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California State Polytechnic University Pomona Department of Architecture

CAL POLY POMONA ARCHITECTURE

CPP ARC California State Polytechnic University Pomona Department of Architecture


California State Polytechnic University, Pomona Department of Architecture A year of studio projects, lecture work, research, events, and theses

Cover image: ARC341/ARC499 Gridshell Project


CONTENTS C H A I R ’S N O T E

12

E D I T O R S’ N O T E

13

N E U T R A AWA R D 2016 N O O N L E C T U R E S E R I E S



16 

T O P I C S T U D I O S / E L E C T I V E S

20 22

ON THE ARCHITECTURE OF DRIVING THRU 24 PCI TOPIC STUDIO: RESORT HOTEL 26 UNFINISHED BUSINESS: THE GEFFEN CONTEMPORARY 28 EDUCATION30 OUT OF THIS WORLD 32 HEALTHCARE DESIGN 34 BOBBY BROOKS INTERDISCIPLINARY DISNEY STUDIO 36 MIESUNDERSTANDING  38 VERTICAL STUDIO 40 ANATOMIES, TRAJECTORIES, AND GEOGRAPHIES 42 LOS ANGELES IN THE 21ST CENTURY: AN EXHIBITION 44 ARCHITECTURAL ROBOTICS 46 INTRO TO DIGITAL FABRICATION 48 FORMACTIVE & BUILDING CONSTRUCTION I 50 FOURTH YEAR DESIGN 3 52 BEIJING URBAN DESIGN STRATEGIES 54

F O U N D AT I O N SPECIAL TOPICS FOR LOWER DIVISION STUDENTS  FOUNDATION DESIGN 2 FOUNDATION DESIGN 3 STUDIES IN LANDFORM ARCHITECTURE MUSEUM FOR A FICTICIOUS ART COLLECTOR SECOND YEAR DESIGN 3 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN II INTERMEDIATE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

56 58 60 62 64 66 68 70 72 74


T E C H N O L O G Y TECTONIC STUDIO ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN MULTI FAMILY HOUSING / INTEGRATED SYSTEMS LATERAL LOADS INTERACTIVE MEDIA FOR ARCHITECTS GRADUATE STUDIO - DESIGN DEVELOPMENT GRADUATE STUDIO - DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

S E N I O R P R O J E C T / G R A D U AT E T H E S I S

76 78 80 82 84 86 88 90

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INDUSTRIAL GEOLOGIES 94 HOUSING98 THE CONNECTED WORLD 102 ON WAITING 106 GRADUATE THESIS PROJECT 110

P R O G R A M S

116

A D M I S S I O N

117

P E O P L E 2016-17

120


CHAIR’S NOTE Students are the strength of Cal Poly Pomona Architecture (CPP/ARC). Many are the first in their family to attend college, most come from diverse backgrounds, and a substantial number of students transfer from a community college to fulfill their dream of becoming an architect. The students of CPP/ARC bring a drive and work ethic that allows them to excel, to establish their careers, and to contribute to the design of the built environments of California and beyond. The Architecture program at Cal Poly Pomona emerged from the creative and practical incubator of Los Angeles, which has long encouraged experimentation as it continually reinvents itself. Our Department also owes its diverse population and perspectives about the practice of architecture to the multicultural demographics of Southern California and the broad spectrum of creative opportunities found in the region. Experimental movements in architecture, along with the influences of high-tech, film, aerospace, and the region’s real estate development economy, are manifest in the Department curriculum. The program begins with a core foundation in design, followed by the technical training necessary for the practice of architecture. At the upper division, students explore electives, topic studios, and culminating projects that range from the theoretical to the practical. Many students focus on sustainability, preservation, urban design, healthcare, education, and hospitality design. Along this journey students build awareness of cultural phenomena, and emerging fabrication and construction techniques, which enriches their work, leading to a variety of careers in architecture.

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Our program consistently graduates well-trained, creative and socially responsible designers that land terrific jobs or pursue challenging graduate studies. As we move forward, new ideas about architecture will transform the built environment, technologies will evolve, practice will surely change, and the students of CPP/ ARC will graduate prepared to make valuable contributions to the profession.

George Proctor Chair and Professor

Cal Poly Pomona Architecture values our relationship with industry. Our program owes much to the architecture and development communities, whose members are always welcomed into our studios as critics, mentors, and ultimately as employers. We consider you a lifelong partner that completes the training initiated in our programs. Come see the work, come meet our students and faculty, you are always welcome!


EDITORS’ NOTE The present edition of CPP ARC combines some of the most exceptional design and research work undertaken at Cal Poly Pomona’s Architecture Department in the 2016-17 academic year. The book presents a cross section of materials from the Department’s wide selection of courses - Studio Projects, Senior Projects, Theses, and research work from Professional Electives, highlighting the program’s emphasis on both design and conceptual work, as well as on the technical aspects of the discipline, reflecting the Department’s strong polytechnic foundation. The book is structured into four sections: Topic Studios and Electives, Foundation Studios, Technology Studios, and Senior Projects / Graduate Theses. Foundation Studios introduce students to the concepts of architectural design 13 and promote experiment and exploration through spatial and form making exercises, as well as more complex investigations into program and architectural form. The Technology Studios that follow focus on the tectonic elements in architecture and examine structure in its relationship to architectural space. More advanced classes investigate larger urban scales, and Topic Studios offer a multitude of design and conceptual approaches, providing a platform for debate and architectural discourse, often across disciplines. Finally, Senior Projects and Graduate Theses present the culmination of the curriculum, and students develop their own design and research agenda through intense and rigorous independent work in the context of the design studio. CPP ARC also offers a strong theory and history curriculum, complemented by the Department’s archival collections of historic documents of architects Raphael Soriano, Craig Ellwood, Donald Wexler, and Richard Neutra. The Neutra VDL House in Silverlake, furthermore, is the Department’s Los Angelesbased platform for exchange, exhibitions, and architectural discourse, forging strong ties with the city’s architecture culture, while the Department’s Noon Lecture Series and the annual Neutra Award invite the public, professionals, and scholars to the campus to foster dialogue and an exchange of ideas. While this book is far from representing a comprehensive overview of the work at CPP ARC, it shows, at a minimum, a snapshot of our vibrant culture and of the discourse that takes place at our school on a daily basis. We hope you enjoy it! Marc Schulitz Katrin Terstegen Editors


NEUTRA AWARD The Richard J. Neutra Medal for Professional Excellence is awarded by the Department of Architecture in the College of Environmental Design at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. The award is in recognition of the many contributions Mr. Neutra made to the practice of architecture in the areas of research and design. The intent, as articulated by Richard Neutra’s family, is to “keep alive the memory of Richard Neutra by rewarding individuals who have dedicated their careers toward researching and developing new environments in which to work, live and play.” 16

Established in 1980, the Neutra Award has been given to prominent architects and landscape architects as well as to individuals outside these professions that have made enduring contributions to environmental design and public policy. The award guidelines encourage the recognition of individuals who have “advocated the opening of wider and more serious channels of communication between the professions of Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Urban and Regional Planning.” In addition, the guidelines favor an individual “whose research and/or project development has made a contribution to the body of knowledge related to environmental design.” In this manner, the award guidelines are prescient in stressing the interdisciplinary nature of environmental design, a value we promote to our students as they prepare for professional practice.

1980 Konrad Wachsmann

1996 Albert Frey

1981 Raphael Soriano

1997 John T. Lyle

1982 Harwell Hamilton Harris

1998 Glenn Murcutt

1983 Garrett Eckbo

1999 Al Gore (VPotUS)

1984 Ralph Rapson

2000 Rafael Viñoly

1985 Erich Schneider-Wessling

2001 Kim Abeles

1986 Lawrence Halprin

2002 Samuel Mockbee (posthumous award)

1987 Ray Kappe

2004 Sim Van der Ryn

1988 Kisho Kurokawa

2007 Ilze & Grant Jones

1989 Herman Hertzberger

2011 Thom Mayne

1990 Roberto Burle Marx

2012 Tadao Ando

1991 Renzo Piano

2014 Michael Rotondi

1992 lan McHarg

2015 Enrique Norten

1993 Moshe Safdie

2016 Carme Pinos

1994 Jamie Lerner 1995 Francis H. Dean


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Cal Poly Pomona College of Environmental Design Department of Architecture Presents:

recipient of the

2016 Richard J. Neutra Award for Professional Excellence November 14th, 2016 6:30 PM University Theater as part of the Henry Woo Lecture Series

design by Necils Lopez e


NEUTRA AWARD - CARME PINOS

18


19


2016 NOON LECTURE SERIES The 2016 Noon Lecture Series in the Department of Architecture was made possible by the Henry Woo Lecture Series Fund.

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Winter Quarter


Spring Quarter

21

Fall Quarter


TOPIC STUDIOS / ELECTIVES ROBERT ALEXANDER

O N T H E A R C H I T E C T U R E O F D R I V I N G T H R U

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MICHAEL FOX (ARC)

P C I T O P I C S T U D I O: R E S O R T H O T E L

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LUIS HOYOS

U N F I N I S H E D B U S I N E S S: T H E G E F F E N C O N T E M P O R A R Y 

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KEVIN O’BRIEN

E D U C AT I O N 30 KATRIN TERSTEGEN

O U T O F T H I S W O R L D

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HOFU WU

H E A LT H C A R E D E S I G N 

34


IRMA RAMIREZ (ARC)

B O B B Y B R O O K S I N T E R D I S C I P L I N A R Y D I S N E Y S T U D I O

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SARAH LORENZEN

M I E S U N D E R S TA N D I N G 

38 23

MARC SCHULITZ

V ERT IC A L S T UDIO

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ROBERT ALEXANDER

A N AT O M I E S , T R A J E C T O R I E S , A N D G E O G R A P H I E S 

42

LAUREN WEISS BRICKER

L O S A N G E L E S I N T H E 21 S T C E N T U R Y: A N E X H I B I T I O N

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MICHAEL FOX

A R C H I T E C T U R A L R O B O T I C S

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BEHN SAMAREH

I N T R O T O D I G I TA L FA B R I C AT I O N 

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MARC SCHULITZ

F O R M A C T I V E & B U I L D I N G C O N S T R U C T I O N I

50

LUIS HOYOS (ARC)

F O U R T H Y E A R D E S I G N 3

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IRMA RAMIREZ (ARC)

B E I J I N G U R B A N D E S I G N S T R AT E G I E S

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Robert Alexander ARC 401 / 405

ON THE ARCHITECTURE OF DRIVING THRU Over the last 75 years, the design of drive-thru restaurants in Southern California, their ubiquity and the consistency of their architecture, have had a profound effect on the region. Despite the negative effects associated with the drive thru and some local communities’ attempts to limit or ban them altogether as a building type, they remain a constant in most of our daily experiences. With the “success” and widespread adoption of the drive-thru as a model and fast food restaurants in general as a standard, their architecture and site designs have been taken for granted and have been frequently treated as a disposable commodity, falling prey to newer development, redevelopment, or corporate rebranding.

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Zachary Green Barret Kruggel


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Michael Fox (ARC) Mikhail Gershfeld (CE) ARC 401 / 405

PCI TOPIC STUDIO: RESORT HOTEL This course, a material/product-based sponsored topic studio on Precast Concrete, was co-taught by faculty from the Departments of Architecture and Civil Engineering and focused on the design of a precast concrete structure. Students worked to produce complete designs, including detailed structural development and developed the architectural and structural design of a 96-room resort hotel. The studio, associated lecture course, and field trips provided a theoretical and practical overview of working with precast concrete to illustrate its advantages, versatility, and constraints. The project engaged design issues, ranging from master planning to detailed structural design for a complex that satisfied the requirements of accommodation, entertainment, sports, shopping, and convention.

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Trevor Kaufman

1.lecture hall

1

Juan Pablo Onate Marla Kardous Andrea Rocha

2.dining hall

3.ballroom

2

5

6

5.children’s daycare 6.marketplace

7

3

7.maintenance 8

Carmelle Luminarias

9

4.spa

4

8.arrival tower

9.athletic center


up

up

up

up up

up

27 up


Luis Hoyos ARC 401 / 405

UNFINISHED BUSINESS: THE GEFFEN CONTEMPORARY The Museum of Contemporary Art holds one of the world’s best art collections. Sadly, the museum is in bad economic shape and needs to generate revenues to survive. There is an opportunity that could work: expand and redesign the Geffen Contemporary and add revenue-generating projects that could amount to an endowment based on real estate value. The student team researched the relevant facts surrounding the Geffen Contemporary by collecting and organizing information about the site, its history, the people and events associated with the building, and the design architect and his practice. Additionally, the teams identified and documented the character-defining features of a building in order to be able to discuss the condition of the building, explaining the major alterations through time.

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Existing Museum of Contemporary Art

Museum Extension

Office with 2 Story Retail

Apartments with 2 Story Retail

Clenel Williams Zachary Peterson Natalie Kester


29


Kevin O’Brien ARC 401 / 405

EDUCATION This studio focused on the rapidly evolving educational models in K-12 education and how these affect – and are affected by – design and architecture. The studio began with a Case Study exercise into innovative schools around the world and then embarked on a field trip to San Diego for tours of four cutting-edge K-12 educational institutions. Working in teams of 4-5 students, the class then began Project #1. For this exercise, the studio visited a typical kindergarten classroom and collaborated with the kinder students to develop concepts for an experimental ‘Learning POD’ – a functional classroom apparatus. Over the course of three weeks, these projects were designed, fabricated, and finally presented to the kindergarten class. The final studio project was to design a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) Academy for a site located near the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena.

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Abigail Robles Pedro Cuin Jamie Ngyuen Nathan Alvarez Haley Galian Julie Mendez


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Katrin Terstegen ARC 401 / 405

OUT OF THIS WORLD For centuries, churches have been architectural testing grounds and served as vehicles to advance the discipline in all its aspects — whether in the conception of space, the articulation of volume, or innovations in building technology. This was only possible because the church’s prominence in society, resulting in large construction budgets and in the commissioning of only the best architects and builders. Even in recent history, when the influence of religion has waned, the church still belongs to one of the most soughtafter commissions for many architects, often resulting in their best work. The single most important reason churches offer such opportunities for experimentation and innovation is that their brief has only one requirement: to create a sublime and mystical space — a space that Le Corbusier calls “L’Espace Indicible,” an “un-speakable” space. The ingredients for such environments are also the most basic ingredients in architecture: space, geometry, light, material — used in the most radical and uncompromised way.

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In this studio, we used the program of the church as an avatar to intensely study these ingredients and sought to propose a new vocabulary not only for sacral architecture but any architecture that is shaped by the ambition to provide the most profound experience of space — a space that is out of this world in every sense.

Adriana Castrejon Kojchakorn Ngamnimitthum Adam Ballard


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Hofu Wu ARC 401 / 405

HEALTHCARE DESIGN The Healthcare Topic Studio focused on the design of two projects. One was a 1,000SF Wellness Clinic inside a fitness center, using modular construction to shorten construction time and reduce waste. The clinic includes orthopedic and acupuncture providers, as well as consulting staff. The second project is a SJHH renovation project that preserves the historical Spanish-Colonial YMCA building in Santa Ana. It provides a community health and wellness facility that encourages local residents for a healthy lifestyle and promotes an ecologically sound urban center.

W

Sycamore

Broadway

34

Civ i

cC en ter

Jerrin Garcia Maryanne Bartolome

Dr

ive

N


Addition WELLNESS CENTER

Existing Addition -

TECHNOLOGY STUDIO CARDIO TRAINING AREA

PLAYGROUND

Existing Addition -

KITCHENETTE

FAMILY LOUNGE

Existing -

CONFERENCE DECK GARDEN

Level STRENGTH TRAINING AREA/ MULTI FUNCTIONAL TRAINING AREA

Groun

35Basemen


Irma Ramirez (ARC) Andy Wilcox (LA) ARC 401 / 405

BOBBY BROOKS INTERDISCIPLINARY DISNEY STUDIO This course was the 8th Interdisciplinary Design Studio sponsored by Walt Disney Imagineering (WDI) in memory of Cal Poly Architecture alumnus Bobby Brooks. The studio was a collaboration between the Architecture Department, the Department of Landscape Architecture, and members of the WDI creative cast. The teaching methodologies were based on the creative story-telling culture of Disney. This year’s topic was based on exploring concepts of freedom in the making of a new national identity for the United States through the design for a new Liberty Museum in New York City. As the Statue of Liberty nears its 130th anniversary, the goal was to create a museum on the site of the legendary Statue of Liberty National Monument. The studio was a process-oriented course informed by design charrettes and discussions addressing how architecture can deal with issues of civil rights and social justice to promote mass awareness, social exchange, and tolerance. The class traveled to New York City to explore themes of liberty present in venues like the 911 Memorial Grounds and Museum, the Statue of Liberty, Ellis Island, and the Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park.

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Walt Disney Imagineering opened its creative studios to the class to host a final presentation review with the expertise and mentorship of Imagineers from diverse disciplines to exchange with Cal Poly Pomona students. Sincere gratitude on behalf of Cal Poly Pomona goes to WDI, the leading WDI Imagineers, and Jennifer Brooks for their continued support.

Ryan Keenan


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Sarah Lorenzen ARC 402

MIESUNDERSTANDING This studio focused on the role that representation plays in generating an architectural project. As architects, the drawings, models, texts, and other descriptors we create are “stand ins” for real objects, but these “representations” are real things in themselves. Representations are the means with which we conceive of the thing that “stands in” for a built project. The peculiarity of a “representation” is that it is simultaneously the tool used to conceive of an object before it exists, a means of communicating an idea about an object that has been imagined, and the descriptor for a physical object that already exists. Architectural representations, given their reductive and diagrammatic nature, allow us to conceptually understand different aspects of a building — a model may tell us something about volume, a diagram may explain functional relationships, an isometric may tell us something about true scale, a perspective may tell us something about a project’s perceived relationship to its context. The “style” of a representation is also charged with meaning – how we draw or model a project tells us something about our philosophical and conceptual affinities, what precedents we looked at, and the period and place that we are situated within. Every line on a page is significant and carries weight.

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Adam Ballard Noel Vazquez Ryan Keenan


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Marc Schulitz ARC 402

VERTICAL STUDIO The studio focused on the design of vertical architecture and researched the theoretical and practical background of high-rise and super-tall structures. Students’ projects researched programming and construction systems of vertical architecture, their relationship to the urban context, and the versatility and constraints of tall structures. A centerpiece of the class’ discourse was the relationship of form and material, both from a design standpoint and also in the context of minimizing the amount of materials and maximizing sustainable features. The design breif required all projects to be located at different buildable lots in Downtown Los Angeles with a creative mix of uses, including a public component as a key amenity. All designs were to be tall and auto-monumental, maximizing the allowable floor-area-ratio. The outcome was an ensemble of super-tall structures in a transforming neighborhood. Students were asked to participate in a critical discussion about the impact of such structures on the present and future environment.

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Max Lam Jamie Nguyen


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Robert Alexander ARC 499

ANATOMIES, TRAJECTORIES, AND GEOGRAPHIES Humans have an inescapable connection to the objects and environments they create. In the case of instruments that have been specifically shaped around the motion and performance of the body, these designs frequently take on a reciprocal relationship: the body is sculpted and trained to perform in concert with the machine and the machine is shaped to perform while being designed to make allowances for the body. While this relationship is ubiquitous, it is seldom explored in depth. The purpose of this class was to draw students’ attention to unique relationships in the history of engineering and technology that have propelled the human body beyond its initial “design” and “performance” limitations. The subjects of study for this course resulted in shapes and forms that through scientific testing and analysis have propelled examples of artistic expression, scientific exploration, and achievement in sport beyond what was previously thought possible.

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Michelle Shadan Clenel Williams Julie Mendez


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Lauren Weiss Bricker ARC 499

LOS ANGELES IN THE 21ST CENTURY: AN EXHIBITION In the 21st century, Los Angeles continues to be a center of architectural innovation. Building on the foundation of 20th century Modernism, contemporary design draws vitality from the diversity of its population, a freedom to explore form and space facilitated by technology, and an appreciation of its mild climate and informal lifestyle – factors that were central to the local modern movement. As the city evolves, it seeks to reconnect with its historic origins – the river, downtown, and its neighborhoods and monuments. This course explored several themes that help explain the built environment of 21st century LA. Visits to sites and architects’ offices were conducted and students conducted research, leading to the identification of projects to include in an exhibition that is projected for a 2019 installation in the Kellogg University Art Gallery.

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Philipp Sieber


THE BOX

THE BOX One of the first young galleries near Downtown is ‚The Box‘ by Mara McCarthy. The daughter of the artist Paul McCarthy opened her gallery in Chinatown in 2007 and they moved to the Arts District in 2012: The building that was a paint shop for public busses in the first place became a playground for children afterwards, then it was the atelier of a fashion designer and now it is an art gallery. The Box is working with artists from all over the world, but especially with artists from California and Los Angeles. It is one of the major meeting points not only of the young scene of the city. McCarthy regularly shows former students of her father, who taught at the University of California (UCLA), curates retrospectives on forgotten or ignored art that are closely related to the history of the city such as the exhibition called ‚Los Angeles Free Music Society‘.

Storage

Storage

Ace

Main Space Kelley

45

BR1 Office

BR2

Front Room

Entry Room

Los Angeles in the 21st Century THE ART OF CHANGING Philipp Sieber

HAUSER WIRTH & SCHIMMEL

Tool Room

Los Angeles in the 21st Century THE ART OF CHANGING Philipp Sieber

HAUSER WIRTH & SCHIMMEL

North Gallery B

North Gallery A

Hauser & Wirth are interested in working together with those wealthy people from the movie and IT business that are latterly interested in art. With their gallery in the Arts District near Downtown Los Angeles they recently opened a further gallery beside their spaces in Zürich, London, Somerset and New York. They opened the probably biggest commercial art gallery called Hauser Wirth Schimmel with the well known curator Paul Schimmel. He had been supporting the careers of artists like Mike Kelly and Paul McCarthy at MOCA, which he left in 2012 when Jeffry Deitch was announced to be the new director of MOCA. Since that time Schimmel has planned the modification of one whole block in the Arts District, which had been an industrial flour mill in the 1900s, into a 100.000 square foot art gallery. There are high-end stucco rooms for famous artists and raw depot rooms for younger artists. A huge courtyard with a soon opening restaurant are the center of the complex. The first exhibition shows abstract sculptures of female artists like Louise Bourgeois or Lygia Pape. Just about ten percent of all works are for sale which probably contributes beside the architecture of Hauser Wirth Schimmel to the gallery feeling more like a museum of contemporary art.

Courtyard

Restaurant Manuela

East Gallery

Public Garden

Restrooms

Book + Printed Matter Lab Education Loft

South Gallery Book Store

Reception/Shop

Los Angeles in the 21st Century THE ART OF CHANGING Philipp Sieber

Los Angeles in the 21st Century THE ART OF CHANGING Philipp Sieber


Michael Fox ARC 499

ARCHITECTURAL ROBOTICS The aim of the course was to develop the skills necessary to explore and design responsive and interactive architecture based on biomimetic processes. The primary goal of the course was to expose students to innovative ways of thinking about design in terms of adaptability. The idea was to create architecture that can physically re-configure itself to meet changing needs. The central issues explored were human and environmental interaction, embedded computational infrastructures, physical control mechanisms, and the processes that architects and designers can use in creating and demonstrating of such systems. Within the framework of this course, design processes and methodologies were developed, so that students will have the practical confidence to explore such systems in future design explorations.

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Max Lam Thao Nguyen Ryan Keenan Noel Vasquez


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Behn Samareh ARC 499

INTRO TO DIGITAL FABRICATION The primary focus of this class was to explore different means and methods of digital output and automated fabrication, such as milling, routing, 3D printing, etc. In addition, the class examined processes for reproduction (molding, casting), as well as systems of assembly and spatial installation.

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Prianka Kuttappa


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Marc Schulitz ARC 499 ARC 341

FORMACTIVE & BUILDING CONSTRUCTION I The classes focused on the exploration of space, structure, and force. The combined course investigated geometries and architectural design solutions that are form-active, meaning that the form solely determines its stability. The logic of forces and structural assembly can be utilized to generate design strategies that are spatially compelling and extremely efficient. Based on these classes investigations and on previous classes’ findings students built a full-scale Grid Shell using a geodesic segment geometry. The Grid Shell project was funded by a Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity grant (RSCA).

50 ARC 341 Student participants: Luis Montoya, Gabie Compolongo, Erick Cerano, Henry Alcantar, Tiffany De Le Cruz, Skyler Maroste, Mariana Uy, Paola Murillo, Savannah Hawes ARC 499 Student participants: David Ascencio Vazquez, Neal AuBuchon, Juan Gonzalez, Ryan Keenan, Sally Nguyen, Nicholas Rosas, Josue Soma, Nathan Spencer, Dannela Valencia, Brian Vasquez


1

2

51 3

Nick Rosas 4

5

A3 TENSILE nick rosas

1. model photo 2. model photo 3. model photo 4. model photo 5. model photo


Luis Hoyos (ARC) Irma Ramirez (ARC) Allyne Winderman (ARC) Phil Pregill (LA)

FOURTH YEAR DESIGN 3

Jean Yang (LA) Kevin Slawson (LA) ARC 403L

The studio and the associated lecture course provided a theoretical and practical survey of the field of urban design with an emphasis on the role of the designer in the shaping of the built environment within the disciplines of architecture and landscape design. The courses worked together to explain the complex social, environmental, economic, aesthetic, and political/regulatory forces that affect the choices designers face in contemporary practice. The studio examined the current state of affairs for large mixed-use projects in Los Angeles. In light of the scarcity of affordable housing, developers are allowed to build ever-denser projects (especially at transit sites) with often minimal amenities, such as social infrastructure or designed open spaces.

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The studio proposed alternatives to these high-density proposals by examining compositional patterns and building types that offer better connections to the outside. Students prepared two projects: a master plan and a final urban design proposal.

Bem Gi Kim Suhyeong Lee


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Irma Ramirez (ARC) Courtney Knapp (URP) Zhang Bo (NCUT) Wang Biao (NCUT)

BEIJING URBAN DESIGN STRATEGIES

Qin Ke (NCUT) Yassar Khadour (NCUT)

ENV China Interdisciplinary Summer Program

Tai Manu (NCUT)

This is an intense travel and study experience in China, a giant of development showcasing extreme examples of our environmental design disciplines in which students experience the controversies of China as a major global power through a view at 5,000 years of history in cities like Beijing and Shanghai. The program is an interdisciplinary collaboration between the College of Environmental Design Disciplines and North China University of Technology (NCUT). The studio focuses around issues of cultural and historic themes that address the fast pace development in China and its impact on historic quarters in Beijing. This year, the topic focuses on Beijing’s historic urban axis and the city’s attempt to lead an urban renewal that addresses the axis as historic heritage.

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Wai To Wong


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FOUNDATION

Mariana Uy


ROBERT ALEXANDER

SPECIAL TOPIC S FOR LOWER DIVISION STUDENTS 

58

ROBERT ALEXANDER

F O U N D AT I O N D E S I G N 2

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ROBERT ALEXANDER

F O U N D AT I O N D E S I G N 3

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AXEL SCHMITZBERGER

S T U D I E S I N L A N D F O R M A R C H I T E C T U R E

64 57

KATRIN TERSTEGEN

M U S E U M F O R A F I C T I C I O U S A R T C O L L E C T O R

66

MITCHELL DE JARNET T

S E C O N D Y E A R D E S I G N 3

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ALEXANDER PANG

I N T R O D U C T I O N T O A R C H I T E C T U R A L D E S I G N

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JUINTOW LIN

I N T R O D U C T I O N T O A R C H I T E C T U R A L D E S I G N I I

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HOFU WU

I N T E R M E D I AT E A R C H I T E C T U R A L D E S I G N 

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Robert Alexander ARC 299L

SPECIAL TOPICS FOR LOWER DIVISION STUDENTS As an introductory exercise to digital design, students designed a font, which included all the Roman characters from a-z. The design of these characters was based on the students’ formal analysis of an architect’s work of their choice. Students were encouraged to use the geometry, regulating lines, and figure-ground relationships found in their case studies to form a distinctive method of written communication. They then formed these elements into new three-dimensional forms created in the computer.

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Macay Clelland


This structure is an office building built in Buffalo, New York originally named the “Guarantee Building.” It is a high rise built in 1896 in the Early modern style. The building was designed with the “form follow function” concept with four different tiers to the building. Shown to the right is an elevation view of the structure. The particular element which I was interested in was the top of the structure where the facade transitions to the roof. The design uses compounded circles to decorate the wall. When I saw this part of the structure, I could envision the letters of the alphabet in this design of the wall. The circular nature of the wall design allows me to work with the ways the circles of the walls intersect each other to create a very similarly styled font between all the letters. The font contains smooth transition from “legs” of the font to the curved lettering, but also utilizes sharp points and intersections from the meeting of different curves that form elements like the serifs on the “L” and the “E” that help improve the articulation between letters.

Macay Clelland

F16 ARC 299A Macay Clelland

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Robert Alexander Behn Samereh Audrey Sato Steven Chodoriwsky

FOUNDATION DESIGN 2

Ruth Oh Mitchell De Jarnett ARC 102L

This course is an introduction to the process of design through projects that address the relationship between spatial ideas and their forms. The purpose is to expose students to the design process through a series of exercises, which involve the transformation of simple geometric elements into increasingly more complex assemblages. Emphasis was placed on drawing and model construction as a means of seeing and understanding the world. The design explorations were framed around four exercises, in which objects built in the first exercise serve as the basis for the subsequent exercises. The projects, called Addition, Subtraction, Division, and Multiplication, emphasized the nature of the design operations used in the studio. The exercises taken as whole were intended to build practical skills, using both physical models and drawing to evaluate compositional design decisions.

60

Elizabeth Yuksel Vi Phan Tyler Bergmann


61


Robert Alexander Behn Samareh Audrey Sato Ruth Oh

FOUNDATION DESIGN 3

Steven Chodoriwsky ARC 103L

During this quarter, students applied the knowledge gained from the exercises in the previous quarter in analyzing order and proportion, and in designing space. Students began with the study of a house, selected from a list of canonical architectural precedents, and analyzed its site conditions, organization, materials, and structure. This research then served as the basis for the design of a small vacation house. Students explored a variety of site, cultural, and climatic conditions in several settings around the world. The goal was to expose students to the diversity and particularities of architecture and what factors can drive its shape and form. By locating the project directly on the site of their case studies, students were not only asked to navigate the site conditions related to their designs but also to confront, absorb, contradict, and learn from the strength of the architectural language of acknowledged masters. Students’ designs served as basis for discussion about a broad array of issues, both in class and during the final review.

62

Hung (Ryan) Nguyen Lenore Roberts


63


Axel Schmitzberger Mitchell De Jarnett Alexander Pang Jose Herrasti

STUDIES IN LANDFORM ARCHITECTURE

Wendy Gilmartin Juintow Lin Tina Chee ARC 201L

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Sydney Ortega Hung (Ryan) Nguyen Lenore Roberts

In this course, students were exposed to a sequence of interlinked lectures, readings, and studies, focusing on site treatment, site documentation, site observation and programming on a site. The main project was the design of an overlook, the new David Lynch Ranger Center (DLRC), located adjacent to the Nike Missile Control Site LA-96 on an unpaved area of Mulholland Drive, facing south-southwest. In their approach to the project and site, students considered the history of Los Angeles, the Los Angeles Basin, and the San Fernando Valley, and its use of water and treatment of the environment. Each student designed an artificial landscape on the given hillside site, into which a hybrid civil awareness and ranger training center was developed.


65


Katrin Terstegen Alexander Pang Hunter Knight Jose Herrasti

MUSEUM FOR A FICTICIOUS ART COLLECTOR

Mitchell De Jarnett Wendy Gilmartin ARC 202L

The project is a contemporary art museum for a fictitious collector, C R O collection PPING located on an infill site in Downtown Los Angeles. The art includes paintings and photography, sculptures, light-sensitive artifacts, light-emitting work, and outdoor sculpture, and each student curated the exhibitions and conceptualized an exhibition strategy. Artists include Robert Irwin, Dan Flavin, Monica Nouwens, Ellsworth Kelly, Erwin Wurm, Ai Wei Wei, Doug Aitken, Alexandre Farto, Bansky, Bill Viola, Mike Kelley, Yayoi Kusama, Rebecca Lowry, Sol Lewitt, Lee Bontecou, and Ron Mueck.

The design of this museum is relied heavily on architectural process. Rather than intuitive designing solution, the excercise explored to design the process of arriving to stage of final design. These process included addition subtraction of simple rectangular cubic volumes, and cropping those created volume in an angle.

The focus in the design of the museum was the balancing of programmatic adjacencies, interior and site circulation, and the implementation of lighting strategies appropriate for the specific artwork, as well as formulating a response to the urban context. As preparation for the project, students worked on three smaller projects exploring connectivity, programming, and adjacencies and also studied several art museums in Los Angeles. After various objects were produced

through cropping of an object that has been added and carved, the project

took another step of addition and subtraction of cropped object inorder to increase in its size to coordinate the programs that are required in the museum.

66

DEVELO P MENT OF C ROPPED OBJEC T

CROPPING

The design of this museum is relied heavily on architectural process. OUTDOOR GARDEN

Rather than intuitive designing solut i o n , t h e e x c e r BOOKSTORE cise explored to design the process of arriving to stage of f i n a l d e s i g n . T h e sTEMPORARY e p r GALLERY ocess included addition subtraction of simple rectangular cubic volumes, and cropping CAFE

those created volume in an angle.

SINGLE ARTIST GALLERY

After various objects were produced through cropping of an object that has LOBBY

been added and carved, the project

Gi Suk (Ryan) Han

took another step of addition and subAUDITORIUM

traction of cropped object inorder to

Mariana Uy

increase in its size to coordinate the programs that are required in the

Shant Charoian

museum. DEVELOPMENT OF CROPPED OBJECT


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Mitchell De Jarnett Wendy Gilmartin Jose Herrasti Hunter Knight

SECOND YEAR DESIGN 3

Katrin Terstegen ARC 203L

The studio’s focus was the importance of the site. The project site chosen for the project had historical, topographical and contextual qualities that had to be addressed by the students as they designed the Orange County Marine Mammal Rescue Center (OCMMRC). The course was set up as a series of additive exercises that had to be negotiated with each other to complete a cohesive design solution. The design of OCMMRC was intended to create a sustainable environment that provided medical care for injured marine mammals and addressed thermal comfort with passive heating and cooling strategies, as well as water resource conservation designs. Students were challenged to create shading designs that fulfilled shading for specific dates and times and to direct favorable natural ventilation for the facility. The best designs of each section of the class were selected to participate in a Southern California Gas Company-sponsored Sustainable Design Competition.

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Sarahi Baeza Parady Sarun


FLOOR PLAN B PRIVATE ENTRY

DOWN

DOWN DOWN

NATIVE PLANT NURSERY SHADE HOUSE

VISITOR CENTER/ GIFT SHOP

NATIVE PLANT NURSERY OPEN AREA

CLASSROOM

TEACHING LAB

RESTROOM RESTROOM

A

A

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FACULTY OFFICE AMPHITHEATER DOWN PUBLIC ENTRY

B RAMMED EARTH CONSTRUCTION

Daytime absorption

THERMAL MASS

Energy efficient

Keeps the interiors naturally cool

Local and affordable materials

Saves money and energy

Evening heating

NATURAL LIGHTING

WATER CONDENSATION COLLECTOR


Alexander Pang ARC 501L

INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN Students worked on a three-part project to engage foundational architectural topics: Point, Line, Plane & Volume Regulating Lines Datum Lines Vocabulary v. Syntax Figure-Ground Relationship Figure v. Field Landscape Frame-Work v. Earthwork Through intensive model and drawing making, students gained familiarity with convention in architectural representation. From selected readings and other references, students contextualized personal work/ investigation as part of a greater architectural discourse. Through serial examination and discussion, students accepted process as essential architectural work and acquired authorship of their work.

70

Jean Dan


71


Juintow Lin ARC 502L

INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN II The focus of the studio was the development of a critical understanding of space, while simultaneously building a process-oriented skillset for the making of space. Students traversed through a cumulative series of process exercises, designed to explicitly and introspectively help them understand key facets of space-making. Exercises focused on questions geared towards clarifying such facets via their counterparts; additive and subtractive processes, light defined through shadow, and solid through void. Students also learned to integrate architectural aspects of space, such as programming, circulation, and a contextual response to an urban infill situation.

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Kyle Ng


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Hofu Wu ARC 503L

INTERMEDIATE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN The studio’s focus was the importance of the site. The project site chosen for the project had historical, topographical and contextual qualities that had to be addressed by the students as they designed the Orange County Marine Mammal Rescue Center (OCMMRC). The course was set up as a series of additive exercises that had to be negotiated with each other to complete a cohesive design solution. The design of OCMMRC was intended to create a sustainable environment that provided medical care for injured marine mammals and addressed thermal comfort with passive heating and cooling strategies, as well as water resource conservation designs. Students were challenged to create shading designs that fulfilled shading for specific dates and times and to direct favorable natural ventilation for the facility. The best designs of each section of the class were selected to participate in a Southern California Gas Company-sponsored Sustainable Design Competition.

74

Christina Younger


75


TECHNOLOGY 76


MARC SCHULITZ

T EC TONIC S T UDIO

78

KIP DICKSON

A RCHI T EC T UR A L DE SIGN

80

KIP DICKSON

M U LT I FA M I LY H O U S I N G / I N T E G R AT E D S Y S T E M S

82

GARY MCGAVIN

L AT E R A L L O A D S

84

JOANNA GRANT

I N T E R A C T I V E M E D I A F O R A R C H I T E C T S

86

GEORGE PROCTOR

G R A D U AT E S T U D I O - D E S I G N D E V E L O P M E N T 

88

GARY MCGAVIN

G R A D U AT E S T U D I O - D E S I G N D E V E L O P M E N T 

90

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Marc Schulitz Nadim Itani Marta Perlas Barry Milofsky

TECTONIC STUDIO

Kip Dickson ARC 301

The brief for the studio was the design of a scientist retreat next to an observation facility, located in a protected nature preserve. The facility is intended to be used mostly as a lookout for scientists, and it will occasionally be available to hikers and weekenders interested in astronomy. Based on the given topic, students generated impromptu design vignettes that amounted to a series of design alternatives. New building design elements were sequentially explored for their design potential, always with the constraint of “technical� accuracy: a stair must work, a ramp is ADA-compliant, the skin of the building achieves closure, a roof drains water, and so forth.

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Edgar Sanchez Peter Goodwin Matthew Rivera


Mount Wilson Science Retreat A program composed of mostly private space with a small amount of public and shared communal areas, yielded two equal rectangular forms. One of these forms was used to accommodate the public and allow overlap between public and semi-public space. The other form hosted the private components of the program. The given site had a small existing foundation. In order to host both shapes while simultaneously keeping a small footprint, the two shapes were forced to become stacked. By using the roof of the lower shape as an ADA accessible gathering space the boxes then began to resemble a cruciform with an extend cantilever on one side. The main construction method used was typical heavy timber framing with pre-stressed tension cables where cantilevering occurred. The choice of wood as the primary structural component was made simply because of the simplicity of the design. The total height of the structure is less than twenty feet and with no extraordinary dead or live loads to accommodate, wood was deemed a suitable choice for this mountain retreat.

The two rectangular forms are composed of six bays, each measuring 8 feet wide, 16 feet long and 8 feet tall. These bays hosted a component of the program with some bays being combined when larger areas were needed. The treatment of the exterior façade was a direct result of the program found in each bay. A small wooden screen composed of 1”x1” posts was placed on tracks along the exterior of the structure. These sliding panels were placed in areas where they could overlap the floor to ceiling windows if privacy was needed but also could slide over solid portions of the structure if light and openness was desired. By strategically organizing the interior program with the wooden screens in mind, the building could either be about 50 % open, meaning all the windows are unobstructed or 100% closed when privacy was needed. Another benefit to the wooden screen was the ability to diffuse the light emitted by the building at night. During nighttime use of the telescope the panels could slide over the windows minimizing the glow and improving the telescopic viewing experience.

exploded axon 1/8” = 1’

site plan 1/8” = 1’

79


Kip Dickson Nadim Itani Marta Perlas Barry Milofsky

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

Dennis McFadden ARC 302

The studio was the first quarter of a two-quarter long comprehensive project, designed to meet the NAAB requirement for all students to be engaged in a comprehensive project. It aimed to augment the knowledge of contemporary production of housing, including the application of specific construction materials and systems in relation to tectonics, expression, and affordability; working knowledge about the dwelling, its internal order, and relevant dimensional limits; an ability to relate multiple dwellings, and an understanding of how architectural design affects the human environment. The project site was an existing parking lot in Pasadena, California. The long narrow site is elongated along an east west axis and was selected to foster southern exposures and cross ventilation to the units. The property allows 10 units by right on the site, however, with inclusionary low-income housing, many students opted for 14 units, including a density bonus for including 2 low-income units within the design proposal. Students were encouraged to develop a subterranean parking solution, which included developing parking ramp access and egress/ADA requirements.

The Units are made of two Mirrored Interlocking U-Shaped forms which are angled on one side (where the stairs split), taking the angle of the site.

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14 ”

Walls are Thic, starting at 20” for the elevation Frame, and inside the Units it becomes 14” twhich creates better sound insulation and also enables the addition of built in Closets and Kitchen Cabinets

All Units have North and South windows which allow views both to the street and the Central Garden. North windows allow sunlight in all Units throughout the day. Crossing windows allow cross ventilation and enhances the space quality.

20 ”

Roof Level

Third Floor

Youstina Youssef Second Floor

First Floor

Parking Level

All Units have a Central Core which has the staircase and all utilities (Kitchens and Restrooms / Powder Rooms). This Core also allows direct access to the parking from Indoors with no need to go outdoor to go to the parking which creates a further degree of comfort.


Mentor Ave.

81 3rd Floor Plan

St. ova Cord

2nd Floor Plan

Site Plan 02

12

6

24

Roof B 33'-4" Roof A 30'-0" 3rd Floor 20'-0"

32'

1st Floor 1'-8" 0 2

6

12

1st Floor Plan

2nd Floor 10'-0"

Parking Level -10'-0"

24

12'-5"

81'

20'

0 2

6

12

24


Kip Dickson Nadim Itani Marta Perlas Barry Milofsky

MULTI FAMILY HOUSING / INTEGRATED SYSTEMS

Dennis McFadden ARC 303

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Yunha Choi

The studio aimed to integrate of a series of learning outcomes from a range of technical classes in the architectural curriculum. The studio utilized the multi-family housing design developed in ARC 302/302L in the previous quarter and advanced the students’ designs to a more detailed level that demonstrated students’ understanding of construction materials, construction processes, structural systems, electrical, plumbing and HVAC systems. The package simulates a typical design development (DD) package from a series of weekly exercises. The final package culminated the comprehensive experience of studio and support lecture courses that are integrated into the individual document sets.


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Gary McGavin ARC 424

LATERAL LOADS Architectural design for natural hazards, such as overturning, high-force winds, and earthquakes are a technological challenge and a professional and social responsibility. In this course, the scientific, technological, social, and economic implications of natural hazards, which subject the built environment to dynamic lateral forces, were considered. Students participated in problem-solving activities, which introduced overturning, wind and seismic design fundamentals, and also prepared the students for the ARE professional exam, including lateral force-resistant design.

3D Seismic Graph

84

Juan Pablo Onate Chiman Lam Bem Gi Kim


Seismic waves from an underground nuclear explosion at the Nevada Test Site recorded by the broadband digital seismographs at Mt. Hamilton on August 13, 1987

3-Dimensional Earthquake Wave Lab Abstract In the event of an earthquake, the ground shakes in three dimension simultaneously: up and down; east to west; and north to south. The information obtained in seismographs is a representation of the ground shaking in each separate dimension. This project attempts to combine the information obtained in an earthquake graph and display it’s three axial behaviors simultaneously it as a threedimensional diagram. A procedure is followed in which each seismograph curve is placed on an axis, given volume, and extruded threedimensionally using CAD. The interception of each of the three dimensions is then isolated and a three-dimensional mass is created which represents the three dimensions of the earthquake. Results

Up and Down Extruded Wave

North to South Extruded Wave

The interpretation of what a threedimensional earthquake wave looks like is open to debate, since such a phenomenon is only conceptual, and nothing physical exists. Our approach resulted in a three-dimensional physical graph that represents the twodimensionality of a seismograph in three axis. It conceptually represents the behavior of an earthquake’s wave in its three-planes of motion.

Interception of all 3 Waves

85

Students: Chinman Lam (Max), Bem Ji Kim, & J. Pablo Onate Department: Architecture Professor: Gary McGavin Term: Spring 2016

East to West Extruded Wave

Resultant 3D Diagram


Joanna Grant ARC 454

INTERACTIVE MEDIA FOR ARCHITECTS “Recognition of the drawing’s power as a medium turns out, unexpectedly, to be recognition of the drawing’s distinctness from and unlikeness to the thing that is represented, rather than its likeness to it, which is neither as paradoxical nor as dissociative as it may seem.” Robin Evans, “Translations from Drawing to Building,” 1986. This course presented the framework through which students were to generate a digital portfolio, reframing an architectural concept through rhetoric and re-representing the project through format. In examining the argument of the autonomy of the drawing, put forth by Robin Evans, this course sought to update that statement through examining the idea of format, as presented by David Joselit’s “After Art.” The course also challenged the conventional means of architectural representation and presentation through the reevaluation of medium (materials that are used to create) and media (the plural of medium; also the collective outlets or tools that are used to store and deliver information or data.)

86

Students were to introduced to new formats, such as filmmaking, video editing, motion graphics and animation, and website development as a diverse toolkit for rearticulating the narrative of an existing project. Throughout the course, students were asked to develop a character to represent their project and method act for presentations. This seminar resulted in the production and presentation of a portfolio through mediums/media specific to each project.

Juan De Robles


87


George Proctor ARC 504

GRADUATE STUDIO - DESIGN DEVELOPMENT The subject of study from this 2016-17 MArch and MLA (Master of Landscape) collaborative design studio sits at an arrested urban boundary, on a seam between the natural and the artificial, and between the ecologies of regional landscapes and the idiosyncrasies of a small interpretive building. At the edge of the Cleveland National Forest on Ortega Highway in south Orange County, the recently relocated Rancho Mission Viejo Reserve land conservancy headquarters sought to develop an interpretive center building and educational gardens with the mission “to preserve and enhance Reserve lands for ecological, educational, charitable, conservation, open space, scientific, and recreational uses.� Second-year MArch students focused their efforts on the design of a simple and highly developed building that was carefully inserted into its natural context. The site contains a repurposed ranch house, now acting as offices, and a hay barn, designed in 1967 by Frank Gehry. As part of the studio project, a substantial landscape and site design component was developed by the second-year MLA studio. MLA students investigated regional landscapes and considered how elements of these landscapes could exist on the plot of land holding the Reserve offices. MLA and MArch students collaborated to fine-tune landscapes with building placement, interfacing the building with the Reserve campus and natural context. The second-year MArch design studio, also known as the Tectonics Studio, links various technical courses and is run jointly with the introductory structures course. The MArch students began by working through a short series of design vignettes investigating envelope and structure as architectural generators. After several weeks, the MArch students settled in to the design of the Reserve interpretive center. The proposed building pad(s) sit between the HQ offices, and the Gehry hay barn.

88

Roland Argomaniz


89


Gary McGavin ARC 506

GRADUATE STUDIO - DESIGN DEVELOPMENT The goal of this course was to prepare a Design Development package of individual student housing designs completed in ARC 505/505L. Design Development is a major contractual phase of professional architectural services. This course continued the students’ exploration of materials, building systems (structural and environmental), and the development of calculations and details to further describe their ARC 505/505L designs. Students also refined code compliance with respect to their designs for fire, life safety, and accessibility.

EN EN DIA DI ENLAR EN DIAGR DIA

NOT US

NOT

NOT USED NOT US

2X12 RAFTERS 2X12 RAFTERS

2X14 RAFTERS 2X14 RAFTERS

2X12 RAFTERS 2X12 RAFTERS

2X6 WALLS @ LOAD BEARING WALLS 2X6 WALLS @ LOAD BEARING WALLS

2X6 WALLS @ 2X14 RAFTERS 2X14 RAFTERS LOAD BEARING WALLS 2X6 WALLS @ LOAD BEARING WALLS

2X6 WALLS @ 2X6 WALLS @ LOAD BEARING LOAD BEARING WALLS WALLS

5/8" PLYWOOD AT SHEAR WALLS AND

FLOORS 2X6 WALLS @ PLYWOOD AT 5/8" 2X6 WALLS @ LOAD BEARING SHEAR WALLS AND BEARING WALLS LOAD FLOORS WALLS

5/8" PLYWOOD AT SHEAR WALLS AND FLOORS 5/8" PLYWOOD AT SHEAR WALLS AND FLOORS

5/8" PLYWOOD AT 5/8" PLYWOOD AT SHEAR WALLS AND FLOORSSHEAR WALLS AND FLOORS

5/8" PLYWOOD AT 5/8"CONCRETE PLYWOOD AT SLAB SHEAR WALLS AND SHEAR WALLS AND ON GRADE FLOORS FLOORS CONCRETE SLAB CONCRETE ON GRADE FOOTING

90

DOUBLE 2X4 STUD WALL DOUBLE 2X4 STUD WALL

CONCRETE FOOTING

CONCRETE FOOTING

DOUBLE 2X4 DOUBLE 2X4 STUD WALL STUD WALL

CONCRETE SLAB CONCRETE ON GRADE SLAB ON GRADE

DOUBLE 2X4 STUD WALL

CONCRETE CONCRETE FOOTING FOOTING

4

3D FRAMING - NORTHWEST 4

4

DOUBLE 2X4 STUD WALL

3

3D FRAMING - NORTHWEST

3D FRAMING - NORTHEAST DOUBLE 2X4

3

3D FRAMING - NORTHWEST 3D FRAMING - NORTHWEST 4

3

DOUBLE 2X4 STUD WALL 3D FRAMING - NORTHEAST STUD WALL

CONCRETE SLAB ON GRADE

CONCRETE FOOTING

CONCRETE SLAB ON GRADE CONCRETE CONCRETE FOOTING FOOTING CONCRETE SLAB CONCRETE SLAB ON GRADE ON GRADE

3D FRAMING - NORTHEAST 3D FRAMING - NORTHEAST 3

C:\Users\Mark Perdiguerra\OneDrive - Cal Poly Pomona\Projects\2016\ARC506 Architecture Studio\Revit\ARC506-STRUC-118-124-N-Ave 52.rvt

C:\Users\Mark Perdiguerra\OneDrive C:\Users\Mark -Perdiguerra\OneDrive Cal Poly Pomona\Projects\2016\ARC506 - Cal Poly Pomona\Projects\2016\ARC506 Architecture Studio\Revit\ARC506-STRUC-118-124-N-Ave Architecture Studio\Revit\ARC506-STRUC-118-124-N-Ave 52.rvt 52.rvt C:\Users\Mark Perdiguerra\OneDrive - Cal Poly Pomona\Projects\2016\ARC506 Architecture Studio\Revit\ARC506-STRUC-118-124-N-Ave 52.rvt

2X14 RAFTERS

Mark Perdiguerra

2X14 RAFTERS

2X14 RAFTERS 2X14 RAFTERS

2X6 WALLS @ LOAD BEARING 2X14 RAFTERS WALLS 2X14 RAFTERS 2X6 WALLS @ LOAD BEARING WALLS

2X14 RAFTERS 2X14 RAFTERS

2X6 WALLS @ 2X6 WALLS @ LOAD BEARING LOAD BEARING WALLS WALLS

2X6 WALLS @ LOAD BEARING WALLS 2X6 WALLS @ LOAD BEARING WALLS 5/8" PLYWOOD AT

5/8" PLYWOOD AT SHEAR WALLS AND FLOORS 5/8" PLYWOOD AT SHEAR WALLS AND FLOORS

SHEAR WALLS AND

FLOORS 5/8" PLYWOOD AT 2X6 WALLS @ SHEAR WALLS @ AND 2X6 WALLS LOAD BEARING FLOORS LOAD BEARING WALLS WALLS

DOUBLE 2X4 STUD WALL DOUBLE 2X4 STUD WALL

5/8" PLYWOOD AT 5/8" PLYWOOD AT SHEAR WALLS AND SLAB CONCRETE SHEAR WALLS AND FLOORS ON GRADE FLOORS CONCRETE SLAB ON GRADE

5/8" PLYWOOD AT 5/8"CONCRETE PLYWOOD AT SLAB SHEAR WALLS AND SHEAR WALLS AND ON GRADE FLOORS FLOORS CONCRETE SLAB CONCRETE ON GRADE FOOTING

DOUBLE 2X4 DOUBLE 2X4 STUD WALL STUD WALL

DOUBLE 2X4 STUD WALL DOUBLE 2X4 STUD WALL

DOUBLE 2X4 DOUBLE 2X4 STUD WALL STUD WALL

KEY KEY

KEY PLA KEY

CONCRETE FOOTING

CONCRETE FOOTING CONCRETE SLABCONCRETE CONCRETE SLAB ON GRADE FOOTING ON GRADE

CONCRETE SLAB CONCRETE ON GRADE SLAB ON GRADE CONCRETE CONCRETE FOOTING FOOTING

CONCRETE CONCRETE FOOTING FOOTING

1

3D FRAMING - SOUTHEAST 1

2

3D FRAMING - SOUTHEAST

3D FRAMING - SOUTHWEST 2

3D FRAMING - SOUTHWEST 0'

1

3D FRAMING - SOUTHEAST 3D FRAMING - SOUTHEAST 1

2

0'

3D FRAMING - SOUTHWEST 3D FRAMING - SOUTHWEST 2 0'

4' 0'


DIO - DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 2x12 ROOF RAFTERS @ 24" O.C. L Designer: Mark Perdiguerra Instructor: Gary McGavin BLOCKING A

B

C

2x6 INFILL STUDS

D

E

STANDING SEAM METAL ROOF WITH STIRATED FINISH

BOTTOM PLATE

A

4

INTEGRATED METAL ROOF GUTTER Sim 4 A5.11

5/8" PLYWOOD

GENERAL NOTES:

W.P. MEMBRANE, TYP.

SHEET METAL FLASHING

SECOND FLOOR 20'-0" CEILING

2X12 WD. RAFTERS SPACED @ 24" O.C. 5/8" PLYWOOD, TYP.

BOTTOM OF SECOND FLOOR CEILING 20' - 6"

SECOND FLOOR (SOUTH UPPER LEVEL) 12' - 0"

BUILDING HEIGHT 37' - 0"

C:\Users\Mark Perdiguerra\OneDrive - Cal Poly Pomona\Projects\2016\ARC506 Architecture Studio\Revit\ARC506-ARCH-118-124-N-Ave 52-2016-06-01.rvt

:\Users\Mark Perdiguerra\OneDrive - Cal Poly Pomona\Projects\2016\ARC506 Architecture Studio\Revit\ARC506-ARCH-118-124-N-Ave 52-2016-06-01.rvt

THIRD FLOOR 22' - 0"

5.91 6.41 6.42 6.43 7.41 7.44

BOTTOM OF FOOTING -3' - 0" 6.41 6.43

TYP.

6.43 TYP.

TYP.

3.0 3

9

°

45.00

10

20

3.1

CARPET 09 68 00 FLOORING 2 psf (including pad) PLYWOOD SUBFLOOR 06UP16 00 LONG TERM BICYCLE PARKING

2.1 3 2% SLOPE MIN. 3.0

3.1

1

4

5/8" PLYWOOD

5

8

PROPERTY LINE

2'-6" BOTTOM OF FOOTING

TYP. TYP.

ARCHITECTURAL WALL SECTION CMU WALL 3/4" = 1'-0" CARPORT ONE STORY HEIGHT: 10' - 0"

CARPORT ONE STORY HEIGHT: 10' - 0"

CARPORT ONE STORY HEIGHT: 10' - 0"

TYP. TYP.

1

TYP.

BUILDING SECTION KEYNOTES TYP.

DESCRIPTION

7.45 8.11 8.43 8.63 9.22 10.71 32.31

GROUND FLOOR PLAN 1/8" = 1'-0"

NO.

3.11(EAST-WEST)CONCRETE FOOTING LONGITUDINAL SECTION 1/8" = 1'-0" 3.12 CAST IN PLACE CONCRETE WITH ROUGH BOARD FINISH 5.91 METAL HANDRAIL, PAINTED 6.41 WOOD OVERHEAD CABINET 6.42 WOOD LOUVERS 6.43 WOOD KITCHEN BASE CABINET 7.41 STANDING SEAM METAL ROOF NO. DESCRIPTION NO. 7.44 WOOD RAINSCREEN SIDING

7.45 8.11 8.43 8.63 9.22 10.71 32.31

SET BACK

PROPERTY LINE PROPERTY LINE

SET BACK

NO.

TYP.

3.11 CONCRETE SINGLE FAMILY HOUSE GENERAL NOTE 3.12TWO STORIES CAST IN PL BLOCKING HEIGHT: 25' -FINISH 0" 5.91 2' - 7"6.41

METAL HAN 5/8" PLYW 12' - 3" OVE WOOD WATERPR WOOD 0.5 psfLOU WOOD KITC WIRE MES STANDING W1.4 W WOOD RAIN 7/8" STUC 10 psf @ 7

6.42 6.43 7.41 7.44

SPECIFIC NOT

NO.

CARPET F INTEGRATE 2 psf (inclu WOOD DOO GARDEN S ALUMINUM 1A TRELLIS A4.1 METAL-FRA GUEST GY PAINTED BEDROOM BREAK ME METAL TRE (FACTORY WOODEN F 103 BLACK MU PATIO 170 SF

105

106

148 SF

MECHANIC

304 D1.1

W1.8

UNIT C-2 INTERIOR

D1.0

203

AVENUE 52 TOW

DOUBLE P

5.1 WALL BEYOND

DOWEL

GUEST BEDROOM

102

ENGINEERED WOOD FLOORING 4 psf

09 64 00

107

FIBER EXPANSION 2A JOIINT

A4.1

WELDED WIRE MESH 4" SAND

118 & 124 NOR LOW-E 1 GL LOS ANGELES A4.3

3' - 0"

CLIENT:

UNIT B-2

11

DESCRIPTION INTEGRATED METAL GUTTER WOOD DOOR ALUMINUM STOREFRONT METAL-FRAMED SKYLIGHTS PAINTED GYPSUM PLASTER METAL TRELLIS WOODEN FENCING

DESCRIPTION

INTEGRATED METAL GUTTER WOOD DOOR ALUMINUM STOREFRONT METAL-FRAMED SKYLIGHTS PAINTED GYPSUM PLASTER METAL TRELLIS WOODEN FENCING

8' - 0

14' - 7" ALUMINUM

LEAD PLU

MY NAME: MARK PERDIGUERRA

FIBER EXP JOINT 2% MIN. S

118 & 124 NORTH AVENUE 52 LOS ANGELES, CA 90042 GUEST W BATH

CLIENT:W

106

GARDEN TRELLIS

103

1A A4.1

AVENUE 52 TOWNHOUSES TRAVEL DISTANCE = 72'

PATIO

6

3' - 7"

UP

6 LIVING 2x SLEEPERS @ 16" O.C. TYP.

KITCHEN

25' - 2"101

MASTER BEDROOM

5.1

ALUMINUM GUE FRAMEBA BE 3.5 psf @ 1 10 W8x36 58 CO MA BEYOND

MY NAME:

UP

GUEST BATH

9

SUSPEND UNIT B-1 GYP. BOA 2.6 psf @ 5

GUEST BATH

303

PATIO

201

108

UP

306

W W

0' - 0"

HALLWAY

204

KITCHEN

MASTER BATH

3'1- 8"

ANCHOR BOLT BOTTOM PLATE

EXTE

TYP.

D1.5 GENERAL NOTES:

GUEST BEDROOM

PATIO

14

A3.11

TERM - FLOOR ONE 0'-0" SHORT GROUND ENLARGED PLAN BICYCLE LEVEL PARKING 4.1 2% SLOPE MIN. 5 1/4" = 1'-0"

UP

202

2x6 STUD WALL GARDEN @ 16" O.C. BEYOND TRELLIS

5

15' - 10"

14

BUILDING SEC 9' - 9"

ACCESSIBLE ELEVATOR

SUSPENDED T-BARPARKING METAL GRID CLEARANCE 8' - 0" LIVING

PARKINGINTERIOR CLEARANCE 8' - 0"

CRIPPLE STUDS

LONGITUDINAL SECTIO 1/8" = 1'-0"

2

91

13

4.1

6/7/2016 12:25:38 AM

6' - 0"

403

A

TYP.

12

307

UP DESCRIPTION

5/8" PLYWOO 1.77 psf SE

TYP.

6.43

MASTER BEDROOM

308 GUEST BATH

BOTTOM PLA

TYP.

6.41

CONCRETE FOOTING 7.45 NORTH ATTIC 5/8" PLYWOOD 31' - 0" IN PLACE CONCRETE WITH ROUGH BOARD CAST 8.11 FINISH PATIO KTICHEN 8.43 404 UNIT C-1 8.63 301 5.91 METAL HANDRAIL, PAINTED THIRD FLOOR 6.41KITCHEN WOOD 22' - 0" OVERHEAD CABINET LIVING 36 1/2" 9.22 6.42 MECHANICAL WOOD LOUVERS 10.71 101 102 6.43 ROOM WOOD KITCHEN BASE CABINET 32.31 7 204 SF 175 SF D1.4 CEILING PLENUM SPECIFIC NOTES: 7.41 ELEVATOR STANDING SEAM METAL ROOF LIVING SECOND FLOOR FOR MECHANICAL NORTH ENTRY 7.44 WOOD RAINSCREEN SIDING 302 LEVEL UP 10' - 0"

D1.6

12

MASTER BATH

W1.7 W1.6 W1.5

37' - 0" NO. 2x12 FLOOR JOISTS

3.11 3.12

THIRD FLOOR D1.7 22' - 0"

11

19 21 4SILL PLATE WINDOW

17

WALL BEYOND

401

BOTTOM PLATE BUILDING SECTION KEYNOTES BUILDING HEIGHT JOIST HANGER

4

SECOND FLOOR NORTH ENTRY LEVEL 10' - 0" 18

KITCHEN

402

D1.8

EXTERIOR

15

C:\Users\Mark Perdiguerra\OneDrive - Cal Poly Pomona\Projects\2016\ARC506 Architecture Studio\Revit\ARC506-ARCH-118-124-N-Ave 52-2016-06-01.rvt

SET BACK

PROPERTY LINE

5' - 6" 13' - 1"

PROPERTY LINE

SET BACK

TWO-WAY AISLE WIDTH

" '-0 20

25' - 0"

PROPERTY LINE 13

C:\Users\Mark Perdiguerra\OneDrive - Cal Poly Pomona\Projects\2016\ARC506 Architecture Studio\Revit\ARC506-ARCH-118-124-N-Ave 52-2016-06-01.rvt

5' - 0"

2.1

U

LIVING

104 NO.

0' - 0"

D

2

0' - 0"

15' - 10" 3' - 8" 2'-6" BOTTOM OF ALLEYWAY FOOTING ALLEYWAY CMU WALL 8 9 25 5 STRUCTURAL WALL SECTION BEATHROOMS 1A ONE STORY 3/4" = 1'-0" HEIGHT: 12' - 0"

ARC 342 0' - 0

REVISIONS NO.

2

DESCRIPTION

DATE

11 13 WALL S ARCHITECTURAL 3/4" = 1'-0" 8.11

2 TYP. TYP.

ARC 342 FINAL

6/3/2016

SCALE: 3/4” = 1’-0”

BEATHROOMS ONE STORY HEIGHT: 12' - 0"

0

3.12

TYP. SHEET NAME:

TYP. TYP.

B SE

SCALE: 1/8” = 1’-0” 3.12

0'

4'

TYP.8'

16'

SECTION NOTES 1. 2. 3.

ISSUE DATE: SIZE:

0'

FOR PLUMBING FIXTURES, SEE PLUBMING DRAWINGS FOR ELECTRICAL FIXTURES, SEE ELECTRICAL DRAWINGS FOR MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT, SEE MECHANICAL DRAWINGS.

PROJECT NO:

DRAWN BY:

BUILDING SCALE: 1” = 10’ SECTIONS

EGRESS / OCCUPANT LOAD / FIRE RATING ANALYSIS - FIRST FLOOR 1" = 10'-0"

SECTION NOTES

32' SHEET NAME:

FOR PLUMBING FIXTURES, SEE PLUBMING DRAWINGS FOR ELECTRICAL FIXTURES, SEE ELECTRICAL DRAWINGS FOR MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT, SEE MECHANICAL DRAWINGS.

1

1. 2. 3.

14' - 7"= 1’-0” SCALE: 1/4”

25' - 2"

8.11

FOOTING -3' - 0"

CONCRETE FOOTING CAST IN PLACE CONCRETE WITH ROUGH BOARD FINISH METAL HANDRAIL, PAINTED WOOD OVERHEAD CABINET WOOD LOUVERS WOOD KITCHEN BASE CABINET STANDING SEAM METAL ROOF WOOD RAINSCREEN SIDING

11

TYP.

TYP.

PARKING STRUCTURE

OPEN

9

E

NORTH ATTIC 31' - 0"

A4.1

D1.9

20' - 0"

CONDENSER

TYP.

8.43

BOTTOM OF FOOTING 4 E -3' - 0" 19' - 10" INTERIOR

2x6 STUD WALL @ 16" O.C. LONGITUDINAL SECTION (EAST-WEST) 2 1/8" = 1'-0" BLOCKING

W2.0

2A

WINDOW HEADER CONCRETE COLUMN TYP.

8

204 INTERIOR

BUILDING HEIGHT 6 37' - 0" 5 D1.10

A3.1

10

7

PATIO

2x12 ROOF R BLOCKING

2x6 INFILL ST 9.22

TYP.

1

TYP.

° 45.00

4

BUILDING AT ADJACENT PROPERTY

16

6

1

STANDING S 1.5 psf TYP.

1

0' - 0"

GROUND FLOOR 0' - 0" LONGITUDINAL SECTION (EAST-WEST) 1/8" = 1'-0" BOTTOM OF

NO.

5.91

14

DOUBLE TOP PLATE

W2.1

A3.11 7.41

GROUND FLOOR 0' - 0" 8.43

W1.10

MASTER 5.91 BEDROOM BUILDING 3 2 AT ADJACENT 9'-0" FIRST 107 FLOOR PROPERTY CEILING 211 SF

3/4" = 1'-0"

GYP.BOARD 2.6 psf @ 5/8" PARKING SINGLE FAMILY HOUSE CLEARANCE BATT TWO STORIES -INSULATION 0" 07 21 008'25' HEIGHT: - 0" 0.05 psf GROUND FLOOR 0' - 0" 09 20 00

TRAVEL DISTANCE = 34'

24' - 8"

2

9' - 0"

HANDICAP STALL TYP.

0' - 0"

1

GYP. BOARD 9.22 2.6 psf @ 5/8" 09 20 00

ANCHOR BOLT TYP. BOTTOM PLATE 0'-0" GROUND LEVEL

9.22

W1.11

INTERIOR

EXTERIOR

203 28 SF

D1.11

N

6.41

9.22 PARKING CLEARANCE 8' - 0"

7.41

TYP.

12

GUEST BATH

108 47 SF 11'-0" SECOND LEVEL FLOOR 8' - 0"

SUSPENDED T-BAR METAL GRID 8.63

07 21 00 BATT INSULATION LARCH RAINSCREEN 07TRASH 46 23 CLADDING

TRASH

1.1

10

D2.0

7

MASTER BATH

THIRD FLOOR 22' - 0"

A4.32

HANGER

D2.1

UP

MIN.

9.22

8.43 8.63

BUILDING SECTION KEYNOTES 3.11 3.12

1

TYP.

THIRD FLOOR 22' - 0"

PARKING CLEARANCE 8' - 0"

OPEN

8

6

W1.13

8.63

CEILING PLENUM FOR MECHANICAL

MARK PERDIGUERRA

WATERPROO

8.63

4'

8'

REVISION #:

N

4

4

NORTH ATTIC 31' - 0"

8.63

5

2x12 FLOOR JOISTS

0' - 6"

NORTH ATTIC 31' - 0"

2 A3.11

OPEN

07 10 00 WATERPROOF MEMBRANE OPEN 2 0.5 psf

1.1 GAS LINE

BUILDING HEIGHT 37' - 0"

2

32.31

6' - 0"

J

CROSS SECTION (NORTH-SOUTH) 1/8" = 1'-0"

2

ALUMINMUM WINDOW FRAME DOUBLE PANE LOW-E GLAZING

KITCHEN

GARAGE 232 SF ROUTE ACCESSIBLE ONE STORY HEIGHT: 12' - 0" D 9' - 10" 6' - 0"

CARPET 09 68 00 FLOORING 2 psf (including pad)

BATT INSULATION 0.5 psf

MIN.

1

BOTTOM OF FOOTING -3' - 0"

3

08 51 13 08 6' 80- 00 0"

36' - 0"

GROUND FLOOR 0' - 0"

3

6.42

22' - 9"

PROPERTY LINE

CROSS SECTION (NORTH-SOUTH) 1/8" = 1'-0" SET BACK

1

8.63

9.22

7.44

BOTTOM OF 32.31 FOOTING -3' - 0"

EXISTING BUILDING

.00°

2 A3.1

6.42

4

A

32.31

TANDEM STALL TYP.

SECOND FLOOR (SOUTH UPPER 2 LEVEL)

12' - 0"

14' - 7"

201

PLYWOOD W1.12 06 16 00 SUBLFOOR

TANDEM STALL TYP. 9' - 0" WINDOW HEADER

7.45 90

G

3

A1 27' - 5"

0' - 6"

7.45

2

9.22 9'-0" FIRST FLOOR CEILING

8.43 SET BACK

PROPERTY LINE

7.45

79' - 0"

32.31

GROUND FLOOR 8.43 0' - 0"

D

CMU PODIUM WALL

2

1

24 X 36

SCALE:

D2.2

A

BLOCKING

A3.11

STANDARD STALL TYP.

8.63

30' - 7"

7.44

4 31' - 7" EXTERIOR

A1 27' - 5"

C

11'-0" SECOND LEVEL 8.43 FLOOR 9' - 0" 7.45

ROLLING 6.42 GATE

8.43

A2

10' - STRIPS 0" 1x4 FURRING BEYOND 0.64 psf 7.45

18' - 8" GAS LINE

7.41

SET BACK

PROPERTY LINE

7.45

202 187 SF

W2.4

3

10' - 0"

LARCH RAINSCREEN 6.42 CLADDING 3 psfB 7.41 A2 DRAINAGE CAVITY

C

6' - 4"

D

MAXIMUM BUILDING HEIGHT

EXISTING 10.71 BUILDING

SOUTH ATTIC 21' - 0"

D 24' - 0"

0.5 psf

10.71

SECOND FLOOR (SOUTH UPPER LEVEL) 12' -7.41 0"

B 18' - 8"

BUILDING HEIGHT

07 46 23

7.41

TOP OF SOUTH ROOF 27' - 3"

TOP OF SOUTH ROOF 27' - 3"

C 6' - 4"

TANDEM STALL TYP.

D1

11' - 0"

SET BACK

PROPERTY LINE

E

D

WATERPROOF 07 10 00 MAXIMUM MEMBRANE

B

19' - 4"

A 1

LIVING

W2.2

SECTION THROUGH PLUMBING WALL 1 GYP. BOARD 09 20W2.3 00 3/4" = 1'-0"

PROPERTY LINE

24' - 0"

A

5/8" PLYWOOD

C INTERIOR 31' - 7"

BOTTOM OF FOOTING JOIST -3' - 0"

3

DOUBLE TOP PLATE

2 EXTERIOR 31' - 7"

ARC342

NORTH ATTIC ATTIC SPACE 31' - 0" 06/03/16

DRAWN BY:

W1.9

ALLEYWAY

D1

SIZE:

2x4 BLOCKING

2.6 psf @ 5/8"

R

N

E 11' - 0"

1

REINFORCING BARS, TYP.

1 B

ISSUE DATE:

SHEET #:

BATT INSULATION GARAGE ONE STORY HEIGHT: 12' - 0"

PROJECT NO:

21'-0" ROOF RIDGE

2x4 BLOCKING-3' - 0" SECTION THROUGH SOUTH WALL 3/4" = 1'-0"

RAFTERS

REVISION #:

CONCRETE FOUNDATION

BOTTOM OF FOOTING

GROUND FLOOR 2X10 0' - 0"

1x SUPPORT MEMBER FOR GUTTER

4" SAND BASE COURSE, TYP.

21'-0" ROOF RIDGE

37' - 0"

1/2" PLYWOOD CONCEALED ROOF DRAIN

BARRIER

09 68 00 STUCCO 10 psf @ 7/8"

UNIT LOADS 3

KEY WALL SECTIONS BUILDING HEIGHT

4" CONCRETE 1/2" PLYWOOD SLAB WATERPROOF MEMBRANE 6 MIL VAPOR

GROUND FLOOR 0' - 0" FLASHING

1

SHEET NAME:

BASALT MOSAIC THINSET TILE ON GROUT BED, TYP.

UNIT LOADS

INTERIOR EXIT ACCESS

DATE

CROSS SECTION (NORTH-SOUTH) 1/8" = 1'-0"

07 62 00 STANDING SEAM METAL ROOF 1.5 psf CONCEALED ROOF DRAIN

A TYPE 1-A CONSTRUCTION (PARKING) BEARING WALLS INTERIOR/EXTERIOR 3-HOUR RATING

2

CONCRETE PAVERS

REINFORCING BARS, TYP.

2

DESCRIPTION

STAIR LANDING 5' - 1"

CONCRETE FOUNDATION

UNIT STACK SECTION

NO.

BOTTOM OF FOOTING GRANITE SINK WITH STAINLESS -3' - 0" STEEL FAUCET 1

4" SAND BASE COURSE, TYP.

EXTERIOR ACCESSIBLE PATH OF TRAVEL

REVISIONS

EXISTING BUILDING

CROSS SECTION (NOR 1/8" = 1'-0"

1

GROUND FLOOR 0' - 0"

FIREPROOF DOUBLE GYP. BOARD ASSEMBLY, TYP. (07 81 00), 1.0 PSF

6 MIL VAPOR BARRIER

SOUTH ATTIC 21' - 0"

BOTTOM OF FOOTING -3' - 0"

2 7.44 32.31

RECESSED CAN LIGHT

STAIR LANDING 5' - 1"

NONBEARING WALLS & PARTITIONS 0-HOUR RATING

1

GROUND FLOOR 0' - 0"

10.71

SOUTH ATTIC 21' - 0"

GROUND FLOOR CEILING 9' - 0" BATHROOM WALL TILE, TYP.

DOUBLE 2X4 WD. STUD FIRE PARTITION ASSEMBLY WITH PLUMBING CHASE (06 11 00), 2.0 PSF

DEMISING WALLS (UNIT SEPARATION) 1-HOUR RATING

2

2X12 WD. JOISTS SPACED @ 24" O.C.

GROUND FLOOR CEILING 9' - 0"

4" CONCRETE SLAB

EXTERIOR FLS EGRESS PATH OF TRAVEL

BATT INSULATION, TYP.

BEARING WALLS INTERIOR/EXTERIOR 1-HOUR RATING

40'

118 & 124 NORTH AVENUE 52 7.45 LOS ANGELES, CA 90042 CLIENT:

SECOND FLOOR (SOUTH UPPER LEVEL) 12' - 0"

5/8" PLYWOOD, TYP.

SECOND FLOOR NORTH ENTRY LEVEL 10' - 0"

5/8" PLYWOOD, TYP.

PER CBC CH.6 TABLE 601 TYPE V-A CONSTRUCTION (DWELLING UNITS)

25'

AVENUE 52 TOWNHOUSES

8.43 2X12 WD. JOISTS SPACED @ 24" O.C.

BOTTOM OF -2'-6" FOOTING

32'

EXISTING BUILDING

7.41

TOP OF SOUTH ROOF

27' - 3" SECOND FLOOR (SOUTH UPPER LEVEL) 12' - 0"

GROUT,TYP.

ALLEYWAY

N

7'

MARK PERDIGUERRA

BASALT MOSAIC THINSET TILE, TYP.

2X4 WOOD SLEEPERS

2X4 WOOD SLEEPERS, TYP.

LEGEND 4 STRUCTURAL WALL SECTION 3/4" = 1'-0"

SECOND FLOOR (SOUTH UPPER LEVEL)

12' - 0"

MY NAME: BUILT IN BATHTUB

BATT INSULATION, TYP.

5/8" PLYWOOD, TYP.

EXIT ACCESS TRAVEL DISTANCE TABLE 1016.2 R-2 (WITH SPRINKLER SYSTEM) = 250 FT.

16'

16'

2X6 WD. STUDS SPACED @ 24" O.C.

FLOORING, TYP.

HEIGHT BASE PLATE HANDRAIL HEIGHT, MEASURED ABOVE STAIR TREAD NOSINGS, OR FINISH DRY PACKSURFACE OF RAMP SLOPE, SHALL BE UNIFORM, NOT LESS THAN 34 INCHES AND NOT MORE THAN 38 INCHES. ANCHOR BOLT ACACIA SHRUB 3' - 6" EXIT ACCESS FIBER EXPANSION SEC. 1014 JOINT EGRESS FROM A ROOM OR SPACE SHALL NOT PASS THROUGH 2% MIN. SLOPE ADJOINING OR INTERVENING ROOMS, EXCEPT WHERE SUCH ADJOINING ROOMS AND ROOM SERVED ARE ACCESSORY TO TROPICAL AGAVE ONE ANOTHER GROUND 0'-0" SHRUB 1.5' LEVEL COMMON PATH OF EGRESS TRAVEL SEC. 1014.3 BAMBOO R-2 (WITH SPRINKLER SYSTEM) = 125 FT. FLOORING, TYP.

gh Plumbing wall

2A

1

Sim

1 A5.11

PARKING BAY WIDTH

0' - 0"

M

C:\Users\Mark Perdiguerra\OneDrive - Cal Poly Pomona\Projects\2016\ARC506 Architecture Studio\Revit\ARC506-ARCH-118-124-N-Ave 52-2016-06-01.rvt

ough South Wall

5/8" PLYWOOD, TYP.

STORAGE (S-2) PARKING GARAGE 200 GROSS (SQ. FT. PER OCCUPANT) 5/8" PLYWOOD 9,978 TOTAL PARKING SQ. FT. / 200 = 50 OCCUPANTS BASE PLATE OUTDOOR SPACES SECTION21004.5 EXCEPTION FOR R-2 OCCUPANCIES: SECOND LEVEL 11'-0" MEANS OF EGRESS FOR THE BUILDING DOES NOT NEED TO FLOOR ADHERE TO THE SUM OF THE OCCUPANT LOADS OF BOTH THE BAMBOO BUILDING AND LARCH OUTDOOR AREAS. RAINSCREEN

PROPERTY LINE

AVENUE 52

I

CITY SEWAGE LINE

NS

INTERIOR

DOWEL WATER METER WELDED WIRE MESH 4"KCONCRETE SLAB 4"LSAND

SOUTH ATTIC 21' - 0"

ACCESSIBLE STAIRWAY SEC. 1007.3 VINYL TILED FLOORING IN ORDER TO BE CONSIDERED PART OF AN ACCESSIBLE MEANS 3 1/4" 25 GAUGE OF EGRESS, A STAIRWAY BETWEEN STORIES SHALL HAVE A METAL STUDS CLEAR WIDTH OF 48 INCHES MIN. BETWEEN HANDRAILS. EXCEPTION: BUILDINGS WITH AUTOMATIC SPRINKLER SYSTEM GYPSUM BOARD, PERMEABLE PAVERS TYP. SIZE OF DOORS SEC. 1008.1.1 MINIMUM CLEAR WIDTH OF EACH DOOR = 32 INCHES W8x36 COLUMN MEASURED BEYOND BETWEEN FACE OF DOOR AND STOP EXCEPTION: R-2 OCCUPANCY - NO LIMIT TO DOOR WIDTHIF THE DOOR IS 3NOT PART OF THE PATH OF EGRESS. ELM (SAPLING) 10' HANDRAILS SEC. 1012

E

TOP OF SOUTH 24' - 0" ROOF

27' - 3"

UNITS A & B FORCARPET 7FRAMING OCCUPANTS xDROPPED 0.2 INCH = 1.4" FLOORING CEILING UNIT C 6SUSPENDED OCCUPANTST-BAR X 0.2 INCH = 1.2" CEILING GRID

K E

M

D1

BATHROOM WALL TILE, TYP.

W.P. MEMBRANE, TYP.

STAIRWAYS ENGINEERED WOOD FLOORING OCCUPANT FIRST LOAD SERVED9'-0" BY STAIRWAY x 0.3 INCH FLOOR EXCEPTION FORCEILING SPRINKLERED BUILDING (0.2 INCH)

H

E 11' - 0"

WOOD RAINSCREEN SIDING

CLADDING ROOF BREAKOF METAL MEANS EGRESS (FACTORY FINISH TO MATCH SECTION 1005 BLACK MULLIONS)

CONCRETE SIDEWALK

F

A

32"

CITY SEWAGE LINE

LEGEND

L

1

BOTTOM OF SECOND FLOOR CEILING 20' - 6"

RECESSED CAN LIGHT

2X12 WD. JOISTS SPACED @ 24" O.C.

5/8" PLYWOOD UNIT A 1,200 SQ. FT. / 200 = 6 OCCUPANTS UNIT B 1,200 SQ. FT. / 200 = 6 OCCUPANTS UNIT C 1,500 SQ. FT. / 200 = 7 OCCUPANTS

B C

BATT INSULATION, TYP.

200 GROSS (SQ. FT. PER OCCUPANT) BLOCKING 15,100 TOTAL BLDG SQ. FT. / 200 = 75 OCCUPANTS TOTAL

RIM JOISTS 2x12 FLOOR JOISTS @ 16" O.C.

5/8" PLYWOOD, TYP.

GYPSUM BOARD, TYP.

GAS LINE

I

SPECIFIC NOTES:

TOP OF COUNTER 21' - 6"

WOOD DECKING, TYP.

14' - 0"

WATER LINE

A

2X12 WD. JOISTS

5/8" PLYWOOD, TYP.

OCCUPANT LOAD / EGRESS EXTERIOR MAXIMUM FLOOR AREA ALLOWANCES PER OCCUPANT TABLE 1004.1.2 2x6 STUD WALL @ 16" O.C. (R-2) DWELLING UNITS RESIDENTIAL

BATT INSULATION, TYP.

BATT INSULATION, TYP.

2X12 WD. JOISTS SPACED @ 24" O.C.

INTERIOR

5/8" PLYWOOD, TYP.

STANDING SEAM METAL ROOF WITH STIRATED FINISH

W.P. MEMBRANE, TYP.

DOUBLE TOP PLATE 1

BATT INSULATION

36"

GYP.BOARD

15' - 0"

ATTIC SPACE

SHEET #:

16'

32'

A

PROJECT NO:

ARC342

ISSUE DATE:

06/03/16

SIZE:

24 X 36

DRAWN BY:

MARK PERDIGUERRA

SCALE:

REVISION #: SHEET #:

A3.11 SCALE:

1/8" = 1'-0"


SENIOR PROJECT / GRADUATE THESIS 92


AXEL SCHMITZBERGER

I N D U S T R I A L G E O L O G I E S SABA SALEKFARD

94 96

ALEXANDER PANG

H O U S I N G  98 SARAH ETAAT

100

MICHAEL FOX

T H E C O N N E C T E D W O R L D

102

HAYDEN MOORE

104

ALEXANDER ORTENBERG

O N WA I T I N G  PARKER AMMANN

10 6 108

GEORGE PROCTOR

G R A D U AT E T H E S I S P R O J E C T

110

JUSTIN ARGOMANIZ LAIDA AGUIRRE

112 114

93


Axel Schmitzberger

Senior Project

INDUSTRIAL GEOLOGIES The urban landscape of Los Angeles is informed in large parts by the radical subordination of nature to the will of real estate speculation and the means of increasing industrial automation. While the organic landscape transformed into an orthographical hardscape, the built environment, industrial buildings remain merely practical, devoid of urban and architectural considerations other than optimized individual positioning for transporting and manufacturing. It occurs that not only streets but also buildings represent an infrastructure of production and transportation. The renewed interest in the relationship between landscape and architecture seeks to identify a distinct relationship between the geography, geology, and nature with the built environment, questioning established architectural terms such as program and building in general. Building upon this assumption, the theme of the Senior Project sought to enter a new territory by establishing new grounds for industrial architecture for production, anticipating places with no permanent inhabitants in a city with (almost) no citizens: Vernon, California.

94

With Vernon, the smallest incorporated city in the state, situated directly adjacent to the largest city in the state and the second largest in the nation, Los Angeles, a clear urban and social context can be identified. However, the questions are less centered around the sustainability of the city of Vernon as an urban entity or its environmental issues. The focus, instead, is that of an industrial landscape, an und(er)efined typology (with all its micro-typologies) that is scalarly bound by urban conditions revolving around human occupation, yet is devoid of human interaction other than migration as a result of labor. This not only leaves an opportunity to question and define industrial architecture within its own boundaries as a hermetic exercise, but also allows an investigation in the layers, archeology and geology of the industrial archetypes, industrial scale, nature, built environment, formation, and functionalism. Each building can be viewed as a self-regulating, self-conditioning entity displacing the rank of the occupant with the pragmatism of its own organization and optimum efficiency.


95


Senior Project

SYMBOLIC PROJECTION “Apparent irrationality of a part will be justified by the rationality of the whole.” Robert Venturi It is often presumed that a symbol, while not necessarily representing the truth, represents a belief. Symbolism is most relevant in the architecture of churches, where geometrical constructions signified the diverse forms of the universe, and ultimately, God. However, this is merely a translation. Church forms often carry arbitrary assignations of meaning, where no resemblance is asked for between the symbol and what it symbolizes (1). Thus, this proposal combines part-to-whole relationships and architectural projection as a technique to reinterpret the divine geometry that exists within church symbolism. Projective geometry serves not as a representation of the traditional church, but rather as a complementary misrepresentation. These geometrical derivations thus allow the symbol to share defined formal properties with its referent. Consequently, an architecture is created where ambiguous symbol, neither model nor arbitrary sign, flourishes. The centralized church serves as the basis for the architecture, for its heavy reliance on symbolism (2) reflects the proposal’s use of projection techniques. Whereas in the Latin cross plan, symbols and forms hold subjective assignations, the central plan pushes a deliberate elimination of the conventional image found within the standard church. In pursuit of geometrical projection as a translation to divest the church of icons and frescoes, the architecture and its representation become equally objectified, yet devoid of equal status.

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Saba Salekfard Notes: (1) Evans, Robin. The Projective Cast: Architecture and Its Three Geometries. Cambridge, MA: MIT, 1995. Print. (2) Wittkower, Rudolf. Architectural Principles in the Age of Humanism. New York: W.W. Norton, 1971. Print.


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Alexander Pang

Senior Project

HOUSING Collage & Montage. Collage and (photo)montage techniques and ideologies  highlight contrasting  approaches by  Le Corbusier and Mies van der Rohe in construction of  three-dimensional space. As in  his Cubist work Corbusier  composes building-like collage with  layered, extruded plans. Mies orchestrates floor, roof, and wall as discrete elements in photomontage owing to his early Dada exposure. Construction and quality  of space were  raised when examining  onestory  Mies projects like the Barcelona Pavilion  and Craig Ellwood’s local residential Mies-tribute projects.  Expanded discussion on two- and three-dimensional space translated, in various projects, into exploration of plan/section relationship, and also making of intentionally flat drawings. Case Study House Program.  Some students revisited  John  Entenza’s optimistic postwar  vision that  never fully materialized despite valiant efforts by  Saarinen, Eames, Soriano,  Ellwood,  Koenig and other  Case Study  architects. The collective body of work,  while influential, ultimately failed to establish a lasting template for modern living and home design. And Modern is relegated as “style,” merely one of many.

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Small Lots Ordinance and Mat Typology. Mat typology, by its very definition high density-low rise and courtyard dependent, is rarely done locally. This is due primary to fire safety requirements, both in terms of unit egress and fire truck access. OMA’s Nexus World in Fukuoka and MVRDV’s proposed Patio Houses in The Hague brought renewed attention to this  oldest density-housing type found in early  cites spanning  Marrakech and Kyoto. Mies’ Three  Courtyard Houses project and Eduardo Souto de  Moura’s Patio Houses in Matosinhos are effectively houses, lacking the requisite density to be housing. The recently enacted Small Lot Ordinance  acknowledges both  the  need for greater  density  and  the preference/demand for freestanding, individual, and ground-bound dwelling. Transit Oriented Development. Metro LA’s ambitious building program includes not only extending and building new rail lines but also developing  mixed-use projects  around the stations. While the efficacy of public transit for a city as far-flung as LA is hotly  contested, both sides of the debate  acknowledge growing environmental concerns and the reversal of 50+ years of suburban expansion. TOD, with its  elevated logistical requirements, is attractive to students who  prefer a  project with  complicated program. TOD  as  urban node also allows a project to  confront issues of the city.


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Senior Project

100 COURTYARD HOUSES “A boundary is not that from which something stops... the boundary is that from which something begins its presencing... Space is in essence that from which room has been made, that which is let into its bounds.” – Kenneth Frampton (Studies in Tectonic Culture) Modernist pioneers Rudolf Schindler and Richard Neutra, friends and rivals and fellow Austrian transplants, pointedly responded to Southern California’s moderate climate and relaxed attitude in their residential work. In a series of early seminal projects — Kings Road House (1922), Lovell Beach House (1926), and Lovell Health House (1929) — they established outdoor living space as the main focal point by dematerializing the building envelope. In 1945, John Entenza, editor of Arts & Architecture, initiated the landmark Case Study House program (CSH). Riding post-war prosperity, the program aimed to firmly establish a Modern residential idiom, continuing the legacy of Schindler, Neutra and their Second Generation followers. The ‘100 Courtyard Houses’ project uses the Dingbat 2.0 site in the Westside Palms neighborhood to ponder an alternative post-CSH Los Angeles. Instead of reinventing Rayner Banham’s beloved dingbats, this project re-imagines the courtyard-centric house in the grand Southern California tradition. “[Mies’s] elegant use and expression of structure, his floor plans, his details, his plays of planes and spaces were perfection. He was the architect I wanted to be, and his work would highly influence mine.” – Craig Ellwood (Life is a Bottomless Barrel) Craig Ellwood, author of CSH #16/17/18, fashioned his architecture in the style of Mies van der Rohe. His pavilion-like designs exhibit strict regulating lines in the x and y dimensions, which are then expressed through only a few free standing walls in the Z dimension, meeting at one major datum line — the roof. With these planes running between the interior and exterior, these houses render interior/exterior divisions non-existent. Mies further exemplified the same regard toward negative space – Brick Country House (1923), Barcelona Pavilion (1929), and 3 Court Houses (1945). In this tradition, planes are layered and juxtaposed against one another, challenging the perceived sense of boundary.

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Sarah Etaat


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Michael Fox

Senior Project

THE CONNECTED WORLD As we continue to embrace a world where the lines between the physical and digital are increasingly blurred, we are beginning to see a maturing vision for architecture that is inextricably tied to technological living trends. Students critically reflected upon the ways in which our architectural world is not only digital, but also seamlessly networked and connected. How architectural design integrates and reconciles the digital in our contemporary context is nothing short of reciprocal innovation. We examined trends in workplace and retail environments as well as the culture of making in commercial projects It is impossible to predict how quickly architecture in the connected world will be widely adopted and executed and what standards will work their way to the fore, and yet, it is vital that student designs recognize this area of design as an inevitable and completely integral part of how we will make buildings and cities in the future. The platform is ripe to foster unique applications that are tied to our living trends which are both affected by, and affect digital technology. In addition to looking at the contemporary context of an increasingly technologically impacted society, the projects in this studio were expected to critically place their buildings within the downtown Los Angeles urban fabric. The specific areas of interest were exclusively confined between the 10/101/110 Freeways. Students were asked to specifically focus on buildings that have failed and/or are currently vacant (partially or other) as well as gaps or neglected spaces in the urban fabric as potential sites.

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103


Senior Project

VERTICULTURE Creating a Better Agricultural Process. The Capitol of Agriculture. Drive through the Central Valley, and it is clear that California is the agricultural capital of America. California’s combined agricultural commodities make up 13% of the U.S. total.(1) This is no surprise because in 2009, approximately 43% of California’s land was used for agriculture, 27% of which was used for solely for crops.(2) The agricultural process takes up enormous spreads of land, not only for the purpose of growing the crop, but also for the processing of the crops into the products that Americans purchase. The Current Dilemma. Despite agricultural products, one of California’s most profitable and necessary resource, the amount of land dedicated to agriculture, has been declining. This land is being lost through the development of more urban areas.(3) As the urban sprawl continues, rural land will continue to diminish, giving way for further development. It seems that there can be no harmony between the rural and the urban. Furthermore, the process in which agriculture is currently being done is questionable; natural habitats are put in jeopardy, there is a decline in healthy soil, and a lot of wasted water.(4) If the process was to be reversed, however, and urban development gave way for more rural uses, it may be possible to achieve desegregation, and a potential solution could be found that did not destroy soils, and even save water and eliminate the need to encroach on natural habitats in the process. High-Rise Agriculture. The goal of this project is to be a precedent for bringing the rural into the urban. Growing the rural product in the middle of the city will starkly contrast the current concrete/ glass/steel urban condition. What was once a 2D horizontal process of agriculture and production will become a vertical process within high-rise buildings in Downtown Los Angeles. The crops will grow on the architecture and then be processed in the architecture.

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Notes (1) California Department of Food and Agriculture, 2014 (2,3) Edward Thompson, Jr., American Farmland Trust, July 2009

Hayden Moore

(4) World Wide Fund for Nature, Environmental Impacts of Farming


GRAPE HARVESTING

ROOFTOP BAR

MECHANICAL

HYDROPONICS

MECHANICAL

HYDROPONICS

RECEIVING & CRUSHING

FERMENTATION

MECHANICAL

BARREL ATRIUM

VINEYARD FACADE SYSTEM

CASE STORAGE

RESTAURANT

KITCHEN

RETAIL

GROUND

AUTOMATED PARKING

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Alexander Ortenberg

Senior Project

ON WAITING A direct result of planning for the future, waiting is a fundamental and universal condition of human existence. Whether planning their life around agricultural and hunting seasons in pre-industrial societies or contemplating such steps as going to college and searching for a job, the life of human beings is, essentially, a continuous chain of preparing for an action and of dealing with its consequences. The Industrial Revolution, which brought greater physical and social mobility, also increased the number of situations where people had to deal with unexpected and prolonged waiting periods. The post-industrial era — and especially the use of portable electronic devices — seems to have eliminated the “unproductive” and “torturous” waiting time. However, the digital revolution and the unprecedented efficiency, with which we now record the present and plan for the future, has also transformed waiting into even more ubiquitous — even if less noticeable — aspect of our lives.

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This section of the senior project focuses on the built environment in which the user is forced to see the same building during a prolonged period of time. The programs include, among others, transportation hubs, training and athletic facilities, health-care and child-care centers, hospitality and residential establishments for people with special needs, judicial and administrative institutions. While operating within the constrains of these relatively simple and mundane building types, the students focused on the portions that are too often considered as subsidiary to more “important” programs. At the same time, students were encouraged to think of waiting as a cultural phenomenon. Does waiting indeed constitute the least productive part of our life? Can waiting be regarded as anything other than a torturous period of forced idleness? Is there any way of transforming the involuntary waiting time into a fulfilling experience of self-reflection and social interaction? And — most importantly — can all or any of the above questions be addressed through architecture?


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Senior Project

[MIS] REMEMBER ME 1. It was an ordinary day in all respects. The clock ticked as time turned, engines buzzed as cars rolled, and eyes began to wander. focus A pair of tired eyelids were livened by a pair of red lights ahead. The car quickened to an agonizing halt and eyes began to wander. focus damn it In the distracted gaze was a building. The building was already faded from memory, existing and gone within a near second of an ordinary look over the shoulder. The heat of the day fuzzed the edges of the cars that finally began to move as traffic began to clear and the world resumed again. And eyes began to wander. 2. It was an ordinary day in all respects. The clock ticked as time turned, the engines buzzed as cars rolled, and eyes began to look around. focus A welcome breeze caressed the hand that casually laid outside the open car window as they zipped passed the drivers unwelcome to the Fastrak lanes. And eyes began to look around. focus damn it In the search around was a building. Part of it seemed to exist as if it were made for this exact moment in time. The image quickly faded from memory when the hands returned to the steering wheel and a further press on the accelerator continues the car on its whizzing journey home. And eyes began to look around. 3. Some would call it an unordinary day. The clock ticked as time turned, engines quieted as cars parked, and eyes began to search. The elusive building had been seen many times but failed to be comprehended. It had always existed as many times, had always existed from multiple places; now, on a rare visit to a DMV, it exists as “a whole�.

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Parker Ammann

[ ] In an image based society Architecture is already expressed and captured in snapshots. Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat; a whole arsenal to capture the world through a small camera on the backside of a smartphone. Architecture might as well step ahead of itself and become generated in the realm of short attention spans. Architecture as a composition of passerbys, casual glances, and rubbernecks. What happens to these image generated spaces in the real realm of Architectural time?


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George Proctor

Thesis Project

GRADUATE THESIS PROJECT Architectural education, importantly, provides a setting for students to explore architectural ideas, procedures, and products, and to overcome preconceptions about architecture that may have in part been influenced by a lifelong immersion in physical environments that are absent of design thought; such is the state of our world. This journey of discovery is, ideally, delightful for both the student of architecture and their thesis faculty advisor. The MArch Thesis Project is intended to be an independent exercise, in part providing evidence the student has mastered the discipline of architecture. Importantly, the Thesis Project also provides the student with a platform for exploring specific interests, and a position for how an architect operates within this set of interests. The Thesis Project requires curiosity, objectivity, intellectual integrity, and passion, which must be supported with personal dedication, conviction, intellectual rigor, and a strong work ethic. Central to the design thesis project is the notion that a student has dedicated his or her critical thinking skills to a real or hypothetical problem, has investigated improvements to known methods, procedures, and products in architecture, or framed a position for architecture from personal curiosities about human environments, buildings, and urbanism.

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For students to be able to proceed to their Thesis Project defense, they must provide documentation of what led to their investigation, and clearly state a proposition based on their research findings, one that can stand up to counterpoint, debate and criticism. The student must also offer both verbal and graphic descriptions of the formal, spatial, organizational, making and material strategies and methods considered for their investigation. They must similarly describe an architectural project, program, context and site that are appropriate as fodder to test the stated Thesis Project agenda. Importantly, it is incumbent upon the student to select the appropriate types of representation for their Thesis Project, prepared in a professional manner, as evidence of their mastery of architecture. MArch Thesis Projects range from the sacred to the profane, and from small strategic infill projects, to large complex institutional and commercial complexes. Each Thesis Project and its author is a participant in the never ending search for perfection in architecture; elegance, originality, and inventiveness, in response to clearly identified architectural design issues.


1

Stuff / No stuff

2

Buildings within building

3

4

Zones + Machines

5

6

Circulation

Shelf spacing

Radius + circulation

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7

LOGICS

8

Information mapping

Second Information mapping


Senior Project

AN URBAN FACTORY The rapidly changing and increasingly unstable nature of the Los Angeles metropolitan condition provides a unique platform for the integration and growth of manufacturing typologies large, small, and those in between. Perhaps the most impactful typology, the factory, reveals itself as the ultimate partner of the metropolis due to its dynamic and flexible nature. Simultaneously, a constant need for respite and livability in the midst of an unstable urban condition can impose a unique tension into a factory typology that traditionally accommodates compositions of workflow, activity, and production. This project intends to explore this conflict to advance the idea that an urban factory can be an incubator for future living, thinking, and making in the city. The factory represents the epicenter of the project and functions as a conceptual window: a medium to reveal future directions that positively reflect this tension within the metropolis. The inherent cultural landscape of the Los Angeles Arts District makes the neighborhood an eclectic fascination and provides the citizen with an exceptional resource to develop this urban factory as a new public realm. Some of the most influential ingredients embedded within the texture of the district are the edges contextualizing its very fabric, namely, its historic buildings, bridges, the river, and the influential art scene. Operating as the assemblage of the district’s infrastructure, the factory will serve as the valve through which urban activity can filter, treat and percolate the diverse nature of the urban landscape. The factory’s participation in the making of a new edge within this context will serve as the platform through which living, innovation, and fabrication can assemble to create endless opportunities for production.

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Justin Argomaniz

A Place for Making - The project’s essential component, the factory, offers flexible and generous spaces for fabrication and accommodates large scaled spaces to operate as the nucleus of the building. A Place for Thinking – The Innovation portion of the project functions as the brain of the building and operates in the spaces between the factory floor and amenity roof. A Place for Living – The tower serves as the binding element of the project and is placed at the north end of the site, overlooking the new park. It functions as the place for rest and each level integrates areas for entertainment like galleries and areas for collaboration as you ascend upward.


The River Master Plan A New Ecosystem

A Future Urban Factory Living Innovation Fabrication

The Parklet Public Art Art Installations

The Bridge Renovation A New Gateway

Live/Work Artist Lofts Cafes Galleries

The Boutique Factory Light Manufacturing Small Product Design

Amenity Roof Cafe Gym A FUTURE URBAN FACTORY The Assemblage of Parts Pool Arts Plaza Public Art Art Installations

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The Incubator Prototype Development Industrial Design The Boutique Factory Light Manufacturing Small Product Design

THE URBAN FACTORY A Factory for the City


Senior Project

CATALOG TECTONICS A manual for an exhaustive warehouse A concrete slab, a 10 foot path, a steel column, a shelf, a watertank leg, A shutter, a shelf, a room full of things, a spout, a stair, a shelf, a shelf, a shelf. Photosynthesis and plumbing, a shaded space. A lift, a shelf, a much bigger shelf, a 6 foot path and a row of many shelves. A sprinkler head. A duct, a duct return, A pipe, two pipes, a vent... This thesis sees Architecture as an organizational act. The indexing of “stuff,” the inventory, the instructions manual, all the ordinary systems, here considered sources of authorship that can be architecturally generative. A manifesto for the boring, this project interrogates the index in an attempt to exhaust what Georges Perec referred to as the “infraordinary.” It uses the reductionist methods of computational logics in order to translate inventory into data then data into built site. Decoupling the content of the catalog from its meaning, it reduces objects to their basic logistical needs, their algorithmic zeros and ones, only to be qualified by their relationships and input strategies. It is a manual for how to organize 900 things. The spatial embodiment of data and its infrastructure, it is photosynthesis and plumbing over architectural composition.

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Laida Aguirre

Referencing the metric measurements of artist Channa Horwitz, Sol Lewitt’s wall instructions and the writings of French philosopher Georges Perec, this thesis is concerned with methods of recording, registering and expressing the smallest unit of a given quantity or quantifiable object and its logistical and spatial necessities. This “accountant’s architecture” rejects the headlines, the metaphor and the explicit desire to create phenomena, instead it leans on a fastidious implementation of information, all else is consequence. Using an inductive method, the space-making process is reasoned from the specific to the general. The object is raised to its programmatic potential, relegating what we currently understand as Program (commonly understood by its potential for human occupancy) to a secondary position. The inventory is the new program, “a self-generating world that varies in time and place, indifferent to our presence.” This thesis effectively reduces architecture to a role of “supporting shed” for a shifting inventory, a mere physical articulation of the ordinary and necessary. - Georges Perec - ‘Species of Spaces’ - Pierre Huyghe - Documenta exhibit press release


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PROGRAMS The Department of Architecture (CPP ARC) offers two degrees: a five-year Bachelor of Architecture degree (B.Arch) and a three-year First Professional Master of Architecture (M.Arch I) degree (advanced standing is available for students with an architectural background). Both the undergraduate and graduate architecture programs are accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB). As a professional program in architecture, we advocate for the broader purposes of architecture, including its public significance, its role in creating sustainable environments, and its provision of service to society through graduates who are responsible professionals, motivated by a sense of civic engagement. Our mission is to: • Promote design excellence, environmental sustainability, and social responsibility • Conduct professional degree programs that exceed national standards • Expand connections and services to the University and the greater community • Create a supportive environment for students, faculty, and staff • Make architecture education available to under-represented communities CPP ARC is one of the most competitive programs in the United States. The popularity of our programs is based on our reputation for excellence in design instruction, for teaching the technical aspects of architecture, and for our learn-by-doing ethos. To underscore our popularity, we can point to our admissions numbers: our undergraduate program receives between 1,500 and 2,000 applicants for 120 places, and our graduate program is also highly selective. We also benefit from our highly diverse student body and faculty, and from our ranking as the most diverse architecture school in the country.

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CPP ARC is highly respected by outside groups, such as the architectural accrediting agency NAAB, the architecture rankings magazine DesignIntelligence, and by the firms that hire our graduates. In its last review of our program, NAAB described CPP ARC as being at the forefront of architectural education with its focus on urgent real world problems. DesignIntelligence lists our program in their Top 20 Architecture Schools in the United States and in their Top 5 Architecture Schools in the West. We are also listed in DesignIntelligence’s Top 10 programs nationwide for Construction Methods & Materials and in their Top 10 programs nationwide for Sustainable Design Practices & Principles. Architectural firms describe our students as excellent designers that also have a comprehensive knowledge of building systems.


ADMISSION Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch)

The Bachelor of Architecture degree is offered in a five-year curriculum with focus on the design laboratory. The studio sequence consists of four segments: a three-year basic core, three quarters of topic studios, an urban design studio, and a two-quarter long culminating senior project. Lecture classes in architecture theory and history, human behavior, professional practice, programming, sustainability, building technology, structures, codes, and digital media are closely coordinated with the studio sequence, and students are expected to demonstrate their knowledge of these areas in their design projects. The undergraduate program in the Department of Architecture is considered to be “impacted,” that is, many more students apply than can be accommodated each year. All candidates must meet regular University admission standards, as well as additional standards required by the Department of Architecture, such as a 3.2 minimum GPA for transfer students. For further information about University requirements for “impacted” programs, please refer to the University website for Freshmen and for transfer students. As a result of state impaction requirements, applications are usually only accepted from October 1 through November 30 for the following academic year; only a small number of non-resident and foreign students are admitted to the B.Arch program. In accordance with University policies for student affirmative action, women, minorities, and disabled persons are especially encouraged to apply.

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Master of Architecture (M.Arch)

The Master of Architecture program accepts students from varied academic backgrounds, including non-design disciplines. Applicants are admitted conditionally, subject to completion of up to 100 prerequisite units, before beginning the final 52 units of the program. For students with no previous study in architecture, two years of intensive prerequisite course work precedes the final three quarters of the Master of Architecture program. Students holding a nonprofessional Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree, with a major in architecture, may be able to complete the required prerequisite course work in one year, before beginning the final four quarters, or 52 units, of the Master’s program. Students in the M.Arch. I program may select one of three concentrations: Sustainability, Healthcare, or Historic Preservation. In addition to offering specialized courses, faculty conduct research in which graduate students may participate. The programs are enhanced by related course offerings in the Departments of Landscape Architecture and Urban and Regional Planning, as well as by university-owned facilities, including the Neutra VDL Research House, the John T. Lyle Center for Regenerative Studies, and the ENV Archives Special Collections. For admission to the Master of Architecture program, an applicant must have received a baccalaureate degree and have attained an overall undergraduate grade point average of at least 3.0. An applicant who does not meet these criteria may be admitted on a conditional basis if evidence of compensating qualifications can be furnished. Students may enter the Master of Architecture program in the fall quarter/semeter only. The Graduate Program accepts non-resident and foreign students.

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Master of Interior Architecture

The Department of Architecture offers a program of study that leads to the degree Master of Interior Architecture. The Master of Interior Architecture is a professional degree (M. INT. ARCH.) and is accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation. The primary goal for the Master of Interior Architecture program is to provide an opportunity for individuals with a minimum of a bachelor’s degree to pursue a rigorous program of part-time study that prepares them to enter the field of interior design, incorporating the highest standards of professional practice. The program particularly serves career-change students seeking to fulfill a lifelong dream of becoming interior design professionals. This program is offered collaboratively by Cal Poly Pomona and UCLA Extension. At Cal Poly Pomona, the program is offered through the College of the Extended University. Most of the classes are taught at UCLA Extension facilities in Westwood in Los Angeles.

CPP Admissions Website

http://www2.calstate.edu/apply If you are applying as a foreign student, please contact the Foreign Student Advisor in Admissions and Outreach at (909) 869-5299.

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PEOPLE 2016-17 College of Environmental Design Michael Woo, Dean of the College of Environmental Design

Department of Architecture George Proctor, Chair of the Department of Architecture (Beginning January 2017) Sarah Lorenzen Associate Chair (Chair until Decmber 2016) Kip A. Dickson, M.Arch Graduate Coordinator

Administrative Coordinator Rocky Sanchez Sam Winfield

Full-Time Faculty Robert Alexander, Assistant Professor Lauren Weiss Bricker, Ph.D, Professor, Director, ENV Archives-Special Collections Kip Dickson, Professor, Graduate Coordinator of the Department of Architecture Michael Fox, Professor Luis Hoyos, Professor Pablo La Roche, Ph.D, Professor Denise Lawrence, Ph.D, Professor, Graduate Coordinator for Regenerative Studies Juintow Lin, Associate Professor Sarah Lorenzen, Professor, Associate Chair of the Department of Architecture Gary McGavin, AIA, Professor, Director of College of the Extended University Programs Alexander (Sasha) Ortenberg, Ph.D, AIA, Professor Axel Schmitzberger, Professor George Proctor, Professor, Chair of the Department of Architecture Irma Ramirez, Professor Marc Schulitz, Assistant Professor Katrin Terstegen, Assistant Professor Hofu Wu, Arch.D, Ph.D, FAIA, Professor

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Lecturers Laida Aguirre Aaron Cayer Tina Chee Steven Chodoriwsky Frank Clementi Blair Davis Mitchell De Jarnett Andrea Dietz Giovanni Fruttaldo Omar Garza Joanna Grant Jose Herrasti Nadim Itani Hunter Knight William Ko Dennis McFadden, FAIA Barry Milofsky, AIA Kevin O’Brien Ruth Oh Alexander Pang Marta Perlas, AIA Emma Price Jonathan Raspa Behn Samareh Audrey Sato Andrew Thul Allyne Winderman, FAIA To learn more about the educational and professional experience of the faculty visit: https://env.cpp.edu/arc/faculty

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Editorial Team Marc Schulitz Katrin Terstegen Zaira Hernandez, Student Editor Book design by Marc Schulitz

Acknowledgments This publication would have not been possible without the efforts of the faculty, the students, and the Cal Poly Pomona AIAS. Special thanks go to Samantha Gonzaga.

This book was funded in part by the generous support of Juliana Terian (’80, architecture)

CPP ARC Š Copyright California State Polytechnic University, Pomona College of Environmental Design, Department of Architecture ISBN 978-0-9966197-3-8 First Printing, 2018 All rights reserved by individual authors who are solely responsible for their content. No part of this work covered by the copyright may be reproduced or used in any form by any means graphic, electronic, or mechanical, including recording, taping, or information storage and retrieval systems without prior permission of the copyright owner. Printing: Graphic Communication Services, Cal Poly Pomona Printed in the United States

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