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Vegetation Management Plan East Ulverstone Coastal Reserve July 2010

sand together at present, but any further decline in vegetation may lead to erosion in this area. The northern edge of this area consists of Marram Grass and Sea Spurge, which should be controlled and replaced by low native shrubs. There are some non-native trees here, but they do not appear to be invading the native vegetation. Planting of native shrubs should be done on the dune mounds and either side of this area, so that vegetation is strengthened, but leaving open grassy areas and views. Recommendations are made in Appendix 10 on plantings which can achieve this balance. The White Gums spaced alongside the road east of Oz Rock Inn would benefit from plantings of native scrub species and more eucalypts to widen the vegetation here. Space for parking near the picnic shelter will need to be left open, however. Figure 6 One of the healthiest White Gums in the reserve is still surrounded by coastal scrub.

Towards Button Creek’s formal beach access track, the native vegetation is in good condition, and has had some revegetation done recently along the edge. There is sufficient room here that more plantings could widen the scrub around this area and still leave a large area open. 3.1.3 Buttons Creek The western side of Buttons Creek is managed as a picnic area, with several picnic tables and a large open grassy area for recreation. At the formal beach access track from this picnic area, weeds become dense. Although there is some good native scrub (Coast Wattles, Saltbush and Bower Spinach) at the beach edge, most of the rest of the vegetation from the track to the creek consists of weeds. The area is dominated by Mirrorbush and White Poplars, with Blackberries, Cape Ivy, a species of palm, Cotoneaster, Trailing Daisy and some Sea Spurge. The White Poplars were originally planted in the picnic area but are clearly now invading the native vegetation. There is an area of Sea Wheatgrass, a very serious beach weed, at the northeast corner of the vegetation. Lombardy Poplars line the road, but do not appear to be encroaching on the native vegetation. Despite the trees here, the picnic area was surprisingly windy during this assessment, with wind coming from the southwest through a gap between trees at the railway line crossing and between the bare trunks of the poplars. Figure 7 Poplars, Mirrorbush and other weeds now dominate much of the coastal scrub at Buttons Creek.

Buttons Creek itself is lined by native Common Reed where the creek widens below the bridge. Apart from the Reed, however, there is almost no native riparian vegetation. The banks are steep and largely bare at the picnic area near the bridge, which allows view of the water and some access (difficult) to the creek. One section has a concrete edge. The creek has high E.coli levels possibly due to farming activities upstream (A.Wind, pers.comm.) so that swimming is not recommended in Buttons Creek. There are also issues at times with the creek blocking upstream due to branches etc, but a platypus has been seen in the creek above the bridge adjacent to Willoway Motel (A. Wind, pers.comm.). Figure 8 Native Common Reed and some Coast Wattle line Buttons Creek and beach, but Poplars and other weeds form the main backdrop, and there is a patch of invasive Sea Wheatgrass (grey, at front).

Bushways Environmental Services Tasmania 11

Profile for Cradle Coast Tasmania

East Ulverstone Coastal Reserve Vegetation Management Plan  

East Ulverstone Coastal Reserve Vegetation Management Plan 2010

East Ulverstone Coastal Reserve Vegetation Management Plan  

East Ulverstone Coastal Reserve Vegetation Management Plan 2010