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2016 Annual Report


Table of Contents 25th Anniversary....................................................................................................................1 Our Mission, Values & Core Outcomes...............................................................................2 Board of Directors ...............................................................................................................3 Message from the Board President ...................................................................................4 Message from the Executive Director ................................................................................5 Resilient Children ....................................................................................................................6 After School Clubs .......................................................................................................6, 7 Missouri Customer Service Partnership, Community Youth Mentoring....................8 Baby & Me..........................................................................................................................9 Educare....................................................................................................................10 Healthy Families ....................................................................................................................11 All Pro Dads ....................................................................................................................11 Youth Mental Health.......................................................................................................12 Drug Take Backs .............................................................................................................13 Coalitions....................................................................................................................14 Parent CafĂŠs....................................................................................................................15 Crisis Intervention..........................................................................................................16 Hope Connection............................................................................................................17 Strong Neighborhoods & Communities .............................................................................18 Collaboratives ..........................................................................................................18, 19 Stand Against Trafficking ............................................................................................20 Fulbright Springs...........................................................................................................21 Springfield Affordable Housing Center ......................................................................22 One Door ........................................................................................................................23 Springfield Community Land Trust .............................................................................24 National Night Out .........................................................................................................25 Neighborhood Clean-Ups .............................................................................................26 Our Priority Partner: United Way ...................................................................................27 Our Generous Donors .....................................................................................................28-30 Budgeting For Impact .......................................................................................................31 Our Community Impact ...................................................................................................32 You Make a Difference .........................................................................................................33


25th Anniversary For 25 years, Community Partnership of the Ozarks has facilitated and promoted the building of resilient children, healthy families, and strong neighborhoods & communities through collaboration, programming, and resource development. Community Partnership of the Ozarks, Inc. was incorporated in 1998, combining the initiatives begun by Ozarks Fighting Back (OFB) in 1991 and the Community Task Force in 1993. The Community Partnership Board of Directors acts as the governing body, while the OFB advisory board oversees programming efforts related to substance abuse and violence. Our founding organization, OFB, was an initiative dedicated to reducing substance abuse, particularly among young people. However, it quickly became clear that we could not build strong communities by focusing on substance abuse prevention in isolation. The Community Task Force, through the Collaborative Initiative, included collaboratives addressing education, housing, health, transportation, environment, early childhood, education, public safety, neighborhoods, and religion. They were focused on developing partnerships composed of grass roots citizens and community leaders who worked diligently to identify gaps and work on solutions to address those gaps. By combining these two groups, the hard work of building strong communities could be done using a holistic approach with a greater chance of achieving positive outcomes. Thus, Community Partnership was born in 1998. Since then, we have grown from an organization managing a small annual budget to an organization that currently manages more than 35 grants and contracts funded by local, state and federal dollars with an annual budget of over $3.2 million. We have remained a trusted leader, a catalyst for change, and a valued resource for solving issues in Springfield and the surrounding region. We are the “go to” organization when there is an emerging issue that needs to be addressed – we bring people together to create solutions. Your support of Community Partnership is an investment in our community’s children, families and neighborhoods. Because of you, we are able to help improve the quality of life for all of us. We’re in this together, and together, we create the world we all want to live in! Thank you for celebrating 25 years of resilient children, healthy families, and strong neighborhoods & communities with us!

1 www.commpartnership.org

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Our Mission To facilitate and promote the building of resilient children, healthy families, and strong neighborhoods & communities through collaboration, programming, and resource development.

Our Values Integrity: We do the right thing, not the easy thing. We steadfastly adhere to high principles and professional standards. We exhibit integrity by always acting ethically and honorably. Compassion: We put people first. We are compassionate, respectful and civil in all we say and do. Teamwork: We achieve more by working together. We are a winning team of talented people, deriving expertise from all levels of the organization. Creativity: We foster creativity in the workplace. We have the freedom to imagine and the courage to act. Collaboration: We use our experience and expertise to build collaborative partnerships that address diverse community needs and reduce duplication. Excellence: We strive for excellence and quality in all our programs, services and interactions with the people and communities we serve.

Our Core Outcomes • Children, Families and Community Members Safe & Healthy • Young Children Ready to Enter School and Succeeding in School • Youth Ready to Enter Productive Adulthood • Parents Working • Strong & Thriving Neighborhoods 2


Board of Directors Lawrence Anderson Manager of Diversity and Inclusion, Springfield Public Schools

Dr. Colleen Hardy Education Department Chair, Evangel University

Sheriff Jim Arnott Greene County Sheriff’s Office

Debbie Shantz Hart Owner, Housing Plus, LLC

Rob Baird CEO, CONCO Companies

Amanda Hedgpeth Assistant Vice President, CoxHealth

Harold Bengsch Commissioner, Greene County Commission

Dr. David Hough Dean, College of Education, Missouri State University

Roseann Bentley Commissioner, Greene County Commission Scott Brady News Director, KY3 Greg Burris City Manager, City of Springfield David Cook Community Bank President, The Bank of Missouri Spencer Cunningham (Board President) Program Manager, Turbocharger Division, SRC Heavy Duty Bridget Dierks Grants Program Officer, Community Foundation of the Ozarks Dr. Janice Duncan Director, Greenwood Laboratory School, Missouri State University Hollie Elliott Coordinator, Economic Development, Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce Brad Erwin (Board Treasurer) President, Paragon Architecture Jim Farrell Director of School Police, Springfield Public Schools Heather Ford 31st Circuit Manager, Greene County Children’s Division Clay Goddard Assistant Director of Health, Springfield-Greene County Health Department Dr. Bud Greve Community Volunteer

Dr. John Jungmann Superintendent, Springfield Public Schools Barbara Lucks Sustainability Officer, City of Springfield Russ Marquart President and CEO, Central Bank of the Ozarks Anne Sallee Mason (Board Secretary) Attorney, Neale & Newman Law Firm Debi Meeds President and CEO, United Way of the Ozarks Scott Meier General Manager, Midwest Family Broadcasting Charlie O’Reilly Vice Chairman of the Board, O’Reilly Auto Parts Leslie Peck President, Peck’s Insurance and Financial Services Scott Reynolds (Board Vice-President) Regional Chief Financial Officer, Mercy Carl Rosenkranz Executive Director, OACAC Rev. Mark Struckhoff Executive Director, Council of Churches Dr. Paul Thomlinson Vice President of Research and Quality Assurance, Burrell Behavioral Health Chief Paul Williams Springfield Police Department

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Message from the Board President It is an honor and a privilege to be the President of the Board of Directors for Community Partnership of the Ozarks. I have sincerely enjoyed my time working with our Executive Director, Janet Dankert, and her unbelievable staff. I look forward to my continued tenure as the Board President through 2017. Community Partnership of the Ozarks plays a critical role in the success and development of citizens within the Springfield and surrounding communities. Our message and mission statement remains, “To facilitate and promote the building of resilient children, healthy families, and strong neighborhoods & communities through collaboration, programming and resource development.” In order to complete this mission, we have been and continue focusing on the following focus areas through collaborative partnerships across the community:

• Substance Abuse & Violence Prevention

• Community & Neighborhood Development

• Early Childhood & Family Development

• Affordable Housing & Homeless Prevention

I want to personally thank Janet’s staff for their tireless efforts to make Springfield a better place for the people who live here, as well as our incredible Board of Directors who have such a passion for making Community Partnership of the Ozarks the best organization possible. As always, we look forward to seeing you at our signature fundraising event next February where we all enjoy miniature golf, food, music and more!

Spencer Cunningham Community Partnership of the Ozarks Board President

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Message from the Executive Director We are so proud to celebrate 25 years this year…that’s a quarter of a century! One of our greatest accomplishments has been our ability to grow and meet the expectations and needs of the communities we serve. Over the past 25 years, the communities we serve have changed and so have we. Expanding from a single-issue organization, we developed four divisions and brought many new programs, initiatives and resources into our communities. Our focus on collaboration never waned though. That is the foundation of who we are and what we do! We’ve seen our Community Collaborative Initiative grow to address critical issues such as child abuse and neglect, poverty, and lack of early childhood education opportunities. We’ve helped many communities organize and develop prevention coalitions to tackle substance abuse, violence, and bullying. We’ve continued our strong partnership with Springfield Public Schools, supporting students and families through after school and academic enrichment programming, parent involvement activities, and crisis intervention services. And we’ve expanded our efforts focused on affordable housing and homeless prevention by partnering with the City of Springfield to open the Springfield Affordable Housing Center a few years ago. Last year continued the trend of collaboration and building partnerships to meet our mission of building resilient children, healthy families and strong neighborhoods & communities. From working with families with young children, to providing academic enrichment and after school programs for school-aged youth, to helping youth in the foster care and DYS systems transition into productive adulthood, to connecting homeless families and Veterans with resources and housing opportunities, to educating residents of all ages about the importance of prevention, we were honored to serve and proud of the impact we made along with our partners, volunteers and board. Reflecting on the past 25 years, I thank all of our current and past staff, volunteers and board members who helped us achieve some incredible outcomes while changing our communities for the better. Looking ahead to the future, I am excited about the next 25 years of Community Partnership and what they will bring! Janet Dankert Executive Director

www.commpartnership.org

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After School Clubs 77 Clubs 1,200+ students

After School clubs are a key strategy for keeping kids safe, engaged and drug free. These clubs help build a firm foundation for academics, personal relationships and skill development. Ballet, chess, computers, choir and reading are just a few examples of clubs supported through our Caring Communities Initiative. We facilitated or provided support for 77 clubs in 16 elementary and middle schools in Springfield and 1 elementary school in Willard. Our clubs are part of an 6

effort to improve skills, encourage daily attendance, and increase academic success. Central Wrestling Club teaches skills beyond wrestling, including responsibility, problem solving and hygiene. One student wrote a letter thanking Caring Communities which stated, “I pour a lot of sweat and love into this sport, and it’s very uplifting when an organization puts their time and money into supporting me along my way.”

FACT: Our Caring Communities Initiative has been involved in After School Clubs since 1995 and has sponsored over 500 clubs.


After School Clubs Approximately 1,200 students participated in after-school clubs this year; of those students, 60 percent had an attendance rate of 95 percent or higher. In a survey of 883 students who participated in our clubs, 72% said they felt the clubs helped them feel better about themselves and 61% said they thought the clubs helped them to do better in school. 72% said their after-school club helped them make friends and feel more connected to other students.

16 Schools 35+ Partners FACT: Since our After School Clubs began, we have served more than 15,000 students.

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Youth Programs Missouri Customer Service Partnership

40 Foster Youth Completed Program 35 Gained Employment

The Missouri Customer Service Partnership (MCSP) connects youth who have aged out of the foster system with a 10-week course to provide them with 3 professional certificates and 4 hours of college credit toward customer service-based jobs. It is designed to help boost their confidence while guiding them into career paths by connecting youth with mentors who work with them throughout the program and beyond. We partner with Ozarks Technical Community College, the MO Dept. of Workforce Development and the MO Dept. of Social Services in the Missouri Customer Service Partnership. This year, 40 foster youth completed the program and 35 gained employment. “I’m proud of our students who made the decision to better their lives,” said Johnny McNeil, MCSP Support Service Coordinator. “Many young adults who have been put in less than desirable situations make excuses for not finding success in their lives. We have one youth who refused to let her past dictate her future and wanted to work in a hospital. After working several months in retail, she secured a position at CoxHealth. She has a bright future ahead of her and is a shining example of how our program works.”

Community Youth Mentoring

65 At-Risk Youth Served

In partnership with the Division of Youth of Services, we provide one-on-one youth mentoring and help them complete their individual treatment plan goals while also connecting them to critical community resources. We provided 990 hours of mentoring, serving 65 at-risk youth this past year. We also hosted a Back to School Night, Family Nights, three weekly groups, as well as field trips through donations of local businesses. In addition, we help youth and families with housing, clothing and supplies, while also helping youth prepare for job interviews, high school equivalency tests, and completing college and financial aid applications. 8

FACTS: MCSP began in 2014 as a pilot initiative in Springfield and St. Louis.


Baby & Me Through Baby & Me, families are able to set and achieve goals, become successful advocates for their children, and take the necessary steps toward reaching self-sufficiency. Baby & Me offers twice monthly home visits to high-needs families with children age birth to three. The visits allow time for parent-child interaction through developmentally appropriate activities, continued learning about child development topics, and discussing resources within the community.

12 Families 18 Children

Monthly play groups and group connections are also offered. Play groups focus on bringing children and parents together to interact in a group setting while educating families on free resources they can access within the community. Group connections offer families opportunities to learn about different parenting and child development topics.

FACT: More than 90% of the Baby & Me parents read an average of 5 hours per week to their young children.

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Educare 66 Childcare Providers 446 Children Impacted The purpose of the Educare program is to offer support to childcare providers who are caring for our youngest community members – our children, ranging in age from birth to school age.

appropriate practices and activities that stimulate a young child’s growth and development while addressing health and safety issues, so children will be ready for school and life.

Childcare providers voluntarily enroll in the program across a five-county area. Our Early Childhood Specialists support providers with developmentally

“It is rewarding to hear stories of providers who tried new ideas and found success engaging children in a new way,” said Denise Lock, Educare Coordinator.

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FACT: The Educare program is funded by the

Missouri Department of Social Services and began serving childcare providers in 1995.


All Pro Dads Our school-based support falls under four areas of concentration: initiatives that improve attendance and academic achievement, parent involvement activities, school-neighborhood connection and family support. Approximately 7,500 students and their families were served through these events and activities.

127 Kids 72 Families

This year we saw a large increase in father involvement through the All Pro Dads program, a nationally-recognized curriculum aiming to increase father participation, childparent bonding, and active male role models in the lives of children. Through monthly All Pro Dad chapter meetings, schools throughout the city offer the opportunity for students to sit down with their fathers, grandfathers, uncles and other male role models for breakfast, a mini-lesson and discussion. “All Pro Dad has fostered great interaction and bonding between fathers and their children at our local schools,” said Krysta Counts, Community Development Specialist. “It has also encouraged more positive male role modeling for our community’s kids.”

FACT: We began supporting father-child activities at Weller Elementary in 2005 and have since supported similar initiatives in 6 schools.

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Youth Mental Health 1,826 Referred Youth Our Regional Support Center (RSC) was awarded a three-year federal grant from the Substance 299 First Aiders Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) for the Youth Mental Health Support 27 Instructors Project. The goal of this project is to increase access to mental health services for youth in need, as well as to reduce community stigma surrounding mental illness.

We launched a community education and awareness campaign to coincide with the Youth Mental Health First Aid (YMHFA) trainings we offer. In the first 9 months, 27 YMHFA Instructors were trained to facilitate the 8-hour course, who then trained 299 First Aiders. Through June, those First Aiders and Instructors referred 1,826 youth to mental health services and self-help strategies! Because of our team’s implementation and success so far, the Youth Mental Health Support Project has received national recognition from SAMHSA.

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FACT: Our RSC team has offered both adult and

youth versions of Mental Health First Aid for 3 years, training 1,051 First Aiders.


Drug Take-Backs For years, our Regional Support Center has assisted communities in the 21-county service region with medication disposal and take-back options. This past year showed a drastic increase in the number of pounds of medications collected for disposal.

6 Tons Collected 95 Locations

There are 18 permanent drop boxes in the region that collected 1,491 pounds of medications-a 275 percent increase over last year. Additionally, there were 77 locations that hosted medication take-back events, which collected a total of 10,416 pounds-a 265 percent increase over last year. That is a total of 11,907 pounds, or nearly 6 TONS, of medications made inaccessible to youth or adults who might abuse them!

FACT: Since 2009, the RSC has been involved in collecting over 42,000 pounds of medications through take-back events and drop boxes.

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Coalitions Community Partnership of the Ozark’s Regional Support Center (RSC) provided technical assistance to 23 registered prevention coalitions this past year, including 2 newly registered coalitions: Dallas County Live Well Alliance and Drug Responsibility Education and Advocacy Movement (DREAM).

23 Coalitions 21 Counties 1,153,515 Served

The RSC serves coalitions in 21 counties of Southwest Missouri, working to reduce youth substance abuse and violence-related incidents in their communities. Prevention specialists working with coalitions promote the Strategic Prevention Framework, a proven model of implementing community-level change that is both sustainable and culturally competent. In addition, the RSC offers a variety of trainings and expertise on drug, violence and mental health related issues.

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FACT: The RSC has helped bring in over

$16,158,786 to our region for prevention efforts in the past 25 years.


Parent Cafés Parent Cafés provide a safe, nurturing environment for parents to have intimate, authentic conversations about their families and ways to strengthen them. The purpose of the Parent Café is to introduce, promote and build the Protective Factors through a non-traditional peer-to-peer learning process and through deep individual selfreflection.

193 Families 21 Cafés

A grant from the Missouri Children’s Trust Fund allows us to offer 15 Parent Cafés over the next three years, with the potential to train several new parent partners and share the program with hundreds of parents in the Springfield community.

FACT: We have offered parenting education and programming for almost all of our 25-year history.

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Social Work 285 Families Served 556 Community Referrals The mission of social work is to enhance human well-being while meeting basic needs and empowering those who are oppressed, living in poverty and vulnerable. Our social workers promote not only human well-being, but also the well-being of the community.

assistance. We also provided several families with utility assistance.

Recently, we helped a single mother when she fell behind on her utility bill and rent. She had no money to buy gas for her vehicle and was also in need of shampoo, laundry detergent, cleaning One vital tool that our senior social supplies and diapers. worker uses to help families who are in need of crisis intervention and family The family’s utilities were disconnected support services is our community on one of the hottest days in June. We emergency fund. Last year, our social used the emergency fund to get them worker was able to help over 100 families reconnected the next day and provided in need with this fund. her with a gas voucher to help her get back and forth to work. We also We were able to provide families gas provided diapers, laundry and cleaning vouchers, food and hygiene supplies supplies and personal hygiene items. during times of crisis, and help families remain in and obtain stable housing. The mother of two has since been able We assisted individuals with getting to get caught up on all bills and provide birth certificates, so they could obtain for her family...just a little help went a housing, employment and public long way!

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FACT: We have provided family support and crisis

intervention for more than 20 years.


Hope Connection 654 Guests 89 Veterans

Outcomes for the day include: • 654 Individuals Served • 89 Veterans • 27 Children • 511 Volunteers • 76 Agencies, 350 Vendor Representatives • Mercy prepared 6,000 meal servings • Bambino’s provided breakfast and lunch to the Veterans in Veterans Village We expanded the event to include the Veterans Stand Down. and created Veteran • Gathering Friends provided hot breakfasts Village, which provided direct access to to all guests over 45 Veteran agencies, organizations and • Convoy of Hope provided 6,000 pairs of advocacy groups. The number of veterans socks served doubled over the prior year with • 127 Eye Exams were provided, complete over 40 Veteran guides walking side-by-side with Rx and frames fellow servicemen and women to provide • 150 flu shots were administered key support and understanding of the complex challenges of seeking VA services. More than 650 guests were served at Hope Connection, an annual one day, onestop service site for the Ozark’s homeless population to gain access to vital services. We also doubled the number of volunteer guides who were on hand to serve our guests.

FACT: We served 230 guests at the first Hope Connection in 2009 and had 165 volunteers.

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Collaboratives 1,747 Kids at Play Day 3,788 People at Big Rig Night CAN Collaborative

The Child Abuse and Neglect Collaborative (CAN) is working to develop a comprehensive approach to meeting the needs of our local children. The group developed a collective impact model focused on preventing child abuse, supporting families while children are still in their parent’s care, and providing quality services

to children who do enter the child welfare system.

The Early Care and Education Collaborative boasts a long history of engagement with governmental and local nonprofit agencies, school systems, Head Start and other partners. They have tackled topics from brain development to the value of play to mental health needs and issues in early childhood settings.

hosting “The Raising of America,” the PBS documentary on early childhood and the future of our nation.

CAN helped us receive a major grant from the Missouri Foundation for Health to implement the Triple P - Positive Parenting Program in Greene County over the next 3 years.

Early Care & Education Collaborative

The Collaborative also sponsors Community Wide Play Day and Big Rig Night, two annual family events. The 19th annual Community Wide Play Day hosted nearly 1,800 children and This past year, the group worked on families. After only three years, Big Rig aligning a variety of early childhood Night broke attendance records with assessments and spent several months 3,788!

Environmental Collaborative The Environmental Collaborative and its subcommittee, the Ozarks Clean Air Alliance, completed 2016 Action Plans, assisted with the planning and execution of the Choose Environmental Excellence Awards, and continued to provide a platform for discussion and activity around environmental issues. Community Partnership was pleased to receive a Choose Environmental Excellence Award from the Ozarks Clean Air Alliance last year. FACT: More than 650 community members have participated in our Collaboratives 18 since they began.


Collaboratives 28 Hoarding Referrals 6 Hoarding Clean-ups

Housing Collaborative

The Housing Collaborative supported several local events this year, including the statewide housing summit, a landlord training, a tenant training, and an

additional housing seminar. The group has also discussed and weighed in on several other projects, including the revitalization of The Kitchen, Inc.’s campus.

Impacting Poverty Collaborative This year, the Impacting Poverty Collaborative strived to dovetail its activities and goals with all povertyreduction strategies happening throughout our community. The Collaborative is working in tandem with the larger community and moving toward the “Together Springfield� collective impact model. The 2016 Life Betterment Fair, a highlight of the Collaborative, served over 150 people and had over 75 volunteers, 30 employers, and 40 agencies participating. At least 8 onsite interviews and 5 job offers were made at the event.

chieving the

DREAM

Life Betterment Fair

Safe & Sanitary Homes Collaborative The mission of the Safe & Sanitary Homes Collaborative is to ensure the health and safety of all citizens and first responders by educating and empowering our community to address and alleviate hoarding and unsanitary living conditions. In addition to its assessment program, the Collaborative executed a successful hoarding fire demonstration in partnership with the Springfield Fire Department that received national recognition.

FACT: We have facilitated more than 20 Collaboratives over the past 25 years.

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Stand Against Trafficking 215 Professionals Trained 10+ Trainings Stand Against Trafficking is one of our 23 registered coalitions and is comprised of local organizations, businesses, colleges, law enforcement and counselors. The Coalition exists to mobilize the community to end human trafficking.

that are most likely to encounter human trafficking cases. Those four trainings included 38 prosecuting attorneys, 21 local law enforcement officers and detectives, 101 local medical personnel and 55 social service providers.

Stand Against Trafficking has worked for over 4 years to raise awareness in the general community about human trafficking in southwest Missouri, provide education to key community leaders about trafficking, promote collaboration among key leaders, emphasize prevention and to support survivors of human trafficking.

All of the post-training evaluations reported increased knowledge about human trafficking and how to identify and assist victims. In addition, the Coalition hosted several community and outreach events to further educate over 400 individuals in the Springfield community.

The Coalition’s leadership also presented The Stand Against Trafficking Coalition at the Missouri Human Trafficking Task received $5,000 in grant funding this Force meeting with Rep. Elijah Haahr year to provide trainings to four major to provide information for potential sectors of the Greene County community legislation.

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FACT: Stand Against Trafficking is the result of a merge between

a grassroots group and a subcommittee of the Violence Free Families Coalition, which has existed for over 20 years.


Fulbright Springs 42 Families Assisted 91 Community Referrals

Fulbright Springs is a single-family housing development designed to provide safe, affordable, quality housing for families in our community. Affordable housing is about more than a roof over someone’s head — it’s about creating solutions to improve lives and strengthen communities. Our Fulbright Springs partnership implements an innovative model that allows us to offer an array of supportive services, education, and neighborhood development through an onsite social worker who assisted 42 families with nearly 100 referrals to community services.

Through partnerships, we are able to provide fresh produce weekly at Fulbright Springs. One single mom with 2 kids who works 2 jobs was having car problems, but could not afford the repairs. She said moving money from her grocery budget to pay for the repairs was only possible because she could count on us to provide produce last year.

FACT: We have provided supportive services to the Fulbright community in partnership with Housing Plus, LLC, since 2010.

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Springfield Affordable Housing Center 21, 245 Requests for Help 35,356 Online Housing Searches The Springfield Affordable Housing Center (SAHC) provides a centralized access point for housing and homeless services and welcomed 21,245 requests for assistance over the last year. While the demand for services has increased, the local resources to address needs have decreased. Reasons for Request by Category: • Shelter 28% • Affordable Housing 15% • Rent Assistance 12% • Utility Assistance 9% • Food or Food Stamps 8% • Transportation Assistance 12% • Household Goods 6% • Medical, Dental, Mental Health 3% • Miscellaneous 7% We welcomed a new partner at the SAHC,

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Burrell Behavioral Health, which began providing access to mental health services for the homeless, joining the following partners at the SAHC: • Catholic Charities of Southern Missouri • Division of Family Services • Habitat for Humanity • Legal Services of Southern Missouri • Southwest Center for Independent Living • Safelink • Veterans Administration • Missouri Work Assistance Program • Springfield Community Land Trust We also offer an online housing locator, TheAffordableHousingCenter.org, which continues to be a valuable resource for our community. Over the last year, there were 35,356 housing searches on the site.

FACT: Sinced opening in June of 2013, the Springfield Affordable Housing Center has received 49,953 requests for help.


One Door 16,153 Crisis Contacts 1,608 Assessments The One Door program received 16,153 crisis contacts over the last year, completing 1,608 assessments for homeless individuals and families seeking shelter services. Of those, 63% -- a monthly average of 84 -were newly homeless. Last year, One Door teamed up with area businesses, faith communities and veteran service organizations to leverage over $114,000 in contributions to assist with diversion, which attempts to keep people from entering the shelter system. That’s a $10,000 increase from 2015! We are pleased to share two success stories from our Diversion Program. ‘Rob’, a single dad with 2 children, was fleeing domestic violence and working to get to Lebanon where the family had support. One Door was able to locate shelter for them in Laclede County while they worked on housing options. We partnered with St. Vincent de Paul to provide gas and food for the drive to Lebanon. ‘Larry’ is a Vietnam Veteran who has cancer and other disabilities. He was living in his own home, but was behind on utilities. One Door partnered with a local Veteran Service Organization which paid the utilities, so Larry did not get evicted and have to enter the shelter system.

FACT: One Door has had 47,431 crisis contacts and has completed approximately 5,359 assessments over the last 3 years.

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Springfield Community Land Trust 13 Homes 3 Years The Springfield Community Land Trust (SCLT) provides access to affordable home ownership by selling homes to people who are credit-worthy with low to moderate incomes. While buyers own the house, the land beneath their home belongs to the community land trust. The homeowner holds rights to the land by paying a small fee through a leasehold agreement.

Housing Center, the SCLT was recently able to keep a family from becoming homeless. The family – a dad, mom and child – came to the Center for rental assistance as the father had lost his job at at a local restaurant when it closed without any notice.

While there, they connected with the SCLT which had a rental property available within the family’s budget. The stable and secure housing made Soon after, the family moved into their possible by the SCLT enables many new home and was kept from becoming individuals and families to invest in their homeless! own future, improve their financial status and positively contribute to the economic development of the community. Through interoffice and partner collaboration at the Springfield Affordable

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FACT: The Springfield Community Land Trust is listed as a Blue Ribbon in the 2015 Community Focus Report.


National Night Out We continued our collaboration with the Springfield Police Department, SpringfieldGreene County Parks Department and City of Springfield to coordinate National Night Out, a community-wide health and safety event. Over 2,300 people attended National Night Out, with more than 100 volunteers who provided 400 hours of service, and more than 30 vendors provided informational booths with activities for kids.

2,300 Guests 100 Volunteers

Our annual Neighborhood Night Out events, which focus on getting together to get to know your neighbors, had more than 2,500 people across 10 neighborhoods, and over 250 volunteers gave 850 hours of service time.

FACT: Over the past 5 years, more than 12,500 people have attended Springfield’s citywide National Night Out.

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Neighborhood Clean-Ups 163 Tons 979 Households 278 Volunteers Each year the City of Springfield partners with us to fund and facilitate neighborhood clean-ups in city-recognized neighborhoods. These events give Springfield residents the opportunity to dispose of bulky items, such as mattresses, furniture, construction debris, and yard waste not accepted through standard household trash service.

help make our neighborhoods more clean, safe, and friendly. During the last year, we worked with 14 neighborhood associations to host cleanup events. These served a total of 979 households, collecting 163 tons of trash and 34 dumpsters of yardwaste. Additionally, over 11 tons of scrap metal were kept out of the landfill.

Each neighborhood clean-up is a great example of how partnerships between This was possible because of the dedication neighborhood organizations, businesses, of the 278 volunteers who donated 1,065 faith-based partners, and volunteers can hours of time!

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FACT: There have been more than 9,000 households served and over 2,500 tons of trash removed through the neighborhood clean-up program during the past 19 years.


Our Priority Partner We share a common goal with United Way of the Ozarks—addressing critical, red flag issues and improving the quality of life for everyone in our community. We do this by working together, sharing and leveraging resources, and building upon each organization’s strengths and talents, while reducing duplication.

2 Organizations 1 Common Goal

Community Partnership’s key focus areas—resilient children, healthy families and strong neighborhoods & communities align completely with United Way’s key impact areaseducation, income and safety and health, and that’s what makes the partnership so unique and strong.

Together We All Live United! FACT: We share payroll, accounting, human resources and employee benefits with United Way to help save dollars and leverage resources. We make a great team!

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Our Generous Donors $100,000 & up O’Reilly Family Trust *

$10,000 - $19,999 Central Bank of the Ozarks

Charlie & Mary Beth O’Reilly

$5,000 - $9,999 William & Rita Gemme Mercy David O’Reilly

Larry O’Reilly Rosalie O’Reilly Wooten Tal & Rosalie O’Reilly Wooten Family Foundation

Lynn & Karen Thompson SRC

$1,000 - $4,999 Aetna Aldersgate United Methodist Church Bank of Missouri Bear State Foundation BKD, LLP Janice Duncan Gannett GFWC Sorosis Club Springfield

Bud & Betty Greve MOPH Department of Missouri Musgrave Foundation One Tiger Foundation O’Reilly Family Foundation Leslie Peck Eric Peterson Prime, Inc. Queen City Roofing & Contracting

Ridgecrest Baptist Church Stamina Products Lawrence Stock & Angela Myers U.S. Bank Foundation - Grants Program John A. Wyrsch Youngblood Automotive

$500 - $999

Mayor Bob Stephens Campaign Cedars Restaurant City of Springfield Environmental Services Coldwell Banker CoxHealth Dr. Richard Cunningham Herb & Janet Dankert Guaranty Bank Hogan Land Title Co. Housing Plus, LLC

Jarden Plastics Jordan Valley Community Health Center KPM Technology, LLC KY3 Lantz Enterprsies, LLC Liberty Press Joe Loeber Neale & Newman, LLP Nixa First Assembly of God

O’Reilly Auto Parts Peck’s Insurance & Financial Services Professional Answering Service Scott Reynolds Ted Scott The Whitlock Co. Star Wholesale Debbie Shantz-Hart Wesley United Methodist Church

$100 - $499

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Randy Alberhasky Leslie Anderson Lawrence Anderson Harold Bengsch Laura Boatman

Bradford Park Neighborhood Association Scott Brady Broadway United Methodist Church


Our Generous Donors $100 - $499 Cont’d Greg Burris Central Christian Church Conco Companies David Cook Mike DeArmon Patricia Deck Bridget Dierks Wayne Dipper Joy Draeger East Sunshine Church of Christ Christian Neighbor Program Dana Elwell Brad Erwin Shelley Evans Curtis Fay Brian Fogle Heather Ford Susan Gettys

Nancy Gose Alistair & Melissa Haddow Colleen Hardy Jerod & Jacqué Harness Amanda Hedgpeth Hopedale Baptist Church Arnold Jansen KPM CPAs, PC Kurt Larson George & Kathy Latimer Kathleen Laws Joyce Livingston-Schearf Barbara J. Lucks Anne Sallee & Scott Mason Russ Marquart Mark McQueary Don & Joan Menchetti Donna Moore

Up To $100 Mariya Adams Aaron & Amber Allen Jim Arnott Gabriel & Brooke Ash Myron Asher Deborah Baker Rikki Barton Stephanie Basham Holly Beadle Lori Benham Cynthia Bennett Melanie Billman Sherby Blakeney Teresa Bledsoe Michala Boehm Becky Borthwick Amy Bozarth LeeAnn Camey Dana Carroll Will Carter Deborah J. Cartright

Maggie Castrey Mary A. Catlett Trust Christ Episcopal Church Rector Discretional Fund Alan & Kay Church Church of Jesus Christ of LatterDay Saints Ben Clayton Nick & Cheryl Clinton Amanda Coleman Lee Coleman William Conway Krysta Counts Michael Crocker Bethany & Jerry Cunningham Spencer Cunningham Chris & Jayne Davis Lou Davis Gabriel DeCicco Cecilia Deck Mark & Nikki Deck

Becky Morgan Northside Christian Church Lacey Nunnally Paragon Architecture Steve & Raeanne Presley Charla Price Matthew Price Michelle Reinmiller Carl & Barbara Rosenkranz Safe to Sleep Kent & Ann Schaller Society of St. Vincent de Paul of Holy Trinity  Paul Thomlinson The Venues Becky Volz Teresa Young Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church Sarah Deck DeLong Plumbing Allison Duncan Pauletta Dunn Hollie Elliott Jim Farrell Jennifer Fausett Michelle Garand W.P. Garand Brian & Samantha Gipson Abby Glenn Clay Goddard David Greer Samantha Grissom Mandy Hagseth Suzanne Hagseth Braedan Hall Connie Harmon Calvin Harris, Jr. Kim Harris 29


Our Generous Donors Up To $100 Cont’d Gene Hartley Bill & Dawn Hennessey Gregory & Debra Herren Cory & Molly Hill Allison Hocklander Secoy Hodges Preston Ingram Cassandra Jansen Jeremy Jefferson Sarah Jenkins Karissa Jones Michele S. Jones Paul Jones Mike Jungers Chris Kemple Heather Kennedy Kippie Kutz Lisa Langley Donovan Lawson Cindy & Mike Lea Alina Lehnert Bobbie J. Ligon Justin & Noelle Lloyd Denise Lock Natasha Longpine Nick Love, CLU Allen R. & Sheri Lupton Gordon & Barbara Lytle Georgina Manahan Michael Manahan, Jr. Marla Marantz Myra Massey Will & Susie McCrimmons Brent & Kathy McCroskey Alex McNeil

Eugene McNeil Johnny McNeil Melissa McNeil Scott Meier Steve Miller Marty Moore Teresa Morlang Jennifer Nemet Joseph & Diamond Netzer Ashley Nichols Lacey Nichols Wayne Nichols Penelope Nickle North Point Church Jason & Jennifer Pace Caron Parnell David & Julie Peck Thomas R. Peck Barbara Peck John Pierpont Jon Potter Danielle Poulson-Jones Kelli Presley Crystal Quade Jaime Reese Linda Regan Carrie Richardson Missy Riley Anthony Roberts Brit William Robinson Gloria Roling Mary C. Ross Chris Rozier Valery & Jason Rule Loyce Rushen

Michael Scarlett Ann Schroeppel Bob Schroeppel Kerry Schroeppel Amy L. Sharp Jenn Shore Trent Sims Janice Smith Chris Smoot Amanda Stadler Kevin & Trudy Stadler Mike Stevens Lorene H. Stone Mark Struckhoff Eric Sutton Charles & Jan Taylor Kate Thieman James & Barbara Towery Katie Towns Kaleigh Trammel Amy & Joshua Unser Allen & Danell Vaughan Deirdre Vest Robert & Melanie Walker Pepi Wallace James R. Ward Melinda Welch Mary Lu Wheeler Alaina Williams Oliver Williams Scott Williams Theresa Williams Michael Williamson Alia Wilson-Lee

Program Designations

* For the purchase of the O’Reilly Building

 Hope Connection

THANK YOU

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 One Door

to all of our donors for making the difference. Your support is critical to our success, and we could not do it without you!


Budgeting for Impact Community Partnership of the Ozarks, Inc. is an independent 501(c)(3) organization that depends on both grant and donor dollars to fund the critical services we provide. More than 88% of our total funds are from grants and contracts; therefore, the use of these dollars is restricted to specific programs and projects. Our unrestricted funds support general operations as well as the Community Collaboratives, the Springfield Affordable Housing Center, and

Revenues

Early Childhood programs. They also allow us to respond to emerging issues in a timely manner. These funds come from private and corporate donors, fundraisers, and our priority partner, United Way of the Ozarks. We fully realize that most of our funding originates with taxpayers in one form or another, and we use our dollars wisely as intended by our funding sources.

Grants & Contracts 88% $2,660,899

Contributions & Fundraisers 7% $220,756 United Way 3% $86,198

Investment Income 1% $11,123 Miscellaneous & Other 1% $29,985

Expenses

Substance Abuse & Violence Prevention 25% $760,605 Community & Neighborhood Development 14% $415,572

Affordable Housing & Homeless Services 12% $351,616

Early Childhood & Family Development 38% $1,148,934

Administration & Fundraising 9% $265,062

Other Program Services 2% $5,816

31


Our Community Impact 96,559 People Served

9,007 Volunteers

59,344 Volunteer Hours

$1,107,721.07 In-Kind Donations 32


You Make a Difference We need you to help us make a difference in our community! Whether you donate, advocate or volunteer, your support is vital to helping build resilient children, healthy families, and strong neighborhoods & communities.

Donate One of the easiest ways to donate to Community Partnership of the Ozarks is through a financial contribution. Did you know for every Caring Communities dollar received, we leverage another $9.28? That’s a 928% return on your investment! You can donate online at cpozarks.org or call (417) 888-2020 or mail a check to Community Partnership of the Ozarks at 330 N. Jefferson, Springfield, MO 65806. Another way to give -- and keep giving -- is through our Legacy Society and Planned Giving. Gifts to the Legacy Society are acts of hope for the future of our organization and our community.

Volunteer Each year, thousands of volunteers help us serve the community in different ways. They are the lifeblood of our agency, and we couldn’t achieve such positive and measurable outcomes without them.

Join Efforts Like These: • Homeless Prevention • Youth Mentoring • Neighborhood Cleanups • Income Tax Preparation • and More

Advocate When you tell others about the positive impact of Community Partnership of the Ozarks, you are advocating to create the community we all want to live in. So please keep learning, and continue sharing all of the great things we’ve accomplished together because of your support!

Learn more about how you can make a difference! Visit cpozarks.org.

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We’ve been partnering with others to create the community you want to live in for 25 years!

cpozarks.org 330 N. Jefferson Ave. • Springfield, MO 65806 • 417.888.2020

2016 Community Partnership of the Ozarks Annual Report 25th anniversary  

For 25 years, Community Partnership of the Ozarks has facilitated and promoted the building of resilient children, healthy families, and str...

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