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Do
You
See
What
I
See?
 



 By
Carly
Buccino
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



Introduction
 
 
 Do
you
see
what
I
see?
This
photo
essay
includes
a
compilation
of
photos
that
are
taken
of
the
same
subject
during
the
 day
as
well
as
the
night.
There
is
an
emphasis
on
lighting
and
how
it
affects
people’s
outtakes
on
various
subjects.
The
photos
 focus
on
perception
and
the
fact
that
everyone
takes
something
different
out
of
the
same
thing.
 
 I
chose
this
topic
because
I
think
it
is
very
intriguing
that
I
can
look
at
something
and
see
one
thing,
while
someone
else
 looks
at
the
same
thing
but
sees
something
totally
different.
By
taking
these
photos
I
wanted
to
show
the
comparison
between
 night
and
day
and
how
a
subject
can
become
something
it
was
not
intended
to
be
when
put
in
different
lighting.
It
occurred
to
 me
that
I
did
not
want
to
do
photos
of
a
girl
crying
and
have
everyone
think,
“sadness.”
Or
a
picture
of
children
playing
and
 have
everyone
think
“fun”
or
“happiness.”
Instead,
I
wanted
to
leave
interpretation
up
to
whoever
looks
at
this
photo
essay.
 Just
because
I
took
the
photograph
and
think
a
certain
way
about
it,
does
not
mean
that
my
audience
should
think
the
same
 way.

 
 I
got
the
inspiration
for
choosing
certain
subjects
by
paying
attention
to
the
seemingly
meaningless
things
around
me.
 All
of
these
pictures
take
place
outside
with
subjects
that
I
passed
everyday
and
did
not
think
twice
about.
Once
I
stopped
to
 take
notice
of
my
surroundings,
I
found
that
the
meaningless
things
can
in
fact
have
intricate
meanings
and
can
be
perceived
 differently
at
night
and
during
the
day.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



Composition
Analysis
 
 I
chose
these
twelve
pictures
because
they
are
all
subjects
that
we
may
pass
every
day
and
never
think
twice
about.
I
 think
it
is
important
to
bring
into
focus
the
images
in
life
that
do
not
necessarily
mean
anything
to
us
or
outwardly
move
us.
 These
pictures
were
taken
in
between
my
house
and
Rowan
University’s
campus.
I
observed
my
surroundings
as
I
walked
to
 and
from
school.
I
noticed
things
that
I
never
thought
twice
about.
I
hadn’t
looked
at
the
inside
of
my
shed
in
months.
When
I
 looked
at
the
hose
in
my
backyard,
I
realized
how
interesting
it
looked
when
it
was
wrapped.
These
are
things
that
I
do
not
 take
time
out
of
my
day
to
notice,
and
I
don’t
believe
others
would
either.
 
 I
decided
to
take
pictures
of
the
same
subjects
during
the
day
and
night
in
order
to
highlight
perspective.
I
wanted
to
 show
how
differently
things
could
be
viewed.
I
really
believe
that
no
two
people
see
something
exactly
the
same.
We
all
have
 different
perspectives
and
takes
on
things.
That
is
why
I
thought
it
would
be
intriguing
to
take
pictures
of
the
same
thing
in
the
 light
and
in
the
dark.
How
can
one
image
look
completely
different
during
different
settings?
I
wanted
to
portray
the
way
I
 found
these
images
during
the
day
when
it
was
light
out
and
during
the
night
when
it
was
dark
out.
One
image
transformed
 into
two
separate,
very
different
images.

 
 I
wanted
my
audience
to
go
away
feeling
the
sense
of
freedom
and
interpretation.
Rather
than
showing
them
pictures
 with
an
outright
feeling
such
as
a
baby
crying
(sad)
or
an
older
couple
holding
hands
(love),
I
wanted
my
viewers
to
make
 what
they
wanted
to
out
of
my
photos.
When
I
look
at
my
photos,
I
see
different
things.
When
looking
at
the
tree
in
my
 neighbor’s
yard
that
I
hadn’t
taken
a
notice
to
before,
I
thought
poverty.
When
looking
at
the
picture
of
the
couple
kissing,
I
felt
 indifference.
I
wanted
my
audience
to
feel
free
to
feel,
not
like
I
was
forcing
them
to
feel
a
certain
way.
Because
really,
 everyone
feels
somewhat
differently
about
the
same
thing.
There
are
so
many
perspectives
and
feelings
that
can
come
from
 one
subject.
Who
am
I
to
hold
my
audience
back
from
seeing
however
it
is
they
see
or
feeling
however
it
is
they
feel?
 
 For
this
assignment,
I
used
my
iPhone
camera.
I
did
this
because
my
digital
camera
broke.
However,
I
realized
that
my
 form
of
technology
went
well
with
my
photo
essay.
Since
I
photographed
subjects
that
were
part
of
my
every
day
 surroundings
that
I
barely
noticed,
when
I
did
notice,
I
had
my
phone
with
me.
When
I
did
have
a
camera,
I
did
not
take
it
with
 me
wherever
I
went.
Of
course
I
do
with
my
iPhone.
I
captured
these
images
to
portray
perspective
and
importance
of
things
 around
us
that
we
never
notice.
I
was
able
to
snag
pictures
with
my
phone
when
taking
notice
to
these
images.
I
then
used
HP
 Photosmart
Studio
to
edit
my
photos
and
make
them
more
interesting
to
observe.
 
 
 
 



Photo
Analysis
 
 
 
 I
chose
this
image
to
closely
analyze
because
it
is
my
favorite
photo
out
of
my
bunch.

It
was
my
favorite
to
capture,
 favorite
to
edit
and
favorite
to
talk
about.
I
have
walked
past
this
tree
almost
every
day
for
the
past
eight
months.
It
is
in
my
 next‐door
neighbor’s
backyard
and
I
have
never
given
it
a
second
thought.
One
day
I
was
walking
up
my
back
steps
and
looked
 at
it.
I
realized
how
lonely
it
looked
without
any
leaves,
and
how
the
broken
down
shed
behind
it
makes
the
tree
look
 powerless.
I
thought
this
was
an
image
worth
capturing.
When
taking
this
picture,
I
thought
about
the
composition
element
of
 lines
and
how
the
tree
branches
and
their
shadows
on
the
shed
served
the
purpose
of
lines.
I
felt
the
need
to
follow
them
with
 my
eyes.
The
lines
are
leading
us
to
the
sky,
which
is
not
the
subject
of
this
photo
but
is
a
very
nice
sight.
I
immediately
look
at
 the
tree
when
focusing
on
this
photo,
but
following
the
lines
leads
to
a
beautiful,
blue
sky
that
acts
as
a
complimentary
 background.

 
 Burgin
says,
“Work
in
semiotics
showed
that
there
is
no
‘language’
of
photography,
no
single
signifying
system
upon
 which
all
photographs
depend”
(131).

Burgin’s
theory
goes
hand‐in‐hand
with
my
goal
of
this
project.
Photographs
do
not
fit
a
 certain
mold.
There
are
different
meanings
and
interpretations
of
a
picture.
Some
people
may
look
at
this
image
and
think
 about
poverty.
Some
people
might
think
of
cold
weather.
There
is
not
a
certain
path
for
people
to
follow
when
looking
at
my
 photograph.
I
leave
it
up
to
them.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



Works
Cited
 
 1.
Burgin,
V.
(1977,
2003).
Looking
at
photographs.
In
A.
Wells
(Ed.),
The
photography
reader
(pp.
130
–
137).
New
York,
NY:
 Routledge.
[PDF]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



Do You See What I See?