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Vegetation Management Plan East Ulverstone Coastal Reserve July 2010

The eastern side of Buttons Creek is also very weedy, dominated by large Poplars and Mirrorbush, and with dense Blackberries and Periwinkle and almost no native plants near the bridge. A small informal track has been blocked by a boulder, but still provides some access to the reedy part of the creek. There are native Coast Wattles, Saltbush and Bower Spinach towards the beach, but this vegetation is very degraded by invasion of multiple aggressive weeds including Blackberry, Cape Ivy, Periwinkle and Mirrorbush. These weeds are mingled amongst the natives, so that management in this section will be complex. This zone ends at the formal beach access track. 3.1.4 Buttons Beach East The sandy beach continues east from Buttons Creek for 1.2km backed all the way by a narrow dune covered mostly with Coast Wattle scrub in better condition, with Coast Wattles, Boobialla, White Correa, Coastal Saltbush, Bower Spinach and some Spinifex. The Caravan park occupies the land behind the dune for approximately 350 metres east of Buttons Creek and the native vegetation has been somewhat modified by planted poplars that are now wind pruned, and by mowing and trimming for neatness as well as informal tracks. Marram Grass dominates an area of foredune vegetation from the formal access at the western end of the Caravan Park and is present throughout the scrub at the front edge and in gaps between shrubs. Sea Spurge is also present scattered along the foredune and is invading over the dune in the cleared area behind the stormwater outlet. However, regeneration of Coast Wattle is present almost continuously along the foredune offering some natural structure and habitat value. Cape Ivy is present mostly in invasive patches or scattered isolated individuals between which the native vegetation is in fair to good condition. Mirrorbush occurs mostly as scattered individuals on the back dune. Figure 9 Buttons Beach East

Informal beach access has formed many tracks through the vegetation creating gaps that are encouraging erosion and weed invasion. Foredune erosion increases towards the eastern end of the beach. The section of coastal reserve vegetation at the most eastern end of the beach near the Sea Kist Lodge is extremely weedy with invasions from many garden escapes and weedy species possibly planted intentionally. Blue Gums have been also been planted by nearby residents. Some revegetation has been attempted near the formal access opposite the school. This has been a Schools Caring for the Coast project involving Leighland Christian School, Cradle Coast NRM and the Central Coast Council. A road runs behind the dune for most of the extent of the beach. There are several schools over the road. There are several open mown areas presumably used for parking and vehicle turning between the Caravan Park and the end of the road. 3.1.5 Fish Pond Buttons Beach develops a cobbled and rocky foreshore at the eastern point which extends around the bay that forms Fish Pond. The western side of the Fish Pond vegetation is in poor condition; invaded by weeds and fragmented by informal access to the bay including informal vehicle access. Garden plants are Bushways Environmental Services Tasmania 12

Profile for Cradle Coast Tasmania

East Ulverstone Coastal Reserve Vegetation Management Plan  

East Ulverstone Coastal Reserve Vegetation Management Plan 2010

East Ulverstone Coastal Reserve Vegetation Management Plan  

East Ulverstone Coastal Reserve Vegetation Management Plan 2010