Page 1

IMPORTANT INHERITANCE TAX CHANGES  Inheritance Tax (IHT) is payable on death at the rate of 40% of the value of a person’s net  estate  (after  payments  of  debts,  expenses  and  so  on)  above  the  current  Nil  Rate  Band  of  £325,000. On the death of a surviving spouse or civil partner, where the Nil Rate Band of the  first to die was not used and is transferrable to the survivor’s estate, this figure doubles to  £650,000.  An additional Nil Rate Band, when a residence is passed on death to direct descendants, will  be introduced for deaths on or after 6 April 2017. This Residential Nil Rate Band will apply in  addition to the existing £325,000 Nil Rate Band and any unused part of the Residential Nil  Rate Band will be able to be transferred to a surviving spouse or civil partner (in the same  way as for the existing £325,000 Nil Rate Band).   The Residential Nil Rate Band will be  • 

£100,000 in 2017‐18, 

£125,000 in 2018‐19, 

£150,000 in 2019‐20, and 

£175,000 in 2020‐21. 

It will then increase in line with Consumer Prices Index from 2021‐22 onwards. It will also be  available  when  a  person  downsizes  or  ceases  to  own  a  home  on  or  after  8  July  2015  and  assets of an equivalent value, up to the value of the Residential Nil Rate Band, are passed on  death to direct descendants.   However,  there  will  be  a  tapered  withdrawal  of  the  Residential  Nil  Rate  Band  for  estates  with a net value of more than £2 million (at a rate of £1 for every £2 over this threshold).  One  important  thing  to  note  is  that  the  new  Residential  Nil  Rate  Band  does  not  apply  to  deaths until 6 April 2017 onwards and the full £1m benefit will not be applicable until 2021,  by  which  time  the  proposed  changes  will  have  less  of  a  financial  impact  than  envisaged  if  house prices continue to increase in value in the way they have in recent years.  What are the conditions? 


The first condition is that the deceased must have had a residence at death or, at least, have  had a residence at some point after the new rules were announced on 8 July 2015.  The definition of “residence” for the purpose of the new rules is not fully clear. However it is  a  requirement  that  the  deceased  lived  in  the  property  at  some  point.  An  investment  property  will  therefore  not  qualify  although  if  it  was  lived  in  and  later  rented  out,  or  vice  versa, the property would qualify.   Where  a  person  has  more  than  one  residence  the  Executors  of  their  estate  can  choose  which residence the Residential Nil Rate Band should apply to. However, the Residential Nil  Rate Band cannot be divided between different residences.  Who can benefit from the Residential Nil Rate Band?  The residence of the deceased must be inherited by “direct descendants”, who are defined  as  children,  grandchildren  and  further  lineal  descendants,  including  step‐children  and  adopted children. The definition also extends to the respective spouses and civil partners of  lineal  descendants,  and  also  widows,  widowers  and  surviving  civil  partners  who  have  not  remarried.   Whether  the  Residential  Nil  Rate  Band  will  apply  where  a  direct  descendant  inherits  an  interest in a trust, rather than inherits outright, depends on the nature of the trust. Trusts  for bereaved minors when they reach 18 will qualify, as do trusts where an individual of any  age is given a legal right to live in the property.   In  contrast,  a  discretionary  trust,  where  no  beneficiary  is  entitled  as  of  right  to  either  income or capital or a right of residence, will not qualify. This means that many Wills that  included discretionary trusts should be reviewed.  Does the Residential Nil Rate Band apply to all estates?  The Residential Nil Rate Band is restricted if the value of the estate exceeds a threshold of  £2m.  For every £2 that the value of the net estate (before taking into account exemptions  and relief from IHT) exceeds the threshold the Residential Nil Rate Band available will taper  by £1. For deaths after 6 April 2017, when the Residential Nil Rate Band will be £100,000,  where an estate is valued at over £2.2m (or £2.4m where the unused Residential Nil Rate  Band has been transferred to a surviving spouse or civil partner) it will taper to nothing. For 


deaths after  2020/21,  when  the  Residential  Nil  Rate  Band  will  be  £175,000,  these  taper  limits  will  have  increased  to  estates  over  £2.35m  in  value  (or  £2.7m  where  the  unused  Residential Nil Rate Band can be transferred).  For estates valued above the threshold there may be circumstances where it is tax efficient  to make lifetime gifts outright or to a trust in order to reduce the value of the estate below  the taper threshold.  UK Residential Property Held by Foreign Domiciled Persons  UK domiciled Individuals are subject to IHT on all their worldwide assets (subject to various  reliefs and exemptions). Individuals who are not UK domiciled or deemed domiciled (often  referred  to  as  “non‐doms”  for  IHT  purposes)  are,  until  April  2017,  only  subject  to  IHT  on  their UK assets (whereas their foreign assets are excluded from the scope of IHT).   From April 2017, all UK residential property held directly or indirectly by foreign domiciled  persons will be brought into charge for UK inheritance tax (IHT) purposes. This will be the  case  even  when  the  property  is  owned  through  an  indirect  structure  such  as  an  offshore  company, partnership or trust.  Restrictions on non‐dom status  The Government has also announced another change that will be relevant to non‐doms and  IHT: From April 2017, those who have been resident in the UK for more than 15 out of the  past  20  tax  years  will  be  treated  as  deemed  UK  domiciled  for  all  tax  purposes  and  will  therefore become liable to IHT on all their worldwide assets (subject to various reliefs and  exemptions).  Conclusion  The  new  rules  for  Inheritance  Tax  will  adversely  affect  many  existing  Wills  and  it  is  important  to  take  advice  on  your  particular  circumstances  before  they  come  into  effect  from 6 April 2017 onwards.   In particular, anyone in the situations mentioned below should seek advice now:  1. Anyone who has downsized after 8th July 2015 or who has moved into a care home  or rented accommodation; 


2. Anyone who  has  made  a  Will  where  the  estate  is  to  be  divided  partly  between  children,  grandchildren  or  other  lineal  descendants  and  partly  between  non‐lineal  descendants (e.g. siblings or friends or charities);  3. Anyone  who  has  made  a  Will  that  includes  a  nil‐rate  band  discretionary  trust  (this  type of Will was popular prior to the introduction of the transferable nil rate band);    4. Anyone who has transferred their residence to their children, grandchildren or other  lineal  descendants  as  a  gift  after  8th  July  2015  and  has  not  sold  it  on  the  open  market;  5. Anyone who has left property to children, grandchildren or other lineal descendants  in their Will and made the gift contingent upon the beneficiaries attaining a specific  age e.g. 18, 21, 25;  6. Anyone who has made contingent gifts like those mentioned in 5 above to children,  grandchildren  or  other  lineal  descendants  but  have  also  included  provisions  that  substitute  non‐lineal  descendants  if  the  lineal  descendants die  before  reaching  the  specified age;  7. Non‐doms  who own residential property in the UK in their own name or who own  property through an offshore company, partnership or trust.   For further advice on these changes or to book a Will review appointment, please contact  

Steven Whiting  Craig Solicitors, 458 Roundhay Road, Oakwood, Leeds, LS8 2HU.  Telephone: 01132 444 081  Mobile: 07467 077 503  Email: steven@craiglaw.co.uk 

Profile for Craig Solicitors

UK Inheritance Tax changes & the family home  

This article explains about the introduction of the Residential Nil Rate Band and changes to non-domiciled status from 2017 and highlights g...

UK Inheritance Tax changes & the family home  

This article explains about the introduction of the Residential Nil Rate Band and changes to non-domiciled status from 2017 and highlights g...

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded