Issuu on Google+

The newsletter of Cockenzie & Port Seton Amateur Radio Club

June 2009 Vol 17 Issue 6

EDITORIAL By Bob Glasgow GM4UYZ Once again this month I am writing the editorial and my newsletter input reasonably early this is due to other commitments. It is hard to believe that soon we will be moving into the major holiday period, isn’t time flying by? Moving on to what has happened over the past month. On the club front we had our first DF night and we will also have had our Special Event at the Scottish Parliament. Fuller reports later on both activities. Also our 25th HF Challenge has kicked off and I for one have made a start by logging some new locator squares although I must admit Band conditions have been absolutely atrocious any time I have been on. How are the rest of you doing? Worked any thing exotic/? Remember there is a good bottle of malt whisky , kindly donated by Malcolm MM0YDG , for the overall winner//. To the future, this month, there is one important change and that is the July Club Night will be one week early and will take place on Friday 26th June. The reason for the change is that our normal first Friday of the month is clashing with VHF Field Day where many of the club members will be away to.

So, what else is happening? Well we are now starting to enter the main contest season for the club of which we will be entering a few. They are the 6M Trophy, PW QRP. I am not sure if anyone is taking part this year in the PW QRP 2M contest on the 14th, which is certainly a good challenging contest for beginners. It also offers quite a few surprises to what can be worked with only 3 watts. This month we also have on the weekend of the 6th i.e. tomorrow as you read this, Port Seton Gala Day then on the 20th & 21st the “Museums on the Air” weekend again from the Museum of Flight, East Fortune. We will be operating from our normal hanger up beside the Vulcan bomber. These demonstration stations offer everyone to have a real go at HF operating using a tremendous HF set up so I hope you will take the opportunity to come along and give it a try. Last but not least is our own 20M Activity Night on the 24th June. I have changed this night from a contest to Activity night in the hope that many others will take part. It is all for a bit of fun and an opportunity to see what can be worked. It is not a serious event but just an excuse to go out for a few hours on a Wednesday evening to “play at HF Radio”. If

you can’t get out then why not go on the air from home as a single operator and see what you can work. So please do not dismiss the idea about not doing it, go on and try and participate. I am interested in what people do work so any chance you could send me your logs and I will try and do a small right up on what was achieved. So can I please have a copy of your log by the 4th July at the latest? A busy month then all rounds so I hope you can take part in all the events. This month certainly has a lot of operating activities so there is something there for everyone. Some of the events will certainly give you an opportunity to practice some of the skills required to go contesting so why not take time out and give it a try. Events like Museums on the Air al(Continued on page 2)

www.cpsarc.com


(Continued from page 1)

though are demonstration setups can at the same time be extremely hectic. What they offer is the ability to use some of logging programs and learn all about them, and also how to handle a pile up like we have experienced over the last few

events we have run at the Museum of Flight. It is better to play at these events rather than try and learn when you are involved in a major contest. The opportunity is there so why not use it.

That’s it then for me this month, I hope you will take part in all of the events; it would be tremendous to see. Enjoy the newsletter. Bob GM4UYZ

10 Pin Bowling night By Bob Glasgow GM4UYZ On Saturday 20th April we held our 10 Pin Bowling Night at the Ten-Pin, located at Fountain Park, Edinburgh starting at 20:00. Originally 34 people paid their money but in the end due to various circumstances only 31 people turned up and took part and as before at this event it certainly turned out to be another fun night. This year there were no special packages available so it was just the case of playing the 2 games, including the shoe hire at a cost of £12.50 for the adults and £10 for the children, with a small amount out of this going for some prizes at the end. With regard to the prizes Kris, my Son-in-Law won both the two games and overall but he decided that he would only accept one prize and to hand out the other two. To that end the second and third overall placings received the prizes which were Gary MM0FZV and Jamie. Congratulations to all the prize winners. I also made the same decision as previous years that the kids would all be treated the same no matter how good or bad they actually did they all received a prize. Thanks to everyone for making it a real good fun night. Hope you all enjoyed it. For interest the scoring achieved is as follows: Bob GM4UYZ

Lane

Name

Score Game 1

Score Game 2

Total

1

Yvonne

60

72

112

1

Elyse

61

99

160

1

Holly

61

76

137

1

Karis

59

70

129

2

Bob GM4UYZ

100

87

187

2

Shaun (M0KLN)

98

72

170

2

Lesley

83

75

158

2

Kris

131

129

260

2

Lisa

65

81

146

2

Robin MM3SRF

76

101

177

3

John MM0JXI

103

99

202

3

Kirsty MM3FZV

90

57

147

3

Gary MM0FZV

109

117

226

3

Eilidh

90

79

169

3

Steve B

73

84

157

3

Kevin M0KLN

93

82

175

4

Liz 2M1GLD

71

74

145

4

Stevie MM3YPN

74

113

187

4

Janet

45

44

89

4

Jamie

106

106

212

4

Kyle

76

61

137

5

Ricky GM1PLY

95

88

183

5

Cathy

66

82

148

5

Gregory

67

79

146

5

Adrian MM3YPQ

87

116

203

5

Debbie

100

62

162

5

Sean

79

67

146

6

Derek MM0WST

82

67

149

6

Denise

70

68

138

6

Campbell

95

83

178

6

Jim GM7LUN

77

82

159

2

www.cpsarc.com


Contents

How Welcome were you made? 2 3

By Bob Glasgow GM4UYZ The following was received from Robin MM3SRF. Thanks for your positive response/ “I was reading over the May edition of the clubs newsletter under the title of "How Welcome Were You Made?" and I thought I would share to you my feelings of the club welcoming me in February. When I joined the club for the first time in February I wasn't really looking forward to the reception I was about to receive and had a vision of walking through the pub doors and being surrounded in complete silence, like an old western film! But instead I was welcomed with so much enthusiasm from the club members that poured through the doors. Upon saying that I had in depth conversations with John MM0CCC and Cambell MM0DXC about propagation, how to modify a vertical CB antenna to any band on the HF spectrum and other experiences from other club members.

My opinion is that the web site is a valuable asset to club. When doing my research on clubs in the area I found that CPSARC had the best by far. I was soon convinced that the club would be the best for me when I saw the phrase "if you walk through the door you are automatically considered a member" which I was disappointed not to see on other clubs introductions.

4 5 6 9 10 11 12

10 Pin Bowling report How welcome were you made? May DF Hunt Repairing a Watson FC-130 GB10SP Report Mountain Bike Diaries Test Your Knowledge Event Calendar 20m Activity night

I am still finding my feet and there are loads of people that I still have to introduce myself to, but once you start chatting to someone in the club you can lose track of time! I am personally glad to be part of a large community that shares the interests in radio as me.”

Contributions to the newsletter and web site are most welcome. Please don’t send these items to GM4UYZ, he’s busy enough doing all the other things he does for the club.

GM4UYZ with the GB10SP Scottish Parliament QSL card (not actual size (the card!))

Send any items you’d like included to mm0jxi@cpsarc.com or submit them direct to the web site.

33


May DF Hunt By Bob Glasgow GM4UYZ

Friday 8th May Once again we were reasonably fortunate with the weather during the DF Night; it basically stayed dry apart from the odd spots of rain and certainly chilly. So were there any disasters or stories to tell/read on. As normal everyone who took part assembled in the Ship Inn car park ready to go at the 19:00 start. This time there were 5 cars which set out so the teams consisted off: Liz 2M1GLD & Ricky GM1PLY, Cambell MM0DXC & Stevie MM3YPN, Colin 2M0CRR & Hugh MM0HSA, Bob GM4IKT and Malcolm MM0YMG & Bob GM4UYZ giving us a reasonable turnout. The fox was once again Iain MM1CPP who was accompanied by Tor MM0PID The seven o’clock start came and off we all went. My team we headed up to the lay-by at Gladsmuir just of the A1. Nothing was heard so we headed east along towards Haddington. We listened once again but nothing heard. As we started to move away from where we had stopped and with the aerial lying in the back of the car up popped Iain's voice. We then discovered that he was transmitting about 1.5 minutes after what the clock in our car showed. Now we at least had a time marker. On the fact we heard the fox we knew he was in close proximity so now it was all about getting bearings and trying to find him. We then stopped for the next transmission and with the fox now being heard we managed to get a bearing in a line going across the west of Haddington towards Samuelston. We then started moving around trying to get cross bearings and

eventually we found that the signal was massive just to the north of Samuelston at the crossroad with the main Haddington to Pencaitland road. It was at this point we ended up going round in circles trying to hone in on the fox but we ended up getting ourselves a little mixed up. We made a decision to go back to the crossroad but this time we decided after taking a bearing to head towards Samuelston itself. We then discovered at the next stop no matter what we did with the aerial and with maximum attenuation in the signal were massive so we knew he was very, very close. We moved east a little and the signal dropped. We came back to the “big signal” spot we noticed a sign that says No Through Road/we then said “I wonder”. We had about 4 transmissions left so we decided we may as well take a look. We drove on and on up this road to where it really went no further. I then reversed back up a side road to turn the car when I noticed Iain and Tor sitting in the landrover. YES, OH YES we found them at 20:35 and we were the only ones.

for at least a couple of years. If nothing else it will now become another DF legend and talking point/ the “Fox” who used the wrong Map!!!! Any way we still found them never the less which Malcolm and I were extremely chuffed about/. Well done Iain and Tor you certainly made it a very entertaining evening even though you were outside the new map boundary/. Now who said DF’ing was easy, but once again it proved that it isn’t particularly when you only get a transmission for less than a minute, every 5 minutes. Everyone certainly enjoyed the evening and wants more, well they will have to wait till September when the next one takes place, and in the dark as well. Yes another test! Roll on September!!!!!!!! Bob GM4UYZ

The DF finished and off we headed to the Thorntree, Malcolm and I as proud as punch for finding them and nobody else did. Little did we know that our excitement was to be short lived. When we got back and we said where we had found Iain and Tor the others said he was off the DF Map area, no they weren’t was our reply until they showed us the map I had handed out. OOPS they were right, as the map we had used was one that Malcolm had downloaded himself. It turns out Iain was using a map that we used to use many years ago instead of the new one which we have used now 4

www.cpsarc.com


Repairing a Watson FC-130 By Derry Hamilton GM4FH There's a range of relatively inexpensive frequency counters, badge engineered by various companies; Watson, MFJ, Optoelectronics, etc. that appear to share a lot of common design. (I suspect that the only thing that changes is the front panel, and the switches installed.) At least, the Watson FC-130, and the Optoelectronics Scout 40 seem to share the same front end. Unfortunately, that front end is a little fragile. It uses a 50Ω MMIC to terminate the antenna. The upside is that this is quite sensitive and low power. The downside is that it's easily destroyed. For example by plugging it directly into an FM-1000! It would appear that this is a common problem, but in contrast to the likes of Yaesu, etc. the manufacturer takes steps to obscure the workings of the device — going so far as to sand the part numbers off some of the ICs! While the input MMIC wasn't specifically obscured, it isn't a common British part. Or a common part at all, as I finally tracked down the markings (A06Z)in a Russian web forum.

It's an MSA-0611, apparently available only by import from the US, with attendant substantial shipping charges. They are, at least, a lot cheaper than replacing the entire counter. A device this small is quite hard to desolder with conventional

tools, since surface tension in the legs renders them immune to solder braid. However, since I didn't intend to recover the device, it was easy enough to apply some larger snips to the package, reducing the problem to some plastic crumbs and four slightly pathetic looking legs still attached to the board. These were easy enough to clean up using a conventional soldering iron and braid.

An MMIC is a Microwave Monolithic Integrated Circuit. This can cover a while lot of applications, but in this case, it's just an improved transistor — effectively just an op-amp. They are more useful than that might suggest, since the package typically contains the biasing circuitry, and matches the input and output to 50Ω, making them useful at any frequency, not just microwave.

labour the point here. The basic procedure is to place a dab of solder on one of the pads, and solder the single leg in place. I chose the bottom right one, since it was more substantial then tha others. One then applies an excess of solder to the legs on the other side, so that the original dab holds the device in place. Soldering the pins together is not a problem, since surface tension draws the solder where it's needed, and the excess is cleaned off with desolder braid. Having done this, proceed to the first side and do the same again. Derry GM4FH

They are especially useful at microwave frequencies as the wavelength approaches a significant fraction of the phase distance between a conventional transistor and conventional biasing circuitry. Indeed, at that point one needs to think of all the interconnects as transmission lines, rather than just wires. The move to SMT components isn't just to make things difficult to repair! Soldering in SMD components has been covered in much longer articles in the likes of RadCom, PW, etc. so I wont 5


GB10SP Report By Bob Glasgow GM4UYZ The GB10SP Event. 09:00 -17:00 Saturday 16th May and 09:00-17:00 Sunday 17th May 2009 The radio club has for many years taken part in numerous Special Events. The main events have been Lighthouse Weekend as GB2LBN (August) since 1995 and Museums Weekend as GB2MOF (June) since 2001. Organisation for these events and all other events has been minimal with only one requiring that little bit of extra work being Museums Weekend at the Museum of Flight at East Fortune aerodrome. The idea of the GB10SP event started back in May 2008 after the radio club’s visit to the Scottish Parliament. Jim Hume (MM0DXH) Lib Dem MSP for the South of Scotland who completed his amateur training with the club and is a member suggesting that as it was the Scottish Parliament’s 10th Anniversary in 2009 could we put on a special event station to commemorate the event. I agreed that it would be a great idea and thus the seed was sown. Jim did some initial checking to

see if it was feasible which all came back positive. From then on emails started flowing backwards and forwards until we got to the stage that it was necessary that we had a site visit to check where we could set-up aerials, and equipment The first meeting took place on the 24th November 2008 with Jim MM0DXH, Cambell Stevenson MM0DXC, Gary Bourhill MM0FZV and myself. From this visit we identified where we could site aerials and what rooms were available to set-up our equipment, idea for a call sign for the event and a few other issues that needed internal Scottish parliament answers. Jim took on board the internal questions that needed answering and I started preparing the paperwork to obtain the GB10SP callsign. Confirmation of the date was given that the event could take place that being the weekend of the 16/17th May 2009. After Jim’s chat with the Fire Safety Officer (Bob Bertram 2M0KLL ex MM3LWJ -Training all done at CPSARC) and Jake Fenton Scottish Parliament Health & Safety a whole list of items were

The team on Saturday F3NED (at radio), MM0YMG, GM4UYZ, MM6TMS, MM0JXI, MM0FZV & GM4IKT

Cushcraft A3S outside the Scottish Parliament

identified that needed to be carried out, see below to give you an idea. Jim at the Scottish Parliament --------------------------------------1. Booking of Room for the event 2. Supply Official Letter to Bob GM4UYZ about the event to enable getting Special Event Call Sign GB10SP 3. Book and Confirm obtaining 4 x Standalone tables each approximately 2 metres long. 4. Book and confirm obtaining trolleys to take equipment to Committee Room. For GM4UYZ ----------------------------------------1. Obtain Special Event Callsign: Complete paperwork and submit 2. Produce list of names for access to building and submit 3. Produce Names and Car Registrations to allow access for antenna and equipment installation and decommissioning. 4. Produce Equipment Diagram for event. 5. Produce Equipment Inventory. 6. Produce Emergency Fire Procedure 7. Produce a Risk Assessment 8. Produce a Method Statement 9. Produce copy of Club Equipment and Public Liability (Continued on page 7)

6

www.cpsarc.com


(Continued from page 6)

Insurance. 10. PAT test all our equipment and submit the PAT testing Paperwork 11. Create QSL card and enquire about costs to be printed Produce document to publicise the event

Setting up in committee Room 5

One of our biggest concerns was whether we could get the GB10SP call sign. Well, that turned out to be totally straightforward. I sent off the paperwork on the Monday and I received a telephone call on the Thursday to say it was granted. How’s that for excellent service from Ofcom? There were issues about where we originally thought we would erect the tower for the Yagi for 20M so it was decided another meeting was required, this time in daylight to confirm up location and go through all the details for the set-up with a fine toothcomb. This was arranged for the 16th March 2009. At this meeting the Scottish Parliament Events Co-ordinator was present along with Fire safety, Security and Health & Safety, Cambell MM0DXC, Gary Bourhill, Bob Purves GM4IKT and GM4UYZ. This was an excellent meeting where all the details required were ironed out leaving a “tweaking” of all the required paperwork to complete everything. After this meeting again a few emails went backwards and forwards tidying up paperwork, confirming small details plus confirming up that we could use a webcam to video our event onto our club website.

John MM0JXI took this task in hand and established that we could video the event and successfully feed it onto the website. Testing of this was done mostly on a Thursday night during the club’s sked as it was a great opportunity to get immediate feedback. The last piece of paperwork I needed to complete was to obtain a list of names on who wanted to attend the event on the Saturday, Sunday or both days. For the set-up on the Friday it was agreed to limit that to Cambell, Gary, Bob GM4IKT, John MM0JXI and myself. The weekend arrives/ On the Friday afternoon 15th May 2009 we duly arrive at the Scottish Parliament to find that a “cherry picker lorry” was parked where we were going to install the tower for the Yagi. Our hearts dropped as we thought, well that is the set-up now going to be aborted. Our fears though were suddenly put to rest when our Scottish Parliament contact popped out say that they would be finished shortly. Whilst we were waiting to go into the area it was decided that we could make the best of the time by going through the security check. This entailed going down into the car park under the Parliament where the van was stripped of all the equipment and duly checked and searched. Thankfully this was made easier due to the form that I had submitted earlier listing what we were bringing in. The check now fully over and the “cherry picker” now gone and we were all duly signed in and obtained our passes. Into the “garden” area we went.

The tower was positioned and detached from the van so it could then drive up to the door that we were using to take the equipment into where we were operating from. Everything was unloaded and the two teams went about their respective tasks. Cambell MM0DXC, Gary MM0FZV and Bob GM4IKT looking after the antennas (all better known in the club as “Twig Jockeys”), John MM0JXI and I started to build the two stations and the set-up the webcam. We are known as the “shack pansies” and are not allowed anywhere near the antennas. I must admit on a serious note this is one of our strengths as a club where we work in teams. Teams take responsibility of the aerials and a team takes responsibility for the shack. This way it ensures that when an antenna needs testing there is at least a station avail-

Jim MM0DXH making the first contact

able to test it... We set up two similar stations each with a computer, a FT1000MP and a Linear, respective auxiliary equipment and band pass filters. The stations one was on 20M and the other the choice of 80M or 40M. The antennas were an A3S for 20/15/10M (decided to run 20M only) and a W3DZZ for 80M and 40M. We started about 13:00BST and everything was set up and the first test QSO made at 1446BST. In addition to the stations we set up a webcam which fed into uStream.tv and subsequently onto the radio club’s website. We had a few issues with this (Continued on page 8)

7


Malcolm MM0YMG and Brian MM3WZB (Continued from page 7)

but they were soon overcome and an active feed was now in place. On the Saturday those who intimated that they would be arriving for the 08:00 admission to the Parliament duly arrived on time and they were Bob GM4IKT, Gary MM0FZV, Malcolm MM0YMG, Steven MM6TMS, Jim MM0DXC our MSP sponsor and GM4UYZ. There was to be another intake at 12:00 where John MM0JXI, Brian MM3WZB and Pierre F5NED who had come over from France to take part in the event. Bob 2M0KLL the Fire Safety Officer came in as well. On getting into the room the antennas and rotator cables were connected up with Jim MM0DXH making the first QSO at 08:14 BST. We continued all day on both 40M and 20M with 40M proving to be the general workhorse and 20M going very busy then dying off then coming busy again. Certainly 20M was not what I would call its usual self having said that QSO’s were made into Canada USA, Asiatic Russia and Japan. A few QSO’s were made on CW by Bob 2M0KLL but the predominant mode was SSB. At the end of the day we closed the station at 16:49 as we had to be off site by 17:00 with 547 QSO’s under the belt. We did have a couple of technical issues early on in the morning, one was getting the webcam to work properly and the other was noise on the 40M audio. This was cured by removing a DVK that we had in line. On the Sunday the morning

team consisted of Bob GM4IKT, Gary MM0FZV, Malcolm MM0YMG, Martyn MM3XXW, Robin MM3SRF and me. The second intake was at 12:00 when Pierre F5NED arrived. Bob 2M0KLL, Jim MM0DXH and Ogilvie GM4VYU arrived at about 11:00. David MM0XDG arrived about 13:00 to complete our Sunday line-up. The first QSO of the day was at 08:16 BST and the last was at 16:00BST. The bands were both a bit strange and it took a while for them really to “kick off”. 20M was definitely the better band and lots of good pileups were made. Most of the QSO’s were on SSB but a number were made on both bands on CW by again Bob 2M0KLL. We had no technical problems at all which was a real plus I must admit. We ended up with 926 QSO’s on the log with 379 made on the Sunday so it can be seen the difference in propagation over the two days. At 16:00 we stopped and dismantled the stations where it took exactly one hour to complete. It just confirms that everything comes down quicker than it

two days: 40M CW: 4 New Countries England, Germany, Hungary and Italy 40M SSB: 19 New Countries Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Eire, England, France, Germany, Guernsey, Italy, Luxembourg, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Scotland, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and Wales 20M CW: 10 New Countries Austria, Czech Rep, European Russia, Germany, Italy, Lithuania, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia and Ukraine 20M SSB: 44 New Countries Afghanistan, Asiatic Russia, Austria, Azores, Belarus, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Crete, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Rep, Denmark, Dodecanese Islands, Estonia, European Russia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Netherlands, Oman, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Scotland, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine and USA Was it all worthwhile? It certainly was and everyone thoroughly enjoyed it. A lot of hard work in the background to achieve it but all worthwhile in the end and would be do another one!

Steven MM6TMS and Bob GM4UYZ

goes up/. After leaving site, it was a case of returning all the equipment to the rightful homes, storing the tower before we were finished. Although that is the operating bit over, the next task is that of the writing the QSL cards and sending them into the bureau. The cards have been ordered and we are awaiting there delivery before that can be done.

For the radio club this has been an honour to be asked and to be able to do something to help celebrate the 10th Anniversary of the opening of the Scottish Parliament. Also the distinction of being the first Amateur Radio Club to actually transmit from inside the Scottish Parliament. Yes it has been a massive honour/.. Bob GM4UYZ

Listed below are the countries we managed to contact over the 8

www.cpsarc.com


Mountain Bike Diaries By Robin Farrar MM3SRF Many of CPSARC members may have been out operating from portable locations from time to time, for example the tranquil island of Tiree (well not that tranquil when the IOTA team arrive!) and the Museum of Flight. I enjoy operating away from home whether it may be in a car on the road side or taking a handheld up the hills, but what I enjoy the most is operating from my mountain bike; yes you did read it right and trust me it is not a late April fool’s day joke! Crazy as it seems but the whole thought of operating from a bicycle works very well, also an excuse to get you healthy! The setup is that practical that anyone with a suitable bike can get on the air.

What type of bike do I need? Whether you want to go on a road trip or up the hills, various bikes can suit your needs. It can range from road bikes or mountain bikes. I would settle for a mountain bike due its robustness and accessibility to gain higher ground within minutes. It might be hard trying to get yourself up a hill with equipment on your back but always think of the journey going back down hill! My trusted bike or what I like to call “my project bike” was bought from Halfords for only £70 a bargain in its own right and sure enough it has served its duty when I cycled from south Edinburgh just to get the CPSARC junk night (It was a good ride out, but bringing back a hefty supply of radios was a nightmare!) The thing I would warn you on is that buy a cheap bike that will serve you well, because a lot of prep work has to be done that will decrease your bike in value!

What will I need? A mirror mount bracket A patch lead Any antenna of your choice Battery Check List! When I was first doing my tests I could not find the right SWR reading, everything on the meter was sky high. When I was able to search around the internet ask several people they told me to scrape a small part of paint off the bike. Once the paint has been removed treat with an anti-rusting agent which will prevent the bike rusting away before your very eyes or causing serious danger to you or other road users. Then clamp the mount to the position of where you want your antenna to go, preferably the handlebars. With my further tests my SWR considerably reduced to a workable position (but be advised it might not be the suitable SWR for your rig!) Once you have done the necessary tests you are free to operate! My equipment consists of a Yaesu FT-817ND running 5W maximum from a small rechargeable battery, a 2m antenna and 20M vertical.

Germany, Croatia, Russia, Spain and Georgia on a 59 report. When doing this expect some passers-by to stare at you or be prepared for some people to come up and ask you questions. Always wait for a shock reply from the radio operator after telling them you are operating from a bicycle! I know several other people who do this kind of stuff. A young lad down in England called Rikki who I have spoken to on the air for some time but strangely enough not bicycle to bicycle, takes a full set up Sony speakers and a car battery to power his 100W radio! NOTE: If you are going to take up the challenge, please be aware for dangers on the road and always comply with the Highway Code! Always wear a helmet and maintain your bicycle to a high standard! Always wrap up warm in the cold and drink plenty of fluids! Thanks for publishing my first article! Any questions just contact me through the website or catch me at the club night, I should be there! Robin MM3SRF

The findings You may be thinking someone must be off their mind to do anything like this? Well I am! My biggest achievements have been Italy,

9


Test Your Knowledge By Bob Glasgow GM4UYZ

1. If a transmitter is rated at 10W input a. b. c. d.

power and requires a 20V supply, what current will it draw: 0.5mA 500mA 2A 200A

6. In a 24V mains power supply unit the a. b. c. d.

rectifier diode is used to: smooth the dc pulses change the ac to pulses of dc reduce the 230V mains to 24V ac reduce the 230V mains to 24V dc

7. If a small base current flows in a transis2. If three 10kΩ resistors are wired in sea. b. c. d.

ries their combined value will be: 1kΩ 3.3kΩ 10kΩ 30kΩ

a. b. c. d.

tor the collector current will be: equal larger Smaller opposite

8. To measure current in a series circuit, 3. A capacitor is best defined as: a. a number of turns of wire b. two metal discs separated by a thin layer of c. d.

plastic a diode that can be used to set the frequency of a tuned circuit a semi-conductor

a. b. c. d.

the multi-meter test probes should be connected: in parallel with the relevant circuit in parallel with the component under test with the battery disconnected in series with the relevant circuit in series with the component under test with the battery disconnected

4. To change the resonant frequency of a a. b. c. d.

tuned circuit you would need to change the: frequency of the oscillator value of the supply current value of the supply voltage combined values of the inductor and the capacitor

9. In a modern transmitter the balanced a. b. c. d.

modulator is normally used to produce: single sideband two sidebands frequency modulation two tones for data transmissions

10. Mixing audio and radio signals together 5. In a 24V mains power supply unit the a. b. c. d.

transformer is used to: smooth the dc pulses change the alternating current to dc pulses reduce the 230V mains to 24V ac reduce the 230V mains to 24V dc

a. b. c. d.

produces: sidebands harmonics Oscillations spurious emissions

Answers on the back page 10

www.cpsarc.com


Event Calendar By John Innes MM0JXI

5 June 2009

Club Night

6 June 2009

Port Seton Gala Day

6 June 2009

RSGB National HF Field Day

14 June 2009

PW QRP Contest

20 June 2009

Museums On The Air Weekend from Museum of Flight GB2MOF

20 June 2009

Newsletter Deadline (early due to July club night being early)

24 June 2009

CPSARC 20m Activity Night

26 June 2009

Club Night (note change of night due to VHF Field Day)

4 July 2009

RSGB VHF Field Day

19 July 2009

RSGB Low Power Field Day

25/26 July 2009

RSGB IOTA Contest GM2T

25 July 2009

Newsletter Deadline

7 August 2009

Club Night

14 August 2009

Junk Night

15 August 2009

Lighthouses Weekend from Barns Ness GB2LBN

22 August 2009

Newsletter Deadline (early due to holidays)

4 September 2009

Club Night

25 September 2009

2nd 144MHz DF Hunt

26 September 2009

Newsletter Deadline

02 October 2009

Club Night

04 October 2009

RSGB 21/28MHz Contest

16 October 2009

Video Night

24 October 2009

CQWW SSB Contest GM2T

31 October 2009

Newsletter Deadline

6 November 2009

Club Night

13 November 2009

Talk (TBA)

28 November 2009

Newsletter Deadline

04 December 2009

Club Night 11


20m SSB Activity Night Over the past few years we have tried running our own “small” contest on the nearest Wednesday to mid-summer’s day. We started at first using 10M but as the sunspot cycle started to fall it was moved to the current 20M band. Over the years it has not been really well supported with many of the comments that have come back after the event is, “it is a “Contest” why not make it an Activity Night”. To that end I have changed it to just that an Activity Night. The aim of the event is to get on the air and work as many stations that you can in the allotted time period plus at the same time have some fun. We are Radio Amateurs after all and we are supposed to get on the air and make contacts so come on then let me see you doing it. After the event can you send me a copy of your log so that I can write up some report on what you all managed to achieve plus why not update the club tables and send Bob GM4IKT an entry for that. I know he would be most grateful for it. Look forward to a massive turnout for the event/ Bob GM4UYZ Date: 24 June 2009 Time: 19:00—22:00 local Modes: SSB / CW Power: as per your licence (400/50/10w) Entrants: open to everyone Exchange: Report (RST) Closing Date: submit logs by Friday 4th July to GM4UYZ (see panel on right for address / email)

Information The Cockenzie & Port Seton Amateur Radio Club is affiliated to the Radio Society of Great Britain and holds the call signs MM0CPS and GM2T which are used for our special event and contest entries. We have our own internet domain www.cpsarc.com where you will find our popular web site which features lively discussion forums and photo galleries. You can also download an electronic copy of this newsletter. The Club was formed by Bob Glasgow GM4UYZ in 1984, to help the local amateurs get to know each other. Far from being just a local club we have members regularly attending from the Borders, Dumfries, Strathclyde, Fife and Newcastle. The Club meets on the first Friday of every month (Second Friday of January) in the lounge of the Thorntree Inn on the old Cockenzie High Street from 7pm till late. The Club is run in a very informal way, just a group of like minded people doing something they enjoy! This does not mean that we don’t do anything, we enter (and win!) contests, train newcomers, hold talks and video nights and run a popular annual Junk Sale. Our newsletter has won the Practical Wireless ‘Spotlight’ competition on several occasions. The Club supports the British Heart Foundation in memory of a member who died from heart disease by donating the profits from some of the events we hold, we have raised over £14,368 since 1994.

Contacts Bob Glasgow 7 Castle Terrace Port Seton East Lothian EH32 0EE Phone: 01875 811723 E-mail: gm4uyz@cpsarc.com General correspondence, training and contest entries Bob Glasgow gm4uyz@cpsarc.com HF Contests Cambell Stevenson mm0dxc@aol.com VHF Contests John MacLean mm0ccc@cpsarc.com Newsletter, website, event calendar John Innes mm0jxi@cpsarc.com Club Tables Bob Purves gm4ikt@cpsarc.com

Supported by BT Community Champions

1B, 2D, 3B, 4D, 5C , 6B, 7B, 8C, 9B, 10A Answers from June 2009 Newsletter “Test Your Knowledge”.

12

www.cpsarc.com


Elements 200906