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TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

CRADLE COAST AUTHORITY - OCTOBER 2008 Please consider the environment before printing this document


Creating the Tarkine visitor experience... The Tarkine has many faces - diverse, wild places that powerfully affect, inspire and change people, from Aboriginal inhabitants to people today. Its combination of globally significant temperate rainforest, dramatic wilderness, rare and threatened species and richly layered history creates a unique and memorable experience that refreshes the spirit and awakens the senses.

AUSTRALIA

Sydney Melbourne The Tarkine Hobart

a tourism vision for the Tarkine... The Tarkine provides unique, intense and powerful nature-based experiences that are well managed and sustainable.


Foreword The Tarkine is an enigma. Its name is not officially recognised and its physical boundaries are imprecise. Local communities have long considered it their place of work and recreation. Its original inhabitants occupied its land for millennia. The Tarkine’s natural and cultural heritage is unique, and recent studies suggest that it has the potential to become a powerful, sustainable visitor experience, invigorating Tasmania’s status as an island of iconic natural attractions. The Tarkine’s success as a tourism destination will depend on the industry’s ability to match product development with market demand. The area’s natural and cultural values need to be incorporated into a dynamic menu of meaningful, high quality visitor experiences that engage the target audiences and represent a sustainable approach to the core asset. From the outset, this will require targeted investment to address unmet demand for:  appropriate access  improved visitor information  increased opportunities to connect with the wilderness  authentic cultural experiences  diversified accommodation and  quality food and wine opportunities Other factors will be critical to its longer-term success and sustainability as a destination:  a robust, authentic Tarkine tourism brand that generates an immediate high-level recognition and meaning in the minds of potential visitors as an iconic destination  formal recognition of the Tarkine in official nomenclature, including maps, signs and other collateral that directs visitors to the experiences, facilities and services they need  land management resources and mechanisms for protection of the Tarkine’s natural and cultural values in place, and maintained, ahead of projected increases in visitation

Abalone Aboriginal Midden, Rupert Point, Tarkine Coast, Peter C. Sims

 continuous communication between land managers, tourism stakeholders and local communities to maintain a common understanding of the Tarkine as a brand and a destination  coordination of land management, planning, tourism and infrastructure development functions within and between levels of government to support appropriate development If these things occur, the Tarkine will have the capacity to generate increased numbers, repeat visitation and its potential economic yield. The ‘flow-on’ effect will substantially benefit surrounding communities, the region and Tasmania as a whole. This Strategy responds to these challenges, providing a guiding framework for managed development of tourism in the Tarkine - from elusive concept to experience-rich destination. Cradle Coast Authority October 2008 TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY


Contents (1) Revealing the Tarkine Introduction Where is the Tarkine? What is the Tarkine? Natural values Cultural values Who manages the Tarkine?

1 1 2 2 2 3

(2) Approach Background Purpose Planning context Consultative process

6 6 6 6

(3) Visitor Markets The Tarkine tourism brand Market appeal Most profitable visitors Potential yield The opportunity Visitor experience

9 9 10 11 12 12

(4) Development Framework Principles Elements  Entry Points  Corridors  Regional linkages & gateways Tarkine Management Product Development Industry Development Marketing & promotion

14 14 15 16 18 19 19 21 22

(5) Recommendations 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.

Arthur River Waratah Corinna Meunna / Phantom Valley South Arthur Forest Drive Western Explorer Savage River Arthur & Pieman Rivers Regional linkages & gateways Tarkine management Product development Industry development Marketing & promotion

24 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37

(6) Acknowledgements

39

(7) Disclaimer

39

(8) Bibliography

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(9) Attachments

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TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY


Tarkine Wave, Tarkine Coast, Grant Dixon

The Tarkine represents a delicate ecosystem; a wild and sacred place... but it is also a ‘peopled frontier’, with an extraordinary heritage of human activity.

TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY


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Revealing the Tarkine

Introduction The name, ‘Tarkine’ is derived from a family group of Tasmanian Aborigines, the Tarkiner, who inhabited the Sandy Cape region of Tasmania’s west coast. The Aboriginal Protectorate Officer, George Augustus Robinson, first documented the Tarkine in the early nineteenth century. Conservationists adopted the name in the 1980s as part of campaigns to protect the area and it has subsequently become widely known as ‘The Tarkine’.

Where is the Tarkine? For the purposes of this strategy, the Tarkine is defined as the area bound by the Arthur River and its tributaries to the north, the Pieman River to the south, the Murchison Highway to the east and the Southern Ocean to the west.

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1 TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

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Map 1: Tarkine in the Tasmanian context

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What is the Tarkine? The Tarkine is as diverse as those who seek its fascinating mosaic of offerings; a place of sustenance for its first inhabitants; a breathtaking, fragile wilderness for those in search of renewal; a robust landscape rich in mineral and forest resources; a playground for the communities that surround it... these are just a few of the acknowledged attributes of the Tarkine. Its cultural heritage continues through personal stories, memories and imagination; layered, different perspectives which all contribute to an understanding of its complex and powerful identity. While a sense of place is largely determined by an emotive and often visceral response to landscape, a discussion regarding the values of the Tarkine yields more tangible information. Broadly, these can be divided into natural and cultural values. The Tarkine represents a delicate ecosystem; a wild and sacred place... but it is also a ‘peopled frontier’, with an extraordinary heritage of human activity.

Natural values The Tarkine’s outstanding natural values have led to the area’s nomination for National Heritage listing. It is home to one of the largest and most significant temperate rainforests in the world; its magnesite cave systems, wild rivers, ancient valley forests, pristine beaches, dramatic coastal heath and giant myrtles, eucalypts and Huon Pines form a magnificent outdoor theatre - an immersive, inspiring and mystical experience.

some 160 years ago, Truganini walked along the Tarkine coastline with George Augustus Robinson, who eventually persuaded the last of the Aborigines of the northwest tribe to leave the Tarkine forever.

International significance: The Tarkine contains ‘a rich assemblage of Aboriginal... sites considered... of international significance’.1

European Whilst the Tarkine has gained prominence for its magnificent wilderness and indigenous values, it also contains a fascinating story of European land use. Nineteenth century explorers considered it one of the most impenetrable landscapes in Tasmania, but the discovery of rich mineral deposits lured many hardy pioneers in search of a new life. Historic towns like Corinna and Waratah remain testament to an era long gone. Miners and prospectors also brought the need for a reliable food supply and their remote locations offered particular challenges. Beef was transported to the mineral fields “on the hoof” via a coastal stock route; 130 kilometres from Marrawah to the West Coast. The Tarkine also holds a long and equally enduring link with forestry, dating back to the 1840s, when Huon Pine was being logged on the Pieman River.

The Tarkine is a haven for over 50 species of flora and fauna, which are listed as either threatened or endangered. It is a natural habitat for Wedge-tailed Eagles, Orange-bellied Parrots, Southern Bell Frogs and many other birds, mammals, fish, amphibians, invertebrates and reptiles. More than 400 plant species exist within the Tarkine, including a number of threatened or significant flora species. Its aquatic habitats are considered to support ‘one of the richest ranges of freshwater crustaceans in the world’.1

Orchid Caladenia sp., Arthur Pieman Conservation Area, Peter C. Sims

The Tarkine also has significant scientific values. The presence of relict species from the ancient Gondwana super-continent is of particular interest and importance. The Tarkine was (or is?) the last known habitat of the Tasmanian Tiger, and now provides a sanctuary for the endangered Tasmanian Devil.

Cultural values The Tarkine has a multi-faceted cultural heritage, which has inevitably shifted over thousands of years from its indigenous inhabitants to the recreational visitors of today.

Indigenous The Australian Heritage Commission acknowledges the Tarkine’s indigenous values, describing it as ‘one of the world’s great archaeological regions’. The area includes middens, artefacts, rock carvings and ceremonial stone arrangements, some of which pre-date the pyramids.2 Many of these sites are listed on the Register of the National Estate. The Indigenous story of the Tarkine is of deep cultural and historical importance - and ultimately one of profound sadness and displacement. In this same location,

1

Planning for People, Tarkine Tourism Development Options Report, March 2008, p.6

2

www.acfonline.org.au

TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 2


Commercial Mining and forestry continue in many areas of the Tarkine today, their operations managed to protect the environment in which they prosper. The Tarkine provides for a variety of other commercial uses including cattle grazing, honey production and tourism; harvesting of specialty timbers for the production of furniture and art pieces; commercial fishing including abalone diving and crayfishing; kelp harvesting and educational activities. The Tarkine’s produce grows in remote areas far from crowded cities and polluting industries. These places are difficult to access and their harvest is often seasonal and limited in supply. Once driven by demand for commodities to support growing colonies, food and timber produced in the Tarkine is now as likely to supply specialist markets for low-volume, high-value products from natural environments on the ‘edge of the World’.

Formal planning, approval and ongoing management of developments and infrastructure in the Tarkine can therefore be subject to multiple jurisdictions, and may be different for similar developments in different areas. There is currently no overarching mechanism coordinating land use planning and management, across agencies and jurisdictions, for the Tarkine as a whole, and most existing legislation, planning and management arrangements have been designed around land uses other than tourism. There is also evidence that public land managers in the Tarkine do not have sufficient human and financial resources required to mange current levels of recreation and tourism use, let alone future development and visitor numbers. This is possibly the mayor factor limiting the Tarkine’s potential for sustainable tourism development, and must be addressed as an urgent priority.

Recreational The Arthur River, Temma and Sandy Cape have attracted seasonal recreation and visitation for generations; local families and friends have long enjoyed a range of outdoor activities in these areas, including fishing, camping, bushwalking, hunting, boating, and horseriding. Here, Tasmania’s much celebrated ‘shack culture’ continues, where simple holiday dwellings are passed from one generation to another as part of a quintessentially Tasmanian tradition. Drive touring through the Tarkine is also popular. Increasing numbers of off-road vehicles are using tracks in the coastal areas and hinterland south of Arthur River and Temma, along the Western Explorer road and west of the Murchison Highway. There is a heightened awareness of the weed, fire and erosion risks associated with vehicle access in these environments, and responsible recreation groups and management authorities are working on ways to actively manage access and educate users to protect them.

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3 TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

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A large proportion of the Tarkine is listed on the Register of the National Estate. Significant areas are protected to varying degrees in the Savage River National Park, Arthur Pieman Conservation Area, Pieman River and Hellyer Gorge State Reserves and Meredith Range Regional Reserve. Smaller areas are managed under a range of state, regional and forest reserves, conservation and recreation areas (Map 3).

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Most of the Tarkine’s land area is managed by either Forestry Tasmania or the Parks and Wildlife Service under a range of State and Commonwealth Acts, intergovernmental agreements and formal planning processes. Parts of the Tarkine also fall under the statutory planning authority of the Circular Head, WaratahWynyard and the West Coast Councils (Map 2).

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The Tarkine’s layered complexity is reflected in its land management and reserve systems.

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Who manages the Tarkine?

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The management of recreational, cultural and tourism sites throughout the Tarkine is a complex and emotive issue. A positive approach by all land managers and users will be required if a level of cooperative sharing of these sites is to be achieved.

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Map 2: Management Boundaries


Warra Creek Forest Reserve Trowutta Forest Reserve Sundown Point State Reserve

Milkshake Hills Forest Reserve Lake Chisholm FR

Balfour Track Forest Reserve

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Luncheon Hill Julius River FR Forest Reserve

Sumac Forest Reserve

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Savage River Regional Reserve Savage River National Park

Deep Gully Forest Reserve

Savage River Pipeline Forest Reserve Arthur-Pieman Conservation Area

Donaldson River Nature Recreation Area

Heazlewood Hill Conservation Area

Hatfield River Forest Reserve

Yellow Creek State Reserve

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Sawmill Creek FR John Lynch Reynolds Falls Nature Forest Reserve Recreation Area Burns Peak FR Huskisson Mount River FR Kershaw FR

Conservation Area Conservation Convenant (NC Act)

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Mackintosh Forest Reserve Boco Creek FR

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Forest Reserve National Park Nature Recreation Area Regional Reserve State Reserve Formal Reserves

Map 3: Reserve System TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 4


Sandy Cape from Southern Ocean on a still day, Ken Boundy

The Strategy is not a definitive master plan... it attempts to fill gaps in our knowledge of tourism’s place in the Tarkine... a starting point.

5 TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY


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Approach

Background In 2004, the Cradle Coast Authority commissioned consultants to conduct an assessment of potential visitor experiences that would benefit the Circular Head area. Market research clearly identified nature and wildernessbased experiential tourism as priorities for future development and suggested that the development of the ‘Tarkine Wilderness Experience’ represents one of the best prospects for attracting new visitor interest. As a result of market preferences and intention, the Authority began investigating the Tarkine as a visitor destination, seeking input from a group of interested stakeholders. In 2007, the Authority received funding from the Federal Government’s Department of Industry, Tourism and Resources to create a tourism development strategy for the Tarkine underpinned by the principles of environmental, economic and social sustainability. In parallel with this process, funding secured under the Tasmanian Community Forest Agreement has facilitated the construction of a range of public infrastructure in the Tarkine, including scenic lookouts, roadside information sites and mountain bike and walking tracks, as well as some marketing collateral.

Purpose The Tarkine Tourism Development Strategy has been designed as a reference tool to help tourism operators, land managers, planners and investors to:  identify opportunities for tourism and related investment in the Tarkine  plan new tourism infrastructure, facilities and experiences  access potential new visitor markets

Tarkine stakeholders with widely differing opinions and expectations. The Strategy is not a definitive master plan for the Tarkine. It does not examine land management, planning and administrative issues in any detail and does not replace any existing planning tools. It attempts to fill gaps in our knowledge of tourism’s place in the Tarkine and should be viewed as a practical, working document; a starting point. Shared vision: The Tarkine Tourism Development Strategy is a shared vision for the sustainable development of tourism in the Tarkine. Cradle Coast Authority

Planning Context The Strategy has been developed in the context of existing strategic plans for tourism in Tasmania and the local area, including:  Tourism 21 Strategic Business Plan 2007 - 2010 (Tourism Tasmania/Tourism Industry Council Tasmania)  New Directions for Our Island; Tourism Tasmania Three-Year Business Strategy 2006 - 2009  Aboriginal Tourism Development Plan for Tasmania (Office of Aboriginal Affairs, 2007)  Stanley Tourism Precinct Study (2006)  Tarkine Wilderness Experience: Assessment of a Potential Visitor Experience in the Stanley Tourism Precinct (2006)

Consultative Process The Tarkine Tourism Development Strategy draws on insight, knowledge and information from many organisations and individuals, and a series of inter-related reports and assessments commissioned by the Authority:

 develop the brand

 Tarkine Tourism Options Report

 address recreational activities, and management issues

 Tarkine Research Report: Market and Customer Analysis

The Strategy aims to reduce ad hoc decision-making regarding tourism development in the Tarkine and provide guiding principles against which new or existing proposals can be assessed. To this extent, it should be used as a tourism-specific adjunct to existing management plans and policies, and a long-term, big picture context for decision making on specific sites and proposals. The process of developing the strategy has also provided a common forum for a diverse range of

 Latent Demand Quantification 1 and 2  Tarkine Brand Development The Tarkine Tourism Options Report is based on the Tourism Master Plan Template for Protected Areas, prepared for the Department of Industry, Tourism and Resources in June 2005. The Template articulates a process to ensure that planning for tourism in areas of high natural and cultural value balances the needs of all stakeholders. The Authority strongly endorsed this view, and facilitated a consultative process based on multi-stakeholder engagement, conducted over two years. TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 6


Community Involvement: Community involvement in tourism has the power to move the industry from existing at a satisfactory level to becoming an internationally recognised destination, full of people who are happy to be where they are, and committed to the collective success of the industry. Allison Wing, The Power of Community Involvement in Tourism, 2001 In 2006, the Authority convened a ‘round table’ of Tarkine stakeholders, the ‘Tarkine Discussion Group’, including representatives from the Tasmanian Aboriginal community, local government, local tourism associations, the Tarkine National Coalition, the Parks and Wildlife Service, Tourism Tasmania, Forestry Tasmania and the Arthur Pieman Conservation Management Committee. The Discussion Group met and was consulted periodically during the design and research phases of the Strategy, including initial workshops that defined the Tarkine project area and brand. During the development of the Options Report, project consultants travelled the region holding discussions with local community representatives and the Authority made numerous presentations to individuals, Councils, community groups and industry bodies. The consultants’ reports were posted on the Authority’s website and a call for public comment resulted in more than 500 downloads and 30 detailed submissions over 3 months. Responses included comments on the content and purpose of the reports, new information and specific proposals. The final Strategy is a synthesis of inputs from all these sources, organised around the core principles and research findings from the initial consultants’ reports. Diversity of stakeholder opinion was evident throughout the consultation process but open dialogue has continued, underscoring the Tarkine’s importance in Tasmania’s psychological, cultural and physical landscape.

7 TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY


Dunes, Mt Norfolk, Grant Dixon

Its contradictions and surprising layers of nature and culture are thrilling. All of this makes it a rare gem in the world.

TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 8


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Visitor Markets

The Tarkine Brand

Brand Credibility

One of the first challenges for the Tarkine Discussion Group was to develop a tourism brand for the Tarkine. This was an important developmental process in itself, conducted over two workshops, twelve months apart, over which time participants’ appreciation of the Tarkine, and each others’ knowledge and perspectives, evolved considerably.

For this positioning and branding to be credible, the Tarkine must achieve excellence in:

This is clearly an iterative process, and the brand will continue to evolve as we learn more about both the products and the markets it seeks to address. For the purposes of this Strategy, however, and the detailed analysis that has informed it to date, the key elements of the Tarkine Brand are as follows:

Flagship Attributes  globally significant temperate rainforest  Aboriginal and European heritage  dramatic diverse places (wild rivers, rugged coastline, mountains, expansive views)  accessible wilderness  rare and threatened species

Core Values  wilderness  power and resilience of human story  mysterious

Personality  haunting spirit  wise  ageless  enigmatic  commands respect and awe  inspires  powerful  has a wide range of expression (gentleness to fury)  engages on its own terms

Essence Powerful connections with wild places

Positioning statement The Tarkine has many faces - diverse, wild places that powerfully affect, inspire and change people, from original Aboriginal inhabitants to people today. Its combination of globally significant temperate rainforest, dramatic wilderness, rare and threatened species and richly layered history is awe-inspiring and enlivening for the senses and spirit. Its contradictions and surprising layers of nature and culture are thrilling. All of this makes it a rare gem in the world. 9 TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

 visitor infrastructure  interpretation and information  experience based or eco tourism accommodation  low impact development  Tasmanian food and wine  evidence of a well managed destination (Refer to the Attached Tarkine Brand Model in Appendices)

Market Appeal The Tarkine reflects a significant synergy with Tasmania’s positioning in the leisure market. The Tarkine’s core attributes are consistent with the Tasmanian tourism brand, which drives the State’s tourism marketing, communications and product development strategies. The Tasmanian tourism brand focuses on ‘inspiring island experiences’ and authentic engagement with those experiences, including contemporary communities linked to a rich, living history, ancient temperate wilderness with unique and accessible flora and fauna, cool climate food and wine and strong maritime connections.3 Similarly, the Tarkine exemplifies the northwest’s own regional brand, which centres on its wild and natural environment; places that have yielded some of the area’s most distinctive stories of triumph and hardship. Premier nature based destination: Forestry Tasmania agrees that the Tarkine’s unique mix of rainforest, river and coastal wilderness, outstanding cultural heritage and proximity to established icons like Cradle Mountain, Strahan and Stanley could see the project develop into Australia’s premier, nature-based travel destination. Forestry Tasmania submission to CCA, May 2008 The Tarkine Tourism Development Strategy has arisen from a broader recognition that the area holds some very special values that can be translated into a range of compelling visitor experiences. The Tarkine’s visitor potential is also supported by the research articulated in the four consultants reports that underpin the Strategy as well as recent studies conducted on behalf of Tourism Tasmania. The ‘Perceptions Study’ (2007)*, confirmed that existing and prospective travellers to the State hold three key perceptions that relate to the island’s core attributes; essentially Tasmania suggests history and heritage, nature and food and wine. However subsequent research


confirmed these perceptions with an additional finding; nature represents the strongest association: The natural element does dominate with the perception that the key activities for tourists in Tasmania are outdoor-focused through a range of medium to soft activities including bushwalking, hiking and camping as well as excellent short walks. Lighthouse Report One p.4 The Tarkine Latent Demand Quantification points out that the nature tourism market is a very valuable one; a high yielding sector worth $13b to Australia’s domestic market and $4.1b to the inbound market. The report’s findings also support the initial conclusions from the research conducted as part of the Stanley project - that the Tarkine is likely to have strong appeal to the nature-based market. Scarce in the modern world: Tourism Industry Council Tasmania notes that ‘consideration should be given to developing the Tarkine as a premium destination for visitors... the primary attributes of the Tarkine... are increasingly scarce in the modern world’. Tourism Industry Council Tasmania submission to CCA, May 2008 Tarkine Trails Experience, Eli Greig

Most profitable visitors In June 2008, Tourism Tasmania commissioned research to gauge consumer response to the State’s newly proposed marketing zones. The findings from this research adds further richness to the existing knowledge regarding mainland perceptions about Tasmania and the holiday expectations of our most profitable market segments the ‘Affluent Older’ and the ‘Young Singles/Couples’. In seeking to engage these target markets, Tasmania’s tourism offering comprises three core values:  reconnection with self and others  reflection in significant environments  indulgence in food and wine Reconnection requires a catalyst... a different environment from that which is experienced at home; reflection is often marked by significance, either in a natural or a historical environment; and indulgence is most often linked with food and wine, preferably accompanied by a local story.4 These values, particularly relating to reconnection and reflection, are often attributed to the emotional space provided through immersive, natural settings like the Tarkine. According to the Briggs research, the ‘Affluent Older’ segment is attracted to nature-based experiences but their interest is qualified:  they enjoy challenges, but seek reward for their physical effort  while nature is a component of their holiday, it doesn’t represent the entire focus; and ‘soft’ adventure is preferable  they like the sense of feeling fit and healthy, but don’t want to undertake exhausting, extended activities  they like to be independent and choose from a range of experiences

3

Anna Housego, Creating the Tarkine Visitor Experience (draft), May 2006, p.3

* The Perceptions Study formed the basis for Tourism Tasmania’s Lighthouse Report One 4

Jane Briggs, Consumer Reaction to Proposed Marketing Zone Positions, June 2008

TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 10


The Young Singles/Couples are described as being attracted to:

Collectively, they are called ‘Nature Enjoyers’ and they have some similarities in common:

 activity and adventure in a unique environment

 a nature experience is a major appeal of their holidays

 iconic experiences with a high ‘bragability’ factor

 they are seeking very high quality, engaging experiences, including new ones

 a holiday that contrasts with their everyday life  enables reconnection, reassessment and ‘me’ time Briggs’ research related to the ‘Western Wilderness’ marketing zone is particularly relevant to the Tarkine. Wilderness and nature-oriented holidays evoked the idea of pristine environments, healthy activity and amazing experiences, but a sense of isolation, a lack of creature comforts and some concern regarding perceived physical challenges were evident. Similarly, while both the Affluent Older group and the Young Singles/Couples display a generally positive response to the concept of a ‘Western Wilderness’ experience, there is a strongly shared attitude about the holiday indulgence or reward component, which also corresponds with views identified in the Latent Demand Quantification report noted below. ‘I want to see more of the food and accommodation... I like to walk for a few hours but I’d like to get back to some comfort afterwards’. Affluent Older focus group participant and, ‘I want to know there is some pay-off at the end of a vigorous day of walking. I want to know about the hearty meal and the fire as well as the environment’. Young Singles/Couples focus group participant The Tarkine Latent Demand Quantification report5 identified and quantified the key consumer segments that will be drawn to the brand position and therefore support the development of the Tarkine. The primary target audience is ‘Nature Enthusiasts’; those for whom nature-based activities are the most important factor in undertaking a trip. According to the report, the needs of Nature Enthusiasts are clearly connected to:

 they are all keen to escape from the crowds  they like camping areas, barbecues/picnic areas in attractive locations  environmental degradation is a real ‘turn-off’  the nature experience needs to be supported by other appealing activities like eating out, different sightseeing, etc They do, however, have some very important differences which impact on their holiday requirements:  the young singles/couples are more active, like some higher quality accommodation and, for the couples, time together is important  with families, everyone in the travel group must be catered for and enjoy the experience - both parents and children, and they are more likely to choose self-contained accommodation  the older, affluent segment travel without children, they wish to get close to nature and they seek opportunities to interact with friends and relatives on the same trip  the older, lower income group is looking for less expensive experiences, they enjoy natural beauty, are physically active and like a trip that caters for the needs of both of the couple7

Potential yield EMDA modelling suggests that, by 2017, the Tarkine has the capacity to generate $58.2m in tourism spending per annum* and support approximately 1100 jobs. These assumptions are based on a Preferred Conversion scenario that presupposes:  core access is largely available via sealed roads

 the inherent appeal of the natural area

 attractions and experiences are aligned to target audiences

 the degree of accessibility

 the area has a strong profile in the market place

 whether the area is managed in such a way that the sense of ‘getting away from it all’ remains authentic

 appropriate infrastructure is provided

Nature Enthusiasts also seek memorable and special experiences, including bushwalks in unique areas, a range of accommodation, including well-placed, attractive campsites and good quality food and wine opportunities. Experiencing natural beauty and escaping city life are among their highest holiday priorities.6 The Nature Enthusiast’s preferences in fact reflect those of the broader holiday travellers whose responses contributed to the Perceptions Study. Tasmania’s wild and natural places provide the setting in which to enjoy a whole range of experiences. There are four other segments for which nature has a strong appeal, albeit to a lesser extent than the Nature Enthusiasts: young singles/couples, families, and the older affluent and older lower income groups. 11 TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

Of that $58.2m, the ‘Nature Enthusiast’ segment will generate $22.3m. The Latent Demand Quantification has clearly confirmed that this segment represents the Tarkine’s most important target market with an expected growth of 35% over the next ten years. The other four segments incorporating the ‘Nature Enjoyers’ are also forecast to grow over the next decade and EMDA predicts their potential contributions to Tarkine tourism as follows:  Lower (income) Nature Enjoyers ($8.5m)  Affluent Older Nature Enjoyers ($7.8m)  Family Nature Enjoyers ($5.8m)  Younger Nature Enjoyers ($5.1m) The remaining $8.7m is attributed to a combination of other market segments.


EMDA also constructed a Base Case scenario assuming unsealed road access and an exclusive focus on the Nature Enthusiast market. Even under this scenario, the Tarkine is predicted to generate $9.9m in annual tourism spending and support over 230 jobs.8

The Tarkine concept: The Tarkine already represents a destinational concept that comprises an envelope with no content... this is a huge potential canvas that can be painted but it would require the Tarkine to move from concept to tangible experience.

The opportunity The Tarkine has an unrivalled opportunity to ‘raise the bar’ in relation to responsible, ecologically sustainable tourism development. This approach should permeate every aspect of the Tarkine experience operations, services, facilities, activities, and projects acknowledging the reality of a climate-challenged world and the profound shift in social awareness that is accompanying it. All stakeholders should be encouraged to not only adopt the key principles of sustainable tourism and good destination stewardship, but to actually exceed those principles. In doing so, they will match the target markets’ preference for an authentic, well-managed natural environment.

The Tarkine Opportunity; Market and Customer Analysis September 2007, p.36 Currently, the Tarkine experience is limited, mostly unsophisticated and quite difficult to access. It is, however, a place that is becomingly increasingly recognised for its rare and extraordinary natural beauty - those attributes that are so attractive to Nature Enthusiasts and Nature Enjoyers who are predicted to comprise the majority of its visitors. While the Tarkine has the potential to provide rich, authentic, market-led experiences, visitors must have the opportunity to engage with the area’s key attributes:  the globally significant temperate rainforest

Unique and distinct:

 Aboriginal and European heritage

The Tarkine ‘provides unique and distinct experiences that cannot be found anywhere else in Tasmania’.

 dramatic and diverse nature  accessible wilderness

Department of Environment, Parks, Heritage and the Arts submission to CCA, 30 April 2008 It has the capacity to provide a much-needed visitor drawcard for the northwest region, an area that currently requires sensitive positioning to increase market share. In doing so, the Tarkine can also link the far northwest with the significant visitor numbers already travelling to Cradle Mountain, the West Coast and other naturebased destinations. An earlier study noted that... ‘The Tarkine has strategic significance for the sustainability of the region’s tourism industry, with the capacity to improve the extent of overnight stays, visitor spend and yield for tourism operators’.9 More broadly, the Tarkine’s potential lies in its ability to refresh and enhance Tasmania’s reputation as an iconic nature-based destination.

Visitor experience

 rare and threatened species10 The visitor’s ability to develop a meaningful connection with the Tarkine brand and its values is facilitated through a range of physical assets. The Tourism Options Report identifies the following components as central to a successful Tarkine experience:  appropriate access  improved visitor information  increased opportunities to connect with the wilderness  authentic cultural experiences  diversified accommodation  quality food and wine opportunities The following Tourism Development Framework addresses these requirements, with a view to building capacity that will meet the needs of identified target markets.

Recent research has important implications for the development of appropriate, market-led products and experiences in the Tarkine. From a consumer’s perspective, the area does not automatically present an attractive holiday option based simply on its undeniably significant heritage. The Tarkine’s success will depend on the industry’s ability to match product development with market demand. The area’s natural and cultural values will need to be incorporated into a dynamic menu of meaningful, high quality visitor experiences that engage the target audiences and represent a sustainable approach to the core asset. If this occurs, the Tarkine will have the capacity to generate increased numbers, repeat visitation and most importantly, higher yield. The ‘flow-on’ effect will substantially benefit surrounding communities and the region as a whole.

5

Economic and Market Development Advisers (EMDA) The Tarkine - Latent Demand Quantification, Phase 1, Consumer Segments, December 2007, p.44

6

Consumer Segments, p.14

7

ibid, pp.44-45

* All financial estimates are based on today’s dollar terms 8

EMDA, Latent Demand Quantification Phase 2: Economic Evaluation of Visitor Scenarios, p.50

9

Anna Housego, Creating the Tarkine Visitor Experience (draft), May 2006, p.3

10

Planning for People, Tarkine Tourism Development Options Report, March 2008, p.30

TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 12


Tarkine Wilderness, Norfolk Range, Rob Blakers

The Tarkine is a collection of stories, both fact and fiction, that when combined create a living library. Its products, experience and ethos present a diverse array of assets that if recorded in written form would fill many shelves within the library.

13 TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY


(4)

Development Framework

Framework As part of the overall strategy, a geographical, experiential and management framework has been proposed to guide tourism development in the Tarkine. The Framework allows the Tarkine to be viewed as a series of interconnected functional components, or ‘envelopes’ in which development can proceed. The Framework does not refer to aspects of formal planning and land management jurisdictions, land tenure arrangements or considerations other than those directly related to strategic tourism development in the Tarkine. It is intended as an informal guide for public land managers, policy makers and developers, aimed at avoiding ad hoc, unplanned development that may fragment or compromise the Tarkine brand and experience. Exceptional wilderness area: Wilderness values... are under threat and in decline the world over. In Tasmania we are, therefore, extremely fortunate to have the Tarkine region, a relatively untouched and exceptional wilderness area. Tasmanian National Parks Association submission to CCA, May 2008 The Framework presented here is a modified version of that proposed by the consultants in the original Tarkine Tourism Options Report. Adaptations have been made to address overlaps in the original report’s classification of elements, and to integrate complementary proposals arising from public consultation. Notwithstanding this, the Framework reflects the principles of the report and its core recommendations.

 partnerships between land managers and business providers are encouraged as playing a significant role in enhancing the range of services and facilities available to visitors  infrastructure (e.g. accommodation) is designed to reflect local character/history as well as the essence of the brand, and is managed and maintained in a way that is consistent with the Tarkine values  tourism development focuses on a high yield, low volume model  tourism development is planned to match demand, is grounded in sound research and is consistent with the Tourism Strategy  the Tarkine’s various management plans and agreements incorporating approved guidelines, protocols and standards will need to be acknowledged and understood by all tourism stakeholders  carrying capacity issues will need to be examined, particularly in relation to areas of high value wilderness The key to the Development Framework lies in the principle of utilising existing entry points, corridors and service centres in order to:  strengthen the viability of infrastructure and experiences  providing a geographical focus for development  protect the core assets and values of the Tarkine

Elements The Tourism Development Framework has seven key elements:

Principles

1. Tarkine entry points

The Tourism Options Report identified the following guiding principles for future tourism development in the Tarkine:

2. Corridors

 visitors are able to enjoy a diverse range of tourism experiences based around the unique values of the Tarkine  tourism opportunities provide sustainable and socially acceptable outcomes for local communities as well as benefits to the regional economy  tourism operations meet Environmentally Sustainable Development (ESD) principles and are compatible with identified values of the Tarkine;  tourism operators commit to providing quality experiences by meeting agreed performance indicators, continually seeking opportunities to improve and reinvesting in both infrastructure and training

3. Regional linkages and gateways 4. Tarkine management 5. Product development 6. Industry development 7. Marketing and promotion. The first three components relate to specific geographical elements that form the physical structure of the Tarkine as a visitor destination. The remaining four are essential to the further development of experiences and services in and around those entry points, corridors, linkages and gateways. Ultimately the Tourism Development Framework will guide the practical delivery of the Strategy. TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 14


Entry points Entry points are existing locations at the boundaries of the Tarkine where visitors are welcomed and oriented to the experiences they are seeking. Entry points:  provide a sense of place and arrival, information about the surrounding landscape and experiences, and basic facilities such as food, toilets and accommodation  are hubs for day activities and overnight stays from which visitors can enjoy self-guided and/or commercial tourism experiences  are accessible from major highways, on roads suitable for all vehicle types, allowing independent access to the Tarkine’s core attractions and activities The three main Tarkine entry points identified in the Framework are:  Arthur River township (northern) - wild coast, river and Aboriginal heritage  Waratah (eastern) - mining history, mountains and waterfalls  Corinna (southern) - remote forest and river wilderness Each of the existing entry points is distinct with contrasting landscapes, and stories about the Tarkine’s history and culture. Each offers basic services, local attractions and entry to corridors leading further into the Tarkine.

umbrella of the Arthur Pieman Conservation Area and its use and development is controlled through the Arthur Pieman Management Plan and its communitybased Management Committee. The Parks and Wildlife Service is seeking to better plan and manage the overall visitor experience in this area through improved access (bridges and tracks), better managed remote camping, such as designated camping areas with basic facilities, quality information and interpretation and a recreational vehicle management system designed to ensure long term sustainable access. The Arthur River area is home to some of Australia’s most significant Aboriginal heritage, including places of archaeological, cultural and historical importance. Its petroglyphs, middens, trading routes and accounts of early contact, and tragic conflict, with Europeans, provide scope for profound visitor experiences. The area’s European history is also powerful and complex, covering nearly two hundred years of exploration, pioneering and frontier survival, recently documented by the Circular Head Council. The stories of early surveyors, shipwreck survivors, foresters, prospectors and cattlemen, are deeply etched in the landscape, the local economy and the living memory of current generations.

A further potential entry point has been identified at Meunna/Phantom Valley, which focuses on proposals for commercial, adventure-based tourism opportunities in a ‘deep rainforest’ setting. Arthur River township, at the mouth of the Arthur River, is currently the best-known entry to the Tarkine, its single-lane timber bridge forming a physical ‘border crossing’ at the Tarkine’s northern boundary. Arthur River is connected to the Bass Highway at Marrawah in the north, and to Corinna and West Coast towns, via the Western Explorer, to the south.

WYNYARD SOMERSET BURNIE

ARTHUR RIVER

MEUNNA PHANTOM VALLEY BLUE PEAK RA PID RIV ER

H

T

15 TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

DISMAL SWAMP

AR

The Parks and Wildlife Service currently manage a range of visitor experiences in the Arthur River, Temma and Sandy Cape region. Much of this area falls under the

MARRAWAH

R IVE

UR

RI

VE

R

TEMMA BALFOUR MT BERTHA

MT FRANKLAND

MT BALFOUR

HELLYER GORGE STATE RESERVE

SAVAGE RIVER NATIONAL PARK

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SANDY CAPE

DONALDSO N

The dominant feature is the mouth of the Arthur itself; best appreciated from the safe viewing platform at ‘the Edge of the World’. Wild ocean beaches, dunes and rock platforms extend north and south, and the area is gaining a reputation for its big ocean surf, with a growing calendar of well-attended tournaments attracting professional surfers, wavesailors, surf writers and photographers.

ROCKY CAPE NATIONAL PARK

DR LAN

The township provides basic visitor services, including a campground, boat ramps, shop and toilets. There are two river cruise operators, boat hire, holiday cottages and guesthouses, and a range of walks and some onsite interpretation. Nearby Marrawah has further holiday accommodation, a hotel and camping facilities.

SMITHTON

K AN FR

The road link between Arthur River and the Bass Highway at Marrawah has recently been sealed, and Circular Head Council has undertaken significant work to upgrade town infrastructure to support its small resident population, and increasing visitor numbers.

STANLEY

MT RAMSAY

MT MEREDITH

CRADLE VALLEY

CORINNA R

MT LIVINGSTONE

MT ROMULUS

TULLAH LAKE

PIEMAN

GRANITE TOR

ROSEBERY MT MURCHISON

ZEEHAN

VICTORIA PEAK

CRADLE MOUNTAIN LAKE ST CLAIR NATIONAL PARK

Map 4: Tarkine Entry Points


The tin-mining town of Waratah, at the junction of the Murchison Highway and the Hampshire Link Road, is an important crossroad linking the Tarkine to service centres on the northwest coast, Cradle Mountain, west coast towns and the entry point at Corinna, via Savage River. Waratah is a showcase of the Tarkine’s mining history and evidence of several cycles of discovery, prosperity and abandonment abounds in its streetscapes and skylines. It has a small resident population, shops, hotel, guesthouses, museum, fuel and camping facilities, and is becoming popular among caravan and motorhome travellers. Because Waratah has been a larger and more populous town in the past, it is well equipped with the basic infrastructure and services, freehold land and planning provisions required to support a renewed phase of development. Mountain-top lookouts, waterfalls and relics of former mining activity are accessible via walking tracks in the town and the surrounding area, some following the routes of abandoned railways. Visitor access sites are currently being upgraded at Whyte Hill and Philosopher’s Falls; a prospector’s ore crushing mill has been restored as a working exhibit and the Heritage-listed, Athenaeum Hall (1886) is currently being returned to its former glory, with potential for use as a Tarkine visitor centre. Key tourism themes involve the artifacts and stories of pioneering explorers, surveyors and prospectors, their links to other mining heritage and current activity in the region, and the ability of the forces of nature to reclaim and all but erase the evidence of previous industrial development. The tourism potential of these stories is currently being explored as part of a regional project, the Cradle Cost Mining Heritage and Experience Strategy, which also includes other mining towns, railways, museum collections and related sites on the West Coast. Corinna, established on the banks of the Pieman River in 1894, was once one of Tasmania’s largest settlements but is now one of its smallest, existing solely as a tourist destination. All visitor facilities and services are provided as part of a recently established wilderness-themed tourism development, including self-contained accommodation, basic shop, tavern and restaurant, river cruises, canoe hire, walks and guided activities. The operator also provides a barge service, ferrying vehicles and passengers across the river. Corinna is accessed from Zeehan in the south, Waratah (via Savage River) to the east and Arthur River township (via the Western Explorer) in the north, all via good quality unsealed roads. There are no public camping facilities, but informal camping is allowed nearby and there are a number of established walks in the area. There is no fuel for sale, power is generated on-site, and mobile telephone services are not available. Downstream from Corinna, Pieman river cruises connect with 4WD beach tours along the rugged coast. Upstream, the Pieman winds through scenic rainforest, and there is scope for remote camps and multi-day walking, mountain biking and river-based activities. Nearby Donaldson River is becoming popular with whitewater rafting and kayaking groups and there is a

picnic area off the Western Explorer, but no facilities. The Mt Donaldson walk offers spectacular views of the river mouth, coastline and inland mountain ranges, and there are numerous 4WD tracks in the area. In the original Options Report, Meunna and Marrawah were also identified as possible, minor entry points to the Tarkine. Marrawah is located outside the notional boundaries of the Tarkine and is close to the Arthur River township, so has not been included as a separate entry point in the final version of this framework. Meunna is a district accessible from the Bass Highway between Wynyard and Stanley. The road to Meunna passes through Myalla, the site of the last recorded capture of a wild Tasmanian Tiger. South of Meunna, unsealed roads managed by Forestry Tasmania and Waratah-Wynyard Council provide access to the Tarkine’s northern boundary, the Arthur River. Forestry Tasmania has identified an area near the confluence of the Arthur and Lyons Rivers, Phantom Valley, as a potential site for improved public access and development of commercial river- and rainforest-based adventure activities. High quality wilderness lodge accommodation has recently been completed on private land nearby, and self-contained accommodation is being considered. Remote waterfalls, thermal springs, rare geological formations and other sites located in mountainous rainforest south of Phantom Valley are currently accessed by guided multi-day bushwalking tours. This combination of accessibility, existing high-value commercial activity and potential for further visitor experiences in a dramatic rainforest setting is sufficient to warrant further investigation of the Meunna/Phantom Valley area as a potential fourth Tarkine entry point and visitor destination.

Corridors Corridors are existing access routes extending from the major entry points into and through the Tarkine, providing access to themed visitor sites and attractions along the way. As such, each corridor should be developed as a series of experiences linked together, rather than a ‘highway’ through the Tarkine. The five corridors identified in the Framework are:  The South Arthur Forest Drive - forest, forestry heritage and river sites  The Western Explorer - wild coast and Aboriginal heritage  The Savage River corridor - mining heritage and river valleys  The Arthur and Pieman Rivers - river journeys into wilderness The South Arthur Forest Drive comprises a series of forest and river-themed visitor sites, walks and lookouts along forestry roads south of the Arthur River between the Kanunnah and Tayatea Bridges. It is promoted as a self-drive loop accessed from Smithton, and is visited by guided tours. TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 16


The Options Report recommended access and infrastructure upgrades at the existing visitor sites, including enhanced walking tracks, interpretation, picnic and boating facilities. More recently, Forestry Tasmania has proposed linking the western end of the South Arthur Forest Drive to the Arthur River township entry point, and sealing existing gravel sections of the combined route. This would provide the basis for a larger tourist loop taking in the service centres of Smithton and Stanley as well as attractions at Dismal Swamp and Marrawah. This proposal is appealing because the main visitor sites and road corridors are already in use by independent travellers and commercial operators, and the experiences offered would appear to match the preferences of the ‘Nature Enjoyer’ market. An enhanced tourist circuit with consistent driving conditions, signage and facilities, offering a range of self-guided and commercial experiences supported by established service centres, would have the critical mass needed to ‘launch’ this part of the Tarkine as a multi-day destination. Forestry Tasmania has also investigated ways to provide a tourist link road joining the South Arthur Forest Drive to Phantom Valley. This option should only be considered when the critical mass of visitor experiences associated with the existing Arthur River entry point, the expanded South Arthur Forest Drive and the potential Meunna/ Phantom Valley precinct have been developed. The Western Explorer is an unsealed road linking the major entry points of Arthur River township and Corinna, providing an important link between the communities and tourism destinations of the West Coast and Circular Head. The route traverses many Tarkine landscapes, and offers significant potential for the development of visitor sites and experiences showcasing the Tarkine’s dramatic coastal wilderness and Aboriginal heritage. These are the least developed of the Tarkine’s attributes, and possibly its most significant. MARRAWAH DISMAL SWAMP

WYNYARD SOMERSET BURNIE

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BLUE PEAK PID RIV ER

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17 TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

RI

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TARKINE

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R VE RI

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LUINA SAVAGE RIVER

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HELLYER GORGE STATE RESERVE

SAVAGE RIVER NATIONAL PARK

MT RAMSAY

MT MEREDITH

CRADLE VALLEY

CORINNA R

MT LIVINGSTONE

MT ROMULUS

TULLAH LAKE

The Savage River corridor provides access to the major entry points of Waratah and Corinna, via the working mine settlement of Savage River. It is an established road with good quality sealed and unsealed sections passing through diverse and rugged terrain including mountains, rainforest, buttongrass and heathland.

UR

TEMMA

DONALDSO N

Management of coastal environments, Aboriginal heritage sites, fire risk and the interests of residents and recreational users in these areas will require close collaboration between tourism developers, public land managers, councils and local communities.

ROCKY CAPE NATIONAL PARK

DR LAN

Further development of the corridor will require staged upgrading of the road to improve driving conditions for all vehicle types - closely linked with the development of unique experiences and managed visitor access in areas such as Donaldson River, Sandy Cape, Balfour and Temma.

SMITHTON

K AN FR

Local residents and visitors use the road to access the coast and inland areas for fishing, surfing, bushwalking, camping and other recreation, and there are several permanent shack sites. Most areas off the main road are accessible only by four-wheel drive and are not well signposted for tourists.

STANLEY

PIEMAN

GRANITE TOR

ROSEBERY MT MURCHISON

VICTORIA PEAK

Road Corridor River Corridor

ZEEHAN

CRADLE MOUNTAIN LAKE ST CLAIR NATIONAL PARK

Map 5: Tarkine Corridors


Visitor sites are being developed at Whyte Hill and the spectacular Philosopher’s Falls, with potential for further walks, activities and points of interest associated with the area’s long and continuing mining heritage. Other natural features, including stands of ancient Huon Pines, could be developed as bushwalking destinations, but would require sensitive management. The Arthur and Pieman Rivers both offer river-based cruise experiences, and a unique means of accessing ‘deep wilderness’ areas of the Tarkine without major built infrastructure. Each river has significant and iconic features, a range of river-based activities and great scope for further development of day, overnight and multi-day experiences for independent adventurers and guided groups. The Arthur River is one of the few major Tasmanian rivers that has not been dammed for hydro-development. Its main channel or major tributaries are accessible at the eastern boundary of the Tarkine at Hellyer Gorge, Phantom Valley, several points along the South Arthur Forest Drive and the Arthur River township, with the possibility of extended tours by canoe or pack-raft through either short sections or its entire length. There is potential for further development of permanent day activity sites, overnight camps and remote eco-cabins or wilderness lodges at selected locations, subject to appropriate lease and management arrangements. The Pieman River experience includes a vehicle ferry crossing at Corinna, river cruises on a historic timber launch and opportunities for whitewater adventure activities on its smaller tributaries. There is scope for further development of overnight river-based activities and camping upstream and towards the river mouth, linking with walks, mountain biking and coastal 4WD tours.

THREE HUMMOCK ISLAND

Regional linkages & gateways Regional linkages connect and ‘articulate’ the Tarkine with existing arrival points, tourist hubs and other destinations in the region currently used by visitors.

DISMAL SWAMP

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PENGUIN ULVERSTONE DEVONPORT

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to LAUNCESTON

SHEFFIELD MT ROLAND

WARATAH LUINA

MT RAMSAY

MT MEREDITH

CRADLE VALLEY

CORINNA R

LEVEN CANYON

MT CLEVELAND

ER

SA VA G

MT NORFOLK

GUNNS PLAINS CAVES

IVER

SANDY CAPE

HELLYER GORGE STATE RESERVE

SAVAGE RIVER NATIONAL PARK

TARKINE DONALDSO N

While a significant share of visitors will travel to the Tarkine from high-volume airports elsewhere in the State, market research indicates that visitors who are primarily motivated by a Tarkine experience will seek out arrival points that are closer to their final destination.

MEUNNA

RIVER

RA

MT BALFOUR

 other nature-based destinations - Cradle Mountain, Strahan/Gordon River.

WYNYARD SOMERSET BURNIE

ARTHUR RIVER

DR LAN

 service centres - Stanley/Smithton, Burnie/Wynyard and Tullah/Rosebery/Zeehan; and

ROCKY CAPE NATIONAL PARK

MARRAWAH

K AN FR

 regional gateways - Burnie/Wynyard and Devonport/Latrobe;

SMITHTON

WHY TE R

They include:

STANLEY

MT LIVINGSTONE

MOLE CREEK KARST NATIONAL PARK CRADLE MOUNTAIN

MT ROMULUS

TULLAH LAKE

GRANITE TOR

PIEMAN

ROSEBERY MT MURCHISON

This particularly applies to those in the highest-value ‘Nature Enthusiast’ category, who stay for shorter periods, don’t want to spend time in transit and may be less sensitive to cost differentials.

ZEEHAN

VICTORIA PEAK

CRADLE MOUNTAIN LAKE ST CLAIR NATIONAL PARK

QUEENSTOWN

On that basis, the airports at Burnie/Wynyard and Devonport/Latrobe, the Spirit of Tasmania terminal at Devonport and cruise ships visiting Burnie and Devonport port are important regional gateways for the Tarkine. There is a need to work with port and airport operators, carriers and marketing bodies to develop, ‘package’ and promote these arrival points as gateways to the Tarkine.

STRAHAN to HOBART

Regional Links Airport

FRANKLIN GORDON WILD RIVERS NATIONAL PARK

Seaport

Map 6: Tarkine Regional linkages & gateways TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 18


Because the Tarkine entry points identified in this framework do not currently offer the full range of services found in larger towns, and it may not be desirable for them to do so, visitors and tourism businesses operating in the Tarkine will continue to rely on established service centres nearby. Stanley, Smithton, Burnie, Wynyard, Tullah, Rosebery and Zeehan are located on major highways adjacent to the Tarkine, providing varying levels and ranges of visitor information, accommodation, fuel and vehicle repairs, food outlets, health and other services for residents and visitors alike. Many guided tour businesses are based in these towns, and independent travellers use them as base camps for day trips into the Tarkine. While some of these towns are emerging tourism destinations in their own right, they are also critically important to the successful development of the Tarkine and must be supported to provide the services and facilities needed to support the Tarkine brand and visitor expectations. Cradle Mountain and Strahan/Gordon River are established nature-based destinations adjacent to the Tarkine that offer complementary experiences to similar visitor markets. Visitors attracted to these destinations could provide ‘spill-over’ markets for the Tarkine, either as an add-on to their existing holiday or as part of a ‘package’ of uniquely Tasmanian wilderness experiences. Further research is required to determine the appeal of these connections to high-value markets, and the potential for the Tarkine to add ‘critical mass’ that increases visitation to all three destinations. In the meantime, the possibility of these benefits highlights a need to establish clear directional signage along travel routes used to access these destinations, and the importance of entry points and corridors leading into the Tarkine from its eastern and southern boundaries.

Tarkine management As described in the first section of this Strategy, management of the Tarkine occurs through a complex mosaic of land use planning, management and protection systems. Some apply to particular areas of the Tarkine, others to particular uses, and they often overlap. This Strategy is the first plan for tourism in the Tarkine and the first plan, of any kind, for the whole of the Tarkine. As such, many of its recommendations cross several planning and management boundaries. There is little, if any, freehold land in the Tarkine, and any tourism-related development is likely to be subject to the requirements of multiple agencies. From the Authority’s own experience as proponent of several low-key public infrastructure projects in the Tarkine, this can present challenges for developers. If the Tarkine’s success as a tourism destination relies on rapid establishment of a critical mass of tourism experiences, private investment and supporting infrastructure, these challenges must be addressed. The Authority believes this is best achieved through creation of a formal coordinating structure involving all major public land management and statutory bodies with responsibilities in the Tarkine. As a minimum, it should include representatives of the Parks and Wildlife Service, 19 TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

Forestry Tasmania, Tourism Tasmania, the Department of Infrastructure, Energy and Resources and local government. The roles of this ‘Tarkine Tourism Development Group’ would include  Formal recognition or adoption of this Strategy, and integration of relevant components with existing land use strategies and management plans  Alignment of land use planning, management and development approval processes across agencies and levels of government, including identification and coordination of human, financial and other resources required for on-ground management activities  Establish and promote a seamless ‘client management’ process for assessment and approval of development applications, permits and licences for tourism-related activities across agencies  Development of ‘precinct plans’ for tourism-related development in and around entry points and corridors identified in this Strategy, including supporting infrastructure and land availability The Group would require formal inter-agency commitments at senior executive and Ministerial levels, including clear delegation and reporting arrangements, and adequate resourcing of its operations. The Group would not replace existing advisory and consultative structures, such as the Arthur Pieman Conservation Area Management Committee and the Tarkine Discussion Group, which could provide important links between the Group and local stakeholders, in addition to their normal functions.

Product development Market researchers have described the Tarkine today as ‘a destinational concept that comprises an envelope with no content’, but confirm significant latent demand for the Tarkine in specific markets if it can deliver ‘a menu of meaningful, high quality visitor experiences that engage the target audiences’. Not just more products; products that are closely aligned to the Tarkine’s known values and markets. This accords with the Strategy’s aim of avoiding ad hoc development, and adoption of a geographic framework that delivers themed products aligned to particular locations and visitor expectations. The aim should be to achieve diversity of products across the Tarkine, and critical mass at each location. Identification of entry points or precincts serves to focus effort and investment, fostering a critical mass of products that can attract and hold visitors and justify provision of support infrastructure and services. Because each entry point samples different Tarkine landscapes and values, and offers different basic services, each may be suited to a different range of products and be attractive to different markets. On this basis, Arthur River township and the (expanded) South Arthur Forest Drive might initially focus on coastal, forest and aboriginal heritage experiences suited to Nature Enjoyers on day visits or tours from Smithton and Stanley. As the destination matures, new products could include overnight or multi-day walks, 4WD and river trips with standing camps or eco-lodges targeting Nature Enthusiasts.


The Parks and Wildlife Service is investigating provision of a managed 4WD ‘Coastal Experience’ extending from Arthur River to Sandy Cape, operating in conjunction with a manned information and interpretive centre at Arthur River and visitor and camp sites along the coast. This could help address some existing problems with coastal access whilst providing a value-added experience for independent travellers, 4WD clubs and guided tour operators. Waratah could initially consolidate its attraction as a base for caravan and campervan tourists and day visitors. Walks, tours, exhibits and interpretation focussing on the town’s history and mining heritage will appeal to segments of these existing markets. Others may use it as a base for more active, nature-based activities in the area, such as the walk into Philosopher’s Falls. Future growth could support a greater range of self-contained and heritage accommodation and food outlets for Nature Enthusiasts taking more challenging guided walks and tours into the Tarkine’s interior. Corinna’s existing products already target parts of the Nature Enthusiast market and its remoteness and limited infrastructure may see it further specialising in higher-value, low volume, multi-day visitor markets, compared to the other entry points. There is scope for further development of river-based activities, including whitewater rafting and kayaking on the nearby Donaldson River, as well as guided bushwalks, mountain bike and 4WD tours, or combinations thereof. The Phantom Valley area may have potential for a product and market profile similar to that of Corinna, but in a ‘deep rainforest’ setting. The sole existing product is aimed squarely at the Nature Enthusiast market, and future options being discussed focus on high-value guided adventure activities supported by quality accommodation, food and ‘wellness’ services. Each entry point should also seek to develop food, hospitality and retail opportunities that reflect the particular heritage and industry theme of each location. Visitors should be able to sample some of the world’s finest grass-fed beef, crayfish and abalone, cheeses, rainforest honey and artisan-crafted timbers, see where they come from and meet the people who made them, as part of their Tarkine experience.

Arcadia II, Tourism Tasmania and Denis Harding

Whilst this overview reveals a diversity of existing and potential products across locations in the Tarkine, care must also be taken to ensure an appropriate range of offerings within special interest sectors. The bushwalking, mountain biking, river-based and 4WD experiences offered in the Tarkine must cater for the adventureseeking enthusiast as well as the casual ‘holidaymaker’. Strategies are needed to ensure that the Tarkine offers challenges and attractions for these specialist markets. Aside from physical product development, this could be achieved through signature events that serve a dual purpose of attracting special interest markets and more general exposure for the Tarkine as a destination. Immediate opportunities include support and further development of existing events associated with surfing, mountain biking and multi-sport ‘challenges’ conducted in and around the Tarkine.

Buttongrass north of Arthur River, Tourism Tasmania and Joe Shemesh

TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 20


Industry development The Tarkine is a collection of stories, both fact and fiction, that when combined create a living library. Its products, experience and ethos present a diverse array of assets that if recorded in written form would fill many shelves within the library. It is the telling of these stories that becomes the very essence of the Tarkine Visitor Experience. Tourism operators, local businesses and communities must understand and respect “The Tarkine� - what is represents to visitors and locals alike, and what it can contribute to the region, economically, socially environmentally and culturally. The Tarkine is projecting itself as an environmental and cultural landscape, which appeals to a variety of Target Markets. The landscape and the stories it nurtures can and will continue to deliver on these projections (promises). Giant Eucalyptus, Arthur Pieman Conservation Area, Tourism Tasmania and Joe Shemesh

The question that must be addressed is can the level of integrity and quality that the landscape projects be matched by the delivery of tourism services and experiences? The answer is simple - it must - to ensure that the service delivers on the visitor’s expectations, provides a credible and honest insight into the Tarkine and its stories, and challenges the visitor both emotionally and intellectually. It is the delivery of this service and experience that must be assessed, monitored and continuously enhanced. All who align their business to the Tarkine need to recognise the value of their contribution to the visitor experience, and the importance of doing so in a professional, courteous and knowledgeable fashion. This Strategy identifies the need for the tourism industry to play a leading role in the delivery of quality service and recommends the establishment of a Tarkine Industry Training Program. This program will incorporate a variety of already established accreditation programs, plus Tarkine-specific content, ensuring its relevance to operators delivering service and experiences within the Tarkine. The uptake of this program must be embraced by all servicing the Tarkine, recognised, acknowledged and supported by landowners and managers, and promoted to all identified Target Markets. The content and intent of the program must:  be delivered by tourism operators through the services and experiences they provide direct to their customers  be reflected in all promotional material for the Tarkine  be incorporated in the interpretation provided at gateways, entry points and experience sites throughout the Tarkine The program will extend beyond the tourism sector, engaging with retailers and the community that surround the Tarkine. A communication strategy will be required for each of these sectors, to address any concerns regarding the development of the Tarkine, highlight the benefits of this approach to local communities and provide comprehensive information regarding the stories of the Tarkine.

21 TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY


The Tarkine presents a unique opportunity for north west Tasmania, but there is only one opportunity to get it right. To achieve this positive outcome will require the support of all associated with this area, its services, people and investors. Communication and Tarkine specific education and training will go a long way to achieving this outcome but only if it is introduced early in the process, and sustained in the long-term.

Marketing & Promotion Research confirms who may be interested in what the Tarkine has to offer. Brand work identifies what the Tarkine is and the Tourism Options Report confirms what the Tarkine can offer to meet the expectations of the target markets with respect to a Tarkine Experience. Match the Tarkine’s experiences and services to the needs of the Target Markets and the job is done - if only it was this simple. As presented at the opening of this report, the Tarkine has many faces - diverse, wild places that powerfully affect, inspire and change people, from Aboriginal inhabitants to people today. Its combination of globally significant temperate rainforest, dramatic wilderness, rare and threatened species and richly layered history creates a unique and memorable experience that refreshes the spirit and awakens the senses.

Marketing of the Tarkine must:  be environmentally sensitive regarding the messages it delivers and the manner it is delivered  be aligned to the Tarkine brand  be faithful to the market research and aligned to identified target markets  include motivational messages/images to attract new visitors to the Tarkine  deliver comprehensive interpretation of the Tarkine through stories and images  provide incentives for repeat visitation There is too much at risk to get these messages and their distribution wrong. To ensure that marketing and promotion of the Tarkine is carefully and sensitively managed, the recently established Tarkine Marketing Committee must be retained, with access to appropriate marketing expertise and resources to effectively manage the Tarkine message.

How do you capture this as a single page advertisement? How do you reflect this as a single brand, logo, image, wordmark, and how do you engage with a market that either has no idea of what the Tarkine has to offer or that has already formed a perception that the Tarkine is only wilderness rainforests. Even the Tarkine Discussion Group, in its first branding workshop, chose ’ Wilderness to the Core’ as the brand essence for the Tarkine, amending that position some twelve months later to ‘Powerful Connections with Wild Places’. Promotion of the Tarkine can be initiated today with confidence as we have identified the potential target markets and are collectively more aware of what makes a ‘Tarkine Experience’. Promotion must, however, be measured against the Tarkine’s need for product and industry development it is critical that the marketing promise is matched by the quality of Tarkine experiences and our ability to deliver them. Promotion of the Tarkine must be implemented with consideration for its carrying capacity, and the ability of land managers and tourism operators to manage the impact of increased visitor numbers. Finally, promotion of the Tarkine must be managed in a cooperative manner, engaging with all landowners/ managers, industry stakeholders and state and regional tourism bodies to ensure a shared approach to the development and distribution of the Tarkine marketing messages - promotional and environmental. TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 22


Dunefield Flowers, Tarkine Coast, Rob Blakers

The Tarkine is as diverse as those who seek its fascinating mosaic of offerings; a place of sustenance for its first inhabitants; a breathtaking, fragile wilderness for those in search of renewal; a robust landscape rich in mineral and forest resources; a playground for the communities that surround it.

23 TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY


(5)

Recommendations

The following section of the Strategy provides specific recommendations and actions based on findings of the Options Report and issues raised through the subsequent consultation process. Recommendations focus on the geographical elements of the framework - entry points, corridors and regional linkages and gateways - supported by a suite of actions regarding resource management, product development, industry development and marketing and promotion, which will be critical to the effective implementation of the Framework.

1. ENTRY POINTS Arthur River township 1.1 Arthur River Precinct Plan 1.1.1 Develop a comprehensive Precinct Plan to guide staged development of the Arthur River Township as a Tarkine entry point, including further investigation of the recommendations below and detailed analysis of:

Experience as an integrated customer focussed system for managed visitor experiences in the Arthur River, Temma and Sandy Cape region, including:  improved access (bridges and tracks)  better managed remote camping, including designated camping areas with basic facilities  quality information and interpretation through websites, pre-visit information packs, onsite interpretation and signage  a permit-based recreational vehicle management system designed to ensure the long term sustainable use of the coastal environment  further development of the ‘Edge of the World’ experience, including signature food and wine experiences and short walks to the beach south of Gardiner Point

Wedge-tailed Eagle, Tourism Tasmania and Chris Mclennan

 existing land use plans and management strategies  existing tourism products, markets and visitor numbers  core Tarkine values, product gaps and target markets  land and infrastructure needs and ‘carrying capacity’  priority projects, lead agencies/partners and resource requirements

1.2 Arthur River Visitor Information and Cultural Interpretive Centre 1.2.1 Establish an Arthur River Visitor Information and Cultural Interpretive Centre, based on initial planning undertaken by the Parks and Wildlife Service and further consultation with Aboriginal community representatives, including:  interpretation and education displays and information  business centre for guided tours and sale of park, RV and camping passes/permits  business opportunities and support such as accommodation and tour bookings, retail, etc  café offering quality food experiences (including sunset and ocean views)  gateway to the Tarkine Coastal Experience 1.2.2 Development of this site must incorporate consideration of private investment opportunities.

1.3 Tarkine Coastal Experience 1.3.1 Finalise business models, values research, planning and stakeholder consultation, as proposed by the Parks and Wildlife Service, to develop the Tarkine Coastal TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 24


 short walks in and around Arthur River township, especially linking with ‘Edge of the World’  multi-day self guided and guided walks between  Arthur River and Temma  Temma and Sandy Cape  Arthur River and Marrawah  commercial opportunities for environmentally and culturally sensitive, guided tours including appropriate interpretation of Aboriginal sites and heritage

1.4 River Based Activities 1.4.1 Retain the low volume capacity of existing river cruise operations with further investment in lunch sites and opportunities to showcase quality Tasmanian food and wine 1.4.2 Provide safe canoe launching areas at Arthur River and South Arthur Forest Drive visitor sites 1.4.3 Investigate development of multi-day guided packrafting experiences with overnight camps linked with upstream visitor sites along the South Arthur Forest Drive and at Phantom Valley

1.5 4WD and Recreational Vehicle Access 1.5.1 Support Parks and Wildlife Service efforts to continuously monitor and manage tracks and 4WD coastal access within the Arthur Pieman Conservation Area to ensure sustainable use, including introduction of a recreational vehicle management system (see Tarkine Coastal Experience).

1.6 Accommodation

STANLEY

1.6.1 Undertake detailed assessment of the current and potential opportunities for camping in the area, consistent with identified standards 1.6.2 Examine feasibility of commercial development of low volume, high yield experiential accommodation focused on the character and opportunities of the Tarkine, such as ‘eco-shacks’, wilderness lodges and standing camps in remote coastal and river locations.

SMITHTON

MARRAWAH DISMAL SWAMP ARTHUR RIVER

MEUNNA

R IVE

BLUE PEAK PID RIV ER

H

T

DR LAN

RA

AR

K AN FR

1.7 Walks (see recommendation 11.1.1) 1.7.1 Review options for the development of the following walks:

PHANTOM VALLEY UR

R

TEMMA BALFOUR

 Linkages between Arthur River Township and ‘Edge of the World’ - class 1-3

MT BALFOUR

SAVAGE RIVER NATIONAL PARK

TARKINE

 Arthur River bridge to Big Bend (2-3 km loop) - class 2 SANDY CAPE

MT NORFOLK

MT CLEVELAND

R VE RI

RIV

ER

W

 Arthur River across to Frankland River back to coast (via boat) which links in with possible overnight camps - class 3-4

Arthur River Entry Point

 Green Point to Mt. Cameron coastal walk - class 4  Balfour track - develop into a heritage track for multiple use - class 3-4 25 TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

VA G

E

 Arthur River - Big Dune loop - class 2-3

SON

 Arthur River to Marrawah via the lighthouse - class 3-4

MT BERTHA

MT FRANKLAND

LUINA

Regional Linkages Proposed Tarkine Coastal Experience Entry Point Corridors


2. ENTRY POINTS - Waratah 2.1 Waratah Precinct Plan

2.5 Walks (see recommendation 11.1.1)

2.1.1 Develop a comprehensive Precinct Plan to guide staged development of Waratah as a Tarkine entry point, including further investigation of the recommendations below and detailed analysis of:

2.5.1 Review options for the development of the following walks:  Lookout over the Waratah Falls - class 1  Town Centre to Mt Bischoff - class 3

 existing land use plans and management strategies

 Upgrade of Philosopher Falls walk linking with proposed car park - class 2

 existing tourism products, markets and visitor numbers

 Luina to Mt. Cleveland - class 3

 core Tarkine values, product gaps and target markets

2.5.2 Instigate site plans for the development of accessible walks within the Wandle River precinct (myrtle forests, waterfalls, historic sawmilling sites)

 land and infrastructure needs and ‘carrying capacity’  priority projects, lead agencies/partners and resource requirements

2.2 Town and Mining Heritage 2.2.1 Explore options for development of a Tarkine information/interpretive site at the Athenaeum Hall in Waratah, linked to a self-guided heritage trail visiting points of interest around the town. 2.2.2 Seek commercial interest in provision of guided tours of historical and current mining activities, including enhanced environmental practices at Mount Bischoff. 2.2.3 Support the development of the Mount Bischoff Mine Heritage Interpretation Walk. 2.2.4 Incorporate mineral fossicking options in the Mount Bischoff precinct SOMERSET BURNIE

2.2.5 Develop site plan for the Waratah Hydro Power Station: MEUNNA

 enhance walking track to station

PHANTOM VALLEY

 explore the possibility of walking tracks aligned to the original water corridors and reservoirs

ARKINE

 Butler’s Road (Philosopher’s Falls)

2.4 Hellyer Gorge 2.4.1 Initiate a site master plan to upgrade the visitor facilities at Hellyer Gorge to provide an attractive day use site including:  options for camping sites within the Hellyer Gorge precinct  maintain the range of short walks at Hellyer Gorge - class 1

N

RIV E

R VE RI E

DONALDSO N

 Magnet Mine track  Mt. Cleveland

UR

RI

VE

R

RIV

HELLYER GORGE STATE RESERVE

SAVAGE RIVER NATIONAL PARK

MT CLEVELAND ER

GUILDFORD

PHILOSOPHER’S FALLS

WARATAH

LUINA SAVAGE RIVER

WHY TE RI V ER

2.3.1 Identify and develop suitable tracks that offer managed 4WD opportunities in areas that do not conflict with bushwalking tracks including:

H

MT BERTHA

AND

SA VA G

2.3 4WD Experiences

BLUE PEAK PID RIV ER

T

RA

AR

 develop and install interpretation at station

MT MEREDITH

MT RAMSAY

CRADLE VALLEY

CORINNA R

MT LIVINGSTONE

MT ROMULUS

TULLAH

Waratah Entry Point Regional Linkages Entry Point Corridors TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 26


3. ENTRY POINTS - Corinna 3.1 Corinna Precinct Plan

3.6 Walks (see recommendation 11.1.1)

3.1.1 Develop a comprehensive Precinct Plan to guide staged development of Corinna as a Tarkine entry point, including further investigation of the recommendations below and detailed analysis of

3.6.1 Review options for the development of the following walks:

 existing land use plans and management strategies  existing tourism products, markets and visitor numbers  core Tarkine values, product gaps and target markets  land and infrastructure needs and ‘carrying capacity’  priority projects, lead agencies/partners and resource requirements

 short walks around Corinna - class 2-3  Mt. Donaldson walk - class 3  Reece Dam short walk - class 3 3.6.2 Establish walking track along the Pieman River from Corinna to Savage River. 3.6.3 Investigate the potential for a multi-day walk from Pieman Heads to Arthur River with opportunities for overnight facilities and commercial guiding.

3.2 River Based Activities 3.2.1 Provide safe canoe launching areas and ‘satellite’ camp sites for overnight canoe trips upstream and downstream from Corinna. 3.2.2 Support further development of white-water activities on the Donaldson River, including launching and retrieval points, toilets and camping facilities.

3.3 Accommodation 3.3.1 Investigate appropriate location and management of a campground in the Corinna area. 3.3.2 Investigate options for the establishment of remote (potentially ‘eco-shack’) accommodation on the coast that offers an overnight experience from Corinna (kayak or drop off). Note: Overnight facilities in the Pieman River area must be reviewed to ensure recommendation is consistent with the Pieman River State Reserve Management Plan 1992.

3.4 Experiences

3.5 Access and signage 3.5.1 Install Corinna information and directional signage at Waratah turnoff.

MT DONALDSON PIEMAN R IVE

CORINNA TRACK

RIV

SA VA G

E

MT NORFOLK VER RI

MT CLEVELAND ER

WARATAH

LUINA SAVAGE RIVER

WHY TE RI V ER

3.4.2 Assess the potential for such an experience to form the basis of a high-profile multi-sports event.

GU SANDY CAPE

DONALDSO N

3.4.1 Investigate development of an iconic guided multi-day experience between Arthur River and Corinna that includes cycling, walking and kayaking, and exploring the range of natural and cultural values of the area.

MT RAMSAY

MT MEREDITH

CORINNA R

MT LIVINGSTONE REECE DAM

TULLAH LAKE

GRANITE

PIEMAN

ROSEB

3.5.2 Upgrade the access route from Waratah via Savage River to improve safety and driving conditions, particularly in winding sections where tourist traffic shares the road with heavy vehicles associated with mining activities. 3.5.3 Seal/upgrade the ‘Corinna Track’ south of Corinna to the Reece Dam Road (C250) as the principal southern access to the Tarkine. 3.5.4 Develop signage and tourist information for other southern access roads from Rosebery and Tullah. 27 TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

MT MURCHISON

ZEEHAN

VIC

CRADLE MOUNTAIN LAKE ST CLAIR NATIONAL PARK

Corrina Entry Point Regional Linkages Entry Point Corridors


4. ENTRY POINTS - Meunna/Phantom Valley

(potential)

4.1 Phantom Valley Development and Investment Strategy 4.1.1 Complete a Phantom Valley Development and Investment Strategy as a basis for provision of public infrastructure and attraction of commercial tourism and investment, including: 4.1.2 Identification of commercial opportunities within the Phantom Valley precinct that  are consistent with the Tarkine Brand and target market preferences  complement existing tourism investment in the immediate area  address gaps in the current range of visitor experiences offered in the Tarkine 4.1.3 Potential products and experiences may include:  ‘zipline’ and rainforest canopy experiences  health spas and well-being services  managed access to remote waterfalls and mineral springs  accommodation and services supporting multi-day guided walks into remote areas  commercial rafting and kayak trips on the Arthur and Lyons Rivers

STANLEY

 guided mountain bike, gold prospecting and angling tours

ROCKY CAPE NATIONAL PARK

 short walk to McGowan’s Falls 4.1.4 Identification of infrastructure required to facilitate and support appropriate commercial opportunities, including existing operators, which may include:

WYNYARD SOMERSET BURNIE

 upgrade and seal of Meunna and Keith River Roads

 Phantom Valley walks, amenities and services  access to Tarkine Springs and Tarkine Falls

BLUE PEAK H RA UR PID TARKINE SPRINGSR I V E RIV R ER TARKINE FALLS T

 installation of controls (signage, barriers, posts, pull overs)

PHANTOM VALLEY AR

 consider options for tourist access (pedestrian and light vehicle) over the Arthur River

MEUNNA

MT BERTHA

SAVAGE RIVER NATIONAL PARK

HELLYER GORGE STATE RESERVE

 directional and interpretive signage

Meunna Entry Point Note: It is envisaged that Phantom Valley will be a centre for commercially operated adventure and interpretive ventures operating in State Forest under license agreements with Forestry Tasmania.

Regional Linkages Potential Entry Point Corridors TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 28


5. CORRIDORS - South Arthur Forest Drive 5.1 Planning 5.1.1 Expand the South Arthur Forest Drive to create an experience-rich, forest-themed visitor circuit linking existing and potential Tarkine visitor sites between Arthur River township and Tayatea Bridge to service centres and related attractions at Stanley, Smithton and Dismal Swamp.

5.2 Infrastructure 5.2.1 Seal remaining gravel sections of the expanded corridor to create consistent driving conditions, signage and visitor facilities between Arthur River and Tayatea Bridge. 5.2.2 Expand visitor parking, signage and brand-related interpretation at Sumac Lookout. 5.2.3 Replace the Tayatea Bridge, and create a visitor orientation experience including river access. 5.2.4 Enhance visitor facilities at Kanunnah Bridge, including:  picnic/day use facilities  lookout experience over river  short walk to river  safe kayak access point 5.2.5 Enhance the Lake Chisholm Forest Reserve site:  create a circuit walk  providing interpretation and orientation information

STANLEY

 install picnic area SMITHTON

5.2.6 Support the development of the Frankland River lookout and visitor facilities. MARRAWAH

5.3 Walks (see recommendation 11.1.1)

DISMAL SWAMP

5.3.1 Provide a short river access walk at Tayatea bridge. MEUN P

LAKE CHISHOLM FR

DEMPSTER PLAINS LOOKOUT

BLUE PEAK

A

R A ARTHUR SOUTH PID FOREST DRIVE RIV ER

JULIUS RIVER FR R IVE

5.4 Brand

DR LAN

5.3.3 Investigate a walk from Dempster Lookout to the falls at Wes Beckett Forest Reserve returning to the road at Rapid River.

MILKSHAKE HILLS FR

KANUNNAH BRIDGE SUMAC LOOKOUT K AN FR

5.3.2 Upgrade walking tracks at Julius River Forest Reserve to class 2 standard and provide Tarkine information and interpretation.

TAYATEA BRIDGE

ARTHUR RIVER

TEMMA BALFOUR MT BALFOUR

MT FRANKLAND

MT BERTHA

South Arthur Forest Drive Regional Linkages

5.4.1 Re-brand the expanded South Arthur Forest Drive as the ‘Tarkine Forest Drive’, creating theme linkages with the recently re-branded Tarkine Forest Adventures at Dismal Swamp. 29 TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

Proposed extension to South Arthur Forest Drive Corridors


6. CORRIDORS - Western Explorer 6.1 Planning 6.1.1 Develop a comprehensive Development Plan to guide staged development of the Western Explorer as a Tarkine access corridor, including further investigation of the recommendations below and detailed analysis of:  existing land use plans and management strategies  existing tourism products, markets and visitor numbers  core Tarkine values, product gaps and target markets  land and infrastructure needs and ‘carrying capacity’  priority projects, lead agencies/partners and resource requirements 6.1.2 In conjunction with development of the proposed Tarkine Coastal Experience, initiate a precinct plan for Sandy Cape and Temma that includes consideration of:  appropriate levels of use and facilities  management of Aboriginal sites  management and rehabilitation of tracks

 identify and manage the Longback Track as an iconic short walk including:  upgrading of trailhead to include orientation and directional signage and parking  maintenance of existing track to class two standard  interpretation of Tarkine vista through point at the end of the walk.  access to Sandy Cape from Western Explorer, connecting with Tarkine Coastal Experience sites and guided activities, similar in concept to the Wineglass Bay walk

6.4 Tracks, Trails and 4WD access 6.4.1 Investigate the potential for a mountain bike track along the old Balfour rail track with the possibility for remote overnight camping or commercial accommodation. 6.4.2 Develop the Mt Balfour Track as a multiple use track with mining history interpretation. 6.4.3 Investigate the potential for suitable tracks that offer managed 4WD opportunities in areas that do not conflict with bushwalking tracks.

 spreading peak use through the existing permit system  designation of camp sites and identification of sites for lease for commercial camps  options for development of walking track access from the Western Explorer STANLEY

 the potential for ‘eco-shacks’ accommodation at Temma in accordance with the APCA National (controlled access) Management Zones criteria

SOM ARTHUR RIVER

MEUNNA PHANTOM VALLEY BLUE PEAK PID RIV ER

H

T

RA

AR

6.3 Walks (see recommendation 11.1.1)

WYNYARD

R IVE

UR

RI

VE

R

TEMMA BALFOUR MT BERTHA

MT FRANKLAND

MT BALFOUR

MT DONALDSON PIEMAN R IVE

MT CLEVELAND

R VE RI E

MT NORFOLK

RIV

ER

WARATAH

LUINA SAVAGE RIVER

WHY TE RI V ER

SANDY CAPE

HELLY STATE

SAVAGE RIVER NATIONAL PARK

TARKINE SA VA G

6.2.3 Upgrade existing visitor facilities and establish additional sites to provide quality visitor interpretation and experiences at short (twenty minute) travelling intervals along the corridor, including, lookouts, short walks, day use and picnic facilities at strategic locations (eg Donaldson River).

DISMAL SWAMP

DR LAN

6.2.2 Confirm hire car policies relating to unsealed sections of the Western Explorer, and engage hire companies and RACT in assessment of road conditions and promotion of safe driving.

MARRAWAH

K AN FR

6.2.1 Explore funding options staged upgrading (or sealing) of the Western Explorer to improve safety and driving conditions for all vehicle types, based on assessment of demand for access to visitor sites.

ROCKY CAPE NATIONAL PAR

DONALDSO N

6.2 Infrastructure

SMITHTON

MT MEREDITH

MT RAMSAY

CORINNA R

MT LIVINGSTONE

TULLA LAKE

PIEMAN

6.3.1 Review options for the development of:  overnight walk on Norfolk Range linking to the Donaldson River - Class 4/5  short walks along the Western Explorer to day use areas and lookouts - class 1-3

GRAN

ROS

Western Explorer Corridor Regional Linkages Western Explorer Corridor Corridors TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 30


7. CORRIDORS - Savage River & Southern Access Routes 7.1 Planning

Cradle Mountain and Strahan.

7.1.1 Develop a comprehensive Development Plan to guide staged development of the Savage River Corridor as a Tarkine access corridor, including further investigation of the recommendations below and detailed analysis of:

7.5 Walks, Tracks and Trails

 existing land use plans and management strategies  existing tourism products, markets and visitor numbers  core Tarkine values, product gaps and target markets  land and infrastructure needs and ‘carrying capacity’  priority projects, lead agencies/partners and resource requirements

(see recommendation 11.1.1) 7.5.1 Establish Heazlewood ‘Pack Track’ into the Godkin mine site. 7.5.2 Investigate options to create a controlled access Savage River Pipe Span Walk - class 3. 7.5.3 Work with Forestry Tasmania to develop opportunities for managed access to, and interpretation of, stands of ancient Huon Pines accessible from the Savage River Corridor. 7.5.4 Identify existing tracks suitable for managed 4WD access that do not conflict with bushwalking tracks.

7.2 Access 7.2.1 Upgrade the access route from Waratah via Savage River to improve safety and driving conditions, particularly in winding sections where tourist traffic shares the road with heavy vehicles associated with mining activities. 7.2.2 Seal/upgrade the ‘Corinna Track’ south of Corinna to the Reece Dam Road (C250) as the principal southern access to the Tarkine. 7.2.3 Develop signage and tourist information for other southern access roads from Rosebery and Tullah.

7.3 Infrastructure 7.3.1 Initiate a site master plan for the Philosopher’s Falls area addressing:  improvements to trailhead for Philosopher’s Falls to provide high quality day use experience  development of a low key camping area potentially at the turnoff to Philosopher’s Falls SOMERSET BURNIE

7.3.2 Upgrade picnic facilities at Whyte River Bridge Crossing.

7.4.4 Provide signage for viewing site south of Savage River. 7.4.5 Upgrade signage for names of rivers and mountains. 7.4.6 Install interpretive signage at Savage River covering history and current operation of the mine. 7.4.7 Develop Tarkine directional signage at exit points at 31 TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

H

T

7.4.3 Install fuel availability signage at Waratah, Zeehan and the Western Explorer turnoff.

BLUE PEAK PID RIV ER

UR

RI

VE

R

BALFOUR MT BALFOUR

MT BERTHA

MT FRANKLAND

MT DONALDSON PIEMAN R IVE

E

SA VA G

R

R IVE

RIV

MT CLEVELAND ER

GUILDFORD

PHILOSOPHER’S FALLS

WARATAH

LUINA SAVAGE RIVER

WHY TE RI V ER

MT NORFOLK DONALDSO N

SANDY CAPE

HELLYER GORGE STATE RESERVE

SAVAGE RIVER NATIONAL PARK

TARKINE

7.4.1 Install Tarkine directional signage at Murchison Highway (via C247) and Zeehan (via C249). 7.4.2 Install distance signage at Waratah, Savage River, Western Explorer turnoff and Corinna.

AR

R IVE

7.4 Signage

RA

DR LAN

7.3.4 Work with Savage River Mine operators to reduce visual impact of the mine area visible from the road, and develop opportunities for guided tours and interpretation of mining operations.

K AN FR

7.3.3 Establish parking areas, lookouts and interpretation at Heazlewood River, Godkin mine site and Whyte River area near Savage River mine.

MEUNNA PHANTOM VALLEY

MT MEREDITH

MT RAMSAY

CRADLE VALLEY

CORINNA R

MT LIVINGSTONE

MT ROMULUS

TULLAH LAKE

PIEMAN

GRANITE TOR

ROSEBERY

Savage River Corridor Regional Linkages Savage River Corridor Corridors


8. CORRIDORS - Pieman and Arthur Rivers 8.1 Planning 8.1.1 Investigate the feasibility of providing and managing sites suitable for development of remote standing camps and other wilderness and eco-themed accommodation experiences in rainforest settings upstream from the Arthur River township. 8.1.2 Conduct market research to determine likely visitor demand and developer interest in such experiences, as a basis for further investigation of development-ready sites and/or investment attraction processes.

8.2 Experience Development 8.2.1 Investigate value adding of existing river cruise operations through:  development of day visitor sites through formal arrangements with relevant land managers  showcasing of quality Tasmanian food and wine on lunch and evening cruises STANLEY

 connections with other land or river-based SMITHTON

experiences, such as guided bushwalks, overnight

ROCKY CAPE NATIONAL PARK

camps, river lodges, canoeing and fishing expeditions

MARRAWAH DISMAL SWAMP

8.2.2 Encourage the development and promotion of ARTHUR RIVER

MEUNNA PHANTOM VALLEY

R IVE

UR

RI

VE

R

BALFOUR MT BERTHA

MT FRANKLAND

MT BALFOUR

 white-water rafting and kayaking, and support facilities, on suitable headwaters and tributaries MT DONALDSON

PIEMAN R IVE

R VE RI

E

MT NORFOLK DONALDSO N

SANDY CAPE

HELLYER GORGE STATE RESERVE

SAVAGE RIVER NATIONAL PARK

TARKINE

 multi-day pack rafting expeditions

 guided angling experiences

H

TEMMA

GUILDFORD

E RIV

SA VA G

and overnight trips

BLUE PEAK PID RIV ER

T

RA

AR

KANUNNAH BRIDGE

DR LAN

 canoe/kayak hire, drop-off services and guided day

SOMERSET BURNIE

TAYATEA HUR RIVER

K AN FR

rivers including:

ART

MT CLEVELAND R

WARATAH

LUINA SAVAGE RIVER

WHY TE RI V ER

additional river-based opportunities on both major

WYNYARD

MT RAMSAY

MT MEREDITH

CRADLE VALLEY

CORINNA R

MT LIVINGSTONE

MT ROMULUS

TULLAH

REECE DAM

LAKE

8.3 Infrastructure

PIEMAN

MT MURCHISON

8.3.1 Establish safe canoe launching areas, rest and

ZEEHAN

camp sites for independent canoeists and guided river tours between Tayatea Bridge and Arthur River township on the Arthur River.

GRANITE TOR

ROSEBERY VICTORIA PEAK

CRADLE MOUNTAIN LAKE ST CLAIR NATIONAL PARK

Pieman & Arthur River Corridors Regional Linkages

8.3.2 Provide camping facilities and toilets to support

River Corridors

river-based activities on the Donaldson River and

Arthur & Pieman Rivers

selected other adventure-based activity sites.

Road Corridors TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 32


9. REGIONAL LINKAGES & GATEWAYS Regional Linkages  Burnie/Wynyard, Devonport/Latrobe  Stanley/Smithton, Tullah/Rosebery/Zeehan  Cradle Mountain, Strahan/Gordon River

Regional Gateways  Burnie Airport (Wynyard) - Regional Express  Burnie Port - Cruise Ships  Devonport Port - TT Line, Cruise Ships  Devonport Airport - Qantas Link.

9.1 Signage 9.1.1 Develop a signage strategy for major linkages and gateways that uses graphics based on the Tarkine brand and integrates the use of standard visitor signage, including interpretive signage. 9.1.2 Develop Primary Boundary Marker sites as per the Tarkine Bushwalk Program:  Arthur River - C214  Kannunah Bridge - C218  Waratah - B23  Zeehan - C249  Tullah - A23.

THREE HUMMOCK ISLAND

9.1.3 Install directional signage for the Tarkine on the Murchison Highway (via C247) and Zeehan (via C249). 9.1.4 Install Tarkine directional signage at following road intersections, establishing secondary entry points for the Tarkine:  Murchison Highway - Reece Dam Road A10/C252 (Tullah)

ROCKY CAPE NATIONAL PARK

MARRAWAH DISMAL SWAMP

WYNYARD SOMERSET BURNIE

ARTHUR RIVER

ARTHUR

MEUNNA

RIVER

PENGUIN ULVERSTONE DEVONPORT

PHANTOM VALLEY

R IVE

BLUE PEAK PID RIV ER

H

T

DR LAN

RA

AR

K AN FR

 Murchison Highway - Camp Road A10/B23 (Waratah/Savage River)

STANLEY

SMITHTON

UR

RI

VE

R

LATROBE

TEMMA

 Bass Highway - Lapoinya Road A2/C230

MT DONALDSON PIEMAN R IVE

E

R VE RI

GUILFORD

RIV

SAVAGE RIVER

MT RAMSAY

CRADLE VALLEY MT LIVINGSTONE

MOLE CREEK KARST NATIONAL PARK CRADLE MOUNTAIN

MT ROMULUS

TULLAH LAKE

GRANITE TOR

PIEMAN

ROSEBERY MT MURCHISON

ZEEHAN

QUEENSTOWN STRAHAN to HOBART

Regional Links

9.2.2 Develop partnerships with carriers and facility managers, and options for Tarkine interpretation and promotional activities, at all major regional Gateways. 33 TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

VICTORIA PEAK

CRADLE MOUNTAIN LAKE ST CLAIR NATIONAL PARK

9.2 Interpretation 9.2.1 Assist Burnie Airport Corporation to incorporate Tarkine brand into internal, interpretive fit-out of the Burnie Airport terminal as the ‘Gateway to the Tarkine’. Airport Seaport

SHEFFIELD

LUINA

MT MEREDITH

 Bass Highway - Myalla Road A2/C229  Bass Highway - Trowutta Road A2/B22.

to LAUNCESTON

MT ROLAND

WARATAH

CORINNA R

LEVEN CANYON

MT CLEVELAND

ER

SA VA G

MT NORFOLK

GUNNS PLAINS CAVES

IVER

SANDY CAPE

HELLYER GORGE STATE RESERVE

SAVAGE RIVER NATIONAL PARK

TARKINE

WHY TE R

 Murchison Highway- Heemskirk Road A10/C249 (Zeehan)

MT BERTHA

MT FRANKLAND

MT BALFOUR

DONALDSO N

 Murchison Highway - Hampshire Link Road A10/B18 (Waratah/Burnie)

BALFOUR

FRANKLIN GORDON WILD RIVERS NATIONAL PARK


10. TARKINE MANAGEMENT 10.1 Tarkine Tourism Development Group

10.4 Environmentally Sustainable Development

10.1.1 Review land manager’s capacity, in financial and human resources, to effectively manage current and proposed Tarkine land and tourism assets and natural values.

10.4.1 Determine the visitor carrying capacity of the Tarkine and its potential impact, within the context of environmental sensitivity.

10.1.2 Create of a formal coordinating structure involving representatives of all major public land management and statutory bodies with responsibilities in the Tarkine to coordinate and drive:

10.4.2 Ensure all projects address Environmentally Sustainable Development principles. 10.4.3 Propose models/benchmarks for world’s best practice in sustainable tourism throughout the Tarkine.

 formal recognition or adoption of this Strategy  alignment of land use planning, management and development approval processes  establishment of a seamless ‘client management’ process for development applications  review the capacity of land managers to administer current assets and resources and the impact of these land management practices on proposed development opportunities

Leatherwood, Tarkine, Tourism Tasmania and Michael Walters

10.1.3 Retain the Tarkine Discussion Group with current representation:  Tarkine Discussion Group to be retitled ‘Tarkine Reference Group’  Tarkine Tourism Development Group to utilise the knowledge and expertise of the Tarkine Reference Group  Cradle Coast Authority to continue to convene and manage the Tarkine Reference Group

10.2 Investment 10.2.1 Develop a comprehensive Tarkine Investment Strategy that addresses the following:  identification of potential investment opportunities including site specific projects  identification of investor markets and match investors with development opportunities  investor specific support documentation 10.2.2 Provide advice to Governments and other funding sources regarding development opportunities within the Tarkine. 10.2.3 Development of ‘precinct plans’ for entry points and corridors identified in this Strategy. 10.2.4 Establish a ‘one stop shop’ for Tarkine development and investment enquiries.

10.3 Reserve Classification 10.3.1 Evaluate possible tourism implications of any future changes in the reserve classification within the Tarkine, including but not limited to:  World Heritage listing  National Heritage listing  National Park status TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 34


11. PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT 11.1 Tarkine Tracks and Trails Strategy 11.1.1 Develop a Tarkine Walking Tracks Strategy (see appendix 6). 11.1.2 Identify a range of walking tracks to meet the needs of all target markets. 11.1.3 Establish designated access to the Tarkine for 4WD and RV users. 11.1.4 Develop a Tarkine Mountain Bike track strategy. 11.1.5 Investigate options for multi purpose tracks within the Tarkine.

11.2 Establish River Based Activities within the Tarkine 11.2.1 Identify opportunities for multi-day canoeing experiences on the Arthur and Pieman Rivers. Pieman River reflections, Ken Boundy

11.2.2 Investigate options for development of guided pack rafting experiences.

11.3 Tarkine Challenge 11.3.1 Develop a high-profile tri-sports event including mountain biking, kayaking and running stages.

11.4 Aboriginal culture and heritage 11.4.1 Develop experiences that are aligned to the Tarkine’s Aboriginal history, culture and heritage. 11.4.2 Support partnerships between the Aboriginal community and Parks and Wildlife Services to establish an Information and Cultural Interpretive Centre at Arthur River.

11.5 Commercial Opportunities 11.5.1 Promote development of low impact/high yield visitor experiences including:  Wellness and health spa services associated with ‘pristine wilderness’ values  Journeys into the ‘Heart of the Tarkine’  Wilderness accommodation in remote coastal and rainforest locations  Adventure tourism activities (Phantom Valley)  Photography and arts related experiences

11.6 Educational Opportunities 11.6.1 Establish partnerships with educational institutions to develop the Tarkine as a ‘living classroom’. 11.6.2 Adopt ‘Stories of the Tarkine’ as a theme for interpretation and visitor and student education. 11.6.3 Develop oral histories as a basis for creation of interpretation, products and visitor experiences. 35 TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY


12. INDUSTRY DEVELOPMENT 12.1 Tarkine Industry Education/Training Program 12.1.1 Establish a training program for Tarkine businesses and service providers, to foster and promote:  Consistent presentation of the Tarkine brand, values and stories  High quality customer service standards  Environmentally sustainable tourism Based on:  The Tourism Accreditation Program (managed by the Tourism Industry Council of Tasmania  The ROC Program (Respecting Our Culture Program)  All or components of Ecotourism Australia accreditation and/or Green Globe or other environmental certification  Content to reflect the environmental and management positions of current and traditional land owners and/or managers 12.1.2 Encourage all business operators accessing or servicing the Tarkine to complete the Tarkine education/ training program. 12.1.3 Encourage public land managers to recognise and support the content and delivery of the Tarkine education/training program. 12.1.4 Develop a specific Tarkine education program for Tasmanian Visitor and Information Centre staff and volunteers throughout the State.

12.2 Tarkine Training/Education Pilot Project - Arthur River 12.2.1 Pilot the Tarkine education/training program with tourism and associated businesses in the Arthur River precinct.

12.3 Staff Development 12.3.1 Develop training and induction programs for tourism staff as part of Tarkine education/training program. 12.3.2 Investigate successful models for staff training and retention in remote visitor destinations.

12.4 Communication 12.4.1 Establish Tarkine Tourism Operators Group. 12.4.2 Develop Tarkine information and interpretation packages for tourism operators and service providers, local businesses, community groups, schools and the general community. 12.4.3 Develop a ‘Friends of the Tarkine’ database for regular communication and feedback. TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 36


13. MARKETING & PROMOTION 13.1 Promotion 13.1.1 Retain existing Tarkine marketing group. 13.1.2 Develop and implement a comprehensive Tarkine Promotional Plan for 2009/10 (and beyond). 13.1.3 Ensure Tarkine is included as a primary tourism product in the ‘North-West Coast’ and ‘Western Wilderness’ marketing zone campaigns. 13.1.4 Develop a specific Tarkine education program for Tasmanian Visitor and Information Centre staff and volunteers throughout the State. 13.1.5 Develop, promote and manage Tarkine Wordmark. 13.1.6 Identify brand-related pre, during and post trip collateral, including brochures and web site. 13.1.7 Promote inclusion of the Tarkine in Tourism Australia’s Australian National Landscapes Register.

13.2 Research 13.2.1 Continue ongoing tourism research specific to the Tarkine, including:  Market research to underpin the Tarkine brand, and the development of high-value visitor experiences  Identification of key triggers that could create ‘critical mass’ to support substantial regional/clusterbased visitation  Product testing as per the EMDA report

13.3 Brand 13.3.1 Complete the brand development strategy, including brand interpretation and creatives. 13.3.2 Develop and manage a ‘Tarkine Brand Style Guide’.

37 TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

Fungi, Arthur Pieman Conservation Area, Tourism Tasmania and Joe Shemesh


Pieman Head, Arthur Pieman Conservation Area, Tourism Tasmania and Joe Shemesh

The Tarkine is an enigma. Its name is not officially recognised and its physical boundaries are imprecise. Local communities have long considered it their place of work and recreation.

TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 38


(6) ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

(8) BIBLIOGRAPHY

The Cradle Coast Authority would like to acknowledge the financial support provided by the Federal Government represented by its Department of Industry, Tourism And Resources, Tourism Division, which has provided significant funding for this strategy.

Inspiring Place, Tarkine Wilderness Experience: Assessment of a Potential Visitor Experience in the Stanley Tourism Precinct (2006)

The Cradle Coast Authority would like to acknowledge the editorial input of Sarah Lebski, Tourism Consultant in the development of this strategy. The Cradle Coast Authority would like to acknowledge the input provided by the Tarkine Discussion Group throughout the development of this strategy, in particular the organisations represented:  Tourism Tasmania  Parks & Wildlife Services  Forestry Tasmania  Tasmanian Aboriginal Land & Sea Council  Heritage Tasmania  Circular Head, West Coast, Waratah Wynyard and Burnie City Councils  Circular Head, Waratah Wynyard and Burnie Tourism Associations  Arthur Pieman Conservation Area Management Committee  Tarkine National Coalition

(7) DISCLAIMER The Tarkine Tourism Development Strategy has been developed by the Cradle Coast Authority with the valued input of various stakeholders. The content of this strategy may not reflect the opinions or policies of all individuals or organisations who contributed to the process. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure that the contents of this strategy are factually correct, the Authority shall not be liable for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the contents of this publication.

Wing, Allison, The Power of Community Involvement in Tourism (Final Report)(2001) Planning for People, Tarkine Tourism Development Options Report (March 2008) Planning for People/Alistair Grinsbergs Heritage Solutions, Tourism Masterplan Template (June 2005) Economic and Market Development Advisers (EMDA) The Tarkine - Latent Demand Quantification, Phase 1, Consumer Segments (December 2007) Economic and Market Development Advisers (EMDA) The Tarkine - Latent Demand Quantification, Phase 2, Economic Evaluation of Visitor Scenarios (December 2007) Office of Aboriginal Affairs, Aboriginal Tourism Development Plan for Tasmania (2007) Housego, Anna, Creating the Tarkine Visitor Experience - The Way Forward (draft) (May 2006) Tourism Tasmania/Tourism Industry Council Tasmania, Tourism 21 Strategic Business Plan 2007-2010 Tourism Tasmania, New Directions for Our Island; Tourism Tasmania Three-Year Business Strategy, 2006-2009 Briggs, Jane Consumer Reaction to Proposed Marketing Zone Positions (June 2008) SCA Marketing/Moore Consulting, The Tarkine Opportunity, Market and Customer Analysis (September 2007) Cradle Coast Authority, Tarkine Tourism Development & Sustainable Management Plan (Milestone 2 Report) (June 2007) Colmar Brunton, Perceptions Research Study (2007) or Tourism Tasmania, Lighthouse Reports One and Two (2007) www.acfonline.org.au

(9) ATTACHMENTS 1. Tarkine Brand Pyramid 2. Walking Track Classification System Parks and Wildlife Service - 2004

COVER IMAGE Pieman Head, Arthur Pieman Conservation Area, Tourism Tasmania and Joe Shemesh 39 TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY


TARKINE BRAND MODEL

ESSENCE Powerful connections with wild places.

PERSONALITY Haunting spirit, wise ageless, enigmatic, commands respect and awe, inspires, powerful, has a wide range of expression (gentleness to fury), engages on its own terms.

CORE VALUES Wilderness, power and resilience of human story, mysterious.

Awe-inspiring, enlivening, thrilling, awakening, surprise.

FLAGSHIP ATTRIBUTES Globally-significant temperate rainforest. Aboriginal and European heritage. Dramatic, diverse places (wild rivers, rugged coastline, mountains, expansive views. Accessible wilderness. Rare and threatened species.

TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 40


41 TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

(AS 2156 Class 2)

(AS 2156 Class 1)

Usually less than 3km for a loop track or 1.5km if users have to double back.

Min 600mm, generally at least 1000mm. Max 2500mm, preferably less than 2000mm over most of track (Tracks more than 2000mm wide may be disorientating for users with impaired vision).

Gradient mostly less than 8°, max 15° over short (30m) sections.

Usually less than 1.5km for a loop track or 750m if users have to double back.

Min 1200mm, preferably at least 1500mm or with sections more than 1500mm wide every 30m and at bends to allow wheelchairs to pass. Max 2500mm, preferably less than 2000mm over most of track (Tracks more than 2000mm wide may be disorientating for users with impaired vision). Ramped sections should be exactly 1020mm wide with handrails on both sides.

Max gradient 5°; mostly less than 2°.

No steps; ramps <5°.

STEPS

Well drained, “shoe” standard. Firm even surface, eg concrete, asphalt, fine gravel, sawn wood planking. Edges clearly defined.

Steps and stairs may be included, with handrails where necessary for user safety.

Well drained, “shoe” standard. Reasonably firm eg stabilised soils, gravel, pine chips, stone. Note: Evenly laid cordwood may be suitable for some W2 tracks but cordwood is generally unsuitable for tracks likely to be used by aged or disabled people.

SURFACING & DRAINAGE

GRADIENT

WIDTH

LENGTH

Opportunity for large numbers of visitors to walk easily in natural environments which are provided with a moderate to high level of interpretation and facilities. Users can expect to learn about the natural environment with moderated to abundant opportunities to learn though interpretive signs or brochures. Users can expect frequent encounters with others.

Opportunity for large numbers of visitors, including those with reduced mobility, to undertake walks which are provided with a high level of interpretation and facilities. Users can expect abundant opportunities to learn about the natural environment thought interpretive signs or brochures. Users can expect frequent encounters with others.

OVERVIEW

W2 (Standard) nature trail

W1 Wheelchair standard nature trail (AS 2156 Class 3b)

(AS 2156 Class 3a)

“Boot” standard. May be rocky and uneven in places. Some mud and water to 100mm deep acceptable in places. Extensive hardening is acceptable where required.

Guidance for managers Gradient mostly <15° but may be steeper in places.

Min generally 500mm, generally at least 750mm. Max 1200mm.

No limit for any tracks of T1 standard or lower.

“Wet boot” standard. Stabilisation/hardening/ drainage mainly for environmental purposes but some concessions to user comfort. Surface may be rough over extended sections. Mud up to 200mm deep acceptable in places.

Guidance for managers Gradient mostly <20° but may be steeper in places.

Width variable along the length of the track. Min 500mm but short sections <500mm acceptable. Max 1000mm.

Opportunity for visitors to walk in slightly modified natural environments requiring a moderate level of fitness and where the provision of interpretation and facilities is not common. Users can expect opportunities to observe and appreciate the natural environment with limited provision of interpretive signage. Users can expect occasional encounters with others along the track.

T2 Track grade 2

T1 Track grade 1

Improved surfacing/drainage minimal – for environmental purposes only.

Guidance for managers Gradient limited by environmental considerations only.

No minimum width. Maximum 750mm.

Opportunity for visitors to explore and discover relatively undisturbed natural environments along defined and distinct tracks with minimal (if any) facilities. Users can expect opportunities to observe and appreciate the natural environment without the provision of interpretive signage. Users can expect opportunities for solitude with few encounters with others along the track.

(AS 2156 Class 4)

T3 Track grade 3

Improved surfacing/drainage minimal – for environmental purposes only.

Guidance for managers No restrictions.

Guidance for managers Gradient limited by environmental considerations only.

Improved surfacing/drainage minimal – for environmental purposes only.

Pads or tracks to be <500mm. Pads or tracks to be kept to an absolute minimum.

Opportunity for highly experienced walkers to explore remote and challenging natural areas without reliance on managed tracks. Users can expect extended periods of solitude with few encounters with others.

(AS 2156 Class 6+)

R Route *

No minimum width. Maximum 500mm.

Opportunity for visitors with advanced outdoor knowledge to find their own way along often indistinct tracks in remote areas. Users can expect frequent opportunities for solitude with few encounters with others.

(AS 2156 Class 5)

T4 Track grade 4


TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 42

Bridges to full width of track, signposts, interpretation facilities, viewing platforms. Shelters and benches are acceptable but not picnic tables. Track markers are unnecessary.

FACILITIES

Min 300mm on either side at ground level, 500mm at shoulder level, 2200mm height clearance. No obstacles.

Bridges to full width of track, signposts, interpretation facilities, viewing platforms. Shelters and benches are acceptable but not picnic tables. Track markers are unnecessary.

Min 300mm on either side at ground level, 500mm at shoulder level, 2200mm height clearance. No obstacles.

(AS 2156 Class 2)

(AS 2156 Class 1)

SCRUB CLEARANCE

W2 (Standard) nature trail

W1 Wheelchair standard nature trail

Signage Directional signposts at start of track and at junctions with tracks of grade T3 or higher. Junctions with T4 tracks may be unsignposted; otherwise signposts should refer to the main (T2) track only. Interpretative signs may be installed existing structures such as huts. Signs may also be installed for management and safety purposes. Note: Users should be warned that routefinding and progress on T2 tracks might be difficult under extreme conditions such as blizzards, flooding, or heavy snow.

Track Markers Track markers where necessary to ensure that direction is obvious except under extreme conditions (eg snow in non alpine areas).

Track Markers Track markers where necessary to ensure that direction is obvious except under extreme conditions (eg snow).

Signage Directional signposts at start of track and at junctions with tracks of grade T3 or higher. Junctions with T4 tracks may be unsignposted; otherwise signposts should refer to the main (T1) track only. Interpretative signs may be installed existing structures such as huts. Signs may also be installed for management and safety purposes. Note: Users should be warned that routefinding and progress on T1 tracks might be difficult under extreme conditions such as blizzards, flooding, or heavy snow.

Bridges and water crossings Bridges to be installed over all major creeks and rivers that are not normally safely and readily fordable at a depth of less than 500mm. Bridges may also be installed to minimise erosion at creek crossings. Log crossings and cable bridges acceptable; flying foxes or swing bridges acceptable over larger rivers. Some fords may be flood-prone.

Bridges and water crossings Bridges to be installed over all major creeks and rivers. Stepping-stones acceptable; fords acceptable where water is generally less than 100mm deep.

Mostly clear of scrub across width of track. Some fallen debris and other obstacles may be encountered occasionally.

(AS 2156 Class 3b)

(AS 2156 Class 3a)

Clear of scrub across width of track and to above head height. Fallen debris and other obstacles will be rarely encountered.

T2 Track grade 2

T1 Track grade 1

Signage Directional signposts at start of track and at junctions with tracks of grade T3 or higher. Junctions with T4 tracks may be unsignposted; otherwise signposts should refer to the main (T3) track only. Signs may also be installed for management and safety purposes.

Track Markers Track markers where necessary to ensure that direction is obvious along most of track, although route may not be obvious in snow.

Bridges and water crossings Bridges or other constructed crossings generally not required if major creeks and rivers are normally safely fordable, except for environmental purposes. Rough log bridges acceptable but not necessary. Flying foxes acceptable over rivers which cannot normally be forded, but some fords may be flood-prone. Delays maybe expected under abnormal conditions.

Sufficient to facilitate fairly easy navigation under normal conditions Fallen debris and other obstacles may be encountered.

(AS 2156 Class 4)

T3 Track grade 3

Signage Signage is limited and only for management purposes.

Track Markers T4 tracks may be marked but markers should be low-key. Track-head may be marked in a low-key manner. Some tracks may be difficult to follow in places. No other facilities except where necessary for environmental purposes – eg “fan out” signs.

Bridges and water crossings Bridges or other constructed crossings generally not provided, except for essential environmental purposes. Where possible natural crossings are preferred. Flood delays acceptable and expected under abnormal conditions.

Minimal. As a general rule living woody vegetation will not be cut except where to ensure the track continues to be navigable.

(AS 2156 Class 5)

T4 Track grade 4

Signage Signage generally not provided.

Track Markers None except where necessary for environmental purposes – eg track markers to concentrate usage in bottlenecks on alpine traverses. Signs may be installed for essential management purposes.

Bridges and water crossings None except for essential environmental purposes. Natural crossings are preferred.

None.

(AS 2156 Class 6+)

R Route *


43 TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

No restrictions.

ROUTEGUIDES

No restrictions.

PUBLICITY

No restrictions.

No restrictions.

No restrictions.

No restrictions.

RECOMMENDED MAXIMUM PART SIZE

No restrictions.

MAXIMUM USAGE

No restrictions.

(AS 2156 Class 2)

(AS 2156 Class 1)

CAMPSITES1

W2 (Standard) nature trail

W1 Wheelchair standard nature trail

May be included in routeguides but routeguide authors will be encouraged to consult with the Service to ensure that published information and advice is compatible with management objectives.

No restrictions – may be included in maps, tourist brochures etc.

Recommended max party size 13. While recognising circumstances for group sizes up to 13 persons for environmental and crowding reasons, party sizes of 6 or fewer will be encouraged.

To be defined where required for social, environmental and management purposes.

May be included in routeguides but routeguide authors will be encouraged to consult with the Service to ensure that published information and advice is compatible with management objectives.

Generally no restrictions, but some types of publicity may be discouraged if overall usage restrictions are necessary.

Recommended max party size 13. While recognising circumstances for group sizes up to 13 persons for environmental and crowding reasons, party sizes of 6 or fewer will be encouraged

To be defined where required for social, environmental and management purposes.

Campsites for up to 12 tents, preferably dispersed in groups of up to four tents. Toilets to be provided at sites of more than 10 tents, or where necessary for environmental or health purposes.

(AS 2156 Class 3b)

(AS 2156 Class 3a)

At major camping nodes, campsites for up to 25 tents preferably disperse in groups of up to five tents. Enclosed toilets to be provided at sites of more than 10 tents, or where necessary for environmental or health purposes.

T2 Track grade 2

T1 Track grade 1

Routeguides are acceptable but should be sparsely written – routeguide authors will be encouraged to follow Service guidelines.

Potential publicists (eg magazine editors) will be encouraged to keep publicity low-key. T3 tracks may be included on maps.

Recommended max party size 8. Party sizes of less than 6 will be encouraged.

To be defined where required for social, environmental and management purposes.

Campsites for up to 8 tents, preferably dispersed in group of two to four tents. Toilets of minimal design to be provided where necessary for environmental or health purposes.

(AS 2156 Class 4)

T3 Track grade 3

Inclusion of T4 tracks in routeguides will be strongly discouraged.

All publicity to be discouraged. Not to be included on maps except for internal management purposes. Authors will be encouraged to keep route descriptions vague (eg in accounts of past expeditions). Photographers and publishers will be encouraged not to identify the precise location of photographs taken in areas accessible only by T4 tracks.

Recommended max party size 6. Party sizes of four will be encouraged. Parties of up to 8 acceptable on some T4 tracks in the Central Plateau SRRZ, subject to environmental conditions.

To be defined where required for social, environmental and management purposes.

Visibly impacted (long-term) sites for up to 4 tents. Toilets of minimal design to be provided only where necessary for environmental purposes.

(AS 2156 Class 5)

T4 Track grade 4

Publication of routeguides (including mention of “Routes” in routeguides) to be strongly discouraged. Service user notes will promote a “fan out” policy except where concentration of usages is desirable for environmental purposes.

All publicity will be discouraged. Routes not to be identified on maps except for internal (ie Service) management purposes. Authors will be encouraged to keep route descriptions vague (eg in accounts of past expeditions). Photographers and publishers will be encouraged not to identify the precise location of photographs taken in trackless areas.

Recommended maximum party size 6. Party sizes of four will be encouraged. Parties of up to 8 acceptable in some parts of the Central Plateau SRRZ, subject to environmental conditions including pad and track formation.

To be defined where required for social, environmental and management purposes.

Formation of campsites to be avoided where possible. Visibly impacted sites for up to four tents, preferably at least partially vegetated, are acceptable where unavoidable or desirable for environmental purposes. No toilets provided unless essential for environmental purposes.

(AS 2156 Class 6+)

R Route *


TARKINE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 44

Permitted but licences are required and numbers of trips may be restricted.

(AS 2156 Class 3b)

(AS 2156 Class 3a)

Permitted but licences are required and numbers of trips may be restricted.

T2 Track grade 2

T1 Track grade 1

Permitted but licences are required and numbers of trips may be restricted. Advertising and publicity should confirm T3 guidelines see 10.2.3.

(AS 2156 Class 4)

T3 Track grade 3

Licenses may be issued on condition that guided parties conform to the recommended party-size limit and to the guidelines relating to the publicity of tracks and destinations (see 10.2.3).

(AS 2156 Class 5)

T4 Track grade 4

* Applies to all trackless areas regardless of zoning. 1 In suitable localities an area might have more than one campsite. 2 Specifications should be read in conjunction with Section 10.2.3 of the Walking Track Management Strategy for the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area: Volume 1 – Main Report.

Licenses are required.

Licenses are required.

(AS 2156 Class 2)

(AS 2156 Class 1)

GUIDED TOURS 2

W2 (Standard) nature trail

W1 Wheelchair standard nature trail

Licenses may be issued on the following condition: guided parties must conform to the recommended party-size limit; guided tour operators must observe the guidelines in relation to the publicity of routes and destinations (see 10.2.3); guided tours must be conducted in such a way as to avoid contributing to unplanned track and campsite formation. In particular, operators will be required to avoid frequent use of any trackless route.

(AS 2156 Class 6+)

R Route *


Australian Government Department or Resources Energy and Tourism This strategy has been produced by the Cradle Coast Authority with the assistance of a grant provided by the Federal Government, Department of Industry, Tourism And Resources, Tourism Division.

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The Tarkine provides unique, intense and powerful nature-based experiences that are well managed and sustainable. appropriate access impro...

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