Page 1

Volume 20

10

Cockenzie & Port Seton Amateur Radio Club

October

Elements

2012

In this issue Morse Training P.2 New October Event P.2 Generator Troubleshooting P.3 The Reverse Beacon Network P.4 First CPSARC Mountain Goat? P.8 Test Your Knowledge P.9 The Sleeve Dipole P.10 Event Calendar P.12 Clublog Table P.12

Cockenzie & Port Seton Amateur Radio Club is affiliated to the Radio Society of Great Britain and holds the call signs MM0CPS and GM2T which are used for our special event and contest entries. The Club was formed by Bob Glasgow GM4UYZ in 1984 to help the local amateurs get to know each other. Far from being just a local club we have members regularly attending from the Borders, Dumfries, Strathclyde, Fife and Newcastle. The Club meets on the first Friday of every month (Second Friday of January) in the lounge of the Thorntree Inn on the old Cockenzie High Street from 7pm till late.

Editorial I am writing this early due to working away from home and a week’s holiday. Such is the pace of life, lots to do and no time to do it in!!! Anyway, I just cannot believe that we are now into the last quarter of the year and that the dark nights are well and truly here so it is once again time to sit back and reflect what you have done over the summer months. The jobs that you did and more than likely you will remember the ones that you didn’t. I myself had intended to do more operating from home but many factors have not allowed me to do so. On the Saturday after last club night my 5 September candidates sat and passed their Foundation Exam so a very warm welcome to them all to this fantastic hobby of ours. The Intermediate Course started on the 22nd September with 5 candidates heading for their Intermediate Exam on the 20th October. I am sure you will go along with me and wish them all the best with their studies and exam . There are still places left for the next Foundation Course starting 3rd November and the Intermediate Course starting on the 24th October. If you know of anyone interested then get them to contact me ASAP please. gm4uyz@cpsarc.com September was very quiet with only one activity taking place and that was our second DF hunt night of the year, which I am sure again it will have thrown up a few topics of conversation. To this coming month as always consult the Events Diary we have added a talk by Geoff MM5AHO on his Maritime Adventures for Lighthouses Weekend. This will take place

on Friday 19th so I hope you will all make an effort to attend as I think this will be very interesting indeed. On the contesting front there is a great demand for operators to take part in the HF Contest CQWW, which runs for 48 hours over the weekend of the 27/28th October. The CQWW contest is being run from Barns Ness so why not come along and either take part or support those who are operating, believe you me seeing a few people turn up and giving support really helps. If you can spare some time to operate please let Cambell know so he can arrange an operating rota. The Christmas Night Out hasn’t been finalised as I write this but I am suggesting we go back the Chinese Restaurant the Dragon Way in Port Seton. To be honest I have a lot on and do not really have time to go running around so hence the suggestion. If someone else wishes to take over organising the event and then let me know. Lastly, this month I am once again looking for your input as I am now starting to look at putting next year’s monthly calendar together, so what you would you like to see done. I would appreciate a quick response, as I would like to get it completed quickly so that I can submit it to the radio magazines. At present I have nothing lined up. Thanks for your help. Enjoy the newsletter and see you all on video night and the HF Contest. Bob GM4UYZ


Morse Training I have now booked two weeks in October to start the Morse Training using the Koch method. If there is enough response on these dates I will book further dates. For information: The last training took a total of 25 weeks to complete.

The reason the day has changed to Thursday is due to my work commitments making Monday nights difficult to attend. If you are interested I look forward to seeing on the 18th October….

Dates Booked in the Port Seton Community Centre THURSDAY 18th OCTOBER 2012 SOURCES ROOM 1

19:00 to 21:00 RE-

THURSDAY 25th OCTOBER 2012 SOURCES ROOM 1

19:00 to 21:00 RE-

Bob GM4UYZ

Change to October Event We originally planned to have a VIDEO/DVD Night on 19th October but once again Geoff MM5AHO has kindly offered to give a talk on his Maritime Mobile adventures for this year.

2012 Lighthouse Weekend and other Maritime Mobile Adventures

After the success of Geoff’s 2010/2011 Lighthouse Weekend event from sailing his yacht around Oban and the Inner Hebridean Islands he decided to do the same again this year but targeting very rare and hard to get lighthouses the question is did he make it well why not come along and find out? Geoff has produced another talk based on his experiences which he will be delivering to the Club on 19 October.

Talk by Geoff MM5AHO 19th OCTOBER 2012 RESOURCES ROOM 1: 19:30 to 21:30

I hope you can all make an effort to attend the talk which I know will be absolutely fascinating….

LRS Surplus Equipment Sale The LRS autumn Surplus Equipment Sale will be held on Wednesday 17th October at St Fillan’s Church Hall, Buckstone Drive, Edinburgh, EH10 6PD. Doors open at 7.30pm and the sale will start at 8.00pm. Please note that this is the 3rd Wednesday of the month due to the availability of the church hall. There will be a raffle with an assortment of prizes as well as the chance for you to exchange your old surplus items for fresh surplus items from others at the sale!

2

Members of other clubs are particularly welcome. Non members can also bring surplus equipment and sell it for a 10% commission


Generator Troubleshooting [this concludes Geoff’s article on the club gen- Hand cranking erator from last month] This can be dangerous. If you have never Fuel done this before, seek advice! It is very easy to break your thumb hand cranking a diesel There’s a pre-filter before the main filter in engine. Never grip the handle the way you’d the fuel line. It’s just downstream of the tank grip a bike handlebar. Rather, wrap your valve, a small plastic see through filter. If you thumb the same way as your fingers round can see the filter in this is clean well and the handle. It feels strange and un-natural, good. If it’s full of dirt - then there’s dirt in the but there’s a reason. If the handle kicks backtank. When the tank is clean this filter could wards, it just comes out of your grip, hopefulbe replaced. If not replaced it can be byly not taking your thumb off! passed, as the main fuel filter is still in place. (you’ll need a screwdriver to rearrange fuel 1. Set the decompressors to the rear hoses) (decompression lets you crank easily)

Our club has been added to the excellent Clublog system developed by Michael Wells G7VJR.

Lack of fuel is the most common cause for a 2. Switch the start switch to “start” (if absodiesel to stop. This could be air in the fuel lutely no power see below) line. A bleed nut is on the top of the fuel filter (see picture).

Clublog also has great facilities for tracking your DXCC status etc so is well worth taking the time to register and get your log uploaded.

3. Hand pump the fuel about 4-5 pumps Loosen this half a turn and hand pump the fuel (wooden handle on the mechanical fuel pump, see picture).

4. Turn the crank handle to spin the engine. (watch your grip – see above) While the engine is still spinning, flick the decompressors off (towards towbar), and see if it starts.

If there’s absolutely no power, then the fuel cut-off solenoid will not activate, and so will prevent fuel flowing. This solenoid can be operated by hand, and there’s a little latch to hold it open. Latch it Battery open. The latch A flat battery will be obvious. The battery is will deactivate charged by a small 12V psu putting out 13.8V. when (if) the enIt runs off the generator output. It is not gine runs, so actienough to charge a flat battery very quickly. A vating the various flat battery needs a battery charger. Hand safety systems. cranking is possible using the crank handle.

www.clublog.org The system allows members to upload their logs in ADIF format and have them displayed in a table with all the other club members.

To update your log with the next set of contacts (SSB, CW or Data) you can simply upload your whole log again and the system will take care of the duplicates. Alternatively you can export the bits you want from your own log and just upload that. The tables we’ll publish here will be the club, filtered by the current year, so everyone starts a new year at 0 contacts.

3


Club Attire The club has a design for Club Tee-shirts, Poloshirts, Sweat-Shirts, Fleeces and Jackets and all of these can be obtained from the address below.

When making an order please quote ‘Cockenzie & Port Seton Amateur Radio Club’ as this will ensure that the Club Logo will be placed on the required ordered garments. If you wish to add your call -sign to the logo then please ask at the time of the order. Cost will depend on garment and should cover the garment and logo, call-sign addition will be extra.

Order from: PATRICIA BEWSEY DESIGNS, UNIT 11, FENTON BARNS RETAIL VILLAGE, FENTON BARNS, NORTH BERWICK, EAST LOTHIAN EH39 5BW Tel/Fax: 01620 850788 Mobile: 07970 920431

The Reverse Beacon Network The Reverse Beacon Network (RBN) is a revolutionary new idea. Instead of beacons actively transmitting signals, the RBN is a network of stations listening to the bands and reporting what stations they hear, when and how well. It should be said that it is only looking for CW CQ’s and not SSB CQ’s.

Can we at CPSARC make use of this? well the answer is Yes. It was Brian G3UJE who brought this to my attention as he has used it in the 80M Club Championship contests. It certainly would be beneficial for the RSGB IOTA contest to see who is calling CQ on CW as it could show up new multipliers. By configuring VE7CC (DX Cluster program) and WtDXTelnet the CQ So why should you care? Well, to begin with, spots can be displayed in the Band Map of the you can see band openings in near-real time active radio station. Like with DX-Spots by just on an animated map. You can call a quick CQ, clicking on the spot it changes the radio to the and see which reverse beacons hear you, and correct frequency and mode so all that is left how strong you are. to do is “work” the station. But the real breakthrough is in the database CONFIGURATION of past "spots". You can instantly find out what stations, from a given country or zone, Overall diagram: have been heard, at what times and on what frequencies. You can see when you've been VE7CC ConVE7CC Connected to DX nected to RBN spotted, who spotted you, and how loud you -Cluster were. "But wait," as they say on the TV ads, "there's wtDXTelnet wtDXTelnet more!" Now, for the first time, you can comconnected connected pare your signal with those of your friends to VE7CC to VE7CC and competitors, in near real time or historically. If you wonder how your signal stacked up during last weekend's contests, the Signal Win-Test Comparison Tool will give you real, quantitative data. Tell it what stations you want to compare, based on signals heard by a given reverse beacon on a certain band at a certain The following is a step by step guide on setting time, and there you'll have it. Of course, both systems up. VE7CC is very powerful on whether you like what you see is up to you. what can be done with it but that is not for this explanation. The Reverse Beacon Network depends on volunteer stations. Currently, we have a few dozen, some active almost 24/7, others coming up only occasionally. We have decent coverage in North America and Europe, but can always use more. It needn't cost a lot, or tie up your station equipment. http://www.reversebeacon.net/index.php The above is an extract from the web site (link above) which gives a basic outline on what it achieves.

Download a copy of the VE7CC program from the website http://www.ve7cc.net/ The same site gives lots of information on what you can actually set up the program to do. The next stage is to create two VE7CC shortcuts and place them on the PC’s desktop screen Rename the VE7CC shortcuts to VE7CCDXC and VE7CCRBN. The VE7CCDXC will be set up for normal DX-Cluster access and VE7CCRBN for the Reverse Beacon Access. (Continued on page 5)

4


Select Port/Logging Program

(Continued from page 4)

At CPSARC we already have purchased WinTest and it is installed on our PC’s. “wtDXTelnet” is part of WinTest so create two wtDXTelnet shortcuts Rename shortcuts to wtDXTelDXC and wtDXTelRBN. wtDXTelDXC will be setup to receive the normal DX Cluster spots and wtDXTelRBN for the Reverse Beacon Spots Setting up VE7CCDXC & VE7CCRBN As we are going via the same steps the action is just the same but what is entered will be different and in those cases it will be made clear.

VE7CCDXC Settings Tick Enable Telnet Tick Use Port 7300 Click Apply

Click on each VE7CC shortcut and load the programs. V7CCDXC and VE7RBN should now be open

Click on Configuration and it opens the following dropdown menu. Select User Info

VE7CCRBN Settings Tick Enable Telnet Tick Use Custom Port and set it to 7000 Click Apply

Ensure Cluster (Telnet) is ticked Click on Cluster (Telnet) and it opens the following Select Telnet Cluster Box. VE7CCDXC Settings Callsign is GM4UYZ Click OK

VE7CCRBN Settings Callsign is GM4UYZ-16 Click OK

Using the drop down arrow in the Node selection box choose the required DX-Cluster or edit a selection and set up the RBN Cluster VE7CCDXC Settings Select GB7UJS or cluster of your choice Click Apply

VE7CCRBN Settings Enter in Node Field RBN Enter in Address Field telnet.reversebeacon.net Enter in Port Field 7000 Click Apply Click on Configuration and it opens the following dropdown menu.

(Continued on page 6)

5


The Club The Club is run in a very informal way, just a group of like minded people doing something they enjoy! This does not mean that we don’t do anything, we enter (and win!) contests, train newcomers, hold talks and video nights and run a popular annual Junk Sale. Our newsletter has won the Practical Wireless ‘Spotlight’ competition on several occasions. The Club supports the British Heart Foundation in memory of a member who died from heart disease by donating the profits from some of the events we hold, we have raised over £14,795 since 1994.

Supported by BT Community Champions

(Continued from page 5)

For both wtDXTelDXC and wtDXTelRBN the following are the same

VE7CCRBN Settings Click YES That is the VE7CC programs set up, so now we Click on Options need to set up the wtDXTelnet programs. Select Win-Test Network Properties Click on each wtDXTelnet shortcut and load Set Broadcast IP Address to 192.168.1.255 the programs. wtDXTelDXC and wtDXTelRBN Set Port Number to 9871 should now be open. Set Application ID to TELNET See under “RUNNING the DX-CLUSTER and Click OK RBN and feeding Win-TEST” when to set up the wxDXTelRBN. This is due to wxDXTelnet That is the VE7CC and wxDXTelnet programs taking the last DXCluster properties settings. set up so now we need to set up the Win-Test program. wtDXTelDXC Settings Click on Win-Test and load the programs Click on Options Select DXCluster properSelect Options ties Select Configure Interfaces Set Profile to profile-1 Set Profile Name to profile-1 Set Hostname/IP to 127.0.0.1 Set Port to 7300 Tick No password required Tick Try to restore connection automatically Click OK wtDXTelRBN Settings Click on Options Select DXCluster properties Set Profile to profile -1 Set Profile Name to profile-1 Set Hostname/IP to 127.0.0.2 Set Port to 7000 Tick No password required Tick Try to restore connection automatically Click OK

In the Ethernet Section Tick Enable Ethernet Network Set Broadcast IP Address to 192.168.1.255 Set Port Number to 9871 Everything is now configured....... see above when to set up wtDXTelRBN

(Continued on page 7)

6


(Continued from page 6)

RUNNING the DX-CLUSTER and RBN and feeding Win-TEST Load each of the VE7CC programs, wtDXTelnet programs and the Win-Test program. Configure Win-Test for the required contest or DX-Pedition i.e IOTA, CQWW CW, etc On each of VE7CC programs Select Connect The wtDXTelnet programs do in the following order... Click on the wtDXTelDXC shortcut to run. Check that the settings for wtDXCTelDXC under DX Properties are set as above. Select DXCluster Select Connect wtDXTelDXC will now be connect to the VE7CCDXC program and DX Spots will start appearing WINTEST BANDMAP Click on the wtDXTelRBN shortcut to run. DX Spots are shown as normal Check that the settings for wtDXCTelRBN under DX Properties RBN Spots show a # in front of the callsign i.e. #W3TW are set as above Select DXCluster Select Connect wtDXTelRBN will now be connect to the VE7CCRBN program and RBN Spots will start appearing The VE7CCDXC will now connect to the DX Cluster Network and VE7CCRBN will connect to the RBN network. Assuming they are both successful and when the wtDXTelnet programs are configured then information should now be being seen in the wtDXTelnet programs and also should now be seen also in the Win-Test Band Map

7


First CPSARC Mountain Goat? Cockenzie and Port Seaton Amateur Radio Club can now boast a member who has achieved ‘mountain goat’ status under the Summits on the Air (SOTA) system. www.sota.org.uk All in a day less than 1 year and 8 months and I couldn’t have done it without CPSARC! To achieve ‘mountain goat’ status you have to collect 1000 points by making at least 4 QSOs from the top of designated mountain summits. Ben Nevis (GM/WS-001) earns you 10 points while North Berwick Law (GM/SS-280) or Arthur’s Seat (GM/SS-272) gives you one point, with intermediate heights giving intermediate points.

advice and reports, but I must lay the blame for my SOTA activity squarely on the shoulders of MM0DHY; it is his fault! My first activation was GM/SS-158; Black Mount in The Pentlands on the night of the 17th January 2011, under his supervision. I also really want to thank GM4UYZ for his help since starting amateur radio and to MM0DXC for some interesting video clips along the way. Thanks to you all for your help and patience in my achieving Goat status.

Highlights, good or bad you decide, included doing the Cuillin Ridge on Skye and activating all of the summits en route; I had even helped MM0DHY activate the Inaccessible Pinnacle the My 1001 points total comprised 887 for summits and 114 bo- year before for the first time. GM/WS-006, Sgurr nan nus points for 38 winter activations (December to March). A Ceathreamhnan turned out to be a long term challenge. Beinn total of 183 summits activated. Some I have been up twice Mholach GM/CS-064 was a first activation and the 4 QSOs (GM/WS-006) but only logged once to keep a 100% unique were all summit 2 summit. On the 6th November 2011, record. Six hills I struggled to the distant summit but failed to starting in the dark I activated 4 summits (26 points) on a maractivate; two were in Italy this July; which shows the limitaathon day out; 3 for the first time, and I recall the final summit tions of 2 metre activations, and I’ll be unlikely to ever go back that day, GM/WS-160. The sun was setting in a clear blue, but to them. One in Switzerland and three are in Scotland, on one darkening sky, I was miles from the road and the pile-up was I had a frustrating three QSOs (!) they remain on my hit list! enormous, in fact I recorded my highest number of QSOs from that summit; and I still made it back to civilization. A total of 1709 QSOs (average QSOs per summit = 9.3) from 709 callsigns so to all the 709 people (will be slightly fewer In April while ski mountaineering we attempted a peak in Switwith /P/M/A stations) a huge and grateful thank you. zerland called the Gross Leckihorn (HB/UR-023, 3068 m). Owing to my concern about the safety of adjacent snow slopes I think MM0FZV is the sole CPSARC member to whom I have we were climbing the rocky north ridge when we saw 4 skiers spoken from some obscure Fife hill; thanks Gary. Also tried to caught in an avalanche on the slopes we had just avoided. QSO with the Barns Ness Lighthouse special events station, but Luckily they were all dug out and survived; of course we demy 5 watts just doesn’t seem to cut it on busy 40m contest scended to help, and we returned to climb to the summit a weekends. few days later although it was then too cold and windy to try I logged 935 QSOs under my foundation licence callsign; an activation! MM6YCJ, and the rest with my full callsign; MM0YCJ. Geal Charn, GM/WS-031 activation on 15th September 2012 My intermediate callsign 2M0YCJ was never broadcast. on 40m when my 6m fibre glass roach pole snapped in the I think my early success on 2m, 20m and 40m has led to me high wind. It was after 4 QSOs so although the hill was activatfavour these bands and not experiment further. ed, my grand total was 995 points and it seemed like someone I use resonant antennae to avoid the weight of an ATU and was trying to tell me something, but thankfully no celestial extra bands just mean more to carry of course so my inherent lightening strike arrived! Next day, with a splinted pole I actilaziness doesn’t help. vated GM/CS-035 to achieve mountain Goatdom! From the total, 810 QSOs were on 2 metres, 40 were on 20 I estimate that I had activated around 37 summits for the first metres (including two to north America) and the remaining time including some in Italy. Activating all year round leads to 859 on 40m. Overseas, my single summit in Switzerland was some uncomfortable summit shacks! activated with 5 QSOs on 2 metres, 29 in Italy and 83 in England (OK, not exactly overseas!) I have produced articles from several of my expeditions and they have appeared in Elements, they have also featured in GM0AXY is my most prolific contact (45/183 = 24.6% of all the SOTA newsletter which is published monthly and can be QSOs). GM7UAU is close behind with GM4YMM. Fourth is the found on the SOTA website. Most articles I have added to the amazing and inspiring GM7PKT. Robin is always on or near a information for the relevant summit, apologies for this self summit (34 QSOs) apart from one single QSO to his home QTH (Continued on page 9) (I think). GM4COX is often up a hill and is always helpful with

8


Test Your Knowledge 1.

600MHz is a harmonic of

6.

Twin feeder consists of two conductors carrying

a.

30MHz

a.

DC and RF

b.

35MHz

b.

The transmit and receive signals at the same time

c.

460MHz

c.

The RF signal and earth

d.

500MHz

d.

Equal and opposite signals

2.

One method of reducing harmonics from a transmitter is to

a.

Increase power

b.

Use an end-fed antenna

c.

Increase modulation

d.

Filter all external leads

3.

7. a.

Not work effectively

b.

Have a low SWR

c.

Radiate with a vertical polarisation

d. The drawing shows a block diagram of a simple Superhetrodyne receiver. What is the block marked X? 8.

X

IF

Detector

If an antenna is not correctly designed for the frequency on which it is used it will

Radiate more than the permitted power Which ONE of the following diagrams best represents the polar diagram of a horizontal half wave dipole?

AF

A Local

B

BFO

D

C a.

Mixer

b.

Balanced modulator

A

c.

Power amplifier

B

d.

Audio frequency amplifier

C

4.

A radio receiver is set to receive a signal on 1.9MHz and the local oscillator is on a frequency of 1.5MHz. What will the intermediate frequency be?

a.

400kHz

b.

500kHz

c.

1500kHz

d.

1900kHz

5.

A receiver is being used to receive a CW signal on 10MHz. The receiver IF is set to 600 kHz. The BFO frequency will be approximately

a.

599.3kHz

b.

600kHz

c.

610kHz

d.

10MHz

(Continued from page 8)

D 9.

The skip zone is

a.

The area beyond the return of the sky wave

b.

The part of the ionosphere used to reflect radio waves

c.

The area beyond the ground wave but before the sky wave coverage

d.

The area that can receive a signal directly from the transmitter

10. Which one of the following has the greatest effect on the propagation of UHF waves? a.

The number of visible sunspots

b.

Daylight and darkness

c.

A layer of snow and ice on the ground

d.

Heavy rain

I now look forward to the next 1000 points and I look forward to speaking to you all further down the log!

indulgence, but I hope they are of some benefit to future acti73s MM0YCJ vators and are entertainment for those chasers too sensible to leave the warmth and comfort of their shacks.

9


The Sleeve Dipole

(Reprinted from Break-In) With kind permission we have been given authority to reproduce this article which was published in the Christchurch West Amateur Radio Club, New Zealand monthly newsletter QTC. Many Thanks. It certainly may be of interest to those who are limited in space to erect Multiband antennas

main 30m dipole and around the plastic tube holds the spreaders from moving up the antenna. Each antenna has a standard “egg” insulator at the end. The coaxial feeder may be any length of RG8U or RG58U 50 ohm cable as the feed point is around 50 ohms for each band.

I used polypropylene rope to fasten the ends of each dipole out to the end support which is a short length of 12mm aluMost of us use dipoles in one form or another and we tend to minium tubing. At first the antenna was set up a few metres put up a dipole on one band only. It is the staple antenna of HF off the ground and tied to one side of the house and a tree amateur radio and various methods are often used to extend about 15m away from the house. I then coupled the MFJ Ancoverage to other bands. Trap dipoles operating on two bands tenna analyser to it and, using the standard dipole formula, and the G5RV type of dipole antennas are noteworthy for their found the dipoles were fairly close. A bit of trimming of multi band coverage but their drawbacks are should also be lengths brought them very close to where I wanted to operate taken into account. Traps are not easy to construct and do in the three bands. The antennas went higher in frequency by exhibit some losses whilst the G5RV antenna requires an anabout 50 to 80 kHz when the antenna was hauled up to the tenna coupler to match wayward impedances at the end of top of the tower. the feed line. Does it work? Yes, exactly like three separate dipoles with no The open sleeve multi-dipole has been around for a long time interaction between the bands. I have used a 30m/17m vertiand articles using the open sleeve principle have appeared in cal loop for a few years and this dipole setup works just as well QST and the ARRL Antenna Handbook. Some commercial manas the loop. If there is 1 or 2 dB difference, I do not notice it. ufacturers are using the design in their multi band Yagi and The antenna exhibits a definite increase in gain and noise over vertical antennas. It is a most interesting antenna in that only other comparative dipoles cut for other bands. For example, if one of the three or more dipoles are connected and fed with I listen to the 30m band on my 40m separate dipole and then the single feed line; the other dipoles are benign and go along switch to this 30m antenna, the noise and the signals increase. for the free ride. I have been using this system for over two The same is true for the 17 and 12m bands. My results are 214 years with a WARC band antenna cut for 30/17/12 metres and countries on 30m, 142 countries on 17m and 68 countries on the results are the same as if I had been using separately fed 12m. If I compare my ability to work DX on 17m with Morrie, dipoles. There is little or no interaction and the feed point imZL2AAA who lives about 2 km from me who is using a well pedance remains around 50 ohms. The horizontal dipole part tuned 3 el Yagi then I am in the hunt after he works the DX of the antenna is about 15 metres long and the spacing of the first. On very weak signals that Morrie will hear I don’t; but dipoles is 5cm (2”) whilst the plastic spreaders can be any mathat is the difference between a 3el Yagi and a dipole! terial such as 12mm plastic tubing with three holes drilled into them and the antennas are threaded through the holes. A sim- I can’t supply gain graphs and charts since I have no way of ple piece of small diameter copper wire threaded around the (Continued on page 11)

10


(Continued from page 10)

am planning to put an 80m dipole in the near future cut for 3.5 MHz and the parallel second antenna a few inches away cut for 3.8 MHz which should give me good SWR readings on both ends of the band. That should solve the traditional bandwidth problems of antennas operating SSB and CW in that band.

measuring gain or losses and I cannot plot the patterns. To be sure the sleeved dipole performance will be very similar to standard dipoles because that is exactly what they are. The convenience of being able to work all three bands with no switching and have an SWR of less than 1.5 to 1 is great. There 73 de Lee ZL2AL <leejen@paradise.net.nz> is no reason why the same technique could not be applied to other combinations such as 40m/30m/17m or 80/40/30m. I

11


Events Column 5 October 2012

Club Night

18 October 2012

Morse Training Lighthouse Weekend Maritime Adventures

Contacts General correspondence, training and contest entries Bob Glasgow 7 Castle Terrace Port Seton East Lothian EH32 0EE Phone: 01875 811723 E-mail: gm4uyz@cpsarc.com HF Contests Cambell Stevenson mm0dxc@aol.com

19 October 2012

Talk By Geoff MM5AHO Port Seton Community Centre Resources Room 1

24 October 2012

Intermediate Course begins

25 October 2012

Morse Training

27/28 October 2012

CQWW SSB Contest Barns Ness Lighthouse GM2T

27 October 2012

Newsletter Deadline

2 November 2012

Club Night

3 November 2012

Foundation Course begins

23 November 2012

Talk by Dr Colwyn Jones on “SOTA Activation” Port Seton Community Centre 19:30 to 21:30

7 December 2012

Club Night

8 December 2012

Christmas Night Out—venue TBC

VHF Contests John MacLean mm0ccc@cpsarc.com Club Tables Bob Purves gm4ikt@cpsarc.com Contest Reports Robin Farrer mm0vtv@cpsarc.com Newsletter, website, event calendar John Innes newsletter@cpsarc.com

Clublog DXCC Table Rank Callsign

160 80 40 30 20 17 15 12 10

1 GM4IKT

0

2 GM2T

0 49 52

0

0

3 MM0XXW

6

2

4

70

DXCCs

Slots

Range

0 90 16 84

0

41

0

0

0

0

152

231

8 yrs

0 70

0 78

0

42 26

0

0

0

92

317

13 yrs

0

6 34 17 46 20 61

8

6

7

0

0

0

86

205

6 yrs

4 MM0GZZ

0

0 15 28 73

0 22

3

20

0

0

0

0

86

161

4 yrs

5 M0RNR

0

0 41

0 54

2 38

0

0

3

0

0

0

80

138

13 yrs

6 GB2MOF

0

0 19

0 54

0

3

0

1

0

0

0

0

56

77

11 yrs

7 MM0DXH

0

0

7

0 33

0 11

0

10

0

0

0

0

43

61

9 yrs

8 MQ0XXW

0

0

7

0 17

2 29

2

1

0

0

0

0

40

58

0 yrs

9 MM0CPS

0

0

5

0 25

0

7

0

0

6

9

7

5

35

64

14 yrs

10 GM4UYZ

0

4

4

0 33

0

7

0

0

0

0

0

0

34

48

32 yrs

11 MM5AHO

0

0

6

0

0

0 14

0

3

0

1

0

0

21

24

17 yrs

12 MM0WZB

0

0

3

0

8

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

11

13

2 yrs

13 MO0XXW

0

0

3

0

7

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

10

10

0 yrs

14 MM0KTC

0

0

1

0

1

3

3

1

0

0

0

0

0

8

9

4 yrs

1A, 2D, 3A, 4A, 5A, 6D, 7A, 8B, 9C, 10D Answers from October 2012 newsletter “Test Your Knowledge”.

Elements 201210  

I am writing this early due to working away from home and a week’s holiday. Such is the pace of life, lots to do and no time to do it in!!!...

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