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Cockenzie & Port Seton Amateur Radio Club is affiliated to the Radio Society of Great Britain and holds the call signs MM0CPS and GM2T which are used for our special event and contest entries. The Club was formed by Bob Glasgow GM4UYZ in 1984, to help the local amateurs get to know each other. Far from being just a local club we have members regularly attending from the Borders, Dumfries, Strathclyde, Fife and Newcastle. The Club meets on the first Friday of every month (Second Friday of January) in the lounge of the Thorntree Inn on the old Cockenzie High Street from 7pm till late.

We are now into the month of February already, where did January disappear too, and already we are beginning to see the nights getting longer and the dreary dark nights of winter starting to fade away, thank goodness says I!!!! I also cannot believe this is the 30th year of the club’s existence and thanks to Robin MM0VTV and Bob GM4IKT who pointed this out to me. Thirty years going and hasn’t time flown by quickly, little did I expect the club still to be running when I started it back in 1984. Thanks to the efforts of everyone it is the case and long may it continue. I would like to do something special for this so any suggestions?

First of all I must thank all of you who turned up for the January Club Night. It would have been nice to see a lot more of you and a massive turnout will occur…I do keep dreaming. Seriously though I would love to see all those who have promised to come along, those who have gone by the wayside come to club night and join in. Sadly I have to announce the passing of GM3VEI, Ian Sheffield’s wife who sadly passed away on Christmas Day. There is never a good time but Christmas day makes it feel worse than any other time. Our deepest sympathies go out to Ian and his family at this time. What has happened since last month? January was its normal quiet month and to be honest I use it as a definite rest period before everything kicks off again for the year. I took part in the RSGB 80M AFS

CW contest and enjoyed the short time that I was on. As I write this I hope to maybe get on the SSB leg but that will depend on finishing time of the advanced class.

I have changed our Activity Night to be an Activity Day after I received this suggestion from a club member. His reasoning being that not everyone is available at the set period so therefore cannot take part, whereas if it runs for a 24 hour period people can join in at anytime. As I write this the January event is still to happen so I hope many of you will have taken part. I Hope to have some sort of write up for this newsletter.

On the teaching front we will have started our Advanced (Full) training session of the 2013/2014 training year. It is a big class with 12 candidates... Their exam is on Saturday 1st March and I’m sure you will join with me and wish them all the best. There will be one more Foundation Course starting on 8th March which will be my last up until September as I definitely need a sabbatical. If you know of anyone who is interested will you ask them to get in contact with me direct ASAP and I will get all their required details. The events program for the year starts this month on Friday 21st with another of John MM0JXI’s Radio Check Night. The radio check night has certainly been well attended in previous years and has been very useful to (Continued on page 2)


The Club

(Continued from page 1)

The Club is run in a very informal way, just a group of like minded people doing something they enjoy!

the extent it has found faulty radios so why not bring along what you have and give it a MOT. THIS REALLY IS A WORTHWHILE EVENT so I hope you will all take advantage of it. Lastly our April event on 18th will be a Wintest Introduction night to show the basics of using our preferred logging program for Special Events and Contesting

This does not mean that we don’t do anything, we enter (and win!) contests, train newcomers, hold talks and video nights and run a popular annual Junk Sale. Our newsletter has won the Practical Wireless ‘Spotlight’ competition on several occasions. The Club supports the British Heart Foundation in memory of a member who died from heart disease by donating the profits from some of the events we hold, we have raised over £15,832 since 1994.

Supported by BT Community Champions

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events please read the Events Column or go onto the web-site and you will find them all in the calendar area. I think that is about it for this month, I am sure there was something else but I cannot think what it is, sign of old age or whatever. Anyway enjoy the newsletter.

Bob GM4UYZ

On all our events I hope that you will all make an effort to attend as many as you can throughout the year. For full up to date list of

The original article was written back in August band at a certain time, and there you'll have 2012 but since then the set-up has changed. it. Of course, whether you like what you see See blow for the way to set it up now....... is up to you. The Reverse Beacon Network (RBN) is a revolutionary new idea. Instead of beacons actively transmitting signals, the RBN is a network of stations listening to the bands and reporting what stations they hear, when and how well. It should be said that it is only looking for CW CQ’s and not SSB CQ’s.

The Reverse Beacon Network depends on volunteer stations. Currently, we have a few dozen, some active almost 24/7, others coming up only occasionally. We have decent coverage in North America and Europe, but can always use more. It needn't cost a lot, or tie up your station equipment.

So why should you care? Well, to begin with, you can see band openings in near-real time on an animated map. You can call a quick CQ, and see which reverse beacons hear you, and how strong you are.

http://www.reversebeacon.net/index.php

The above is an extract from the web site (link above) which gives a basic outline on what it achieves. Can we at CPSARC make use of this well the answer is Yes. It was Brian G3UJE But the real breakthrough is in the database who brought this to my attention as he has of past "spots". You can instantly find out used it in the 80M Club Championship conwhat stations, from a given country or zone, tests. Since 2012 I have used it in a few conhave been heard, at what times and on what tests that I have done and also found it benefrequencies. You can see when you've been ficial for the RSGB IOTA contest to see who is spotted, who spotted you, and how loud you calling CQ on CW as it could show up new were. multipliers. By configuring VE7CC (DX Cluster program) and WtDXTelnet the CQ spots can "But wait," as they say on the TV ads, be displayed in the Band Map of the active "there's more!" Now, for the first time, you radio station. Like with DX-Spots by just clickcan compare your signal with those of your ing on the spot it changes the radio to the friends and competitors, in near real time or correct frequency and mode so all that is left historically. If you wonder how your signal to do is “work” the station. stacked up during last weekend's contests, the Signal Comparison Tool will give you real, quantitative data. Tell it what stations you want to compare, based on signals heard by a given reverse beacon on a certain


that is not for this explanation.

(Continued from page 2)

CONFIGURATION

Download a copy of the VE7CC program from the website http://www.ve7cc.net/

Overall diagram: (Was) VE7CC Connected to DX-Cluster (DXC)

VE7CC Connected to RBN

The same site gives lots of information on what you can actually set up the program to do. The next stage is to create a VE7CC shortcut and place it on the PC’s desktop screen

wtDXTelnet connected to VE7CC (DXC)

wtDXTelnet connected to VE7CC (RBN)

Rename the VE7CC shortcut. to VE7CC DXC/RBN. At CPSARC we already have purchased WinTest and it is installed on our PC’s. “wtDXTelnet” is part of WinTest so create a wtDXTelnet shortcut

Win-Test

Rename shortcut to wtDXTel DXC/RBN which will be setup to receive the normal DX Cluster spots and the Reverse Beacon Spots Setting up VE7CCDXC/RBN

Overall diagram: (Now) Click on theVE7CC shortcut and load the program. V7CCDXC/RBN should now be open VE7CC Connected to DX-Cluster (DXC) Click on Configuration and it opens the following dropdown menu. wtDXTelnet connected to VE7CC (DXC)

Win-Test

Select User Info

VE7CC DXC/RBN Settings Callsign is GM4UYZ Name is Bob

As you can see now there is quite a significant change in what is connected together but this change has made it so much simpler The following is a step by step guide on setting the system up. VE7CC is very powerful on what can be done with it but

QTH is Port Seton Click OK (Continued on page 4)

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Club Attire The club has a design for Club Tee-shirts, Poloshirts, Sweat-Shirts, Fleeces and Jackets and all of these can be obtained from the address below.

(Continued from page 3)

Click on Configuration and it opens the following dropdown menu.

Using the drop down arrow in the Node selection box choose the required DX-Cluster VE7CC DXC/RBN Settings Select VE7CC-1 or cluster that uses CC Cluster Click Apply That is the VE7CC program set up, so now we need to set up the wtDXTelnet programs.

Select Port/Logging Program Setting Up wx wtDXTelDXC/RBN Click on the wtDXTelnet shortcut and load the programs. wtDXTelDXC/RBN

When making an order please quote ‘Cockenzie & Port Seton Amateur Radio Club’ as this will ensure that the Club Logo will be placed on the required ordered garments. If you wish to add your call -sign to the logo then please ask at the time of the order.

Cost will depend on garment and should cover the garment and logo, call-sign addition will be extra.

Order from:

PATRICIA BEWSEY DESIGNS, UNIT 11, FENTON BARNS RETAIL VILLAGE, FENTON BARNS, NORTH BERWICK, EAST LOTHIAN EH39 5BW Tel/Fax: 01620 850788

VE7CC DXC/RBN Settings Tick Enable Telnet Tick Use Port 7300 Click Apply Ensure Cluster (Telnet) is ticked Click on Cluster (Telnet) and it opens the following Select Telnet Cluster Box.

wtDXTelDXC Settings Click on Options Select DXCluster properties Set Profile to profile-1 Set Profile Name to profile-1 Set Hostname/IP to 127.0.0.1 Set Port to 7300 Tick No password required Tick Try to restore connection automatically Click OK wtDXTelDXC/RBN Click on Options Select Win-Test Network Properties Set Broadcast IP Address to 192.168.1.255 Set Port Number to 9871 Set Application ID to TELNET Click OK That is the VE7CC and wxDXTelnet programs set up so now we need to set up the Win-Test program.

Mobile: 07970 920431 (Continued on page 5)

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Setting up WinTest to receive Spots over Ethernet Click on Win-Test and load the programs Select Options Select Configure Interfaces In the Ethernet Section Tick Enable Ethernet Network Set Broadcast IP Address to 192.168.1.255 Set Port Number to 9871 Everything is now configured....... RUNNING the DX-CLUSTER and RBN and feeding Win-TEST Load the VE7CC programs, wtDXTelnet program and the WinTest program. Configure Win-Test for the required contest or DX-Pedition i.e IOTA, CQWW CW, etc On the VE7CC program Select Connect

The wtDXTelnet programs do in the following order...  Click on the wtDXTelDXC/RBN shortcut to run.  Check that the settings for wtDXCTelDXC/RBN under DX Properties are set as above.  Select DXCluster  Select Connect The VE7CCDXC/RBN will now connect to the DX Cluster Network and showing any new spots. At this point there will be no RBN spots. See the bandmap on the right

To start receiving the RBN spots then Go to the VE7CCDXC/RBN Program and at the bottom of the screen there is a place you can type DX Cluster commands Type: SET/SKIMMER and press Enter

Spots will now start to be displayed on the VE3CC Cluster, wtDXTelDXC/RBN on the band map

DX Spots are shown as normal RBN Spots show a # in front of the callsign i.e. #W3TW

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Thanks to the sterling work by M0RNR, our club has been added to the excellent Clublog system developed by Michael Wells G7VJR. www.clublog.org The system allows members to upload their logs in ADIF format and have them displayed in a table with all the other club members. Clublog also has great facilities for tracking your DXCC status etc so is well worth taking the time to register and get your log uploaded. To update your log with the next set of contacts (SSB, CW or Data) you can simply upload your whole log again and the system will take care of the duplicates. Alternatively you can export the bits you want from your own log and just upload that. The tables we’ll publish here will be the club, filtered by the current year, so everyone starts a new year at 0 contacts.

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A friend from the Newcastle area had sent me an email saying that a Heathkit GDO was for sale in his club for ten quid, there was also an HRO receiver for £80. I jumped at the chance of the GDO (always a useful gadget) but it was only when I was having a cuppa at 0300 because I was not sleeping well, that I thought “Well, why not the HRO?” It was duly brought up to me, and the first impression was that it must have been stored in a damp attic for some considerable time! The tuning dial was too stiff to turn, all bolts were rusted and it was thick with dust.

I’m 93 years old, my right hand shakes, so it was obvious I would need some help. But the circuitry I knew like the back of my hand, so it was the physical repairs that I would need help with. In the meantime, I filled the tuning dial gearbox with penetrating oil, cleaned all the valve pins with switch cleaner (oh happy days of yore) and did the same with the coil contacts and spring sets.

All except two valves showed red heaters after a few minutes – I thought replacement (6D6 and type 48) would be difficult, but they were easily obtainable on the net.. I then applied 120v H.T. and waited. Nothing happened!! It was as dead as the dodo. One old dodge I used to use was to put your finger on the top cap of the valve because in those days the top cap was always the grid. A finger on the stage preceding the output valve did produce a hum, so that was something, the audio section was working. Tracing out the wiring around the second detector showed it was not like the standard diagram, and after much hunting on the net, I discovered the receiver was an RBJ model – produced in 1940 for the navy. This was a bit of a blow because it did not have the special band-spread coils, only general coverage. It was ability to spread an amateur band over nearly twenty revolutions of the tuning dial that made the standard model (usually M or MX) so attractive. In the end I rewired the second detector conventionally for rectification and provision of AVC. Now a finger on the last I.F stage produced a little noise. Progress!!

I have no sig generator these days, but I was not aiming for perfection, so using the GDO as that, I managed to tune up the two I.F stages on the crystal frequency of 456 kHz All the old rolled-paper capacitors (we called (kc/s!!) using my TS590 to show the exact frequency which I did by winding a piece of them condensers) were oozing wax, and wire round the oscillator valve and holding it needed replacement. A much younger close to the TS590 aerial socket. With the friend of mine, Peter Barclay very kindly offered to do that and without his assistance I.F,’s now roughly aligned, signals were apthe work could not have been done. When plied to the aerial from the GDO and using he had done this, the next thing for me to do the coil pack marked “7-14 MEGACYCLES” I did find 7, 10 and 14 ,Hz bands. But nothing was apply a little bit of power and see what from outside, so sensitivity was very low. I blew up. upped the H.T. to 220v but with little im-


(Continued from page 6)

provement, so I replaced the two R.F. valves and the set was now quite different. The I.F,s and the BFO were also set up correctly, and now I had a good receiver. Carefully adjusting the crystal phasing and the selectivity control does enable the set to be used in a real “single-signal” mode, and it was probably the first commercial receiver which would do this in its day. Of course, it is much more difficult to use than the TS590 and there is no frequency read-out which we are so used to these days. But I’m a radio operator of the old school and as far as actual results are concerned, there is little difference in listening to a DX station on the HRO than on the TS590 – once you have to the station properly tuned in!! THAT is the difference.

15th January 2014 00:00 to 23:59 After a suggestion from a club member asking could we not make it an Activity Day otherwise run it for 24 hours? This allows everyone to take part at least at sometime through the day; otherwise it would help shift workers, others who can manage the evening slot, etc. So a day before the actual day I made the change, Apologies first: Duncan MM0GZZ Sorry bob it was carpet bowling night John GM3BST I was not on at all. GM3BST is inactive at the moment. Bob 2M0KLL Not very well at the moment Bob, did not take part. Here's hoping for the next one; it's a very good idea Sean 2M0SRY Didn’t get chance to get on Reports: Bob GM4UYZ (18:00 to 19:30) This was the first of our monthly activity days. Due to work commitments it was after 18:00 before I got chance to get on. It turned out a bad night for band conditions. For me I started at 15M and worked my way down to 80M. On 15M I heard

If anyone knows where I can get a set of band-spread coils, please let Bob GM4UYZ know and you will be my friend for life (not likely to be all that long anyway!) Altogether a great project, and thanks to the help I’ve had, successfully achieved. If you want to have a go at using a set that did wonderful service during the war, arrange to visit me some time and see for yourself what we used.

John GM3BST

two very weak stations but could not make out who they were, onto 20M again only a couple of weak stations and not workable even called CQ for ages but no joy, down onto 40M could hear some German stations and reasonable signals so found a frequency and called CQ on SSB and CW again for ages but again no takers and lastly down onto 80M again very poor and also called CQ on SSB and CW. I then came across a Norwegian station calling CQ on CW and bingo a station logged. That was it although I persevered until 19:30 I decided it was going to be another fruitless night so I called it a night. The bottom line was ONE QSO’s for the night. See below reports coming back from others relaying the how they got on. Looking forward to the February event to see what if any are the changes.... It is a great chance on these events for getting on the air and away from the couch, TV and even computers? Andy MM0GYG (15:00 to 17:00) I managed only a few contacts in yesterday's activity day. The log is attached. I did hear many American stations mostly talking to other American stations. These were mostly mid-west, North Dakota, Minnesota. However, their QSOs were quite long and I wasn't able to contact them myself before the big European 1.5kW stations took their notice. I would have tried 10m but I don't have a good antenna for that band. Not as good as December when I had QSOs with KC3BJW,

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frequency but nothing was heard. I use a vertical tri-band co-linear on 2m and 70cms, normally CO2GL, 4L1BR, T6MH, KC4TIE CO8LY, CU3HN, YD2SM, W4PKU, running 5 or 10 watts. VE3OIJ, PY4HGM, UA9XCQ and KB8BIP -- all on one page of All in all I had an enjoyable day. As usual, I did a lot more lismy paper log! tening than transmitting! Bob GM4IKT (09:00 to 09:30 and 15:55 to 16:06) Did not manage to get on for very long, just 2 short spells 6 The best DX was by Bob on SSB with VK6BP in Australia at a contacts altogether, best DX VK6BP distance of 13825kms Alan MM0WXT (14:30 to 16:45) A full detail of all QSO’s made in the table below. I managed to get a functioning antenna up and managed a "piddly" small amount of contacts. I know the evening time was a real struggle for those of us Chris 2M0YSR who could only manage operating then but for those who got Only manage 1 contact. on earlier it showed a different story. It will be interesting to Jamie MM0JMI see how the Activity Days progress over the rest of the year Managed a few QSO’s all on data and all being well it might show some statistics of how propaJohn MM6DQY (18:30 to 20:00) gation varies. Hope everyone will at least take part and submit As expected, 10m-20m is dead as a doornail :) I really need to their logs or even if they don’t make any contacts tell us about organise a 40m-80m antenna for those long winter months what it was like. After the year hopefully it will show us propawhere the sun is down when I leave for work and when I get gation trends, etc. Good DXing in 2014. home. I've seen a few verticals which claim to be < 1.5:1 SWR from 10m to 80m (presumably using coils) so could be worth Thanks to those who came on it was much appreciated. looking into or would a quarter wave with groundplane be better? Bob GM4UYZ Tom GM4LRU I started my day around 10.15am. My first and furthest away contact was with RV9DC on 21 MHz in Asiatic Russia. He was collecting WAB squares along with his friend OH3GZ in Finland. Mine was a new square for them so I got “two for the price of one” contacts! I worked a couple more Russians but heard many others who were communicating only in Russian. In the early afternoon I got an Italian station. I had hoped to work some US stations, but they were just too weak for me to copy that day. 7 MHz was in excellent shape in the morning for inter-G working, with little background noise. My most pleasant contact of the day on that band was with John GM3TCW in Newmains. We exchanged 5 and 9 plus 20 reports. He had spent holidays at Seton Sands Camps in the fifties when the accommodation Consisted mainly of wooden huts and converted railway wagons. He and some friends had attended our Junk Night and he made a comment on the excellence of the catering! As darkness set in and the Europeans crept in, I made a couple of French and German contacts but there was a bit of QSB with them. My HF antenna is a simple Double Extended Zepp which is one and a half wavelengths on 21 and also works fine on 7, both bands without using an ATU. It runs approximately North and South and is about 25 feet in height. I normally run around 100 watts. In the evening I made three contacts, on 2m and 70cms FM. Had it been a Thursday night I would have had six or seven to report on 2m! I put out several CQ calls on the 2m SSB calling (Continued from page 7)

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QSO's MADE BY ALL THOSE WHO TOOK PART 2014 January Activity Day - 15th January 2014

QSO

Band

Ant

Power (W)

Mode

Station Worked

Your Locator

Their Locator

Distance (Kms)

Time

Operator

1

15

Small Tx Loop

100

SSB

HA5EBP

IO85jw

JN97nl

1,940

15:00

MM0GYG

2

20

Small Tx Loop

100

SSB

SP3EWP

IO85jw

JO91bs

1,466

15:30

MM0GYG

3

17

Small Tx Loop

100

SSB

S52QM

IO85jw

JN67cf

1,617

16:00

MM0GYG

4

20

Small Tx Loop

40

PSK31

YL3BF

IO85jw

KO06mm

1,491

16:30

MM0GYG

5

20

Small Tx Loop

80

CW

IZ6FCK

IO85jw

JN62vq

1,908

17:00

MM0GYG

6

10

3 ele

400

SSB

VK6BP

IO85mx

PH12dc

13,825

09:06

GM4IKT

7

10

3ele

400

SSB

RM22HD

IO85mx

KO85kv

2,449

09:24

GM4IKT

8

17

dipole

400

SSB

S57DX

IO85mx

JN75dx

1,268

15:55

GM4IKT

9

20

3 ele

400

SSB

LY5A

IO85mx

KO15qu

1,633

15:58

GM4IKT

10

10

3 ele

400

SSB

6W/F6IRS

IO85mx

?

4,736

16:05

GM4IKT

11

10

3 ele

400

SSB

W1AW/3

IO85mx

?

5,432

16:06

GM4IKT

12

80

"L" Wire

100

CW

LI9DFA

IO85mx

JP50xh

997

09:06

GM4UYZ

13

21

Multi-Band

50

SSB

IZ4ZZB

IO85lu

JN54pm

1,617

17:01

2M0YSR

14

15

longwire

40

PSK

SN8WOSP

IO85JV

KN19cn

1,840

14.35

MM0WXT

15

15

longwire

40

PSK

RA1TL

IO85JV

KO67px

2,201

14.48

MM0WXT

16

20

longwire

23

PSK

DL4LTM

IO85JV

JO61ei

1,143

15.18

MM0WXT

17

15

longwire

27

PSK

IW7EGJ

IO85JV

JN90ci

2,790

15.44

MM0WXT

18

21

Dipole

100

SSB

RV9DC

IO85mx

MO09cs

3,619

10:15

GM4LRU

19

21

Dipole

100

SSB

OH3GZ

IO85mx

KP11oq

1,622

10:15

GM4LRU

20

7

Dipole

100

SSB

GM3TCW

IO85mx

IO85bs

62

10:20

GM4LRU

21

21

Dipole

100

SSB

RM22DU

IO85mx

KO85kv

2,449

10:30

GM4LRU

22

21

Dipole

100

SSB

UX1AA

IO85mx

KO70kh

2,568

10:30

GM4LRU

23

21

Dipole

100

SSB

IZ4ZZB

IO85mx

JN54pm

1,623

14:00

GM4LRU

24

7

Dipole

100

SSB

F5JHD

IO85mx

JN28go

966

16:00

GM4LRU

25

7

Dipole

100

SSB

DJ9RQ

IO85mx

JO43ib

819

16:00

GM4LRU

26

433

Vertical

10

FM

MM0RBN

IO85mx

IO86od

28

21:00

GM4LRU

27

144

Vertical

10

FM

MM0RBN

IO85mx

io86id

28

21:30

GM4LRU

28

144

Vertical

10

FM

GM0CII

IO85mx

IO85jx

15

21:30

GM4LRU

29

144

Vertical

10

FM

MM0CZK

IO85mx

IO86gb

32

21:30

GM4LRU

30

40m

Wire

20

PSK31

G4GUG

IO86pa

IN69UV

721.9

20:05:00

MM0JMI

31

40m

Wire

20

PSK31

F5PEZ

IO86pa

JO10ep

688.5

20:23:00

MM0JMI

32

40m

Wire

20

PSK31

M0SAS

IO86pa

IO82ve

427.4

20:41:00

MM0JMI

33

40m

Wire

20

PSK31

UR5ZGY

IO86pa

KN5ot

2405.1

20:50:00

MM0JMI

34

40m

Wire

20

PSK31

OM3DM

IO86pa

JN98qn

1708.8

21:30:00

MM0JMI

35

40m

Wire

20

PSK31

EB5DZC

IO86pa

IM97mo

2049.8

21:35:00

MM0JMI

36

40m

Wire

20

PSK63

EA2IV

IO86pa

IN92td

1553.6

21:47:00

MM0JMI

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History: For a few years we’ve tried running our own “small” contest on the nearest Wednesday to mid-summer’s day. We started at first using 10M but as the sunspot cycle started to fall it was moved to the 20M band but sadly over the years it was not really well supported. Many of the comments that came back after the event are, “it is a “Contest”. Why not change the event to an Activity Night”? To that end it changed to just that an Activity Night. Up to 2012 this event was run just at the Summer Solstice and starting in December 2012 we tried the same activity at the Winters Solstice. It was interesting to see the differences. Another change is that it now includes all Bands from 1.8MHz up to 432MHz to allow those who have no HF equipment to take part by submitting their VHF/UHF contacts. Developing this activity further starting in January 2014 it will be run on a monthly basis throughout the year to try and encourage club members to go on and operate even if it is just one night a month. It also changes from an Activity Night to an Activity Day to allow everyone to take part depending on their availability. Basically you can operate any time within the 24 hour period. If you can manage 0.5 hr or 4 hours or 24 hours then the choice is yours. Aim: The aim of the event is to: 

Encourage everyone to operate at least once a month

Get on the air and work as many stations that you can in the allotted time period

Upload your contacts to Clublog and have them added to the club’s DXCC table.

Copy of a blank log (Summer-Winter Solstice & Monthly Operating Log Sheet) can be downloaded from the clubs website: http://cpsarc.com/downloads/ I Look forward to a massive turnout for all the activity days … Bob GM4UYZ (1)

Date

See Dates below

(2)

Time

00:00 to 23:59 Local Time

(3)

Modes

SSB/AM /FM /CW/ Data

(4)

Bands

1.8, 3.5, 7, 10, 14, 18, 21, 24, 28, 50, 70, 144 & 432 MHz

(5)

Power

As per your licence

Lastly, we are Radio Amateurs after all and we are supposed to get on the air and make contacts so come on then let me see you doing it. After the Event:

Full=400W, Intermediate=50W and Foundation=10W World Wide Locator (WWL) i.e. IO85MX Open to any one who wishes to take part

(6)

Your Locator

(7)

Eligible Entrants

(8)

Transmit Exchange

Report (RST)

(9)

Receive Exchange

Report plus Contacts WWL

(10)

Closing Date

(11)

Return Logs to

Closing Date for the Logs is 5 days after the Month date Bob Glasgow GM4UYZ, 7 Castle Terrace, Port Seton, Prestonpans, East Lothian, EH32 0EE Email: gm4uyz@cpsarc.com

(12)

QSO’s not Eligible

Most of all have some fun.

Using the World Wide Locator (WWL) system as part of the exchange gives the ability to measure the distance between your location and the contacts location and it also offers the challenge to obtain the remote contacts WWL. I have certainly noticed that over 98% of all QSL cards that I receive have the stations locator written on the card so obtaining one should, hopefully be quite easy. Note: I will accept the locator as 4 characters (FN32) if that is what the station gives you but please try to obtain the full 6 characters as this will give a very accurate distance. If 4 characters are given I will use the centre of the square which is LL to make the locator FN32LL

10

After the event can you send me a copy of your log, so that I can write up a report on what you all managed to achieve plus why not update the ClubLog club tables and show everyone else what you achieved.

DATE th

15

January

12th February th

12

March

16th April th

14

May

18th June

Any HF/VHF/UHF QSO’s via a repeater do not count

COMMENTS th

DATE

COMMENTS

July

Monthly Date

Monthly Date

16

Monthly Date

13th August th

Monthly Date

17

Monthly Date

15th October

Monthly Date SUMMER SOLSTICE

th

19

September

November

17th December

Monthly Date Monthly Date Monthly Date

Monthly Date WINTER SOLSTICE


Thanks to Robin MM0VTV and Bob GM4IKT it was brought to my attention that we are now in the club’s 30th year. I think we should celebrate it with “something” that is radio related. At our 25th Anniversary back in 2009 we organised the following challenge: CLUB 25 YEAR 20M (14MHz) CHALLENGE The club was formed in 1984 so it is 25 years old this year therefore to mark the 25th anniversary I have decided to generate a small challenge around the 25 figure i.e. Number of QSO’s per entry 25, etc, etc. The challenge will be open to all radio amateurs who wish to take part. The reason behind using QSO’s as the challenge is that we are a radio amateurs, and our main function at the end of the day

is to use our radios and make contacts with other amateurs. Hopefully it will encourage everyone to have a bit of fun and give them something to aim for whilst “playing radio”. The question is what would you like to see done...? Do we do the same again but this time it is 30 QSO’s and the challenge runs over 30 weeks? Personally I would like to do something different but as said before something radio orientated. I am looking for your feedback ASAP so I can get something sorted out. Email me please at gm4uyz@cpsarc.com Bob GM4UYZ

Duncan MM0GZZ sent in this QSL card for an interesting contact he had with DS4NYE in Korea worked with 35W on 20m on RTTY. He suggests having a regular column highlighting any interesting or unusual contacts you have had, so send them in and we’ll add them to the newsletter.

John MM0JXI

11


2014 is a special year for Scotland in several ways.

The Ryder Cup, one of Golf's most prestigious tournaments, this year in Scotland. 23-28 September.

The Commonwealth Games, 2014 in Glasgow. 23 July 3 August.

700th anniversary of Battle of Bannockburn. 23 to 24 June 2014

BannockburnHomecoming Scotland.

Similarly the Top Three Scottish stations using their special prefix working the largest number of stations outside Scotland are eligible for Quaichs. Any band and any mode can be used. To enter: Submit your total score of stations worked by the 1st week in December 2014, via email (only) to gm0gav@hfdx.co.uk

After assessing from these totals who are the leading stations in each category, the GMDX Group Committee will request submission of logs from these for final scrutiny and selection To celebrate the year, GMDX has petitioned Ofcom successfulof winners. ly to have a special prefix allowance for Scotland during the year. It only applies for stations whose main address is in Scot- In addition to the above awards, the prestigious Homecoming Scotland Shield will be awarded to the club whose memland. bers make the most contacts outside Scotland. The club score As in 2009, Scottish amateurs may include a special Regional to be the number of active prefixes multiplied by the number Secondary Locator ‘A’ for Alba in their call signs in place of the of contacts made. Logs will be requested from the top three usual M. (eg GM2ABC becomes GA2ABC) entrants for scrutiny. This will be available from Burns Night (25 January 2014) to St There is no fee to pay for entry into any category. Andrews Day (30 November 2014). Special Activity weekends: Amateur radio licensees whose main station address is in Scotland may apply for a variation to their licence by going to this The first whole weekend in every month during the period will website where an NOV can be applied for online. It's a simple be designated a "special activity weekend" during which we procedure, you need your license number (check your license hope for there to be increased activity. documents). We need your support of this initiative, by applying for your NOV now, and the getting on air with your special callsign. Radio amateurs throughout the world will be looking out for those special prefixes from January 25th! In order to add some incentive to participate, GMDX will be awarding prizes to stations that achieve more contacts than others. The GMDX Group will be awarding Homecoming Scotland engraved Quaichs to the Top Three stations outside Scotland, who contact the largest number of different GA, MA and 2A stations in the period.

12


Across 1. This chap holds the tower, not the fireworks. 3. fine wire in multiple strands 5. sunlight causes colour to disappear, but on signals? 7. component stuck in my throat 8. amplifier brand 10. group of chinwaggers 11. dash that for a joke 13. knocked. connection partway along a coil 14. hose for amplifying 15. Ten bells and alls well 16. UHF reflections to identify others 17. bounced signal off smaller planet 18. where you get the juice from 20. about 11 metres long 21. ionising interference near the poles 25. unit of current 27. fiddlers of these we areÍž dial me in. 28. ball shaped reflector in the sky 32. match this Greek antenna feed 34. magnetic or electric, they grow crops 35. elevation of the bfo? or angle of the prop? 37. predjudicial voltage 38. two on earth, but motors can have many. 39. a spectrum that's hours 40. antenna parts on the ground 43. element lacking charge? or with excess. 45. early satellite name 46. trains arrive here in the shack 47. "I'll have more" said to increase

Down 1. 2. 3. 4. 6. 8. 9. 12. 18. 19. 22. 23. 24. 26. 29. 30. 31. 33. 36. 41. 42. 44. 46.

firearm type of diode lightning bolt type of antenna presented by dummies, or antennas, to the transmitter the best braids are made of this dipole on a slant? device for reducing signal strength element at the back end, mirrors the rest. A limit to power? blow that! the top of the envelope? potential in this for a shock ohm made one active, and often a range. front end signal injected here. networks of these often add to 3.14 time of year for good DX desired activity of antenna not the mine for carboniferous solid fuel, but an oscillator letter container that shapes a signal device to capture, in antenna. ferrous material that smooths shirts unwanted radio signal device for increasing the amplitude a wave without end

The solution will be printed in next monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newsletter

13


I will be holding another of my very popular Radio Test Nights, where Club Members can bring their radios along to have them checked out on professional test gear.

Receive Sensitivity (an indication of receiver performance measured as SINAD where a modulated RF signal is compared to the same signal with the tone filtered out at the audio stage and the RF level is reduced until 12dB SINAD is observed, the result is a figure in μV which can be used to compare receivers. Modern VHF radios can achieve 0.2μV and HF radios achieve 2μV

Sub-audible Tones (CTCSS tones for repeater access or PMR sets)

I have access to test equipment like the Marconi 2955 Radio Test Set , a Rhode & Schwarz Spectrum analyser and Bird Thruline 43 Power Meter with RF sniffers.

Over the years this has been a very popular event and also very worthwhile. It is a great opportunity to give all your radios an annual checkup which can be recorded in your log. Marconi 2955

Remember to bring all your power/microphone/etc. leads for your respective radios. You need to know how to reduce the output power below 30W (the most the Marconi 2955 can handle) and set the radio to FM or AM. I’ll have a 23 amp 12V power supply and a good selection of cables and an RF connector kit to make adapters for almost any common RF connector If you have more than one radio to test we ask that you return to the end of the queue to allow everyone to get a fair chance of getting their radios tested.

Rhode & Schwartz FSH-3 Spectrum analyser

Bird Thruline Wattmeter

I can test nearly everything from a 2m Baofeng Handheld to a Yaesu FT2000, any band from 160m to 70cm.

There will be plenty people around who can explain what is being done and please take the opportunity to ask me what I’m doing or discuss the results. The Test Night takes place on Friday 21 February 2014 in Resources Room 2 in the Port Seton Community Centre from 19:00 to 21:00, entry fee £2.

Using this equipment we can test almost any radio you care to John MM0JXI bring along for: 

Power Output (from 1mW to 400W, power greater than 30W will be measured using the Bird RF Wattmeter into a dummy load as the Marconi 2955 can only handle up to 30W)

Deviation (measures how much bandwidth your signal occupies, modern radios have a wide and narrow setting, most repeaters now use the narrow setting)

14

Spectral Purity (the relative strength of any harmonics of the fundamental signal)

RF Sniffer (used to take a low level sample of the signal for display on a spectrum analyser)


1.

Which one of the following frequencies would be affected by harmonics from a transmitter operating on 10.10MHz

6.

In a single sideband transmitter the carrier is removed by the

a.

1.01MHz

a.

RF Oscillator

b.

10.20MHz

b.

Balanced Modulator

c.

30.30MHz

c.

Sideband Filter

d.

50.51MHz

d.

RF Power Amplifier

2.

Harmonics present at the output of an HF transmitter are normally reduced by fitting a

7.

When an audio signal is mixed with a radio frequency signal, new frequencies are produced called

a.

Low Pass Filter

a.

Intermodulation products

b.

High Pass Filter

b.

Frequency modulation

c.

Band Pass Filter

c.

Carriers

d.

Band Stop Filter

d.

Sidebands

3.

The function of the demodulator stage in a radio receiver is to

8.

Harmonic frequencies are

a.

Multiples of the chosen frequency

a.

Indicate the presence of harmonics

b.

Not multiples of the chosen frequency

b.

Select the required signal

c.

Half and one third of the chosen frequency

c.

Extract the audio frequencies from the carrier

d.

Not related to the fundamental frequency

d.

Change RF into AF when a CW signal is received 9.

4.

The intermediate frequency of a receiver is 500Khz. The local oscillator is running at 5MHz. The frequency of the signal received will be

A fast rise and fall of the transmitted RF envelope of a CW transmitter may result in

a.

Chirp

b.

Poor frequency stability

c.

Reduced output power

d.

Excessive bandwidth

10.

A product detector is used to

a.

Recover the audio from a SSB transmission

b.

Indicate the received signal strength

a.

500KHz

b.

4.5MHz

c.

5MHz

d.

6MHz

5.

Which control on a transceiver is used to alter the note of Morse Code signals?

a.

A power output control

c.

Recover the audio from a FM transmission

b.

A squelch control

d.

Produce an amplitude modulated signal

c.

A BFO (Beat frequency oscillator)

d.

A microphone gain control

15


General correspondence, training and contest entries Bob Glasgow 7 Castle Terrace Port Seton East Lothian EH32 0EE Phone: 01875 811723 E-mail: gm4uyz@cpsarc.com HF Contests Cambell Stevenson mm0dxc@aol.com VHF Contests John MacLean mm0ccc@cpsarc.com

12 February 2014

Activity Night

21 February 2014

Radio Test Night

7 March 2014

Club Night

8 March 2014

Extra Foundation Licence Course

12 March 2014

Activity Night

21 March 2014

Aurora Talk

4 April 2014

Club night

6 April 2014

Norbreck Rally (Blackpool) See Robin MM0TVT if you want to go

12 April 2014

GMDX Convention

16 April 2014

Activity Night

17 April 2014

International Amateur Radio Day

18 April 2014

Wintest Introduction

2May 2014

Club Night

9 May 2014

1st 144MHz DF Hunt

14 May 2014

Activity night

16-18 May 2014

Dayton Hamvention (Dayton, Ohio)

6 June 2014

Club night

14/15 June 2014

Museums on the Air (GB2MOF)

14 June 2014

Port Seton Gala Day (MM0CPS/P)

18 June 2014

Activity Night

Club Tables Bob Purves gm4ikt@cpsarc.com Contest Reports Robin Farrer mm0vtv@cpsarc.com Newsletter, website, event calendar John Innes newsletter@cpsarc.com

Rank

Callsign 160 80 60 40 30 20 17 15 12 10 6

4

2 70 23 13 DXCC Slots Range

1 MA0DXH

0

1

0 21

0 15

3

4

1

4

0

0

0

0

0

0

34

49 11 yrs

2 MM0DXH

0

1

0 21

0 15

3

4

1

4

0

0

0

0

0

0

34

49 11 yrs

3 MA0XXW

0

0

0 20

0

8 16

0

0

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

29

47 0 yrs

4 MM0XXW

0

0

0

7

2

2

7 10

0

0

0

0

0

0

28

49 8 yrs

1C, 2 A, 3C, 4B, 5C, 6B, 7D,8A, 9D, 10A

5 MM0GZZ

0

0

0 10

0

1 10

0

0

8

0

0

0

0

0

0

26

29 4 yrs

6 GM4IKT

0

0

0

0

0

2

1

5

0

6

0

0

0

0

0

0

12

14 10 yrs

Answers from February 2014 newsletter “Test Your Knowledge”.

7 GM4UYZ

0

4

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

4

4 34 yrs

6 15

Profile for John Innes

Elements 201402  

We are now into the month of February already, where did January disappear too, and already we are beginning to see the nights getting longe...

Elements 201402  

We are now into the month of February already, where did January disappear too, and already we are beginning to see the nights getting longe...

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