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Here (above) we have an abandoned bus way up in Icelandic countryside, where no one goes and no one sees.. When I came across the bus, it was filled with heaps of ash from the volcano eruptions in 201 0 and 2011 (from the now internationally famous Eyjafjallajรถkull of course). When I saw it my mission was clear, I would add to the landscape using the bus as my surface (or canvas) and I wouldn't look back. Considering it was in ruins I fealt no guilt in taking over its broken state, mine for transforming. However vandalistic this may seem, I attempted to return the vehicle on some level back to nature with my use of color. Only camouflage colors were used in my attempt to soften the view (regardless of shapes or images I created on it). Although the photograph in front of you is the documentation I choose to explain this project, the process itself was perhaps more the work I had in mind (not necessarily the end result). So of course recorded myself whilest in action and worked on other experiments simultaneously on location.


When I was a young boy of 1 4 I developed a fascination for street tagging and its impact on the inviortment in which it inhabits. How it alters the atmosphere, decorates othertwise (questionably) dull two dimensional spaces and the undeniable trace it leaves of the tagger. This fascination quickly worked its way through over to other variations of graffiti/street art. It wasn't long until I took to the camera (video/digital) and started trying to combine the two fields, both in the pursuit of documentation and video projects. Eventually I reached the result you see before you, different varations of screen printing (see t-shirts) creating the opportunity to be one with the my own work.


To the right you see a mixed media piece on canvas, (primary materials; spray paint, led and oil/acrylic paints). As many people, I reflect on death every now and then (even more so as an artist). This piece is maybe more a reflection on youth and life rather than obvious, death. The repetitive, almost roller print effect is a quality in two dimensional creation I been fascinated by since early childhood, and intend to experiment with even further. Below we have a very colorful painting that relfects on the ideas that all may not be as it seems. If you stare long enough into the vivid and (at times) confusing ripples you should (as intended) start to see what lies beneath the surface of the colorfull textures but the mysteries in them as well. *(Hint: it's staring straight at you).

To the right (below) is a picture of the smokingarea in my previous school MIR (The Reykjavík school of visual arts). To the right (top) is a model I crafted recreacting the smokers territory. Random you may think, the fact of the matter is that I didn´t have to make a model of this area (it wasn't assigned to me). As a subject to feature in any kind of art piece, I primarily wanted to capture the essence of how others percieve this area.


This is a piece I made for the community center for the town of Garðabær. I salvaged the billdboard you see in front of you from a storage facility in the town itself. It's a photograph of a well known designer from Iceland who was currentlly (at the time) hosting an exhibition in the town of Garðabær. The first thing I did in regards to the process of this piece, was paint the towns logo on the subjects face. Secondly I painted a heart in her left hand, and finally I positioned a spray-paint can in her right. Each individually symbolising their own relations with the subject and in untiy create a logo of my own design, calling out that the town of Garðabær should open up to concept of street art (excluding of course vandalism).


Here we have a piece that was more a study of different facial aspects of a very versitile group of people. What originally started as an excercize quickly molded into a rather inspiring project. Leaving the faces imperfect or unfinished was an intentional choice to create an almost dream like quality to the work. Like foggy flashes from memories past creating a new perception of a crowded space, an almost emotional or mental perception of space. Not having had too much experience with oil colors at the time, this project and several others like it stimulated my taste for (and conception of) oil colors. (Done with oil paints on canvas).


This is a commissioned project I did for the local Freemason establishment here in Iceland. Chosen out of three primary contestants, I was given the opportunity to work with the head architect and take in the entire situation as a massive learning experience in the pursuit of senergy. As you are most likely well aware, access to such a building (let alone contribute to the art/design history of the site/organization) is not granted lightly, so I took particular honor in the opportunity. As seen, the Masons wanted the entire rounded ceiling of one of their larger halls to be a portrail of a serene and yes heavenly section of sky. Inspired of course by art history, in this project I took a more traditional approuch to painting and stylistic choices.


This is me in action, like so many artists throughout history I had mixed feelings about the physical efforts put into arching myself to paint the ceiling, but in the end I assured myself that my labor payed off. All I could think about during the process was how trying it could have been if the subject matter had been different, even though I dare say it took its toll. It is a combination of spray painting and traditional brush painting, all in all I would say the likeness of the sky really shined through for it. Atmospheric effects in the sky tend to be themselves versitile and various, (atleast up here in the north). Specifically the time period the sky is meant to be portraying, is a beautiful and pure breif moments between sunset and sunrise (between realities). I was tempted to fill in the entire sky with clouds, but in the end felt compelled to allow the (almost) endless blue space to remain. Reminding us of the enless unknown..


One summer I was staying at a rental cottage in the country for a fishing trip. The owner had a great talent for telling stories, most of which were merely tales of previous guests. As dull as it sounds, his discriptions managed to breathe such life into his stories that many of the characters came alive to me in my imagination. This (imagined) portrait is of one of his very discriptional characters. As he told me all sort of stories about him, I began to wonder if he would eventually describe me to others in such a vivid fashion.. and how? Would they be able to imagine me? Would it be accurate? I suppose what I am trying to say is that this process has all been more of an attempt to create an image through anothers discription than anything else. An attempt to cast a view over something (someone) I have never seen before, and I find that to be a remarkable experience. Experience through another persons experience.


The picture below is another altered "found work". It's a commercial poster for pretty universal living room furniture and appliences. While examining it I couldn't help but reflect on my relationship with my own living room through time, and as result others with their own. Continuing my study of the applications of street art teniques and styles in other two dimensional works, I decided to "voice" the most overwhelming aspect of my relationship with the living room (the television). Tag reads T.V-O.D.


The inspiration for this piece comes from several directions, stretching from work I had done before in classic model sketching classes to more contemporary directions (models, movies and more). While examining myself in the process of making this work I noticed that the poses I was putting my (female) subjects in were borderline erotic, although I had perhaps not intended them to be originally. Through self-reflection and examination I discovered that the figures almost had to be in such positions to really express their gender and attitude, especially when it came to the visual effect of the material being used. Although everything in this paragraph I can personally argue against at the same time, it is these kind of conflicts that make researching new materials and subject matter exciting for me as an artist. Standards are an illusion.


Continuing my interest with street art culture, here we have a rather dark humored selfportrait of an exagerated mental circumstance/reality. Although the piece appears merely spray-painted, it is in fact a combination of stencil and assemblage/collage work on canvas. As suspected the original host was a photograph of course (see cover). Multimedia work for me is in fact nothing more than to express my interest for the various fields creative arts have to offer.


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