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High and Dry Craig Simmonds


Two hundred years following its construction, the canal that sits between Gloucester and Sharpness can still be seen, flowing calm and nonchalant.

As commercial traffic progressively hindered along the waterways, the route’s indigenous identity diminished along with it.

Even now, it offers up its same aptitude, the only talent it was intended to possess. Expectant, as though unaware of the time that has elapsed: the same time and historical progress that finally instituted alternative methods to the canal and its sole purpose; transportation of cargo.

Yet the canal, like so many others, has sat and remained over the years, inheriting the distinction of its surroundings - as they have moved on and developed without it - and thus becoming part of the landscape.

And this ubiquitous function of canals being the veins of our country - spread out in such a visual manner whilst providing the lifeblood and means to operate fluidly as a nation - were effortlessly dismantled.

One almost neglects to consider its synthetic origins when observing how it reaches out to connect so many locations with such consistency.


All images and text Š Craig Simmonds, 2014 www.craigsimmonds.co.uk



High & Dry | Craig Simmonds