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Cockenzie & Port Seton Amateur Radio Club is affiliated to the Radio Society of Great Britain and holds the call signs MM0CPS and GM2T which are used for our special event and contest entries. The Club was formed by Bob Glasgow GM4UYZ in 1984, to help the local amateurs get to know each other. Far from being just a local club we have members regularly attending from the Borders, Dumfries, Strathclyde, Fife and Newcastle. The Club meets on the first Friday of every month (Second Friday of January) in the lounge of the Thorntree Inn on the old Cockenzie High Street from 7pm till late.

Well folks here we go again with another month’s editorial, this being written a little early due to time constraints on me from a very heavy working schedule which is not allowing me hardly any free time at all. I mustn’t grumble as at least I do have a job. August was certainly a busy month up until the Lighthouses Weekend with regard to the radio club activities, not just what we have taken part in but the continual work that runs away in the background. I am not sure if any of you knew John GM0WFB but it was brought to my attention during our “Junk Night” that he had passed away suddenly on the 7th December 2012. Another sad loss to our hobby. From the club point of view we had another successful Junk Night and hopefully another Lighthouse Weekend. The first Foundation Course of 2013/2014 session started on the 31st September with the pupils sitting their exam tomorrow on the 7th September and I am sure you will go along with me and wish them every success. This month the planned activities are another DF Hunt night at the end of the month, 27th September. Now this one is a real challenge as it is done in the dark, this really tests your skills. The “fox” has

certainly been getting devious on the last few outings so why not come and try and catch him…. Not sure who is going to do it this time but having said that it seems to make no difference in trying to find him. To the future, the Christmas Night out on Saturday 7th December this year have you any idea what you would like organised this year. As always I will go with the majority assuming that I get some feedback and if not I will make a decision. The last few years we have went down the Chinese Meal route do you fancy that or a change away from the meal to do something else. What are your thoughts? Can you let me know them ASAP to give me some idea? Thanks I am also starting to think about next year’s activities, any ideas. Does anyone want to take a project onboard and get something going? Don’t all rush! Serious I feel I need help here and I would like someone to take it on and run with it fully. Who ever does it will find it is hard work to sustain a level of interest and drive it forward? No I am not being negative but realistic. So a volunteer then!

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The Club The Club is run in a very informal way, just a group of like minded people doing something they enjoy! This does not mean that we don’t do anything, we enter (and win!) contests, train newcomers, hold talks and video nights and run a popular annual Junk Sale. Our newsletter has won the Practical Wireless ‘Spotlight’ competition on several occasions. The Club supports the British Heart Foundation in memory of a member who died from heart disease by donating the profits from some of the events we hold, we have raised over £15,832 since 1994.

Supported by BT Community Champions

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I have mentioned this in previous editorials and it is something I have noticed whilst we take part in Special Events, Demonstration Stations etc. is that we get lots of visitors who are all licensed and most are unwilling to have a go on the radio. At the end of the day we are all licensed amateurs. I wonder why that is the case? Is it shyness? Because we use computer logging at these events are you afraid of that? (Computer logging is easy; honestly plus from my perspective after the event it makes the paperwork 1000 times easier). Is it the thought of running a Pile-Up, yes it can be daunting but remember you will be controlling it? Are you not interested at all?

RSGB IOTA Contest

So what is your reason it would be great to know? For those of us who do operate we have all been there and have worked at it plus we do enjoy the buzz as well. There is no doubt it does enhance your operating skills. Why not just give it a try you may just like it. Is there something we can set-up to help you to practice logging but the question is would you be interested in attending? That is it, then enjoy this month’s newsletter. Bob GM4UYZ

This year the team consisted of Cambell MM0DXC, John MM0JXI, Bob GM4UYZ, Brian GM2T M0RNR, Geoff MM5AHO, Stevie MM0GZA, The club has been going to the Isle of Tiree to Robin MM0TVT, Paul MM0VPR, Ellis take part in the RSGB IOTA contest since GM4GZW, Cephas MM0INS and newcomer 1998, this has grown from half a dozen guys Taner MM0SEN. in a couple of cars to the major expedition we We were unfortunately without the services undertake these days with a team of 12 or of Brian G3UJE whose daughter was getting more and two transit vans towing 60ft trailer married that weekend. towers. The ferry times mean that we have to travel The funding model we adopted many years overnight on the Thursday to get to Oban for ago was to charge a fixed fee to cover the the Friday 5.45am sailing and as there would transport costs (nearly £1000 for van hire, not be enough time to build everything if we fuel and ferry fares) plus an extra amount to travelled on the Saturday. This gives us plenty fund the purchase of contest grade equipment for the team, this has resulted in the GM2T team being able to buy several Yaesu FT1000MP’s and Alpha amplifiers as well as antennas, antenna switches, band pass filters, band decoders, voice recorders and all the other components of a fairly large contest station. This doesn’t just get used for IOTA, the upcoming CQWW SSB contest will allow us to utilise everything we have in a large (Continued on page 3) multi-multi setup.


(Continued from page 2)

time to build the station and allows us to relax on the Friday evening. Elaine, our host on the Island is now letting out her house and a clash of bookings meant we didn’t have the space we needed to accommodate everyone for sleeping and be able to build the shack on the Friday, this had to wait until the Saturday morning so Bob and I had a fair bit of work to get everything put together in time for the 1pm contest start. We were able to get the majority of the antennas erected on the Friday and the twig jockeys were treated to the rare sight of the shack pansies unrolling co-ax! Friday evening we went over to the local pub for a few beers in the sun then walked back to the house for dinner and more beer before heading to bed. The sight of 11 blokes all sharing one large room was something to behold as was the noise of the snoring!

After the contest finished we donned our IOTA T shirts for the traditional team photo in from of our antenna farm (thanks to Brian M0RNR for designing and ironing the T shirts) then it was all hands to the deck to dismantle and pack away all the gear ready for the journey home.

On the Saturday morning after breakfast we cleared the room we’d been sleeping in overnight of airbeds and personal kit and began the transformation into the contest shack, installed an Ethernet network, PC’s and band decoders, antenna switches, band pass filters, voice recorders, rotator controllers, radios and amplifiers and getting everything set up and connected to the DX cluster via the house broadband. We managed it with about 30 minutes to spare, too close for comfort!

Once again the ferry times mean that we have to wait until the Monday afternoon to catch a ferry back to the mainland so we had time for a BBQ and more socialising over at the pub on Sunday evening before continuing the party back at the house including setting off some Chinese lanterns at about 2am!

Monday morning we had our final breakfast before setting off to the pier to wait for the ferry and say goodbye to our friend Elaine who looks after us so well for our long weekend providing a constant stream of soup and home-made food.

Without our CW maestro Brian G3UJE this year we knew we were going to have to concentrate on SSB as Bob and Ellis The journey back from Oban was uneventful although very weren’t confident enough to run on CW so they picked off CW wet, we stopped for a quick tea at Callander and then drove multipliers when they could. We were hoping that at this stage the final leg down to Tranent. Once there teamwork made of the sunspot cycle that 10m would be productive but in the end the band didn’t open for us until the Sunday morning, 15m was ok and we were able to get a run going there early on but we soon had to drop back to 20m and 40m to keep the rate going. It was great to see so many people willing to take a spell on the run station and we were really pleased with keeping the QSO rate high for much of the contest. However, without the ability to run on CW, our serial numbers were soon being passed by the faster stations. We did get a boost when 10m opened on Sunday morning and we had a few hours running there. In the end we logged 2272 contacts with 336 multipliers giving us a score of 6,351,000 points, about 12% down on last year but still a decent effort.

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Club Attire The club has a design for Club Tee-shirts, Poloshirts, Sweat-Shirts, Fleeces and Jackets and all of these can be obtained from the address below. When making an order please quote ‘Cockenzie & Port Seton Amateur Radio Club’ as this will ensure that the Club Logo will be placed on the required ordered garments. If you wish to add your call -sign to the logo then please ask at the time of the order. Cost will depend on garment and should cover the garment and logo, callsign addition will be extra.

It was suggested on the way home from Tiree that some members would appreciate being short work of unloading the vans and packing able to spread the cost over the year, I’m hapeverything back into its storage spaces before py to take instalments paid into the Tiree Acheading home to a well-earned sleep. count, contact me directly (mm0jxi@cpsarc.com) to get the details for An expedition of this size doesn’t just happen, the bank transfer and be sure to put your we started planning it back in January and I’d callsign as a reference so I can identify your like to thank everyone who spent their time payments. preparing everything so that the contest went off without problem, then there was the fantastic teamwork shown on the island, everyone knows what they need to do and make up small teams to assemble and erect each antenna as well as putting together the shack so it all gets done in double quick time. (Continued from page 3)

I know that GM2T on Tiree is the highlight of my radio year and I’m sure everyone else enjoys a fantastic weekend of camaraderie with the opportunity to operate a big station and really get stuck into the pile up. Looking forward to next year already! John MM0JXI

Order from: PATRICIA BEWSEY DESIGNS, UNIT 11, FENTON BARNS RETAIL VILLAGE, FENTON BARNS, NORTH BERWICK, EAST LOTHIAN EH39 5BW Tel/Fax: 01620 850788 Mobile: 07970 920431

Robin MM0VTV, Cambell MM0DXC, Cephas MM0INS, Taner MM0SEN, Stevie MM0GZA, Paul MM0VPR, Elaine Bob GM4UYZ, Willow the dog, Ellis GM4GZW, Brian M0RNR, John MM0JXI, Geoff MM5AHO

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The club took part in the RSGB IOTA contest as we have done since 1998 from the Island of Tiree – IOTA Reference EU008. The logs have been checked for mistypes and general logging mistakes before it was finally submitted. It can be quite amazing the difference of doing these checks before submission on how much your actual score can change. Sometimes it goes in the negative i.e. we lose points but often it goes positive and we gain points, the bottom line it is well worth doing. The log entry is in my opinion one of the main important aspects of any contest. It is why you took part and that is to submit the best score you possibly can…. Strange as how many contesters dismiss the checking off their logs!!!! This year due to rule changes checking had to be more stringent especially for the new rule of 6 Band or Mode changes in the hour. The description in the rules is certainly not clear and it caused quite a debate on its interpretation. At the end of the day we came to an agreement and that is what we worked too. Contest Information 2272 QSO’s logged which include DUPES (2252 Actual QSOs and 20 Dupes) Contest : Callsign : Mode : Category : Transmitter (MM) Overlay : Band(s) : Class : Zone/State/... : Locator : Operating time :

Scores after checking…. BAND SSB/IOTA CW/IOTA POINTS AVG ---------------------------------------80 207 41 13 12 2210 10.05 40 686 74 20 19 6970 9.87 20 761 91 15 15 5650 7.28 15 399 55 13 13 3090 7.50 10 134 16 2 2 870 6.40 ---------------------------------------TOTAL 2187 277 63 61 18790 8.35 ======================================== TOTAL SCORE : 6 351 020 We have ended up with more points after checking so we now await and see how it all checks out and where we end up in the contest. Personally I am really pleased with our effort this year so well done to everyone who took part. Bob GM4UYZ

IOTA Contest GM2T MIXED Multi Operator - Multi

--All bands (AB) High Power (HP) EU8 IO66OM 23h59

BAND SSB/IOTA CW/IOTA POINTS AVG ---------------------------------------80 207 41 13 12 2210 10.05 40 686 75 20 19 6945 9.84 20 762 90 15 15 5645 7.27 15 400 53 13 13 3080 7.46 10 134 16 2 2 870 6.40 ---------------------------------------TOTAL 2189 275 63 61 18750 8.33 ======================================== TOTAL SCORE : 6 300 000 Dupes are not included in QSO counts neither avg calculations Operators : GM4UYZ MM0GZA MM0JXI MM0DXC MM0VTV MM0VPR MM0JXI MM0SEN MM0INS GM4GZW M0RNR

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Thanks to the sterling work by M0RNR, our club has been added to the excellent Clublog system developed by Michael Wells G7VJR. www.clublog.org The system allows members to upload their logs in ADIF format and have them displayed in a table with all the other club members. Clublog also has great facilities for tracking your DXCC status etc so is well worth taking the time to register and get your log uploaded. To update your log with the next set of contacts (SSB, CW or Data) you can simply upload your whole log again and the system will take care of the duplicates. Alternatively you can export the bits you want from your own log and just upload that. The tables we’ll publish here will be the club, filtered by the current year, so everyone starts a new year at 0 contacts. Due to several amateurs across the world accidentally adding themselves to the CPSARC tables, we now approve all additions which might take a day or two.

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This year the weather for our Junk Night was absolutely excellent so no complaints on that front as we couldn’t have asked for more. The worry before this sort of event is will people turn up; glad to say I wasn’t disappointed.

ing times by 30 minutes. Did it have an effect, it really was hard to say but personally I don’t think it did.

The numbers that came via the door this year were down on the 2012 numbers from 138 to 130. Glad to see that this year both Radcom and Practical Wireless both advertised our night which I think helps immensely. I did do a quick search through the RSGB Yearbook for 2013 and emailed all the club secretaries within a 150 mile radius so I really don’t know if it was successful or not. For those of you interested in statistics then numbers that have come through the door on each junk night are as follows: 1994

150

2005

138

1995

154

2006

158

1996

162

2007

147

1997

133

2008

135

1998

151

2009

127

1999

154

2010

158

2000

157

2011

153

2001

168

2012

138

2002

152

2013

130

2003

176

Average No.

150

2004

165

Looking around the hall this year, the number of people there looked very constant all evening and the normal thinning out at about 20:30 did happen this year. Those who stayed were all eagerly awaiting the raffle being drawn, any way tremendous to see everyone. Again this year I received a few compliments about our Junk Night and a sample are “Tremendous Friendly Atmosphere”, and “Well run night congratulations to you all, keep it up”. Personally on hearing these it makes all the hard work really worthwhile.

The best we have ever achieved is in 2003 with 176 through the door and the least in 2009 with 127.

Carol and Calum who now run the Tennamast business were not available due to holidays but before they went they sent me across the This year due the Community Centre changing Tennamast Trophy for the PW 2M QRP presentheir opening times plus the high extra cost of tation. Scott, Bill and Betty of Jaycee continued running past the closing time the vent times to give us their support on the evening plus as were changed from 18:30 to 21:30 to 18:00 to (Continued on page 7) 19:00, basically moving the starting and endFor a Friday night event we certainly cannot complain, so long may it continue.


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normal handed in a raffle prize Other’s donated prizes and to them I am also eternally grateful for their donations to our Raffle and food for the kitchen

Before the raffle was drawn the Tennamast Trophy was presented by Scott from Jaycee to the Galashiels Radio Club for being the leading Scottish Station in this year’s Practical Wireless QRP Contest. I had been asked by Tennamast if we could carry out the role which I was very pleased to organise. Well done to the Galashiels Radio Club you well deserve it.

Lastly I would like to say a personal thanks to everyone who helped put the Junk Night together particularly to Gary MM0FZV for helping me with the door, to Yvonne, Janet and Liz who worked hard behind the refreshments counter and if I have missed any one then thanks to you also.

Lastly to everyone who handed Food or raffle prizes in. Without this sort of help this type of event would never happen. So again thanks.

WELL DONE EVERYONE FOR A VERY SUCCESSFUL JUNK NIGHT AND FUND RAISING EVENT.

Bob GM4UYZ

The raffle then took place, drawn by John MM0JXI and me. The amount that we raised after expenses were removed was £590.68. This has now been added to the club’s funds. We also raised £75 for the British Heart Foundation via the BHF Tin.

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As you are aware that the Gx100RSGB call sign is being used to celebrate the 100 years of the Radio Society of Great Britain (RSGB) during 2013 and Clubs have been approached and applied to use the call sign. We were personally approached earlier on this year to see whether we as a club were willing to take part in the event. The month for South Scotland is November of which we will be taking part over the weekend of the 16/17th November.

is agreed with Ofcom at least 28 days in advance. To add some fun to the operation contacts we have a related Centenary Award that will create some fun and activity throughout the year.

Below is an extract from the RSGB website on the call sign and where it is operating or has operated throughout the year: Ofcom have agreed to what is a very special arrangement for the use of the Special Event Station call sign Gx100RSGB, where x is replaced by the secondary location identifier, M, W, I, D, U and J, etc. The very special nature of the station’s licence is that we are allowed to operate the call at a number of different locations in sequence through the year.

26th Mar – 22nd Apr 11

A few suggestions on how we will operate over the 16/17th November have been bandied about but the final decision was made that we would operate from Barns Ness Lighthouse as that has once again become available to us. What we will be setting up and running is yet to be decided Description but I suspect it will be 80M or 40M and also 20/15/10M deNW England & Isle of Man pending on what is open. Decisions will be made nearer the time and a formal announcement will be made when it hapNorth Scotland pens. NE England Again this is a great opportunity of publicising the club, a chance to operate and also a major thing with us is to have SW England & Channel some fun as well.

23rd Apr – 20th May

10

S & SE England

21st May – 17th Jun

7

South Wales

So in summary we will be taking part and further information will be posted via the club’s forum on the website.

19th Jun – 15th Jul

9

London & Thames Valley

Bob GM4UYZ

16th Jul – 12th Aug

12

East of England & East

13th Aug – 9th Sep

6

North Wales

10th Sep – 7th Oct

13

East Midlands

8th Oct – 4th Nov

5

West Midlands

5th Nov – 2nd Dec

1

South Scotland

3rd Dec – 31st Dec

8

Northern Ireland

The licence plan approved is for thirteen 28 day periods, allowing each RSGB Region to operate the Special Event Station against a rota, see the table below; Dates

Region

1st Jan – 28th Jan

3

29th Jan – 25th Feb

2

26th Feb – 25th Mar

4

Within each 28 day period in a Region, the SES may be operated by different clubs or groups, again on a fixed rota that

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COCKENZIE & PORT SETON ARC 144MHz FOXHUNT RULES

Date

: 27 SEPTEMBER 2013

Time

: MEET AT 6:30PM FOR A BRIEFING PRIOR TO A 7:00PM START

Place

: The "OLD SHIP INN" CAR PARK (Bar Entrance Side), PORT SETON Grid Ref. NT408 759 ORDNANCE SURVEY LANDRANGER MAP No.66

Entry Fee

: £2:00 PER PERSON, TO BE DONATED TO THE CLUB FUNDS

Frequency

: 145.275MHz, FM, VERTICAL POLARISATION

Callsign

: Announced before the start

Hunt Area : THE FOX WILL BE LOCATED WITHIN THE AREA ON ORDNANCE SURVEY LANDRANGER MAP No.66 BOUNDED BY THE FIRTH OF FORTH TO THE NORTH, THE LINE JOINING GRID REF. NT560728 and NT560855 TO THE EAST, THE LINE JOINING GRID REF. NT370728 and NT370738 TO THE WEST.

A SMALL MAP SHOWING THIS AREA WILL BE ISSUED TO ALL COMPETITORS AT THE START.

TX Times : TRANSMISSIONS BY THE FOX WILL BE FOR 30 SECONDS EVERY 5 MINUTES. THE FIRST TRANSMISSION BEGINNING AT 7:00PM, FOLLOWING TRANSMISSION TIMES WILL BE 7:05PM, 7:10PM.etc. THE FINAL TRANSMISSION WILL BE AT 8:45PM AND WILL REVEAL THE LOCATION OF THE FOX AND THAT OF THE POST HUNT MEETING. (Normally the Lounge Bar in the Thorntree Inn) Access : THE FOX WILL BE IN A POSITION WHICH IS ACCESSIBLE BY CAR (4WD NOT NECESSARY!)

TX Ban : NO TRANSMISSIONS, OTHER THAN THOSE OF THE FOX, SHOULD BE MADE ON THE HUNT FREQUENCY AT ANY TIME DURING THE EVENT Vacate : ONCE A TEAM HAS FOUND THE FOX THEY SHOULD LEAVE THE IMMEDIATE AREA AND SHOULD NOT TRANSMIT ON ANY FREQUENCY WHILE IN THE VICINITY OF THE FOX Equipment : ONLY ONE SET OF DF EQUIPMENT IS TO BE USED PER TEAM AT ANY ONE TIME. Hunting : DURING THE HUNT PLEASE TRY TO BE CONSIDERATE TO OTHER ROAD USERS WHEN CHOOSING YOUR STOPPING POINTS ANY TEAMS FOUND TO BE BREAKING THE ROAD SPEED LIMITS IN ANY AREA WILL BE DISQUALIFIED IMMEDIATELY SIMILARLY, ANY TEAMS FOUND TO BE BREAKING ANY OF THE ABOVE RULES WILL BE DISQUALIFIED

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17 & 18th AUGUST 2013 It turned out to be another great weekend again with lots of laughs... The weather this year was perfect all weekend apart from a couple of shower on Saturday morning and just as we finished on the Sunday. Apart from the weather it was a first for a few people there actually seeing the ISS (International Space Station) passing over on the Saturday evening. When we left the lighthouse after the 2012 CQWW SSB contest it was deemed that we had lost the facility as the people who had gone into the house were staying on a long term let. This didn’t despair us as we decided that it would be back to tents and the generator just outside the Lighthouse area what we had done for quite a few years. As it turned out it never happened as after a Cambell MM0DXC paying the lighthouse a visit one day that he was “bored” discovered that the house was not being used. Armed with this information I wrote an email to the letting agency who confirmed that it was empty and that we could use the outbuildings in both August and October as normal. About the same time I received an email from Lafarge asking us if we wanted the use of the buildings as the long term let had left. Replies were sent to confirm up our dates and the covering paperwork was signed.

This year the decision was made to set-up the station on the Friday afternoon as some work was required to tidy up the buildings, run the GB2LBN call sign from 00:00 Saturday and finish about 15:30 on the Sunday but in the end we finished about 14:47. I contacted Ofcom on the Thursday to see if I could extend the Notice of Variation (NOV) to start on the Friday but sadly was unable to do so. As always in any event some prep work was required before this.

Dave Goodwin VO1AU

This year the story starts as normal very early on in the year where we send away to get our normal GB2LBN call sign. As mentioned earlier a few emails backwards and forwards with Lafarge to ensure that the use of the buildings are once again free to use. As well as Lafarge we are in contact with Coast Properties who hold the keys for the buildings to ensure that they are booked as well. A week before Cambell picks up the keys whilst he is working in North Berwick. This also gives us time to sort out any discrepancies that need to be done. On the Friday afternoon we headed for the site and arrived at 13:00 with Cambell MM0DXC, Robin MM0VTV and Bob GM4IKT setting up aerials along with me setting up the two stations in the shack which were both connected using a wireless network and running the logging program Win-Test. The shack this year was the smaller of the two main rooms in the outbuildings. Bob GM4IKT went home after the testing was (Continued on page 11)

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(Continued from page 10)

complete Later Cephas MM0INS and Stevie MM0GZA arrived after their work and mid evening John MM0CCC arrived, ending with six of us staying over. Station 1 – FT1000MP & ALPHA Linear fed into a Cushcraft A3S 10/15/20M Yagi at about 60 feet on a tower. Station 2 – FT1000MP & ALPHA Linear fed into the 40M Dipole. The 40M Dipole was hung from the top of the lighthouse down to a top of the bothy. On the Friday a few QSO’s were made using the club’s MM0CPS call sign to test that everything was working successfully. It was decided that on the Friday evening just to have a relaxing one with a pizza from Dunbar and a few “beers”. The serious stuff started early on the Saturday morning when I went on the air about 06:05BST. I tried 20M and 40M calling CQ but no avail before getting the first QSO in the log on 40M was with DL4LAX at 06:47BST and 20M was on the air at 08:57 BST working UT7VO After this the pile ups started and continued until we left on the Sunday afternoon. This year it was a real relaxed atmosphere where operating did keep going as far as possible but many stops were made for light refreshments and obviously to get fed as well. On Saturday the 40M and 20M stations kept really busy when operating was taking place until 21:59BST on the Saturday night... On the Sunday we started on 40M with HB9CCL in the log at 06:16BST and again both that and 20M were very active throughout the day.…. On the Sunday we stopped operating at 13:47 BST working G0CIW on 40M. We ended up with 1200 QSO’s not the best we have ever achieved if you compare it with 1400 in 2007 but then as mentioned earlier it was run in a very relaxed fashion.

also a more descriptive story on how we treat this event. Dave accepted the invite and duly arrived at the lighthouse. After the normal introductions Dave got straight on the air. He demonstrated a very relaxed operating style working the pile-ups with so much ease on both voice and CW which was a pleasure to see. Dave just did not turn up for the Saturday as he had originally planned but duly arrived on the Sunday as well to do some more operating. How he managed to “play” radio during his holiday well I must learn the secret or maybe he just has a very understanding wife...maybe the fact that she went shopping on her own on the Saturday had something to do with it!!!!! Dave from us all it was a pleasure meeting you and thanks for all the operating you did. I hope that if you are ever back in Scotland that we could all meet up as it would be a fantastic to see you again. Plenty of social breaks were taken as well as this is what the event was all about. Saturday night saw the normal “social – let the hair down” all well enjoyed before the last departed to bed about 01:30 on the Sunday morning, I think!!! It was once again a great social event, certainly enjoyed by everyone who attended. 1200 QSO’s were made with the breakdown as follows:

Call sign : GB2LBN Mode : MIXED Locator : IO85SX Operating time : 20h07 BAND SSB CW RTTY OTHERS DUP ---------------------------------------40 658 0 0 0 37 20 376 70 0 0 5 15 4 48 0 0 2 ---------------------------------------TOTAL 1038 118 0 0 44 ======================================== TOTAL QSO : 1 156

Full list of operators and visitors that came were Bob GM4IKT, Bob GM4UYZ, Robin MM0VTV, Stevie MM0GZA, John MM0CCC, Cambell MM0DXC, Cephas MM0INS, Duncan MM0GZZ, Alisdair MM6LRK, Keith MM0KTC and a very welcome overseas visitor Dave Goodwin VO1AU.

For those who didn’t attend you missed a great opportunity to operate from a fantastic site, learn to work the pile-ups plus have some fun. Many thanks to everyone who came and took part and contributed, without this the event could never take place. Again I must thank Lafarge for allowing us to Dave had approached us by email a few months back asking if operate from such a fantastic site. he could join us whilst he was visiting Scotland on holiday Bob GM4UYZ from Canada. I immediately replied that he would be most welcome. Cambell also emailed saying exactly the same with

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1.

The frequency of the mains electricity in the UK is

6.

The major risk when drilling metal is that

a.

230 volts

a.

small metal particles (swarf) may fly up into the eyes

b.

60 Hz

b.

the noise will cause temporary deafness

c.

240 volts

c.

sparks will occur if the work is not earthed

d.

50 Hz

d.

the drill bit will be left with sharp edges.

2.

By which of the following modes may speech be transmitted?

7.

Why is a buffer stage used after an oscillator?

a.

To isolate the oscillator from other stages.

a.

Data

b.

To prevent spurious oscillations.

b.

SSTV

c.

To boost the output level of the oscillator.

c.

CW

d.

To multiply the oscillator frequency.

d.

FM 8.

3.

Which of the following is essential on a QSL card?

Stray coupling in a Power Amplifier may be the cause of

a.

Weather conditions.

a.

drift

b.

Date of contact.

b.

unwanted mixer products

c.

Type of equipment.

c.

losses in the dielectric

d.

Antenna details.

d.

Unwanted self oscillation.

4.

When operating via satellite it is found necessary to keep readjusting the received frequency. This is because the

9.

In a frequency synthesiser, if the reference oscillator is not in control of the output frequency, then the synthesiser is said to be

a.

large temperature changes on the satellite cause frequency drift

a.

out of lock

b.

out of sync

b.

very long propagation path can cause frequency changes

c.

unbalanced

d.

Neutralised.

10.

The ratio between the input signal that can just be heard on a receiver and the signal level at which it overloads is known as the receiver's

a.

dynamic range

b.

overload margin

c.

receive threshold

d.

Noise factor.

c.

movement of the satellite affects the received frequency

d.

narrow range of frequencies available must be shared between all the users.

5.

Skin burns when soldering can be avoided by

a.

ensuring adequate ventilation

b.

wearing appropriate eye protection

c.

using an appropriate solder sucker

d.

using an appropriate soldering iron stand.

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I thought you'd be interested in this, seeing we've discussed this before. Clearly its not clear! even to Ofcom! An interesting outcome of this is that Ofcom don't see the regional part of the prefix as that important! Geoff, M5AHO in Scotland! -----Original Message----From: General Managers [mailto:gm.dept@rsgb.org.uk] Sent: 28 August 2013 20:00 To: 'Geoff Crowley' Subject: RE: Licencing enquiry Hi Geoff, Many thanks for your enquiry. You raise an area of licencing that many believe is not sufficiently defined. As a result, Ofcom tell us that they will be seeking to clarify the regulations as part of their upcoming review of the Amateur Radio Licence terms and conditions, but this will not be until next year. In the meantime, I hope that the following is helpful.

So, in terms of the questions you pose my interpretation is that. 1. If you were to operate off the coast of Northern Ireland (or off any UK coast) you may use MM5AHO/mm if your licence is issued as MM5AHO. If your licence is issued as M5AHO, however, you may use M5AHO/mm. In either case it would seem that the /mm is optional. In practice, I am sure that whether you identify yourself as MM5 or M5 is immaterial! 2. In the example above, there is no distinction as to where the vessel might be (in relation to international waters). If you are berthed at a wharf then optionally you could use /p. 3. I asked for a definitive response from Ofcom to the question of how you should identify your station if you should be sailing off the coast of another country. I give below the full text of their response verbatim. “Graham,

Thank you for your call this morning. You wondered what call sign variant should/could be used when operating ‘Maritime Mobile’. This actually took far more research that I anticipated, hence the delay in replying. However, I have now had a chance to look at this more carefully. In fact, I do think that The "official" guidance can be found in Section 2 of the licence this is one of those cases that, ultimately, would really need to (Terms, conditions and Limitations by Ofcom. It says that be determined by the courts, as there are quite a few variables and permutations and we get into the choppy legal waters of Only Full licencees may operate from a Maritime Mobile Loca- international law. So, the following is my lay interpretation of tion - 2(1)(e) the general principle and I don’t doubt that others would in"Maritime Mobile" means the Radio Equipment is located on terpret things differently. any vessel at Sea 17(1)(v) "At Sea" means in the Tidal Waters or territorial sea of the At the risk of stating the patently obvious, I think that the best United Kingdom or in international waters 17(1)(e) general advice that I can give is that wherever the station is operating, it must be clearly identified and this is particularly In the Notes to the Licence it says that (para (d)(iv) true, if it is operating other than in the UK. If it is at sea and is in or near the jurisdiction of another country and officials of If the licencee operates the Radio Equipment from a Maritime that country (eg a port authority, customs or the coastguard) Mobile Location, the licencee may use the suffix "/MM" with were to indicate that the call sign was not recognised or unthe callsign (emphasis is mine) derstood, then the station should be guided by that and simplify the call sign – ultimately to the ‘core’ UK call sign, for exThe above all applies to your callsign (as printed on your liample “Mike Zero Alpha Bravo Charlie”, so losing secondary cence) regional identifiers or non-main station suffixes. Considering your specific question, one of my first conclusions is that the definition of ‘Maritime Mobile’ (or, rather, ‘Vessel at Sea’) really does need to be clarified. At present, the definition of ‘At Sea’ at best causes confusion over the definition of (Continued on page 14)

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(Continued from page 13)

‘Vessel At Sea’. This is because there are (usually) three bands of waters in relation to a state. First is ‘inland waters’. These are within the ‘baseline’ (generally speaking, the low water mark). Second, there is then a 12 nautical mile band of territorial seas, measured from the baseline. Beyond that lies the third band, International Waters.

Perhaps this is another aspect of maritime mobile that we can include in the review.

If the vessel were in international waters, then T/R 61-01 would not apply. The only provision in the licence relating to call signs and Maritime Mobile operation that I can see is Note (d) IV. That provides that “/MM” may be added to the normal call sign. My own interpretation would be that the licensee should identify the station in the same way that it would be For completeness (though not relevant, here), I should note identified at the main station address but with the “/MM” that States can also declare a ‘contiguous zone’ of up to 200 added as a suffix. Obviously, if the ship’s master or another nautical miles from the outer limit of their Territorial Seas. station or the authorities in another state were to indicate that The UK has done this for the ‘UK Sector’ of the North Sea. The this call sign rendered the identity of the station less than contiguous zone is really for the purpose of exploiting sub-sea clear, then I think that I would expect the UK amateur to reminerals, such as oil and gas. spond by reverting to the ‘core’ call sign. Again, I wonder if we need clearer provisions in the licence for this or, at least, some This is all based on my understanding and lay interpretation of guidance. the UN Convention of the Law Of the Sea (“UNCLOS”). I hope that this slightly desultory exploration of the issues The wording of the UK Amateur Radio licence describes ‘Vessel raised by your question is nonetheless helpful.” at Sea’ as being on the seaward side of the low water line. That could be within the territorial sea of a state or it could be My conclusion is that this re-inforces the need for the licence in international waters. For the definition of ‘At Sea’ to refer review to come up with (simple) and definitive guidance, and to international waters is thus inconsistent with the definition you may wish to contribute to the debate when consultation of ‘Vessel at Sea’, which could include a state’s territorial sea, begins too. Best Wishes Your question concerned the call sign that should be used if an amateur finds himself in the waters of, say, the Irish Republic. I thought of the scenario of a yacht sailing across the top of Graham Coomber, G0NBI Ireland from the sea off County Londonderry to the sea off General Manager County Donegal. Radio Society of Great Britain Tel: 01234 832701 If the vessel were hugging the coast, so within the 12-nautical Fax: 01234 831496 mile limit, then it would be entering the territorial seas of the Email: graham.coomber@rsgb.org.uk Irish Republic. Consequently, my slightly glib comment this morning would apply, namely that the station should comply with the call sign requirements of T/R 61-01. That, in turn, implies that this must be a Full station, as T/R 61-01 provides only for Full licensees and their overseas equivalents. That is reflected in clause 2(1)(e) and (f) of the licence, which provide that T/R 61-01 and Maritime Mobile working are available only under a UK Full licence. T/R 61-01 provides that visitors must prefix their national call sign with the local country code plus “stroke”. My own view is that overseas authorities won’t necessarily be anticipating a long UK call sign and may query the use of the secondary regional locators and/or the suffixes. That said, using these when maritime mobile is not expressly prohibited by the UK licence. So, licensees should use common sense. If they are not being understood, then, obviously, they need to simplify the call sign that they use to ensure that they are understood.

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It was announced on 25th August 2013, that the RSGB’s legacy committee has agreed a submission for funds to advance the above study. You may remember that a couple of months ago I updated RSGB members on my PSC HF Noise Measuring Campaign via an article in RadCom. The new funds will allow an extension to the original Campaign, which is to be titled “Noise Floor Study”, and will include university involvement. To read the RSGB announcement look at URL http://rsgb.org/main/technical/propagation/noise-floor-study/, which carries a link to my web site for further information on my Campaign? To further the Campaign part of this initiative, more input devices are required that will, hopefully, be scattered around the U.K. The suggested Rx. is the Sentinel SDR Rx. and an active aerial, both sold by Cross Country Wireless. Ideally there should be one or two Rx’s in quiet/Rural locations, so that comparisons can be made with more noisy locations, and as a basis for final analysis. One of the reasons why more Rx’s are not in the field right now I guess is, the price; both the Rx. and the aerial cost around £169.95p each plus P+P. The controlling software runs on Windows XP or Windows 2000, so older PCs/Laptops can be utilized. Perhaps groups such as affiliated societies could consider purchasing the units, to install and maintain them as a group project. As part of the legacy funding, a web site will be established to

display the Sentinel reported noise levels on 5 different QRG’s, each site will automatically report their readings every 10 minutes. The display will take the form of a European map with the Rx. sites marked at their geographic location, along with their most recent readings. There may be other outputs, which are in the discussion process. To advance Radio Amateur’s standing in the general publics and scientific communities’ ethos, many more data gathering Rx’s are required in all sorts of noise environments. Participation will also provide those participants with another fulfilment of the licence conditions, and that is the gaining of knowledge through the study of the radio environment. Full information can be found on the sites that the URL points to; those interested can also e-mail me directly at g4fkh@sky.com. Gwyn Williams – G4FKH

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General correspondence, training and contest entries Bob Glasgow 7 Castle Terrace Port Seton East Lothian EH32 0EE Phone: 01875 811723 E-mail: gm4uyz@cpsarc.com For events listed below, please use these contacts HF Contests Cambell Stevenson mm0dxc@aol.com VHF Contests John MacLean mm0ccc@cpsarc.com

Club Tables Bob Purves gm4ikt@cpsarc.com Contest Reports Robin Farrer mm0vtv@cpsarc.com Newsletter, website, event calendar John Innes newsletter@cpsarc.com www.cpsarc.com has forums everyone can use for technical discussion or for sale items

6 September 2013

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21 September 2013

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GM100RSGB from Barns Ness Lighthouse

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30 November 2013

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Callsign 1 MM0DXH 2 GM4IKT 3 MM0GZZ 4 GM2T 5 M0RNR 6 GM2Y 7 GB2VEF 8 GB2LBN 9 MM0XXW 10 GB2MOF 11 GM4UYZ 12 MM0CPS

Rank

160 80 60 40 30 0 23 0 62 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 55 56 0 42 0 57 0 0 0 0 34 0 0 20 0 35 0 0 0 0 19 0 0 0 0 32 0 0 1 0 20 8 0 0 0 16 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

20 17 15 12 10 127 4 99 0 30 86 5 63 0 18 82 0 21 10 37 80 0 64 0 21 54 0 40 0 3 56 0 29 0 2 59 0 0 0 0 53 0 18 0 0 37 23 20 1 7 48 0 5 0 0 31 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

6 DXCCs Slots Range 0 159 353 10 yrs 0 131 172 9 yrs 22 111 286 3 yrs 14 94 278 14 yrs 0 79 131 14 yrs 0 68 142 3 yrs 0 62 78 0 yrs 0 60 103 18 yrs 2 58 119 7 yrs 0 51 69 12 yrs 0 33 34 33 yrs 9 9 9 15 yrs

1D, 2d, 3B, 4C, 5D, 6A, 7A, 8D, 9A, 10A Answers from September 2013 newsletter “Test Your Knowledge”.


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