s more like a celebration of life... Another one is food, definitely. If you ever come to my house, you’re probably going to get some African food. Most of the time we’re eating stuff from back home.” FAVORITE TRADITION? “My favorite aspect of Sudanese culture is probably family. Family is really big, but it’s not just your immediate family. It’s more like you have this respect for everyone around you. Even if it’s someone you don’t know, everyone instantly becomes your aunt or uncle. That’s just a respectful thing. That kind of support, even though we’re so far away, is really nice.”

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JOSH

STUBBLEFIELD GRADE: Junior ETHNICITY: Japanese BACKGROUND: “My mom is all Japanese. She was born and raised there, and moved here when she was younger ... My dad is not Japanese, but I’ve only ever lived with my mom — so some [traditions] carried over.” CULTURAL DIFFERENCES? “Just some little things, like taking your shoes off when at the door when you walk inside. In Japanese culture, people are usually really reserved and don’t open up a lot. People make jokes about it sometimes, but Japanese people are big on honor. My grandpa is very traditional and sometimes he sends us letters to make sure we’re behaving and stuff.” FAVORITE TRADITION? “All my favorite foods are Japanese. Lots of noodle dishes, lots of rice. Japanese curry is one of my favorite dishes. [My mom] usually sticks to what she was raised learning how to cook from her mom.”

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XUEWEI

ZHAO GRADE: Junior ETHNICITY: Chinese BACKGROUND: “My mom’s family worked in a factory [in China] and made air bomb planes for the government. My dad’s family are farmers. Neither of my parents were rich or even middle class. My dad’s family was really poor and they had more mouths than they could feed.” CULTURAL DIFFERENCES? “When I visited China the summer of sophomore year, I got to witness the biggest streets of my life. The streets that we have here are smaller than their sidewalks. I’m not kidding. They have ten lane roads, roads that will take you a minute to cross.” FAVORITE TRADITION? “I like the gatherings. When I went back with my mom last year, she had a gathering with all of her friends and we sat around this huge table with food. It’s kind of a tradition too. Whenever someone goes back or there’s a celebration, everyone gets together and spends a lot of time together around this big round table. So we can all talk and there’s a thing we spin around to eat.”

FEATURED STUDENTS

9. Pierce Fulmer - Senior

20. Bella Radler- Freshman

10. Mallory Thompson - Senior

21. Henry Flott - Freshman

11. Orlando Crawford- Sophomore

22. Njali Kowa - Junior

1. David Basile - Junior

12. Nick Gentillalli - Freshman

23. Ervin John - Senior

2. Husna Kabashi - Freshman

13. Drake Schmitz - Senior

24. Alizay Starks -Junior

3. Khalil Jordan - Freshman

14. Jordan Rys - Freshman

25. Kenyan Scott - Senior

4. Emi Driscoll - Freshman

15. Cecilia Glass - Sophomore

26. Anna Hengen - Sophomore

5. DeVontae Thompson - Freshman 16. Reem Alomar - Junior 6. Gina Wees - Junior 17. Owen Rush - Sophomore

27. Mike Tran - Senior

7. Andy Rodriguez - Freshman

18. Deja Zeigler - Junior

29. Harper Newell - Sophomore

8. Onyx Blake- Junior

19. Stephen Muller - Junior

30. Mitch Povey - Sophomore

28. DaeDae Moss- Freshman


TRAVEL

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L E V TRA we story

er... m m u s t id l as d u o y t ha know w

n by Lia and desig

and terviews Hagen, in

ox y Estella F photos b

us luckiest of e th r, e m Every sum s in a suitcase, say clothe head throw our iends, and fr r u o to e time. goodby re of a life tu n e v d a s tions are a out on the a n ti s e d r s ou unk Sometime or the pod y it C s a s live an ndparents close as K a r g r u o s town Nebraska

ke us cky, they ta ate lu y ll a e r in. If we’re es. For these fortun lac eant to far-off p f school last year m ble do unforgetta few, the en ly u tr a f o ing truly the beginn n African vacation a eexperienc ing about. it worth wr

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TRAVEL

CHASE MCCANN AND NATE LIPPINCOTT WHERE? South Africa WHY? Our soccer coach ... went to Africa, and we were talking to him, and he jokingly said ‘oh, you guys should come down and visit to help’, and then we actually made it happen. We were going to stay with him down there, but ... he had to come back four months before we left. We’d already planned it so we just went down there without him.

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DAILY ROUTINE?

BIGGEST DIFFERENCE?

We stayed in a little surfer town ... about half a mile away there’s a township called Ocean View. It’s kind of similar to areas in New York where there’s projects; there were about three or four shootings while we were there. During the day, we’d go there and play soccer with the kids. Then at night we’d usually hang out with them or go back and hang out with our host family. That’s pretty much what our usual days consisted of.

The kids there know they don’t have very many belongings or assets to their name, but they don’t go around and complain about it. They just go through their day and try to have us much fun as they can. With things like us coming there, ... they love having coaches come and being able to play soccer with them. They just savor the moments, and they don’t complain.


ANNA

HEADLEE WHERE? Malawi WHY? A medical missions trip with Teen Missions International... it ended up being 2 months. SHOCKING MOMENT? We saw some pretty bad things. Wounds get infected a lot easier there so there was this wound that was all sorts of weird colors, like green and white. It was pretty deep, and the kid didn’t even think twice about it. We were cleaning it, and it just kept going deeper and deeper. THINGS TO LOVE? It’s a lot prettier in Africa. It’s not as dirty, which is surprising because you would think “What do they do with trash?” They honestly don’t have as much waste as us so it’s not a problem. There were a lot less buildings, and there was a lot of nature. IMPACT? It was really rewarding to see how much need there is and help. Many people are so caught up in their lives that they don’t take the time to notice the world around them. When you actually go there, you realize it exists. If you don’t really experience it first-person, I don’t think you can comprehend what is actually going on.

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DIY

HENNA seven steps to professional looking skin art story and design by Abegale Headlee, photos by Sarah Lemke

Henna is a paste used to decorate skin and dye hair, it’s like a temporary tattoo and was used in ancient Egyptian cosmetology to enhance ones appearance. In India, it’s used for the happiest of occasions, including marriage, birthdays, pregnancies and other celebrations. The paste has a strong unique smell, it’s a rich, earthy, and muddy. It’s the scent of walking

through a forest after its just rained. The mix is made out of powdered leaves from a tropical shrub and pink, red, and white flowers. It has no side effects and is completely pain free. You can buy pre-made Henna at any local Indian grocery store. When purchase the dye, you may notice that it is less than a fancy cup of coffe from starbucks, ranging from 2-3 dollars.

MATERIALS: Wet wash cloth Henna mix or pre-made Steady hand Patience

where to find it... India Spice: 3029 S 83rd Plaza India Mart: 3720 S 132nd Street Indian Bazaar: 1322 72nd Street

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STEPS: 1. Get a clean wet cloth and clear the desired area of skin. * tip: Baby wipes or a wet paper towel work the best

2. Decide on a design. Or if your feeling spontaneous, wing it!

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3. Start from the top or the center and work you way down or out. This helps eliminate the possibility of smudges

4. When the design is 5

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applied and complete, let it air dry until cracking occurs, generally 45 minutes.

5. Once the entire design is completely dry and cracked, gently rub it off * tip: If this does not work, wipe with a damp cloth

6. Sleep on it! It will appear 7

extremely light at first. The henna will naturally darken. 7. Now you can go show it off to your friends.

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SEPTEMBER story by Camille Messerly, design by Jenna Hynek and Abegale Headlee

MONDAY

SUNDAY While you count the days to your world travels, enjoy these events around your city. It may not be backpacking across Europe, but hey... what can you do?

29 Last Day for Florence Farmers Market @Florence Mill 10 am-3 pm

Admission: FREE

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Nebraska Race for the Cure @CenturyLink Center Omaha 6 am-11 am

Poetry at the Moon: @ Cresent Moon Coffee 7 pm

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Last day of Disonaur Alive @ The Henry Doorly Zoo

A Night In Treme @ A Holland Center 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

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Admission: FREE

1 Creators Workshop @ Legend Comics 3:45 pm

Admission: FREE

Legacy: Emily Fisher @ Joslyn Art Museum 10 am-4 pm

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TUESDAY

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Admission: FREE

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FRIDAY

SATURDAY 28 Teen and Adult Art Class @ Joslyn Art Museum 1-3 pm

Westdie VS Benson Football Game @ Westside Main Field 7 pm

WEDNESDAY 2

THURSDAY

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Westside VS Millard South Football Game @Millard South High 7 pm

Omaha City Slam @ The Omaha Healing Arts Center 7 pm

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Fall Chrysanthemum Show @ Lauritzen Gardens 9 am-5 pm

Big Voodoo Daddy @ Holland Preforming Art Center 7:30 pm

Westside VS South High Football Game @ Westside 7 pm

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Local Filmmakers Showcase @ Film Streams 7:30-11 pm

Spooktacular @ The Henry Doorly Zoo 5:30-8:30 pm

Saturday Surprise @ Joslyn Art Museum 10:00-12:00

Admission: $9

23 Authors Speak @OPL- Millard Branch 7-10 pm

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Admission: FREE

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26 ACT 8 am @Westside High School

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Craze Issue One: Around the World