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C A R O L E W A L L E R : M E E T I N G P L A C E Alison Carter


C a r o l e Wa l l e r : M e e t i n g P l a c e Alison Carter


C a r o l e Wa l l e r : M e e t i n g P l a c e Alison Carter

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ISBN 978-0-9554373-3-4 Published by the Crafts Study Centre in association with Hampshire County Council Museums and Archives Service Crafts Study Centre University College for the Creative Arts Falkner Road, Farnham, Surrey GU9 7DS Front and back covers: Meeting Place series 2008, enamel/dye/cloth (photos: Carole Waller and David Hyde) Inside front cover: installation, dye/silk 6 x 1m, 4 panels, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford Inside back cover: Colonnade at Urchfont Manor, dye/silk viscose/glass/steel (photo: Carole Waller) Book design by David Hyde at celsius.eu.com Book production by chromatec.co.uk Published April 2008 on the occasion of the exhibition Carole Waller: Meeting Place held at the Crafts Study Centre. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic, mechanical or otherwise, without prior permission of the publisher. The rights of Alison Carter to be identified as the author of this work have been asserted by her in accordance with the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1998. Carole Waller: Meeting Place was planned in collaboration with Hampshire County Council Museums and Archives Service as a touring exhibition and has received generous support from the Foyle Foundation.

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C

arole waller conceives her works

in terms of their

dynamic relationships with four essential and enduring elements: people, landscape, light, and movement. Whether it be the figures they adorn, or the spaces they inhabit, the pieces take on new lives and new interpretations according to the individuals they surround, or the people who move around them,

the natural or built environments they inhabit, and the interplay of natural or artificial light. The work is intriguing through the layering of media, and the intervention of both predicted and unpredictable factors. Spontaneous drawing is the starting point of each new project. Each piece of Carole’s work is a one-off painting, formed of paint brush on fluid textile. She develops works of art that create a sense of place. Garments transform bodies; textiles hang in mid-air as a thin membrane to slice through and divide spaces, or they interleave with glass to change environments. The figures are dressed, the scene is set, and now, in her latest body of work, film enters and interacts with people like us who inhabit her clothes and these spaces to change our perceptions further, and imbue new layers of meaning in our lives and surroundings. We may embrace these changes or we may ignore them; we do not need to feel manipulated, for we may be part of the encounter but we are free to move through and beyond. Yet we are bound to be affected in some way by this experience, that plays with our memory and our imaginings, and takes our mind elsewhere to a place, as Carole describes it: “somewhere between memory and dream”. Carole’s life resonates vitality and drive, spurred on by a chain of serendipitous moments yielding fresh projects, borne out of a network of contacts, and experiences shared. The strongest statements in her work use vibrant colour and bold linear images: leitmotifs of her style. Her current practice has evolved over a period of more than 20 years’ continual experimentation and refinement, and research into new techniques which have enabled her to develop familiar themes in new media, and thereby inform her art. There are darker moments, reflective pieces, like punctuation marks; preludes to changes within herself, and her work, as a new direction beckons. Increasingly there are more layers – of fabric, mixed media, and now film1 – which draw us into a deeper complexity of meaning, and challenge perceptions of what we are seeing more acutely. Carole is always an idea

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ahead, moving on to the next project, with a new vision of how she is going to infuse her work with elements both specific to herself, and generic to the world around us, how to share with us the reach of her imagination. She is concerned about what is going on around us and also about what lies deep

Top left: Meeting Place installation 2008, silk coat – dye/silk organza, film still

within us.

Bottom left: Georgina, dye on silk, 1.8 x 0.5m

Consider her process of painting on cloth, of marking the fabric with

Right: Gary 2001, dye/silk viscose, 3 x 1m

energetic brush strokes yet with the immediacy of drawing, and you can

Photos: Carole Waller

sense the artist’s energy even where her imagery is understated. This imagery is predominately figurative. The figures are on a human scale; close enough to our form to enable us to identify with them. There is an androgyny that is not threatening, not gender-averse. These figures quite simply represent humanity, a humanity increasingly stripped bare to the essentials. Drawing is clearly compulsive, and for her an art form in which she is forever striving for solutions. The revelatory point at which she knew “all I wanted to do was draw” came at age 11, while in Rome with her mother, both seeking to gain mastery over a column that her own pencil at first could not make stand up; but she was determined she would make it do so. Her self-belief and sense of self-worth then enabled her to pursue her painting and art textiles with such dedication at undergraduate and postgraduate level respectively, and then to establish her name as an international artist very early on in her career. She has never worked for anyone else or even engaged an agent. Sheer hard work coupled with utter conviction, has kept her financially afloat for the last 21 years. Her early figures were always drawn from life, over and over, until they worked themselves into the psyche of this artist so that they now emerge from a repertoire of past and present friends, reinvigorated by a photograph, or a live encounter with someone who has inspired her. One particularly powerful image in the latest body of Carole’s work apparently derives from a child, caught play-acting in water like Millais’ Ophelia; another from a press image of an ordinary man caught in extraordinary circumstances. Carole herself is clear who her figures represent; one with double-layered textiles superimposing images is boldly named Gary, for Gary Wood, her ceramicist partner; yet often, in capturing an essence she adds another layer, a veil of anonymity, so that the identity of the original model is for her alone to know.

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Growing up in an artistic household evidently had its influence: nurturing a certain way of being, thinking and seeing. To have one child who is an artist may be considered fortunate, to have two is hardly an accident, to

Beach triptych 2008, dye/ silk viscose/glass, approx 0.7 x 0.7m each piece Photo: Martin Thomas

have all three progeny making their way in the field of the applied arts and entertainment (Joanne a potter who made her name with raku-fired ceramics, Antony a dance animateur) must be sheer delight, and if not engineered was at least actively encouraged. For Carole’s mother is Irene Waller, who headed the School of Woven and Knitted Textiles at Birmingham College of Art, exhibited internationally, not least at the Lausanne Biennale, and then concentrated on commissioned works and lecturing, making films for television and writing about the craft of weaving. Carole is perhaps the one most clearly sharing her love of textiles as an art form, and she is rightly proud of her mother’s achievements in the field. For Carole, a foundation course at Bourneville College of Art (1975) led to a BA Honours in Painting at Canterbury College of Art (1978) and a significant transatlantic move, and for her, leap into the textile arena to study for a Masters Degree in fine art textiles at Cranbrook Academy of Art, in Detroit, Michigan. Here she followed in the footsteps of Joan Livingstone, now Professor in the Department of Fiber and Material Studies at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Illinois, and came under the influence of Gerhardt Knodel, then artist-in-residence in the Department of Fiber at Cranbrook, whose thinking was of particular interest to Carole in the notion of textiles both manipulating space and having their own interior threedimensional spaces.2 She achieved her MA in Fine Art Fibers in 1982. Carole’s subsequent immersion in a life of sunshine and minimalism in the Mediterranean on board a yacht for three years further impacted her vision in terms of the absorption into her repertoire of glorious primary colour and vibrant colour mixes, emanating from the crystal clear waters and bright light effects – she emerged from a period of quite intense drawing, and work with pastels and oil paints to describe “the brilliance of light at sea”. Her turquoises and azure blues continue to resonate, two decades on, with cool Adriatic luminosity. Return visits to Venice and the Italian interior have continued to inspire dress collections with a rich, warm palette – the burnt ochre of Siena (1995 collection), the vibrant pinks and greens, gold and deep blues of Ravenna (2004) – reflecting her abiding love affair with Southern European light and climate, and with the early Renaissance masters particularly Giotto and Masaccio who worked within that culture

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and nurtured the spirit of their compatriots through their art. She applauds and emulates this. A recent series of paintings inside curved glass, slumped in the kiln, entitled Beach, is suffused with understated notations on the thinnest film of silk that lets the light do the talking.

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Yet colour is not to her as important as line. “Black gives structure to colour” avows Carole, adding “and black gives architecture to colour”. Is she happy with being described as a colourist? Yes, to a point. Her work is full of “energy expressed through colour”. Colour is rarely muted, yet there is a fine balance achieved, between the deep and the pastel, the warm and the cool tones. The painterly technique allows the dye to bleed across the surface of the textile; colours are absorbed into the cloth, merge and transform, run up to and into each other, touch and move on – so there is a sense of constant movement across the surface. The resultant effect is of areas which are flooded with deep colour, while other areas are semi-opaque wash and mere translucent film. Therein lies the essence of her practical, honed skill with the brush; to retain control where it matters, while allowing a serendipitous element of freedom of movement that can excite by its very unpredictability. This is not flat art work, “not to do with a flat plane”, as she says, for “a sense of depth comes intuitively”. So the art work is conceived right from the start as creating three-dimensional imagery, it is seen in the round and occupies cubic, not square metres. She also has a wealth of art historical knowledge to draw on: in her imagery she acknowledges the influence of the works of Francis Bacon, and Walking and Falling recalls the methodology of photographer Eadweard Muybridge. Just as clearly her colour in the glass installation Olu for Salisbury Arts Centre gave a nod to Kandinsky and Sigmar Polke. Other sources of inspiration include Dada and Man Ray, Rauchensberg, and she is an ardent admirer of Bill Viola. The thought behind each artist’s output is fully understood, and respected. A natural progression for Carole in recent years has been a preoccupation with architectural glass installation. She was drawn, some fifteen years ago, to Bath by the peculiar luminosity that pervades a valley rich in Georgian Bath stone architecture, and that quality of light with its architectural backdrop has remained a constant source of inspiration.3 She developed a method of laminating painted translucent fabrics between toughened glass sheets sealed with resin which presented an ideal opportunity for placing works of textile art in an outdoor arena. The qualities of the glass itself – its transparency, and its reflective facets, as well as its durability and sculptural, architectural stance – have made it an ideal vehicle for Carole’s work. Outdoors the viewing is weather-dependent, which makes it exciting in a different way. The textile is safe and unchanging of itself but its fortress glass is subject to a myriad of unforeseen external factors – from narrow

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Alice’s dress 1998, dressmaker’s interfacing, 7m Photo: Josh van Gelder

shafts of sunlight and shadows cast by clouds, to the interruptions of light and bounced reflections from buildings and man-made street furniture. She has recently moved from placing such glass in window spaces to creating glass works that inhabit the actual windows themselves. The potential for large-scale work beyond a gallery context had great appeal. Scale is important; scale defines the impact. She had already explored the idea of size impacting interpretation in 1998 when she made a site-specific installation Alice’s Dress4 a vast white sheath dress hanging from the vaulted ceiling of St Matthews Church, Bath, creating a diffuse shaft of soft light on an enormous scale. Carole’s paintings are imbued with emotion which is both intensely personal and yet often neutral in effect, in that we are not adopting her feelings, but rather overlaying our own. She simply creates the setting and invites the happenstance. Of course she explores themes that are constant, drawing on collective memory, in this instance to do with childhood innocence, and the warmth of an all-encompassing embrace, in a ‘safe’ setting, tinged with an intangible ethereality.

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In 2003 Carole was invited to design an installation for the International Festival of the Garden held at Westonbirt Arboretum, Gloucestershire. Painstaking preparation ensured that the commission would resonate with its surroundings. Against the backdrop of a wealth of foreboding oaks and elms, surrounding vast open spaces and canopied by a huge expanse of unadulterated sky, she sited Gravity, six striking yet harmonious monumental glass works three metres high and a metre wide, flanking a wide walkway, with wispy willowy abstracted forms in dye on silk viscose. Here as ever the focus was on “the human presence in space and time”. These were a resounding success and, significantly, although the original installation was for three months, the pieces are still there, rooted to the spot, five years later. For Carole there is a measure of pleasurable anticipation in seeing a sitespecific commission finally in situ. She is constantly intrigued by the effect her works can have on an environment, excited to see and to share with others “the imagery that I caused but did not put there”. Westonbirt led to a special commission for work to accompany Sue Adcock’s Monet Garden at the Chelsea Flower Show in 2004, where the abstracted silk screen painting in glass intersected a still pond with water lilies, and she returned to Chelsea with Sue in 2005, to show Colonnade, a set of shimmering semi-transparent figures. This work, comprising eight panels, changes in mood with each new installation and location – from hospital courtyard to open landscape, to white gallery.

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Far left: Gravity, International Festival of the Garden, Westonbirt Arboretum, 2003

In 2007 Carole won a commission to design a chapel skylight and

Photo: Bronwyn Williams-Ellis

yet another audience, and the results are spectacular. The project at

Left: Colonnade 2005, dye/ silk viscose/glass

Freshford School involved workshops with children who made drawings

Photo: Jason Ingram

window at Minster School, Southwell, Nottinghamshire. Educational site-specific projects with glass works in schools have taken Carole to

that were absorbed into the imagery of Carole’s painted textiles and captured in the glass of a new indoor/outdoor window, and another enveloping a circular staircase in The Pound Arts Centre in Corsham. Placing work in public environments such as hospitals also interests Carole for the level of reaction it invites. At the Royal United Hospital Bath and Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford she set herself a personal challenge to change the atmosphere, perhaps to distract, to provide solace, and provoke a life-affirming response, amidst places often poignantly testament to the fragility of human existence and our transient hold on life. An evolving repertoire of new techniques echoes this sense of vulnerability, with reverse devoré silk giving the glass an etched effect, and conveying further a sense of “precious, fragile materiality”. The creation of clothes as wearable art has been enduring, across three decades. The early I’m no walking canvas label summarised a noncatwalk approach to the painting and screen-printing technique on cloth that Carole developed. The joy of these clothes was that they were oneoff artworks, some made as commissions, others formed into a full range of ready-to-wear shapes. The textile is always the vehicle not the driver: crushed silk, organza, silk crêpe, velvet, wool, cotton, all are made to work, and work well together, layer on layer. Wearing Carole Waller clothes becomes a collaboration between artist and wearer. The clothes do make bold statements; Carole is aware that, as she was once told, “you have to know who you are to wear them.” She adds, “I observe how the clothes change when they are worn and with certain characters the alchemy of wearer and garment make something very special happen”. Such clothes found a perfect niche with buyers at the Paris fashion shows where Carole first showed a collection in 1993. The movement of painted figures on shimmering silk adorning glamorous models under the catwalk spotlight was clearly seductive to both artist and audience. The clothes sold well and began to inhabit off-beat celebrity and fashionista closets from Milan to New York. Carole continued to show two collections annually in Paris, and latterly New York Fashion Week until 2005,

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when she won a major Arts Council England Research and Development grant to explore the glass work further, as well as embarking on a new series of exhibitions. The clothes are still available through galleries and

Alignments collection 2001, dye/silk Photos: Ursula Steiger

exhibitions, and at her studio.5 The Crafts Study Centre installation Meeting Place ostensibly explores the movement of people and their interaction, in a state of transition, moving through a space. Light impacts on and through the textiles in myriad ways. Banners absorb light into the opaque parts of the fabric to impart deep rich tones and allow it through translucent areas to impact imagery on surfaces beyond. Glass is suffused in natural light, and artificial light from gallery lighting and film, and reflects or acts as conduit. Interleaving layers of paper further mediate the viewer’s gaze. The move into film allows the artwork in motion that has always been implicit in Carole’s work. Film introduces an overlay of imagery that is present, absent; appearing, disintegrating, in a way that is both stimulating and disturbing.

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Left: Suspended 2007/8, dye/silk, 4 x 1m, 3 layers Photo: David Hyde

Right: Meeting Place (detail) plus: Yin Yang 2007, stoneware wallpiece by Gary Wood Photo: Carole Waller

Just as the works are subject to constant change in this scenario, we, the visiting audience, become part of that process of happening, engaging ourselves in the interplay. We move through the space, spotlighted by the moving film, sidetracked by glass, eyes darting about, moving on through, unmarked, and largely unnoticed. The sound is a subtext, from a busy meeting place. As in any such location, be it a tube station, or a crowded beach, we may be surrounded by people, absorbed in activity, but also immersed in our private thoughts, thoughts that may be tripped by what we see and hear, but which move off into our own unique world and re-form around the things that are of interest and concern to us. What we experience within the installation is ultimately visual, non-verbal, sensory, emotive. For the writer tasked with description, it inspires a vocabulary rich in opposites: on film, in a fashion shoot, the clothes in play; clothes on display, eloquently still; interventions of fabric, interjections of sound. There are dramatic textural contrasts between free-hanging textiles and textile works in glass: soft silk chiffon, hard toughened laminates; textile

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that is tactile, non-tactile; that appears ephemeral, preserved. Colours that are warm, cool; materials that reflect, or absorb light. Some contrasts were always there, set up in the painterly origins of the work: imagery that is

Presence/Absence 2001, dye/silk, 12 paintings, 2 x 1m Photo: Carole Waller

linear, then painterly; lines that are clear and strong, then indistinct and fuzzy; colours that are polychrome, then black – or blue – and white. There is always a lively interplay of light and shadow, surface and depth, transparency, opaqueness; faces that are looking at us, or away. Imagery that is familiar, strange.6 Carole has complex messages to convey and she is continually searching for new ways to express her thoughts. Apropos of her latest work she quotes a line from a Pierre Reverdy poem, Forever There: “my head is a heavy, full ball” and certain qualities of his poems clearly have a resonance for her own work – beautiful yet disquieting, with elements of outwardness and inwardness, transience and permanence, touching base with the everyday and yet with almost mystical otherness. Hers is perhaps the artistic equivalent of Reverdy’s poetic response to enduring themes, in a state of constant change and transformation. As people are, as light is, as life is. We are left walking and falling, running to catch up with her frenetic creativity. But it’s always worth the chase. She creates in her installations places we want to be; where, as she intends, “all the aspects of the self meet”.

1

Fran Landsman (franlandsman@yahoo.com) generously produced the film for Meeting Place. The cameraman was Stephen Robinson (www.manfridayfilms.co.uk) and the editor Jimmy Edmonds (www.jimmyedmonds.com).

2

see Telos Portfolio Collection monograph, 2002

3

Reflections, and faces in glass and windows have been enduring leitmotifs, as witness pieces in Hampshire Museums Service’s collection Face in the glass and Glass and Angels silk faille and georgette kimono coat, both 1993.

4

a reference to Alice in Wonderland at the point at which she is big and the other characters and mis-en-scene are small.

5

www.carolewaller.co.uk

6

Her own title for a recent body of work Presence, Absence offers a positive negative counterpoint that celebrates this fruitful juxtaposition of opposites.

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Left: recycled painted dress 2007, dye silk Photo: Kevin Clifford

Right: Presence/Absence 2001, dye/silk painted coat and dress

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Top left: Presence/Absence dress 2001, dye/silk organza Photo: Carole Waller

Bottom left: Spine scarf 2003, Alignments collection, dye/silk georgette Photo: Maggie Lambert

Right: Reflected 2007, glass/enamel/ sandblasting, 25 x 16cm Photo: Martin Thomas

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Left and top right: Suspended 2007/8, dye/ silk, 4 x 1m, 3 layers + film (by Fran Landsman) Photos: Martin Thomas

Bottom right: Transition 2007/8, dye/silk viscose, 2 x 0.5m, 5 panels Photo: Martin Thomas

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Meeting Place series 2008, dye/silk viscose/glass Photos: Carole Waller

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Carole Waller: curriculum vitae 1956

Born in Birmingham

Education

1982

Cranbrook Academy of Art, USA, MA Fine Art Fibers

1978

Canterbury College of Art, UK, BA Hons Painting

1975

Bourneville College of Art, UK, Foundation

Exhibitions

2008 Latest Works - Carole Waller, Red House Museum & Gardens, Christchurch, Dorset one two five Summer Exhibition, one two five gallery, Bath Meeting Place, Aldershot Military Museum Meeting Place, Crafts Study Centre, Farnham, Surrey The Blue and White Show, Victoria Art Gallery, Bath Millstream Sculpture Garden, Bishopstrow, Wiltshire 2007

Colonnade – solo show, The Pound Arts Centre, Corsham Lustre, University of Nottinghamshire Textiiles in Performance, Woodchester Mansion, Stroud, Gloucestershire Celebrating Art in the Garden, Urchfont Manor College, Urchfont one two five Summer Exhibition, one two five gallery, Bath Fresh Air, Quenington Sculpture Trust, Cirencester Collect, Victoria and Albert Museum, London London Art Fair, Thackeray Gallery,London 2006

New Glass ’06, Cowdy Gallery, Newent Summer exhibition, Thackeray Gallery, London Summer exhibition, The Garden Gallery, Broughton, Hampshire Solo Exhibition, Contemporary Applied Arts, London London Art Fair, Thackeray Gallery, London Origin (glass and clothing), Crafts Council, London Journeys: the art of making, West Dean Gallery, West Dean, Chichester

2005

Christmas exhibition, Thackeray Gallery, London

Fashion’s Memory: From Peasant Art to Wearable Art (clothing), Letharby Gallery, Central St Martin’s London Glassworks, Salisbury Arts Centre Summerheat, Quest Gallery, Bath Paintings/painted clothes, West Dean College, Chichester Break into Colour – Fashion show for the Chairman of the Council, Bath Council, Bath Glassworks, Stroud Valley Festival

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Grand Designs Live, Excel, London Chelsea Flower Show (Gold Medal), London Chelsea Craft Fair (glass and clothing), London

2004

Carole Waller/Gary Wood, Six Chapel Row, Bath Art of the Garden, Westonbirt Arboretum, Gloucestershire Chelsea Flower Show, London Collect, Victoria and Albert Museum, London Atelier, New York Fashion Week

Public collections

Victoria and Albert Museum, London Birmingham City Art Gallery, Birmingham Holburne Museum, Bath Kwangju Fashion Association Contemporary Art Biennale, Korea Crafts Study Centre, University College for the Creative Arts

Represented by

one two five Gallery, Bath Contemporary Applied Arts, London Thackeray Gallery (glass), London Garden Gallery, Broughton, Hampshire Ray Harris (clothing), London Julie Gallery (clothing), New York, New York Santa Fe Weaving Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA Pat Henderson, San Francisco, California, USA

Public commissions

2007 The Minster School, Southwell: stained glass windows The Pound Arts Centre, Wiltshire: sculptural glass installation Freshford School, Bath: external glass installation and paintings with residency and workshops Greenmere School, Didcot, Oxon: glass window and residency 2005 Salisbury Arts Centre: installation of three glass panels in garden Chelsea Flower Show: installation/show garden/collaboration with Sue Adcock Designs, Gold Medal 2004

Chelsea Flower Show: installation as above

2003

Crossover Contemporary Dance Project, Oxford: costumes and set

 he Art of the Garden, Westonbirt Arboretum: permanent installation T of paintings outdoors

2002 Bath International Music Festival: Street Banners community project in five schools 2001

WH Smith: installation of paintings at corporate headquarters



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Baldor Steel International: installation of paintings at corporate headquarters 1997

Kokoro Contemporary Music Group: paintings for a portable set Cecilia McFarlane Dance Company: set and costumes

1996 Radcliffe Infirmary Oxford: installation of paintings 1995 Bath International Music Festival: street banner project, residency in six schools 1995 Royal Academy of Arts, London: painted scarf commission National Gallery, London: printed scarf 1992

Phoenix Dance Company, Leeds: set and costumes

1990 Royal Academy of Arts, London: painted scarf Ballet Rambert School, London: installation of paintings 1986–90 Many collaborative arts projects and performance projects with other artists, schools, special needs groups and adults.

Professional experience

2004–07 External examiner, Bath Spa University College 2005–06

Supervisor, PHD Textiles, Bath Spa University College

2007–08

Part time tutor/visiting lecturer: Bath Spa University: textile print

2005

University of Gloucestershire: foundation textiles

2003–08

West Dean College: ongoing

1997–2002 Bath Spa University College 2001

University of the West of England, Bristol

Visiting lecturer (selected) 2006 Textile Forum, South West Colour Conference Stroudwater Textile Festival: visiting speaker London College of Fashion Victoria and Albert Museum Royal College of Art, London Crafts Council Middlesex University, London Ravensbourne Polytechnic

Awards

2007

Queen Elizabeth Scholarship, QEST DTI Export Award, New York Gift Fair

2005 Research and Development Grant, Arts Council England 2003

Passport to Export award, Trade Partners UK

1998

Whitewash project, Arts for Everyone, Arts Council England

1993 London Arts Board: exhibition funding

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1991

British Fashion Exports award, BKCEC

1989

Southern Arts: development award Crafts Council: enterprise award

1981

Michigan Council for the Arts Award, USA

Affiliations

2007 Trustee, Stroudwater Textile Trust 2006

Member, Contemporary Glass Society

2005

Member, Surface Design Association, USA Member, European Textile Forum

2004

Management board, Textile Forum South West

2003

Member, ETC Research Group, UWE Bristol

2002

Company Director, No Walking Canvas Ltd

1990–94

Crafts panel member specialist advisor, Southern Arts

1992–94 Regional management board member, Artswork South

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Further reading  andy Black, Fashioning Fabrics: Contemporary Textiles in Fashion, Black Dog S Publications, 2006, ISBN 1904772412 Ed., Margot Coatts, Colour into cloth, Crafts Council, 1994, ISBN 1870145305 Ngozi Isoku, British Textile Design 1940 to Present Day, V&A Publishing, 1998, ISBN 1851771255 Joanna Kinnersley-Taylor, Dyeing and Screenprinting on Textiles, A&C Black, 2005, ISBN 0713651806 Peta Levi, New British Design, Mitchell Beazley, 1998, ISBN 0866363432 Mary Schoeser, Silk, Yale University Press, 2007, ISBN 9780300117417 Suzanne Trocme, Fabric, Mitchell Beazley, 2005, ISBN 1840004606 Carole Waller, Walking and Falling, 2005 Carole Waller, Whitewash, 1998

Acknowledgements Many thanks to Simon Olding for inviting me to write this essay and to Carole Waller for talking to me and coaxing me into an understanding of the way she thinks and works. Thanks also for editing by Simon Olding and Susie Alcock of the Crafts Study Centre. David Hyde has produced an attractive design that beautifully complements the photography. The images are reproduced by kind permission of Kevin Clifford, David Hyde, Jason Ingram, Maggie Lambert, Ursula Steiger, Martin Thomas, Josh van Gelder, Carole Waller and Bronwyn William-Ellis. Carole Waller: Meeting Place was planned in collaboration with Hampshire County Council Museums and Archives Service. Alison Carter, March 2008

The Crafts Study Centre is grateful to the Foyle Foundation for their generous support.

About the author Alison Carter is Senior Keeper of Art and Design, Historic Dress & Textiles for Hampshire Museums and Archives Service based in Winchester, Hampshire, United Kingdom.

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Further reading  andy Black, Fashioning Fabrics: Contemporary Textiles in Fashion, Black Dog S Publications, 2006, ISBN 1904772412 Ed., Margot Coatts, Colour into cloth, Crafts Council, 1994, ISBN 1870145305 Ngozi Isoku, British Textile Design 1940 to Present Day, V&A Publishing, 1998, ISBN 1851771255 J oanna Kinnersley-Taylor, Dyeing and Screenprinting on Textiles, A&C Black, 2005, ISBN 0713651806 Peta Levi, New British Design, Mitchell Beazley, 1998, ISBN 0866363432 Mary Schoeser, Silk, Yale University Press, 2007, ISBN 9780300117417 Suzanne Trocme, Fabric, Mitchell Beazley, 2005, ISBN 1840004606 Carole Waller, Walking and Falling, 2005 Carole Waller, Whitewash, 1998

Acknowledgements Many thanks to Simon Olding for inviting me to write this essay and to Carole Waller for talking to me and coaxing me into an understanding of the way she thinks and works. Thanks also for editing by Simon Olding and Susie Alcock of the Crafts Study Centre. David Hyde has produced an attractive design that beautifully complements the photography. The images are reproduced by kind permission of Kevin Clifford, David Hyde, Jason Ingram, Maggie Lambert, Ursula Steiger, Martin Thomas, Josh van Gelder, Carole Waller and Bronwyn William-Ellis. Carole Waller: Meeting Place was planned in collaboration with Hampshire County Council Museums and Archives Service. Alison Carter, March 2008

The Crafts Study Centre is grateful to the Foyle Foundation for their generous support.

About the author Alison Carter is Senior Keeper of Art and Design, Historic Dress & Textiles for Hampshire Museums and Archives Service based in Winchester, Hampshire, United Kingdom.

28 l CaROLE WALLER : MEETING PLACE


Carole Waller : Meeting Place  

Art catalogue published in March 2008. Carole Waller is a visual artist who works with colour, light, textiles, glass, dyes and paint.

Carole Waller : Meeting Place  

Art catalogue published in March 2008. Carole Waller is a visual artist who works with colour, light, textiles, glass, dyes and paint.

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