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CONTENTS GB Special 2016

FEATURES 8 34 88 118 144

Olympic Cycling The Tour of Britain UK and Ireland Rides Touring Special Velocipedia: How to (Not) Draw a Bike

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Overseas Riding

NEWS 15

Chris Froome to attend ICAP L’Etape London

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Bikes and Horses Share the Roads Safely

REGULARS 28 30

Products: Editor’s Pick Bike Review: Bamboo Bike with Ison

Components

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Book Review: Circus Inside the World of Professional Bike Racing

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Film Review: Milk Race On and On

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Ask Anita: Overcoming Fears

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From the Workshop: Protect your Chainstay Training and Nutrition: Climb Well

GB Special

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Cycling World 6

CYCLE TOURING FROM A NEW PERSPECTIVE The Atlas Mountains, Atlantic Coast, Sahara Desert … Morocco is the ideal place to have an amazing cycling adventure this spring. Hire a bike or bring your own to enjoy the great weather and fantastic landscape of this exotic country on Europe’s doorstep.

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David Robert

ED's LETTER GB Special 2016: Conquering Islands

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e were inspired to produce the GB Special by both The Tour of Britain and my own training for The Deloitte Ride Across Britain- a Land’s End to John O’Groats event. Or, on reflection, we were also inspired by the beauty of our diverse Isles and Teams GB’s impressive track cycling performance in Rio. I hasten to add that it had nothing to do with the Brexit/Remain referendum. There’s a can of worms (is that a product currently regulated by EU law?) that I don’t wish to open. Our frequent forays to cycle in Europe and our partnerships with so many European tour providers no doubt nail our colours to the mast. So you’ll be pleased to know that this GB edition also celebrates overseas cycling with a focus on France and South America, both nestled temptingly in our recent memories having been such wonderful bike race locations. When I was a teacher I tried to explain the difference between England, Great Britain, The United Kingdom and The

British Isles. The latter I referred to as geographical, not political. Perhaps an oversimplification but it did generate a healthy interest in the numerous islands that encircle our mainland. It is an interest that I also detect in cyclists. An island can be cycled around in a definitive time frame, even a long weekend if the island is small enough. An island can be conquered by a cyclist lapping up dramatic coastlines, some challenging climbs and sunsets to marvel at. Cycling World is engaging in some island hopping; this month the Isle of Wight and next month the Channel Islands. And of course an island can be all-conquering, and so we celebrate Team GB’s domination in the Rio velodrome. Great Britain in its entirety offers a challenge, so the hardy amongst you, and those who have the time, might wish to circumnavigate as our very own Anna Hughes did. You just have to get into the routine of “Eat, Sleep, Cycle,” much like the nation’s dedicated athletes.

PUBLISHED BY

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DISTRIBUTED BY:

Cycling World Limited Myrtle Oast

Editor David Robert editor@cyclingworldmag.co.uk

Kemsdale Road, Fostall

Senior Designer Ivan Boyanov

Faversham, Kent

COMAG Tavistock Road, West Drayton Middlesex UB7 7QE

Junior Designer Matthew Head

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FRONT COVER DETAILS:

Tel: 01227 750153 colin@cyclingworldmag.co.uk

ADVERTISING Sales Manager Simon White simon@cyclingworldmagazine.com Sales Executive Alice Allwright

CONTRIBUTORS

Tudor Tamas; Steve and Anni Gregson; Gordon Cairns; Peter Edwards; Anita Powell; Chris Burn; David Robert; Scot Christian; David Wilson-Green; Wendy Johnson; Isidore and Martial Prévalet; Tom Sweeney; Brian Roberts; Stephen Fabes; Keith Gilks; Gianluca Gimini; Tim Ramsden; Nathan Bell.

alice@cplmedia.net Sales Executive Declan Wale

Picture by Alex Whitehead/ SWpix.com - 12/08/2016 - 2016 Rio Olympic Games. Olympic Velodrome. Great Britain's Sir Bradley Wiggins celebrates winning his fifth Olympic Gold medal

dec@cplmedia.media Sales Executive Ryan Graves ryan@cplmedia.net Sales Executive Tom Thorman tom@cplmedia.net

Although every effort is made to ensure the content of features in Cycling World is accurate and correct, the publisher cannot accept responsibility for the veracity of claims made by contributors, manufacturers or advertisers. No guarantees can be made upon the safe return of any unsolicited copy of photographic images. Thepublisher reserves the right to alter or amend any submitted material that is printed in Cycling World. All material in Cycling World is the copyright of the publisher and any reproduction of said material would require written permission from the publisher. ©Cycling World Limited 2015 ISSN: 0143-0238

GB Special

Publisher Colin Woolley

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Olympic Road Race Report A crash on the final descent ended Geraint Thomas’ hopes of an Olympic medal. Lizzie Armistead rides well put misses out on medal PHOTOS BY ALEX WHITEHEAD OF SWPIX.COM

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elgium’s Greg van Avermaet eventually sprinted for gold by the shores of the famous Copacabana beach, nudging Jakob Fuglsang of Denmark and Poland’s Rafal Majka into silver and bronze medal position respectively.

Thomas had looked in with a chance of challenging for the medals after a crash involving two of the lead group, Vincenzo Nibali and Sergio Henao, left the door open to chase the loan leader Majka 10km from the finish. But the Welshman fell victim to the same misfortune almost immediately and eventually finished in 11th, one place ahead of Chris Froome and four clear of Adam Yates.

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“Until the final circuit I thought the guys rode a perfect race. G put himself into the bike race perfectly,” said coach Rod Ellingworth. “In general, great teamwork but it’s just unfortunate the crash happened when it did. I knew from the test event that final descent would be a deciding factor in the race and that’s how it turned out.”

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Rod Ellingworth Team GB coach added: “It was exactly what we thought it would be and was full on all the way. That first break was a really strong group but we knew it wasn’t enough riders to stay away. However, it was a group of quality riders so you had to respect that.” “We had some bad luck with Ian who broke his bike on the cobbles but then Steve did a great job bringing the lads into the first climb. Looking at Geraint he was properly disappointed as he knew that was a real gold medal chance. Chris rode well and left a lot of class bike riders on the climb. But for him it’s about recovery now, looking after him and giving him the best chance for the time trial.”

Men’s road race result: Gold: Greg van Avermaet of Belgium, Silver: Jakob Fuglsang of Denmark, Bronze: Poland’s Rafal Majka Team GB results: Geraint Thomas 11th, Chris Froome 12th, Adam Yates 15th, Steve Cummings DNF, Ian Stannard DNF


Lizzie Armitstead may have fallen short in her quest for a second Olympic medal but she admitted only a miracle could have helped her claim gold on the Copacabana. The women’s road race followed on from the drama of the men’s edition on day one with American Mara Abbott caught within 100m of the line to be pushed into fourth as the Netherlands’ Anna van der Breggen claimed gold in a race marred by Annemiek van Vleuten’s crash on the final descent.

Women’s road race result: Gold: Anna van der Breggan of the Netherlands, Silver: Emma Johansson of Sweden, Bronze: Elisa Longo Borghini of Italy Team GB results: Lizzie Armistead 5th, Emma Pooley DNF, Nikki Harris DNF

Emma Johannson of Sweden took silver with Italy’s Elisa Longo Borghini in bronze while Armitstead’s consolation prize of winning the bunch sprint of the chase group was enough for fifth. “It wasn’t entirely unexpected to be honest,” said the 27-year-old from Otley. “I knew I would need a near miracle to come away with gold medal on this course so I’m happy. “I came up short on the climb. It’s something I’ve been working hard on but that’s sport and what it’s about.

“I had a puncture right at the foot of the first climb which was unfortunate. But again it’s part of sport and one of those things that happens. I’m really grateful to the girls. They did a great job and Nikki [Harris] in particular was a bit of a psychologist on the way. “It’s the Olympic Games and I’m a sports fan. Team GB are going to have some extraordinary performances and I hope that the nation gets behind the team.”

GB Special

“It’s been a hard time but once I get a number on my back I’m an entirely different person and I was totally focused on doing what I do best.

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Olympic Time Trial Report Chris Froome follows up his third Tour de France victory with Olympic time trial bronze. A disappointing ride for Emma Pooley PHOTOS BY ALEX WHITEHEAD OF SWPIX.COM

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roome, who also won bronze at London 2012 in the same discipline, finished the 54.5km course in 1:13:17 hours, over a minute down on winner Fabian Cancellara of Switzerland who also took gold at Beijing 2008. Tom Dumoulin of the Netherlands took the silver medal ahead of Froome, and the Brit said he was proud to come away with a ‘special’ second Olympic bronze medal in Rio. Chris Froome said: “I’ve got no regrets today; I gave it everything I had. Fabian was clearly the strongest guy on the road today. If I’d only come five or ten seconds down on him, I may have been questioning whether he could have gone any faster. But a minute clear of me he was by far the best guy out there. “They were tough conditions. I tried to hold something back for the second lap but I got into it and just didn’t have the legs to really push on. “It’s been an amazing summer. Winning the Tour was a big target for me and I came here to try and back it up. Just to be at the Olympics is really special, but to come away with another medal is even more special.” Reacting to Chris Froome winning a bronze medal in the Olympic time trial, British Cycling’s president, Bob Howden, said:

Men’s Time Trial Result: Gold: Fabian Cancellara of Switzerland, Silver: Tom Dumoulin of the Netherlands, Bronze: GB’s Chis Froome Other Team GB results: Geraint Thomas 9th

“What a fantastic achievement on top of Chris’ third incredible Tour de France win and testament to his absolute dedication to the sport. This is the first medal for Britain’s cyclists and I am sure this result will spur the whole team on ahead of the track programme. Everyone involved in cycling can take pride in this success.”  

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In the women’s race Emma Pooley struggled in the conditions to cross the line with the 14th fastest time. American rider Kristen Armstrong won her third consecutive Olympic Games time trial gold, finishing the 29km course in 44:26:42.

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Pooley said: “We knew there was a chance of rain. With my physiology it’s a bit tougher when there’s a strong, blustery wind like that because it makes it harder to control the bike. But that’s bike racing, you get what you’re given on the day.” Women’s Time Trial Result: Gold: Kristin Armstrong of The United States, Silver: Olga Zabelinskaya of Russia, Bronze: Anna van der Breggen of The Netherlands Team GB results: Emma Pooley 14th


Olympic Track Cycling Team GB dominate in the Velodrome PHOTOS BY ALEX WHITEHEAD OF SWPIX.COM 11AUG: GOLD MEDAL FOR MEN’S TEAM SPRINT Despite winning the event at the two previous Olympic Games, Jason Kenny was the most surprised man in the velodrome after helping Team GB to team sprint gold. Kenny, Philip Hindes, and Callum Skinner clocked a new Olympic record to claim the first track cycling gold medal of the Games, with New Zealand taking silver and France bronze. Kenny commented: “We’ve been going quite well in training so we had a rough idea of what we could do but we surpassed that in that first ride when we set an Olympic record. At that point I thought we could run away with it like London.” Earlier in the evening, both team pursuits squads enjoyed successfully qualifying rides with the women in particular in blistering form, setting a new world record with their opening effort. Laura Trott, Joanna Rowsell Shand, Elinor Barker and Katie Archibald took over 0.4 seconds off their previous best as they came home in 4:13.260.

12 AUG: GOLD MEDAL AND WORLD RECORD IN MEN’S TEAM PURSUIT Sir Bradley Wiggins confirmed himself as the most decorated British Olympian of all time after winning gold in the men’s team pursuit. Wiggins, alongside teammates Steven Burke, Ed Clancy and Owain Doull recorded their second world record of the day in the final as they came home in 3:50.265 to push Australia into second place. Australia led for much of the race but the Team GB quartet reeled their 0.6 second lead back in and overtook the in the final 1000m to clinch gold.

GB Special

The victory means Wiggins now stands alone as the only British athlete to have won eight Olympic medals having claimed five gold, one silver and two bronze.

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13 AUG: TROTT FIRST BRITISH FEMALE TO WIN THREE OLYMPIC GOLDS Laura Trott became the first British female to win three Olympic gold medals as Team GB’s women’s team pursuit outfit broke the world record yet again to retain their Olympic title. The third Olympic gold of Trott’s career took her past the likes of Victoria Pendleton, Charlotte Dujardin and Rebecca Adlington, all of whom have won two Olympic titles during their careers. Trott along with Joanna Rowsell Shand, Katie Archibald and Elinor Barker knocked almost two seconds off the new World Record time they set in the morning session to beat the USA in the final. The time of 4.10.236 minutes was enough to finish in front of the Americans by over two seconds. Rebecca James made it a doubly special afternoon with silver in the women’s keirin.

14 AUG: JASON KENNY RETAINS SPRINT CROWN Jason Kenny triumphed in the battle of the Brits to retain his individual sprint crown, beating Callum Skinner to win a fifth Olympic title. He becomes only the third cyclist to defend his sprint title, the first since 1996, and Kenny now joins Sir Bradley Wiggins and Sir Steve Redgrave on five career Olympic titles.

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In the men’s omnium, Mark Cavendish sits third overall after three of the six events. Mark’s results in Men’s Omnium are: sixth in the scratch race, second in the individual pursuit, seventh in the elimination race. Rod Ellingworth, coach, said: “He right where we want him to be. He’s still in with a shout [of a medal] and there’s still all to race for.”

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Becky James and Katy Marchant also safely navigated qualifying and the first round of the women’s sprint to move forward into the next rounds.


15 AUG: MARK CAVENDISH WINS FIRST OLYMPIC MEDAL AFTER OMNIUM SILVER Mark Cavendish claimed his first Olympic medal after winning silver in the men’s omnium. Cavendish held off the charge of Denmark’s Lasse Hansen in a dramatic points race - the last of the six disciplines. Italy’s Elia Viviani took gold and Hansen bronze. "We have got the best bike riders in the world but what’s been forgotten the past few days is we have the best staff behind us…I needed those people in what was my third ever international omnium.” Elsewhere, Laura Trott’s dominance of the women’s omnium continues as the defending champion leads at the halfway mark after wins in the individual pursuit and her favoured elimination race. Trott, who is looking to become the first British female to win four Olympic titles, sits on 118 points after three events - eight clear of Belgium’s Jolien D’Hoore.

16 AUG: MEDALS CONTINUE WITH FOUR MORE COMING ON A DRAMATIC FINAL NIGHT THAT SAW LAURA TROTT AND JASON KENNY BOTH WIN GOLD Trott dominated the women’s omnium, coming first or second in each of the first five events before marking her nearest rivals Sarah Hammer (USA) and Jolien d’Hoore (Belgium) to ensure the gold. “What I did at London 2012 was incredible and I was so so proud. So to come back and to it again is unbelievable,” she said. Jason Kenny, meanwhile, took his third gold of the Games to match Sir Chris Hoy’s record of six. The Bolton sprinter mirrored Hoy’s Beijing performance by adding the keirin title to his team and individual sprint golds.

It wasn’t all about the golden couple Kenny and Trott, though as Becky James and Katy Marchant pushed Team GB’s track cycling medal tally winning silver and bronze respectively in the women’s sprint. James beat her keirin vanquisher Elis Ligtlee (Netherlands) in the semi-final to set up a clash with Kristina Vogel (Germany), who beat Marchant. But James went down 2-0 to Vogel to take silver, while Marchant ousted Ligtlee to claim her first Olympic medal, having only switched to cycling from heptathlon in 2013. The medals take the track team to a total of eleven having won a medal in every event entered in the velodrome. Chris Froome’s time trial bronze gives cycling twelve medals from Rio 2016.

GB Special

“I was there in Beijing when Chris rocketed to stardom,” said Kenny. “He was already an Olympic champion, but when he won those three medals, to me it was really special. To be doing the same thing eight years later is an incredible feeling.”

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Chris Froome to attend ICAP L’Etape London

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hris Froome, three times winner of the world’s most famous cycle race, will be joining thousands of amateur cyclists at ICAP L’Etape London by Le Tour de France on Sunday 25 September. Riders still have the opportunity to enter England’s only official Le Tour de France sportive and ‘have their day in yellow’. As well as great riding, cyclists will enjoy a number of Le Tour de France experiences similar to the professionals. On the day at ICAP L’Etape London by Le Tour de France, Chris Froome will be meeting riders before they start, giving advice at one of the feed stations and on route, and handing out medals to those who complete the ride. You may even be able to grab a photo with Chris on the podium, which is an exact replica of the one used during Le Tour de France, something he is used to standing atop.

Nick Rusling, CEO of organisers Human Race Events, said “In recent years Chris has won the hearts of the British public with his spectacular performances and winning attitude. Having somebody of his calibre attend on 25 September will add an extra sprinkle of Le Tour magic to this already very special event, I can’t think of anybody I’d rather have supporting ICAP L’Etape London by Le Tour de France than Chris Froome.” With demand high riders are advised to enter fast. To find out more and to register for ICAP L’Etape London by Le Tour de France visit www.letapelondon.co.uk

GB Special

Those wishing to ride ICAP L’Etape London by Le Tour de France can choose from 42, 92 and 117 mile routes, which follow many of the same roads from stage three of the 2014 tour – when it began in the UK. The start and finish is the iconic Lee Valley VeloPark, instantly recognisable from the 2012 Olympic Games. To add to the authentic Le Tour de France atmosphere the famous red Skodas will be on display, along with official Le Tour number bibs, directional signs and museum. Those of a competitive nature can set a time around the final closed road kilometre, with the fastest appropriately winning the official Le Tour de France green sprinters jersey. The inaugural 2015 event sold out its 3,500-person capacity, with great demand expected again in 2016.

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The Cycle Show Celebrates 15th Anniversary With Biggest Ever Event

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fter a record breaking number of bike companies took part in 2015, the Cycle Show at the NEC in Birmingham (September 23 – 25, 2016) has expanded adding a new hall for the crowd-pleasing mountain-bike dirt jumping contest and the addition of a new electric mountain bike track where you’ll be able to test ride the latest Bosch powered Cube off roaders. It also means there will be extra space for the show’s retail village and even more bike brands showcasing their latest products. Joining the exhibitor line-up for 2016 is US giant Cannondale who are appearing at the Cycle Show for the first time. One of the pioneering brands of the UK mountain bike scene, Orange bikes from Sheffield, will also be making its debut at the show. Merckx bikes, from legendary five-time Tour de France winner Eddy Merckx, have recently launched an extended range of models across Europe and are certain to be another major showstopper. New to the UK and appearing at the show for the first time are direct-to-public brand Radon from Germany, Orbita from Portugal and Megamo bikes from Spain. Isla bikes also make their first appearance at the show and will be running an indoor kids’ track where children can try out their bikes and get advice on the perfect model. They join the biggest line-up of bike and accessory brands in the country including Cube, Canyon, Ribble, Planet-X, Trek, Bianchi, Colnago, Boardman, Whyte, KTM, Hope, SRAM, Lazer, FSA, Shimano, Cinelli, Kinesis, Ritte, Primal, Pinarello, Schwalbe, Deda, Lapierre, Mondraker, Storck, Condor, Campagnolo and many more. With e-bikes becoming ever more popular, it’s not a surprise to see that the show’s eBike Village has grown again with a major new presence from Shimano Steps. The 800m outdoor eBike track was the most visited of the four test tracks at the show last year and you’ll find over 100 different models to try out this time. With this year’s show coming hot on the heels of the Rio Olympics, visitors can also expect to see a stellar line-up of medal winners, current pro riders and legends of the sport at the NEC including the likes of Rob Warner, Stephen Roche and Condor’s Ed Clancy who will be going for gold in Rio on the Track in the Team Pursuit. There’s also a new women’s cycling-focused area hosted by VeloVixen. Alongside their megastore, you’ll be able to meet and chat with riders, bloggers and female brand and product experts. As an official partner of the Cycle Show, Cycling World readers save an extra 10% off tickets to the show when booking in advance. Simply head to the Cycle Show website, click the book tickets button and enter ‘cycwld’ when prompted to redeem this offer. To view the full exhibitors list and for more details about the 2016 Cycle Show visit the new event website at http://www.cycleshow.co.uk/


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Levelling the Playing Field ‘But everywhere I look the stands and products are black and shiny – there’s nothing for women!’

VeloVixen Founder Liz’s first reaction to a walk around a major cycling show.

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t’s been a few years since Liz went to her first cycling show, and much has changed.

Manufacturers have wised up to the fact that there’s a massive market of female cyclists out there who are passionate about cycling and willing to invest in it. Cycling shows are brighter, airier, and just more fun to be at than in the days when everything seemed targeted at the male die-hard fanatic/cycling geek (delete as appropriate). Even the coffee is better. So why is it that organisers of cycling exhibitions large and small still struggle to attract a female audience proportionate to the huge numbers of women riding regularly? Yes, perhaps some stands could be accused of undercooking their female offering. We’re hesitant to blame them, because they know what sells best and we know that floor space is finite.

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You might also say (warning: generalisation ahead) that women lead busy lives and can’t commit to spending a day at a cycling show. Or that they’d rather be riding their bikes than looking at products. Fair enough.

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But the biggest factor mentioned to us time and again is the shortage of high quality female speakers. Historically, female speakers have been as rare as clean Russian athletes. And that’s despite a plethora of inspirational, engaging women to invite who ought to have been an organiser’s dream.

That’s all changing now. The Cycle Show is the UK’s biggest cycling show of the year. Yet the organisers were the first to admit that they’ve never sold enough tickets to women. So when we suggested an area devoted specifically to women’s cycling they wasted no time in agreeing to work with us. From September 22nd to 25th, we’ll be running the VeloVixen Women’s Cycling Hub – a 1200 sq.ft. area devoted to more than just retail (although there’ll be some tasty delights on offer!). Almost half of the area will be given over to a mouthwatering list of speakers. We’re bringing together some of the best known names in cycling (think Olympic medallists) together with some lesser known but no less engaging characters. The things they’ll all have in common are a passion for cycling, bags of energy, strong opinions and inspirational tales. There’ll be presentations, panels of speakers, Q&A sessions and demonstrations. And we can guarantee a fantastic buzz of enthusiasm in every corner of our stand, which we hope will emanate throughout the show. In short, if you’re a woman hesitating about coming to the NEC, hesitate no longer! You’ll be fully represented and we intend to make it worth your while. The winds of change are blowing into the world of cycling shows… VeloVixen is the UK’s Leading Specialist in Women’s Cycling Kit www.velovixen.com


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GB Velo Special Vixen


Bikes and Horses

SHARE THE ROADS SAFELY The British Horse Society Campaigns for Cyclists and Horse Riders to Respect One Another

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here is an increasing demand on the same amount of tarmac, by more and more road users, all looking for somewhere safe to ride. A great deal of focus in cities and towns rightly goes to cyclists who are extremely vulnerable as they go about their daily commute, but in open countryside, it’s another story. There is another group of riders that have been around for hundreds of years, who now share the same space as cyclists, and many of the problems, and that’s horse riders. There is no doubt that horse riders share the same dangers as cyclists so it makes good sense that courtesy, consideration and care are shown to each other. Our horses and your bikes are expensive acquisitions. Neither of us wishes them to be damaged. Our horses, however, are living, breathing creatures, and add another brain to the situation. Both horse and rider may feel fear in a stressful situation – the horse is a creature of fright and takes flight when it’s stressed. That’s when the problems can start for everyone. So, here are some key points that will ensure cyclists and horse riders can share the road and off -road routes together: •

Horses are creatures of fright and flight – It could

be a plastic bag in the hedge, sudden reflection from a gel wrapper, or the sudden appearance of your bike that causes the horse to shy into your path, particularly if it’s a young or inexperienced horse. •

Everyone needs to take personal responsibility for their own actions – If riding in an event, let’s make sure everyone in the vicinity knows it’s happening, give some timescale and duration. The British Horse Society can add your event to its website if they have advance details. Local equestrians can contact you directly. Most cycling events require police permission to run – share the information to a wider audience. Many horse riders have cyclists in their family so we could all win some new recruits.

Approaching a horse and rider? Calling out ‘hello’ before you get too close will be appreciated. Before you pass, ask if it’s safe and call again if the rider doesn’t respond. If the horse appears to be unsettled, give the rider chance to calm the horse and move out of your way. Be patient; if you are asked to wait a minute, please stay back until it’s clear for you to pass. Singling out and slowing down is truly welcomed. All


Everyone wearing hi-viz clothing is a great help – Being seen much sooner really helps. Hi-viz clothing has been proven to allow up to three seconds longer for a vehicle to see a rider, either cyclists or horse-riders. Riding off-road can provide as many challenges as riding on the road. Keep a sharp look out for horse riders, and call out so that they know you are there. Give them a chance to move out of your way. A speeding cyclist coming out of the blue can easily startle a horse. If a horse rider asks you to stop or slow down please do so.

Please don’t be tempted to cut up the inside. Most ridden, or carriage driven horses will be used to going out on the roads, with all types of vehicles passing them on the right hand side. They will not be used to bicycles passing them on the left.

Finally – we are both vulnerable road users and with care, courtesy and consideration we can both enjoy our riding.

GB Special

horse riders are really grateful for your help and consideration.

25


Cycle and raise money for those affected by a rare neuro-genetic condition

T

he Neuro Foundation supports families who are affected by a neuro-genetic condition, Neurofibromatosis (NF). Every day a baby is born in the UK with NF, there are over 25,000 people in the UK affected by this condition. There is no cure and we have no Government funding. The money we raise goes towards funding our Specialist Advisors who provide valuable support to children and adults in their homes, schools and hospital clinics. The Neuro Foundation has a number of Bond places and we would love you to cycle for us and be part of our Team 2017. The Prudential RideLondon event is the world’s greatest cycling festival; you will be joining over 25,000 other cyclists. To be involved all you have to do is train, get fit and have fun whilst raising money and awareness for families affected by Neurofibromatosis. On the day the atmosphere is absolutely brilliant; you will be cheered along the 100 mile route, passing Buckingham Palace to finish triumphantly on The Mall! Fundraising can be daunting but we are here to support you on your journey. We are also very proud to offer our Prudential RideLondon Team a new and exciting fundraising experience through Everydayhero UK which enables you to set up your own personally tailored fundraising page. One of the benefits is that through Everydayhero you can connect your account to Strava or MapMyFitness smartphone apps so that your sponsors can follow all your training efforts which will in turn generate more fundraising!

Cycling World

So, your friends, family and colleagues can now visit our Prudential 2017 campaign page at http://everydayhero. co.uk/event/nfaukridelondon2017 and begin supporting straight away!

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If you would like a guaranteed place in next year’s RideLondon event and would really like to make a difference to a family, please raise money for this very small national charity and support The Neuro Foundation. £100 pays for one day of a Specialist Advisor’s time. For more information please contact fundraising@nfauk.org and be part of a very special event. Thank you so much.


Don’t limit your

challenges... ...Challenge your limits

RIDE IN AN OLYMPIC SLIPSTREAM You could be one of over 25,000 cyclists taking on a 100 mile challenge. Cycle through the urban landscapes of London and the rural beauty of Surrey Hills on a route based off the London 2012 Olympic Road Race.

Join The Neuro Foundation’s Team for the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100 to #RideforNF and challenge your limits on the big day 30th July 2017.

Visit www.nfauk.org for more information or contact us at: 020 8439 1234 Fundraising@nfauk.org

The Neuro Foundation

There are calf-burning climbs and beautiful scenery as you approach the finish line on the Mall in London. IMPROVE YOUR FITNESS & FIGHT NF Cycling is an amazing way to get fit, and is not defined by age. Some of the best cyclists are over 60, and some of them are under 30! It doesn’t matter how fancy your bike is or how you train – crossing the finish line is the only objective and raising funds to fight Neurofibromatosis is the end goal.

@TheNeuroFdn @TheNeuroFdn

The Neuro Foundation HMA House (Suites 7-10) London SW20 0TL 020 8439 1234 info@nfauk.org

Charity No. 1078790 & SC045051 Company reg. No. 03798407 The Neuro Foundation is the working name of The Neurofibromatosis Association which is a Registered Charity.

GB Special

#RIDEFORNF

It doesn’t matter if you are a seasoned club cyclist or a keen amateur, this is the perfect challenge to sink your teeth into.

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PRODUCT

EDITOR’S PICK Burley Piccolo Trailercycle £350 Family cycle touring revisited! I am really enjoying the freedom that this have given me to take the young lad further afield. Now four and a half, and a cyclist himself, he rides this trailercycle confidently. It could equally be used to train cycling especially as it is 7-speed, so initially it offers a controlled environment to learn about gears and then efficient pedalling for your young riding buddy. It is impressively upright and stable with 20” inch wheels and ingenious hitch system on a Burley Moose Rack (included). It will last well with an 85lb capacity and welladjustable seat and handlebars. Lightweight aluminium frame weighing 20lbs with rack, so keep the child pedalling and trim and you’ll be able to take him/her up Ventoux. www.raleigh.co.uk

Ekoï Reverso: Reversable Vest £111.75 A French brand producing a reversible vest (also available as jacket) with both black and fluorescent green wear. For use in temperature range 8-18 °C, it provides good protection against cold and rain. It is 86% Polyester and 14% Spandex, making it comfortable, waterproof and breathable. Both jacket and vest have side pockets and come in sizes S-XXXL. www.ekoi.com

Cycling Cycling World World

Copper 88: Compression Top £39.99

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This compression top uses 88% embedded copper to aid muscle relief as reportedly it transports oxygen through the bloodstream to affected areas. Being embedded it remains after washing. It is certainly lightweight and comfortable, and features antibacterial and anti-odour qualities, as well as protecting against UV rays and providing fast wicking. Available as joint supports, as well as women’s and men’s gloves, socks, short and long sleeve shirts, and undershorts. Products range in price from £12.99 to £39.99. www.copper88-uk.co.uk


Hiplok DX £69.99 Hiplok are well-known for their stylish and reliable locks. The DX follows the mould: it is a wearable D-lock that fits belts and bag straps and weighs only 1250 grams. Though a slim profile (14mm hardened steel shackle), it still offers maximum security with a Gold Sold Secure rating. It offers a decent shackle area of 15cm with 8.5cm internal area and dual locking tabs. Additional features include coded key replacement and a waterproof key seal. Available in black, red and orange. www.hiplok.com

Scicon: Race Rain Bag £95 Don’t let the name limit you, we have used this for sportives and general riding. It has several compartments which are all specifically labelled to place items of clothing you need for a ride. Thus it has space for your shoes and covers, warmers (arm and leg), gloves, helmet, jersey and jacket. No more fumbling around in the rucksack! You can even personalize it with your name and flag.

Dimensions

L 37cm x D 24cm x H 21cm. It weighs 450 grams

uk.sciconbags.com

With lens type Chromafusion® 2.0 this eyewear protects against low to high sun glare with light-reacting photochromic lenses of 1-3 sun rating. We have used comfortably from early in the morning until dusk. Good all round protection with panoramic lenses, anti-fog technology and a water-repellent feature. They are comfortable as made of lightweight polycarbonate with a flexible rubber nose pad and sleeves. Have proved to be robust and impact resistant. Available in black, white and pink. sunwise.co.uk

GB Special

Sunwise Sunglasses Wellington £69.99

29


Bike Review: Bamboo Bike Club Frame with Ison Distribution Components

I

f you caught the bamboo feature in our May issue, I'm going to assume you've been camping outside your newsagent to find out whether the few bits of grass (yes, it's a grass) I glued together could be turned from a frame into a 'bike'. Spoiler alert if the photos aren't a clue: yes, they can. Firstly, the excellent folk at Ison helped me put together a bunch of lovely parts and didn't laugh too hard when I asked about bar-end shifters. Secondly, it is a bike frame; the more I ride it the more I forget why people glance quizzically as I ride past. As it's a road bike frame, I tried to keep it so; but the thing is that almost anything will fit, especially if you've thought about it at the build stage. Fat tyres for gravel? Space the chainstays further apart. Funky cable routing? Five minutes making some bamboo cable stops. I'm pleased at how 'together' the complete bike looks – natural rawness seems to give the titbits of red anodising a jewel-like appearance.

Cycling World

I couldn't deny being slightly terrified as I mounted for the first time. There was a genuine possibility (so I imagined) of anything from the bottom bracket shell to the dropouts well... dropping out. Apprehension faded with the first few bunny-hops: lucky, as I'd arranged a pleasant 60-mile route around Kent the next day.

30

As I rolled gently from Canterbury station to meet a fellow rider, the 'initial impression' senses were feeling for everything that we like to talk about in bike reviews: BB stiffness, steering precision, geometry, comfort etc. It felt quite like a good steel frame, with a definite damping effect on the chewed up tarmac for which Kent should probably be infamous. Our route took us South, at first on bumpy lanes with short climbs. That smooth ride was definitely a sum of the build – chiefly Halo's Evaura wheels and Twin Rail Courier tyres. The Evauras ooze smart understatement in black. They balance comfort and snappiness, steering and accelerating well. Lightness certainly helps, and these are bang-on at a shade over 1500g. New-school 24mm rim width gives room for tyres to breeze over potholes, especially the 29c (yes, 29c – you can have 24c as well!) Couriers. The

tyre rolls on two 'rails', which effectively isolate the rest of the carcass from road contact unless cornering, even at low pressure. Even at 50psi, it was only my friend remarking I looked “a little soft” (gee, thanks!) that prompted me to pump up. The combo has proved durable too: the only truing I've had to do was after a nasty pothole which left bike and myself in a heap on the grass verge. At least the bike felt at home! Wending our way past Hythe and along the coast to Dymchurch, the roads smoothed out and widened. Even with only one chainring, I didn't run out of gears on the wide ratio 11-34 cassette and the 9-speed SunRace SLR R9 shifter and RDR9 mech worked well together. I could have gone for a 10 or 11 speed but I honestly felt it wasn't necessary. We picked up speed with a following wind, the bamboo stable thanks to the stiff Genetic fork, sorted head angle and generous hemp binding on the headtube. The fork was a bit of a gamble – I wasn't convinced carbon would be right but it looks great, with a subtle aero profile and clean graphics. Genetic might be Ison's 'house' brand but they've certainly put the time in getting things right. I couldn't fault any of their components. The stem and bars are another neat package, nicely contoured and stiff with a split clamp and durable stainless hardware. The silicone bar tape is the best I have ever used, offering huge grip and comfort. Brilliantly, as it sticks without glue, if it wears on the outside you could just unravel it and wrap it inside out! Pushing hard on the flat or uphill, there was definitely a little give at the BB, a gentle reminder you're riding something that was alive not long ago, instead of inert carbon stiffness. It's not crazy light, but comparable to a good quality alloy bike. That slight weight and stiffness penalty in exchange for day-long comfort and head-turning looks (that a hundred carbon or alloy bikes will never have) seems a fair swap to me. There are people out there creating carbon-light bamboo frames, but at wallet-beating prices. At less than £1000 for this build, however, you'll be forgiven for wondering why there's not one on every Sunday ride in the country.


SPECIFICATIONS

all components from Ison Distribution

GB Special

Forks: Genetic Karyotype Headset: Dia-Compe CB2 Stem: Genetic SLR Bars: Genetic Creed Tape: Genetic Silicone Tape Levers: Dia-Compe Evo Brakes: Dia-Compe BRS-101 Seatpost: Genetic Heritage Seat: Gusset R-Series Black Jack Cranks: Sturmey-Archer FCSX External Chain: Gusset GS9 Mech: SunRace RDR9 Wheels: Halo Evaura Tyres: Halo

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Cycling World Bamboo Bike Club Frame with Ison Distribution Components


LOCK | LIGHT | CLIP

1M

3 DIGIT COMBI LOCK

R E T R A C TA B L E CABLE

10 LUMEN LIGHT OUTPUT

I N T E G R AT E D UNIVERSAL CLIP

1M LOCKING DIAMETER

LIGHT WITH FLASH MODE

GB Special

In t roduc ing t h e H i p l o k F L X , a 1 m r e tr a cta b le ste e l ca b le co m b i nati on l ock w i th a n int egrat e d 1 0 l u m e n r e a r L ED lig h t. F e a tu r in g CL IP + RIDE, i t can be w orn i n a jers ey p o c k e t o r o n a b a g str a p . T h e F L X o ffe r s se curi ty and safety, g i ving y ou p e a c e o f m i n d o n r id e s wh e n o n ly th e e sse n tial s are needed.

33 HIPLOK FLX

|

RETRACTABLE CABLE LOCK WITH INTEGRATED LIGHT

|

CLIP + RIDE SYSTEM

|

AVAILABLE IN BLACK OR WHITE

|

HIPLOK.COM


Cycling World 34

Photo by SweetSpot


The Tour of Britain

35

GB Special

Cycling World celebrates Britain’s largest free-to-watch sporting event by inspiring you to ride the regions covered by the Tour. Re-launched in 2004 after a five-year absence from the calendar, the Tour of Britain is British Cycling's premier road cycling event giving cycling fans the opportunity to see the world's best teams and riders competing on their doorstep. It is the UK's highest ranked professional stage race and is covered live on ITV4. Enjoy the best of British Cycling!

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The Tour of Britain This year's Tour of Britain will feature ten of the UCI's top level WorldTour teams for the first time ever, with top tier teams making up half the field for this year’s Tour, which takes place from Sunday 4 to Sunday 11 September

A

Spanish Caja Rural – Serguros RGA team, from whom Preston's Hugh Carthy rides, and the Belgian Wanty – Groupe Gobert team, who include former SKODA King of the Mountains Mark McNally. Having won both the Yodel Sprints and SKODA King of the Mountains jerseys with Peter Williams in 2015, ONE Pro Cycling return for their second Tour of Britain, their first as a UCI ProContinental team. Commenting on the line-up, Tour of Britain Race Director Mick Bennett said; "This is a world-class line-up of teams entirely befitting of the Tour of Britain's continuing growth in stature and importance on the global cycling calendar. Half of the teams selected raced in the Tour de France, giving British fans a taste of the high-level of competition which they can look

forward to watching this September.” Jonny Clay, British Cycling director of cycle sport and membership, said: "The fact that ten World Tour teams have confirmed their place on the start line in Glasgow at this year's Tour of Britain is a fantastic endorsement and underlines the strong reputation that the event now holds within an ever increasingly competitive international calendar. We are greatly looking forward to the spectacle of a world class peloton racing on British roads this September.” It will be the largest number of UCI WorldTour teams to compete in Britain at any point since the Tour de France Grand Depart in 2014.

Cycling World

mong those teams will be Team Dimension Data, who won the 2015 Tour of Britain with Edvald Boasson Hagen and now also boast Mark Cavendish, who won four sprint stages at this year’s Tour de France. They will be joined by the likes of regular Tour of Britain participants Team Sky, Movistar Team, BMC Racing Team and Cannondale Drapac, while Team Giant Alpecin, Orica BikeExchange and Trek Segafredo return having not competed in 2015. Team WIGGINS will also race, with Sir Bradley Wiggins having already publicly stated that he intends to ride the Tour of Britain following the Rio de Janeiro Olympics. Two UCI ProContinental teams will be making their Tour of Britain debuts – the

36

by SweetSpot


1

GLASGOW TO CASTLE DOUGLAS SUNDAY 4 SEPTEMBER

2

DENBIGH TO BUILTH WELLS WEDNESDAY 7 SEPTEMBER

CARLISLE TO KENDAL MONDAY 5 SEPTEMBER

4 3

5 BRISTOL INDIVIDUAL TIME TRIAL BRISTOL CIRCUIT RACE SATURDAY 10 SEPTEMBER

7

CONGLETON TO TATTON PARK, KNUTSFORD TUESDAY 6 SEPTEMBER

ABERDARE TO BATH THURSDAY 8 SEPTEMBER

8

SIDMOUTH TO HAYTOR, DARTMOOR FRIDAY 9 SEPTEMBER

GB Special

6

THE LONDON STAGE PRESENTED BY TFL SUNDAY 11 SEPTEMBER

#ToB2016

tourofbritain.co.uk

© CROWN COPYRIGHT AND/OR DATABASE RIGHTS 2016 OS

37


Scotland: MTB in Glasgow With the Tour of Britain starting in Glasgow on Sunday 4 September we feature the Glasgow MTB Waterways Loop, courtesy of a New Cicerone Guide

Cycling World

T

38

he NCR 756 follows the Kelvin Walkway northwest from Glasgow city centre alongside the eponymous river, winding its way between wooded embankments to cross the A81 by the West of Scotland Science Park. The Kelvin is rejoined on the edge of a housing estate, although it soon gains a more rural feel. The Kelvin is left behind and after a brief road section the Allander Walkway is followed into Milngavie. The route then heads north along the WHW through Mugdock Country Park and past Carbeth before descending into Strath Blane. From here the route turns east beneath the mighty escarpment of the Campsie Fells to Strathblane. (An alternative, shorter route between Carbeth and Strathblane is also described.) The Strathkelvin Railway Path is followed from Strathblane to Lennoxtown alongside the Pow Burn and the Glazert Water before the route strikes out across country, climbing over Blairskaith Muir on narrow lanes. A long descent along metalled tracks, rugged paths, winding lanes and surfaced trails delivers you to Cadder on the Forth and Clyde Canal for the ride back into Glasgow to rejoin the Kelvin Walkway by Maryhill Locks, where the outward route is rejoined.

Directions

1. Follow the Kelvin Walkway as it wiggles its way N alongside the River Kelvin, following signs for Milngavie. After 5km the walkway climbs towards the Maryhill Road, but turn sharp left

Start/Finish

Boer War Memorial, Kelvingrove Park NS 572 665

Distance

54km (33½ miles); variant: 50.5km (31½ miles)

On road

8km (5 miles); variant: 6.5km (4 miles)

Off road

46km (28½ miles); variant: 44km (27½ miles)

Ascent

748m (2455ft); variant: 686m (2250ft)

Grade

Medium

Time

3½–4½hrs

Maps

OS Explorer 342 Glasgow, 348 Campsie Fells;

OS Landranger 64 Glasgow

Pub

Blane Valley Inn, Blanefield

Café

Cafe Barga, Lennoxtown

on a tarmacked track through woods. Follow the track for 500m to arrive at a road then turn right to follow it through the West of Scotland Science Park. At a T-junction turn right, exit the Science Park and continue straight over the roundabout on the A81 Maryhill Road. Take the RH fork at a mini-roundabout to continue along Acre Road. Keep straight onto a tarmacked footpath then turn left after 300m onto a small path (no signpost), which leads back to the Kelvin. 2. Follow the riverbank NE on a singletrack path (sometimes muddy and/or overgrown), soon emerging from the trees as the river winds its way through open countryside. After 2km the path reaches the A879. Leave the riverside path as the next section is largely unrideable. Turn left and stick to the pavement along the roadside for 1.25km, turning first left off a roundabout (stay on the grass verge) before crossing with care where a road bridge crosses the Allander Water. 3. Continue along the pavement for 150m then turn right around a gate and continue along an embankment a short way. Go through a gate and turn left to continue along the Allander Walkway riverside path. Cross a footbridge to the opposite bank before crossing back and continuing until the  A81 

is reached on the outskirts of Milngavie. Turn left under the railway bridge then cross the road and follow the path uphill (Allander Way signpost) and continue to traffic lights at a junction. Turn right onto the B8030 and continue for 500m to another set of traffic lights at a junction. Turn left onto Ellangowan Road and follow it round to a paved area on the left with a WHW sign; leave the road here to join the WHW. 4. Follow signs for Mugdock and the WHW, keep SA at a path junction, pass under a footbridge and keep straight on where a path bears left to the library. The path continues through woods then emerges by a bridge over the Allander Water right; bear and continue alongside the burn (watch out for dog walkers), soon looking out for a signpost on the right where the WHW climbs suddenly and steeply away from the river. At the top of the climb turn left at a T-junction, following the WHW. The path broadens and continues through Mugdock Wood. 5. Pass around a metal barrier onto a road; turn left then jink right again on the WHW. Continue along the metalled track, skirting Scroggy Hill and soon passing to the left of Craigallian Loch. At a fork bear right, descending then climbing a little past a collection


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Aldershot

A287

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Bracknell

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Salisbury

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Burford

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Shepton Mallet

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Boston

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Towcester Silverstone

Banbury

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Melksham

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Bradfordon-Avon

66 A3 A3 62

M45

A14

1 18

13

Moretonin-Marsh

A44

Cotswolds Cirencester

Chippenham

A365

14

A427

Rothwell

19

Royal Leamington Daventry A425 Spa 12

Chipping Campden

A417

Lyneham

A420

A45

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18

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Street

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71

SOMERSET

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Blackdown Hills

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A396

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8

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Stamford

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Yate

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17 18a 18

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CITY OF BRISTOL

Mendip Hills

M5

A396

A39

A3

28

21

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16

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Burnhamon-Sea Bridgwater Bay

A3

M4

N SOMERSET

Westonsuper-Mare

A39

20

21

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A4135 Nailsworth Dursley 33 Tetbury A4

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M5 SOUTH GLOUCESTERSHIRE Malmesbury

A403

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Kenilworth

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Chalford

A419

Thornbury

2

M49

Avonmouth

Clevedon

Barry

Wellington 27

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A48(M)

CARDIFF

Taunton

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Wigston Uppingham A6

Coventry A4

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Oakham

A47

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M69

Stratford- Wellesbourne upon-Avon A422

Brockworth

GLOUCESTERSHIRE Stroud

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A4

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3

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Leicester

CITY OF 21a LEICESTER

28

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Broadway

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M6 A45

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Stow-onthe-Wold Cheltenham

11

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72 30

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25a 26 25

27 28

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Tiverton

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Launceston

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A48

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L CH A

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Alcester

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607

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Donington

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A46

A6

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Sleaford

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Loughborough

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Ross-on-Wye

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Pontypool Caerphilly

THE VALE OF GLAMORGAN

EXMOOR

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Hartland Point

A39

M4

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Bridgend Cowbridge

Lynton

Ilfracombe

North Devon

Pencoed

37

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Barnstaple or Bideford Bay Northam

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Malvern Hills

Ledbury

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Grantham

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Spilsby

Woodhall Spa

A52

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Ibstock

Atherstone

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CITY OF NOTTINGHAM

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Horncastle

Ruskington

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Mablethorpe

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Wragby

Metheringham

Fulbeck

A1

Lowdham

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North Somercotes Louth

LINCOLNSHIRE

Waddington

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National Forest

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Lincoln

Nottingham

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Ilkeston

Derby

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Great Malvern

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69

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Port-Eynon

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NEATH PORT TALBOT

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Spurn Head Cleethorpes

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Tuxford North Hykeham

NOTTINGHAM0 Ripley SHIRE A46 Hucknall A6 27

CITY OF DERBY

Burton

Rugeley

A513

Cannock

A4

Bewdley

2

A4

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The Black Mountains

Pen y Fan

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Worms Head

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29

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CITY OF STOKE-

A4

Kidderminster

11

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BRECON BEACONS

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0

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Milford Haven

A40

A484

Skomer Island

Carmarthen St Clears A40

A40

Kington

Penkridge

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A4

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88

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A631

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Leek

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Rotherham

ROTHERHAM

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31

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25

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Doncaster

A630

Winterton

3

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A160

NORTH LINCOLNSHIRE Ulceby

2

Scunthorpe

3

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A15

A18

M180

CITY OF KINGSTON UPON HULL

Kingston upon Hull

A164

Hessle

Humber Br

Goole Thorne

6

A1174

Cottingham A63

Hornsea 5

A103

5

Beverley

38

M62

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34 34

Bakewell

Wolverhampton 15

A411

A4113

Knighton

Llandovery

Cynwyl Elfed

A4

7

A44

Llandrindod Wells

2

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A48

Pumsaint

A48

PEMBROKESHIRE

Haverfordwest

A475

A484

0 A4

A4

Crymych

Lampeter

A486

Fishguard

Mathry 87

Solva

Newcastle Emlyn

A487

PEMBROKESHIRE COAST

St Brides Bay

Cardigan

Rhayader

82

Synod Inn

A487

St Davids Head St Davids

Tregaron

A4

Aberporth

Newport

CEREDIGION

5

Bridgnorth

Ludlow

POWYS

6

A54

Swinton

35

Bridlington Bay Skipsea

A103

A1079

Howden

37

4

36

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Flamborough Head

Bridlington

Leven

Market Weighton

36

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37

36

A6

7

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DONCASTER 38

A635

Sheffield

Buxton

A537

38

28

A6

A614

79

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A6

M62 34

33 40

Barnsley

A618

23

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Castleford

32

37

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M6

38

PEAK DISTRICT A6

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42

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31

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RO

Wakefield Pontefract A1

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SHEFFIELD

A57

M67

Biddulph

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WAKEFIELD

BARNSLEY A62 M1 A628 9

STAFFORDSHIRE

A53

Market Drayton Eccleshall

Shropshire Hills

Llangurig

wy

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Aberaeron New Quay

Dinas Head

Lledrod

7

Much Wenlock

Bishops Castle

Clun

1

A642

YORK

Tadcaster

44

65

4

A61

Driffield Stamford Bridge EAST RIDING Pocklington OF YORKSHIRE

A64

Wetherby

43 48 47

A1

Nortonon-Derwent

4

A166

York

46

Filey

A64

Malton A6

A59

A1(M)

46

45 43 44 29 30 42 41

A616

Stockport

15

A5

24

Scarborough Eastfield

A170

A1039

Knaresborough

2 5

28

40

Huddersfield

Kidsgrove

Newcastleunder-Lyme

Telford

Church Stretton

A489

Llanidloes

R

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1 27

26

25

M62

48

LEEDS A64 Dewsbury

71

Pickering

Howardian Hills Easingwold

45

LEEDS

Robin Hood’s Bay A1

Helmsley

A170

A168

A659

Ashton-under-Lyne 12 Glossop Stocksbridge

3

CHESHIRE EAST 4

Newport TELFORD AND 8 WREKIN A51

SHROPSHIRE A458

A489

Newtown

A470

G e/A Wy

Llanrhystud

90

A44

A4120

A4

70

Aberystwyth

Rosslare Harbour

er ev

RS

A5

Montgomery

n

Carno

ES

CARDIGAN BAY/ BAE CEREDIGION

A458

Shrewsbury

Llanfair Caereinion

A4

89

A4

Machynlleth

A493

90

95

Welshpool

1

16

A525

Shawbury

A4

A4

A5

7

n Afo

Tywyn

Llanfyllin

A458

25 27

A6

Bradford

Whitby R Esk

NORTH YORK MOORS

49

58

Otley

74

Goathland

Thirsk

50

Harrogate A65

A1

A19

A1(M)

47

Ilkley

Macclesfield

7

A5

18

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A5

8 A4

fi

Dy

A4

28

Mallwyd

Ellesmere

24 1

5

A53

M6

AND

Whitchurch

A41

95

6

M56

Audlem

25

Oswestry

8

A59

Wilmslow STOCKPORT Knutsford

Winsford Middlewich 17 Sandbach Crewe

Malpas

A5

10

KIRKLEES

23

9

8 7 19

Nantwich

Wrexham

A5

892m

A41

A470

Cadair Idris

93

A4

Chester

WREXHAM

A5

A470

A496

Dolgellau

Barmouth

15

A534

1

Leeming 51

23

Guisborough

MIDDLESBROUGH REDCAR AND CLEVELAND

Northallerton

A684

A684

A6

MANCHESTER

Lymm

10

Northwich Helsby

Tattenhall

6

3

Ruabon

Corwen

Llangollen A5 Clwydian Range & Dee Valley

8

12 A51 CHESHIRE WEST 40 A54 CHESTER

7

A1

Masham

A58 22

M60

11 8 8 9M607 6 5 Warrington 3 21 3

11

12

19

11

10

A5

14

A55

38

A483 4

A 542

A5

Llyn Celyn

10 11

36

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Betwsy-Coed

Llan Ffestiniog

4

A49

1 16 14

12 11

18

17

32

A580

22 9

M56 HALTON A53 3 6

9

32

DENBIGHSHIRE

M62

7

6

4

WIGAN

ST HELENS

2

Runcorn

5

40

Catterick

13 A62 A635 Holmfirth Oldham

19

BURY

5

Widnes 14 209

A5

Buckley

Ruthin

Pentrefoelas

4212

Bardsey Island

Strumble Head Goodwick

3

4 A5

A Bala Criccieth Trawsfynydd SNOWDONIA Pwllheli Llyn Harlech Tegid Abersoch

Lleyn

3½h

25

98

A4

Blaenau Ffestiniog

A497

A5

A499

Porthmadog

A4

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5 A408

Llanaelhaearn

Nefyn

70

1085m

St Asaph

A548

Llanfair Talhaiarn

Llanrwst

A54

A5

8

5

6

A58

A57

3

A41 4

M53

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31

Holywell

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Richmond

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CALDERDALE

46

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6

6

Darwen Bacup

Wigan

26

Accrington

A56 A681

STOCKTON-ON-TEES

Middlesbrough

A66

57

56

BRADFORD

Burnley A6

A55

FLINTSHIRE

Prestatyn Rhyl

5

St Helens

M57

6

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Blackburn

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Skelmersdale

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A677

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28

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Beaumaris Conwy

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Leyland

Maghull

Llandudno

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Southport Formby

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A60

75

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Cleveleys

Blackpool

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M6

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3

Holy Island

A 585

Hartlepool

A689

Stocktonon-Tees

DARLINGTON

Settle

Galgate Forest of

88

A5

Garstang

HARTLEPOOL

A19

60

A689

Nidderdale Ripon

A65

Hornby

A1(M)

NORTH YORKSHIRE

Ingleton

Peterlee

81

61

Lancaster

KNO

02

ANGLESEY/ YNYS MÔN

Holyhead

83

A6

34

A6

Seaham

82

A1

69

Newton Aycliffe

Bainbridge

A6 87

A6

3h

Dun Laoghaire

97

Morecambe Heysham

A587

Amlwch

A5

A6

8 A6

35a 35

68

YORKSHIRE DALES

Kirkby Lonsdale

A1

62

0

Leyburn

A684

M6

A65

36

A6

ISLE OF ANGLESEY

Sedbergh

37

Sunderland A690

691

Crook

88

Barnard Castle

SUNDERLAND

65 64 63

Durham

ES NIN PEN THE

A65

2h

A689

A684

Carnforth Morecambe Bay

70

8h

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Fleetwood

Numbered unitary areas: 6 LIVERPOOL 7 BOLTON 8 SALFORD 9 TRAFFORD 10 ROCHDALE 11 MANCHESTER 12 TAMESIDE 13 OLDHAM 14 WARRINGTON 15 CITY OF WOLVERHAMPTON 16 WALSALL 17 SANDWELL 18 DUDLEY 19 BIRMINGHAM 20 SOLIHULL 21 COVENTRY

4h

A1

8 A6

A685

A 59

A 2 69

Kirkby Stephen

A685

38

Windermere

A5

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89

A6

39

South Shields

A1

COUNTY DURHAM Bishop Auckland A

© CROWN COPYRIGHT A66 AND/OR DATABASE RIGHTS 2016 OS

33

3h

3h

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8h

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A6 0

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A7

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Appleby-inWestmorland

A6

A592

Barrowin-Furness

4h

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A591

3h

A66

SOUTH TYNESIDE

Chesterle-Street

Tow Law

R Wear

Tynemouth

Gateshead

A695

A689

NORTH TYNESIDE

A19

Consett Washington

40

A 0 59

A5092

ne

N O RT H S E A

Blyth Cramlington Whitley Bay

A189

A1

A69

GATESHEAD

Wearhead

41

A5091

95

Castletown

s

A7

Broughton in Furness

R Ty

Hexham

86

Newbiggin-by-the-Sea

Ashington

Bedlington

NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE

A6

Castle Douglas North Pennines Langwathby

Penrith

964m

Coniston

Amble

NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE

Corbridge

en

Ambleside

Ulverston Millom 90 A5 Dalton-in-Furness

Port Erin

96

Ed

Patterdale

LAKE DISTRICT

A5093

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R

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Scafell Pike

A5084

7

R Esk

A66

CUMBRIA

A1

Morpeth

A6

Alston

M6

Bassenthwaite

A5

A1

A2

Dalston

Troutbeck

Wast Water

95

A4

Peel

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A69

9

A6

Wetheral

95

A591

Egremont

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the right of the path. Cross the Blane Water and keep straight on (leaving the WHW) to a T-junction. Turn right along the A81 or 1km before turning left onto an unsignposted farm road.SE Head IRISH A towards the farm at Craigbrock, turn sharp left and follow the winding road up to a junction with the ‘Pipe Track’ running beneath DUBLIN the escarpment of the Campsie Fells. Turn right, continue around to Cantywheery, then follow the CONWY track straight on for 2km to reach the A81 at Blanefield. Turn left and follow the road for 700m into GWYNEDD Strathblane. 7. Turn left off the mini-roundabout onto the A891 (signposted WAL Campsie Glen, Lennoxtown), then after 150m turn right off the road onto a narrow lane (signposted Strathkelvin Railway Path: 755). Continue along the lane and cross a bridge to join the surfaced path alongside the Pow Burn. AfterCARMARTHENSHIRE 5km, jink right at a path junction (signposted Strathkelvin Railway Path: 755), cross a footbridge and arrive at a road. Turn left a short way then cross over (755 sign) to continue by the river on a surfaced path through woods. At a path junction, turn left then right to follow the Strathkelvin Railway Path alongside Glazert

Brampton

42

Keswick

Cleator Moor

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96

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A5

A5

St Bees Head St Bees

Ramsey Bay Ramsey

Seahouses

NORTHUMBERLAND Rothbury

Bellingham

A689

Solway

94 R Derwent

Whitehaven

A3

A

Longtown

22 45

Silloth Coast Wigton

Aspatria

Workington

A10

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Burrow Head

ISLE OF MAN

Jedburgh

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Castle Douglas TH

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Point of Ayre

Ramsey Island

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A7

A68

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#ToB2016

19

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A71

Whithorn

Mull of Galloway BELFAST Stage distance 168 kilometres | Total ascent 1,849 metres | Highest point 308 metres

A7

Kielder Water

18

21

Drummore

Glasgow

Etal

Wooler

8

A7

Dalbeattie

A75

Holy Island

98

99

A6

R Annan

Port William

55

A6091

Eildon & A6 Leaderfoot

SCOTTISH BORDERS

Langholm Lockerbie

17

Nith Estuary

East Kirkcudbright Stewartry Coast A711

A7

Fleet Valley

A746

A716

Luce Bay

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Clyde

L

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6

NE

A7

Kelso

16

A7

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Gatehouse of Fleet

Wigtown

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Melrose

Moffat

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Lochmaben

Crocketford 13 A7

A718

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A7

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Stranraer Portpatrick

12

Berwick-upon-Tweed

Norham

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Dumfries

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Eyemouth

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A608

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St John’s Town

GALLOWAY of Dalry

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Galashiels

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Galston

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Troon Prestwick

Whiting Bay

Campbeltown

A78

St Abb’s Head

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A7

Lamlash

Kilmarnock

A71

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NORTH AYRSHIRE

A703

6

1h

Brodick

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A841

ISLE OF ARRAN

Maybole

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Numbered unitary areas: 1 RENFREWSHIRE 2 EAST RENFREWSHIRE 3 GLASGOW CITY 4 NORTH LANARKSHIRE 5 CITY OF EDINBURGH

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Milngavie A8 M80

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Isle of Gigha

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Strathblane A

Dumbarton

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A907

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A9

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A9

12

Arbroath

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Cupar

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A91

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Port Askaig

Laggan Bay

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Kilmartin

GLASGOW TO CASTLE DOUGLAS SUNDAY 4 SEPTEMBER JURA

Oronsay

Portnahaven

3

1

Strachur

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A934

Forfar

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11 10

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Loch 974m Katrine Ben Lomond

Tarbet

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A92

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A9

4

A9

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LOCH LOMOND & THE TROSSACHS

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Scarba, Lunga & The Garvellachs Colonsay

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A932

A926

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A90

Tummel

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Iona Fionnphort

Lochbuie

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Ben Nevis & Glen Coe

Lynn of Lorn

Craignure

Kerrera

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L Scrid

A8

Ballachulish

A828

Banchory

Stonehaven

Blair Atholl Loch

R Tummel

A9

Loch na Keal

ISLE OF MULL

Lochaline

Salen

Ulva

Treshnish Isles

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Loch Rannoch & Glen Lyon

Kinlochleven

26 A8

A848

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1344m

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Loch na Keal

Loch Tuath

A884

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3h

1h

Ben Nevis

Leven

Aberdeen

A93

R Dee

Laurencekirk

24

Arinagour

Scarinish

Loch

Aboyne

Braemar

R Dee

A9

A861

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A9

Acharacle

1h

Loch Treig

Westhill

Ballater

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A96

A944

A9

U N T A I N S

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Fort William

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ABERDEENSHIRE 80

A93

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Ben Macdui

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Loch Shiel

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Loch Eil

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Spean Bridge

A830

Sound of Arisaig

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Loch Morar

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A9

A9

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Loch Arkaig

Cairngorm Mountains

Kingussie

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Oldmeldrum

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A90

A920

Rhynie

Cairn Gorm

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Newtonmore

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Loch Cluanie

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A865

A87

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Carrbridge

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of the Carbeth Huts (wood cabins used as weekend retreats). S C O T L A N D 6. Go through another gate, descend M O N INNER I A HEBRIDES a short way then turn left at a P M path junction, continuing past the PERTH AND KINROSS west side of the wooded knoll of Dumgoyach. The path descends, swings right then climbs to a gate. Go ARGYLL through and follow a track to AND BUTE Canna

5h

SE

Cannich

Glen Affric

Maud A920

Dufftown

MORAY

A948

Kintail

7

A8

Broadford

Belleheiglash

A9

7 A94

Cuillin Hills

Charlestown of Aberlour

RN

Inverness

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Loch Mullardoch

Kyle of Lochalsh

Scalpay

Drynoch

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Loch Monar

A939

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Loch Carron

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90

A8

A862

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Strathfarrar

Lochcarron

A9

ISLE OF SKYE

HIGHLAND

Raasay

41 A9

Eriskay/ Eirisgeigh

63

A939

Lochboisdale

Portree A8

A952

Dunvegan


Cycling World 40

3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Water. Pass under a road bridge, re-cross the river on a footbridge and arrive at a road 300m further on. 8. Turn right (signposted Lennox Forest, Balmore) along the track road then fork right after 600m onto a loose stone track climbing through Finniescroft Wood. At the T-junction with South Brae Road, turn left (signposted Balmore) and continue, soon climbing steeply. The gradient eventually levels and enters Lennox Forest. The public road runs out at a parking area near a communications tower. Keep straight on (signposted Balmore 3Ÿ) around a barrier onto a forestry road. After 400m turn left and descend along a forestry track; where it swings left keep straight on onto a path (this is easy to miss), which soon leaves the forestry via a stile, swings right and contours around to another stile. Go over and descend steeply on the Mealybrae Road – a narrow, bouldery path, which makes an entertaining descent. Keep straight on downhill and the track soon rejoins tarmac. 9. Keep straight on at a junction then straight on (right) at a fork and follow the winding road down to Balmore, continuing through the village to a junction with the A807. Jink left then right onto residential Old Balmore Road, then after 250m turn right onto a surfaced track between fields (signposted Canal, Bishopbriggs). Turn left then right to cross the River Kelvin on a footbridge and continue right (signposted Canal, Bishopbriggs) along a wooded path between golf courses then a track road. Pass the church at Cadder and swing right on the road alongside the Forth and Clyde Canal. 10. Continue on the NR754 cycle route along the towpath for 6km before taking a RH fork down off the embankment onto Lochburn Road (signposted Clydebank, Bowling). Go through the tunnel then turn immediately left to climb the path to the embankment. Turn left and continue along the embankment (signposted Clydebank, Bowling), soon passing Maryhill Locks. Look out for a Kelvin Walkway sign and turn left to follow the path in a series of zig-zags down to the river, bearing left to follow the outward route back to the start in Kelvingrove Park.


Mountain Biking & Cycling Trails at Drumlanrig World-class trails in the heart of Dumfries & Galloway

Bike hire & facilities

• Trails to suit all levels and abilities • Trails crafted from nature over 12 years • Season passes available from £20, offering unlimited access and discounts throughout the season • FREE CAR PARKING!

Rik’s Bike Shed offers bike sales, spares, repairs and hire as well as skills coaching and guiding. Showers, bike wash, adventure playground and tearoom all open during the estate’s open season. 01848 330080 | 07722 828 139 | mtbrik@aol.com

Country Estate Open Daily: 10am - 5pm Thornhill Dumfries & Galloway DG3 4AQ | Tel: 01848 331 555 Email: info@drumlanrigcastle.co.uk

WWW.DRUMLANRIGCASTLE.CO.UK

Drumlanrig Castle

Visit

www.drumlanrigcastle.co.uk for further information.

GB Special Castle Drumlanrig

D

rumlanrig Castle’s mountain biking and cycling trails have been described as one of Dumfries and Galloway’s ‘best kept secrets’ in the mountain biking world. Here you’ll find world-class trails to suit every ability and interest through some of Scotland’s most stunning scenery. There are gnarly ‘old school’ technical, single-track routes, swooping family trails through the woodlands and quiet country back roads. You’ll find three different trail types: moderate (blue routes), difficult (red routes) and hard (black routes), giving you the chance to find the right one for you. Don’t forget to pick up a handy map at the kiosk on your way in or simply follow the waymarkers en route.   To add to the experience even more is Rik’s Bike Shed, located in Drumlanrig’s Stableyard. Here you’ll find bike hire, wash, spares, repairs and advice. Having built many of the routes himself, Rik can help both experienced and novice riders get the best from their ride.   Drumlanrig also has a fantastic tearoom to refuel in afterwards, open seasonally until the end of September. And if you’re bringing the whole family you’ll find a spectacular adventure playground, gardens, shop, ranger events plus Castle tours on selected dates.

41


I Promotional Cycling WorldFeature - Caledonian Discovery

magine. Your very own mobile hotel, complete with top grade cooks and guides, which follows you around on your cycling holiday enabling you to come back to the same comfortable en-suite cabin every night.

42

tracks and we can help you devise a route that will suit your needs and abilities. Alternatively, a guide will lead a route each day. A day off? Again not a problem. Simply stay on the barge as we glide smoothly to the next pick up point.

Instead of grunting along with a heavy load on your bike from one predictable hostel to the next, simply set off each day on your adventure and then gloriously find, at the end of the day, your hotel has magically appeared at your destination. Absurd? Not at all. Substitute barge for hotel and it's a concept which is not only fascinating but also proven as "Bike and barge holidays", already very popular across Europe. Caledonian Discovery who run two comfortable barges, each carrying no more than a dozen guests, in the Highlands of Scotland, are now taking the continental idea into Scotland. We have been running barges up and down the Caledonian Canal for over twenty years and have bikes on board ready for our customers. The "Bike and barge” holidays are specifically aimed at those who want to combine comfort with as much exercise as they are in the mood for that day.

Every evening after dinner you can talk through your plans for the next day with the staff who are not only familiar with the ground but also well informed on what kind of weather to expect. Only fancy an hour's pedalling? Fine. Fancy something a bit more challenging?  Not a problem. The boat's route down the Caledonian canal runs parallel to the Great Glen Way. The wild hills around the canal are criss-crossed with mountain

This is cycle touring the way it ought to be. Well organised, comfortable and with so many of the stresses and inconveniences removed. The paths, high and low, offer  nothing less than life events, twisting and turning as they do, through semi wilderness, wild woodland, before bursting out onto long stretches of pathways from which you can see miles up and down the sixty mile long Great Glen. The wildlife is spectacular, deer and eagles are regularly sighted and whose knows, you might even sight Nessie, so bring a camera!

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT

www.caledonian-discovery.co.uk Tel: 01397 772167


GB Special

Glasgow MTB Waterways Loop

43


Glasgowopolis Gordon Cairns takes a futuristic ride along the Clyde to the heat of Glasgow

Cycling Cycling World World

T

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he precinct of Glasgow's media hub could have been created by a cartoonist from the fifties imagining a futuristic metropolis. This unusual cityscape with its rocket-shaped Science Tower across the river and assorted oddly shaped buildings is our starting point to cycle along the banks of the River Clyde, taking us into the city's industrial past. Even reaching it is slightly futuristic, as we cycle through a massive corrugated orange tube which takes us up and over the Exhibition Centre train station then spits us out at the city's newest music venue, the Hydro. Another curious aspect of the architecture here are the close proximity of the bridges, two footbridges straddle the river within pebble skimming distance of each other and a road bridge just a few hundred metres away. In fact, twenty two bridges cross the river and act as distance markers on the trip I am taking with my 10-year-old son Noah. There are also a couple of tunnels under the river. Does this say something about the citizens of Glasgow, I wonder, never happy with the side of the river they are on. We head out of the car park of the Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre on what feels like the first sunny day of the year towards the largest remaining artefact of the city's industrial age, the Finnieston Crane, a 175-ton colossus which was built to load steam engines onto ships to be exported across the world. Now standing out-with its industrial context, it is like a giant toy abandoned by a bored child. We navigate over the 'Squinty Bridge', so called for the angle it crosses the river and drop back down to the riverside passing the long disused Anderston Quay, now converted into flats, with the Kingston Bridge, the main motorway artery taking traffic south west, looming above. On the other side of the bridge is a section skirting the financial district of the city which has been landscaped in recent years into a wide, ramped section ideal for cycling through stone benches and bollards. Here is another remnant of Glasgow’s past as a starting off point for sea voyages from the city that once built more than half of the World's ships. We pass a group of cycling's illegitimate offspring, a bunch of baggy kids doing stunts on their tiny BMX bikes. Meanwhile, on the water sits the creaking Renfrew Ferry, a nightclub and live music venue with a carpet of river debris connecting it to the shore. We soon have to dismount and carry our bikes up a set of stairs to get under the George the Fifth Road Bridge which sits alongside the second Caledonian Railway Bridge, an impressive Victorian structure which carries thirteen tracks into Glasgow's Central station and at one point was the widest railway bridge over a river in the country. The next bridge we pass is my favourite; a Victorian suspension bridge which gently vibrates as you cross and was used in the film 'An Englishman Abroad' to replicate Cold War Moscow. On our left hand side is a massive mural of a tiger painted onto a wall: as striking as the black and orange image is, we can't come up with a possible reason how it got there. We are now not far from ex-professional Billy


TRAINS The bike path can be joined from the west at either the Partick or Exhibition Centre train stations although both can be awkward manhandling bikes! Cost from Glasgow's Central or Queen Street stations are £1.90 return to Partick and £1.60 to the Exhibition Centre. The closest station at the east end of the route is Cambuslang, which can be reached from Central Station. A return costs £3.10.

ROUTE INFO

GB Special

From Partick station turn right and go through the gap between the shopping arcade and the station. Cross Beith Road at the traffic lights, where you will see a signpost marking National Cycle Network Route 7. Turn left, heading towards the city centre. From the Exhibition Centre station, turn right and immediately right again to go through the covered walkway, which crosses the track and Clydeside Expressway. Then, head down towards the waterfront to the find the cycle path. From Cambuslang train station, exit the station onto Main Street and cross the road onto Bridge Street, which leads down to the footbridge crossing the River Clyde onto its north bank. Turn left to cycle back into the city.

Science Centre and Tower by Florian Fuchs

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Cycling Cycling World World 46

Bilslands' Cycling shop, and it is worth the slight detour alone to see Robert Millar's polka-dot King of the Mountain's jersey hanging on the wall. Millar gave the jersey he won at the Tour de France in 1984 to his first trainer Bilsland. During last year's Commonwealth Games in the city, this small shop became known across the globe for giving the Malawian cycling team a couple of time trialling bikes after putting their own, less roadworthy, frames into the shop to be repaired. The shop sits on the edge of Glasgow Green, a beautiful sprawling park made famous by revolutionary Glaswegians over the centuries. It is also the base for the Glasgow Rowing Club, and for a stretch we pedal alongside a cox on his bike calling out strokes through a megaphone to the rowers skimming through the peaceful river. This stretch of river in the east of the city has benefitted from the Commonwealth Games immensely, from the Hockey Centre in the park, the Athlete's Village which has been turned into a mixture of social housing, and the Chris Hoy Arena, Glasgow's first velodrome. I must admit to initially feeling cynical about the games organisers claims that watching world class athletes in their home city would inspire Glaswegians to take up a sport and get fit. After all, we are voracious sporting spectators here in a city full of football stadiums, but are still known as the sick man of Europe. Perhaps because we associate watching sport with either the traditional pie and Bovril or the more modern crisps and hot dogs, not to mention the after-match beer. And yet, the large number of cyclists, joggers and walkers on this newly opened stretch of path through the east of the city show that actually, there has been a very positive legacy effect. Once past the Commonwealth Games village, the landscape becomes surprisingly rural as the river bank which was previously used by industry is allowed to grow wild. Trees and bushes fringe the path which has been resurfaced. And although I am riding a road bike, I find the ride smooth apart from a few bumps where tree roots have tried to push through. Below us the river bends back on itself. The path rises up just as it goes under the new M74 motorway bridge as the river rushes across rocks way below us. There are only a few more bridges to go under before the path finally peters out. We eat our sandwiches sitting at what looks like a disused pumping station covered in graffiti on the edge of the suburb of Carmyle before turning back to the city. With twelve miles in his legs, my son is beginning to feel tired, perhaps because the carrot of the double-chocolate cookie has now been eaten, so we cycle back arm in arm as I try to sling shot him home. We trundle back through the centre of the city, passing a statue commemorating Spanish Civil War heroine La Passionara and the British members of the International Brigade who went to Spain to fight. However, her inspirational words carved below the memorial: 'Better to die on your feet than live forever on your knees.' are not enough to keep him going, and so we curtail our journey at seventeen miles, and instead get a train from the nearby Central Station home.

Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre Footbridge by Kanakari


Cycling on the shores of Loch Rannoch The highlands are a region synonymous with drama and romance, with its sprawling unbridled landscape. The Loch Rannoch Highland Resort incorporates itself within

soaring Munros and beautiful mountain ranges, sat on the banks of the jewel blue of Loch Rannoch surrounded

by emerald forests. Our lodges blend tastefully within this incredible location. We offer self catering lodges that cater

GB Special

up to 8 persons.

Loch Rannoch Highland Resort The Avenue, Kinloch Rannoch, Perthshire, PH16 5PR www.lochrannochhighlandclub.com • admin@lochrannochhighlandclub.com • +44(0) 1796 471850

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ACHARN COURTYARD

Cycling Promotional WorldFeature - LHH

WELCOMES CYCLISTS

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P

erthshire is the number one road cycling destination in Scotland and Acharn Courtyard is located right in its centre. The complex, which sleeps up to 34 in 9 separate self-catering cottages, offers the chance for large groups to enjoy their own private apartments whilst benefitting from the communal facilities for socialising. All cottages are also available on their own. The social room has a kitchen, bar and wood-burning stove and can be used for group dining or route planning. Clear away the tables and you can have a dance or a party before retiring to your own private cottage just yards away.   There is secure bike storage, laundry facilities, a drying room, gas barbecue and every cottage has Wi-fi. The village of Killin, which is on Sustrans National Cycle Route 7, is under a mile away and has a great selection of shops and cafes to stock up or to spend a rest day. There is a pub and restaurants and take-aways too!

The Etape Caledonia, one of the biggest cycling events in Scotland takes place every May on closed roads not far from Acharn. The event has grown in popularity, in part, because of the stunning scenery and friendly welcome given here to cyclists. In addition to the route of the Etape there is easily a week of riding available straight from the front door of your cottage, with hundreds of miles of quiet roads including the classic loop through Glen Lyon. Glencoe, Loch Lomond and the Road to the Isles are all within pedalling distance.   Mountain bikers are also catered for here with the downhill trails at Dunkeld an hour drive away and the old railway line which runs right next to the cottages, now part of the Rob Roy Way which stretches all the way from Drymen to Pitlochry. There is also a mini trail centre with bike hire and a café at Comrie Croft, just outside Crieff.


ACHARN COURTYARD, LOCATED CLOSE TO BEAUTIFUL KILLIN.

Suitable for cycling groups and individuals. 7 Cottages sleeping 26 plus 2 log cabins for 8.

For more information and to make a booking:

w: LHHScotland.com e: LHH@LHHScotland.com

GB Special

t: 01381 610496

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Bike it in Britain’s only truly coastal NATIONAL PARK

Freshwater West

Breathtakingly beautiful coastline, a warm Welsh welcome and awesome sea and mountain rides make the Pembrokeshire Coast National one of the best cycling destinations in the UK.

Park

Whether you’re a family looking for a seaside adventure on two wheels or an Ironman contender seeking a seriously tough challenge, the Pembrokeshire Coast has it all. “Pembrokeshire will appeal to anyone who appreciates the open air and a beautiful, unspoilt landscape where they can really enjoy exercising at their own pace,” said Hannah Buck, Health and Tourism Policy Officer with the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park Authority. “Major events have enticed keen cyclists and active families to the National Park in recent years, including the Ironman Wales and Long Course Weekend triathlons and the Tour of Pembrokeshire sportive. “From the shortest eight mile family ride in the Tour to the full 112-mile cycle in Ironman, the routes feature inspirational coast and countryside. What’s great is that those routes are here for everyone, all year round.”

Cycling World

Pembrokeshire is a spectacular place to discover; a patchwork of sandy beaches, rugged cliffs and islands, ancient woodland, peaceful estuaries and dramatic hill country, plus pretty harbour towns and Britain’s smallest city, St Davids. Strikingly beautiful and remote, the county is home to more than 20,000 people.

Supporters spurred Gayle on from first light to midnight, when she completed the course with nine minutes to spare. She added: “If you want to train for a big event, Pembrokeshire is perfect, but it’s equally suitable if you just fancy a quiet family cycling break in stunning surroundings. Whatever your reason for coming, the warm welcome you’ll receive is part of the package.” Pembrokeshire has miles of rides for mountain bikers, tourers or racers and you can make it as easy or as hard as you like. The Preseli Hills and the woodlands around Canaston Bridge and Stackpole are suitable for true off-road mountain biking but in any area you can link villages, coastal views and historic sites via quiet country lanes and byways. Find out more: www.pembrokeshirecoast.wales/cycling

Ironman is the ultimate triathlon. A 2.4mile sea swim, followed by a 112-mile cycle and finishing with a full 26.2-mile marathon, all within a 17-hour time frame with strict cut-off times for each discipline. For five years the epic annual event has been hosted in Tenby, one of the jewels in the National Park crown, and supported by the National Park Authority. For registration and spectator information visit: www.eu.ironman.com

Tour of Pembrokeshire

There’s a distinctly Welsh feel to the Tour of Pembrokeshire, which draws around 3,500 visitors to the county each spring. Organiser Peter Walker said: “It’s not just that we’re able to give people a great ride with sea and mountain scenery of unrivalled beauty, but we offer people a real taste of Pembrokeshire too. With the exception of things like bananas and energy drinks, every item on our feeding stations is made in Pembrokeshire, from Welsh cakes to faggots. People seem to really appreciate this.”

With the recent elevation of Pembrokeshire as a major player on the world triathlon stage, many of those people have taken cycling to their hearts.

Gayle Lister, a National Park Discovery Ranger who herself completed the Ironman course in 2015, said: “There were very few sections along the bike route that didn’t have people waving flags, shouting and cheering or offering help with the inevitable 50 punctures.”

Ironman Wales

Pembrokeshire Coast National Park Discovery Ranger Gayle Lister enjoying the local support during Ironman Wales

Find out more: www.tourofpembrokeshire.co.uk


#PembsCoast

Cardigan

Fishguard Pantmaenog

St Davids

Llys y Fran

Pembrokeshire Haverfordwest

Milford Haven Pembroke Pembrokeshire Coast National Park

Tenby

Stack Rocks

Family cycling routes

Preseli Hills

GB Special

Relatively quiet roads and safe off-road routes make Pembrokeshire a first choice for families with small children. • Goodwick Parrog – start of the 14mile Last Invasion Trail, linked to the last invasion of Britain near Fishguard in 1797. • Llys y Frân – a 7.5-mile trail circles the reservoir in this country park. • Pantmaenog Forest – open to cyclists and horse riders on 12km of signposted tracks. • St Davids Airfield – a former airfield, managed by the Park Authority as a Site of Special Scientific Interest. Great for beginners to lose their stabilisers. • Stack Rocks to St Govan’s – a rare bit of bridleway on the 186-mile Pembrokeshire Coast Path National Trail. Follows a fairly level gravel track. • Brunel Trail – a 14-mile route starting at Brunel Quay in Neyland, then along bridleways and quiet lanes. Once part of the Great Western Railway. Find out more: www.pembrokeshirecoast.wales/cycling www.visitpembrokeshire.com Pic credits: Pembrokeshire Coast National Park, Frank Whittle, Pembrokeshire County Council, huwfaircloughphotography.co.uk.

#Year of Adventure

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23•04•17

register your interest now : www.etapelochness.com The Event Frontrunners

T Cycling Promotional WorldFeature - Caledonian Concepts

he Etape Loch Ness, on 23 April 2017, is a 66-mile (106km) cycle sportive held on fully closed roads around the stunning shores of iconic Loch Ness in the Scottish Highlands.

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Loch Ness is one of the world’s best known destinations, its breath-taking scenery and the centuries-old myth and mystery of the Loch Ness monster have attracted visitors from around the world for years. Cyclists now have the opportunity to cycle a 360° route on traffic free roads around the loch, starting and finishing in the historic Highland capital of Inverness. In 2016, 4200 took part in this exciting event and there is increased capacity for 2017. There is a timed King of the Mountain stage on leaving Fort Augustus with a 4.8mile / 9km climb gaining 380m in height and at times with a gradient reaching 12%. The event offers a fantastic challenge with unrivalled scenery on traffic free roads, so whether you’re a seasoned cyclist or a newcomer looking for your first sportive it is a not to be missed opportunity.

To register your interest for the 2017 event and receive priority entry go to: www.

etapelochness.com Entry was sold out in 51 hours for the 2016 event so don’t delay and register now!

Etape Loch Ness – 23 April 2017


Rosetta Holiday Park, Peebles, Scottish Borders Whether you want to get out and about and explore or just sit back and relax on park you’ll have a fabulous time at Rosetta Holiday Park; a beautifully matured park in the heart of the Scottish Borders. The local area provides some of the best dedicated mountain bike routes in the UK with areas such as Glentress Forest on the outskirts of Peebles, which offers a wide selection of tracks for all standards of riders. • Caravan holidays, touring and camping • Bar & cafe • Walled garden with playground • Games & TV room • Secure bike storage

10%

EXCLUSIVE OFFER CODE: CYCLE10

Call 01721 720770 or visit rosettaholidaypark.com Rosetta Road, Peebles, Peebleshire, EH45 8PG *Offer ends on 31 October and applies to all accommodation and touring excluding electric tent pitches. Offer applies to new bookings only. Offer cannot be combined or used in conjunction with any other offer or discount. Offer is subject to availability at time of booking. Standard brochure terms and conditions apply.

R

osetta Holiday Park, on the outskirts of the Scottish Borders town of Peebles, is the perfect base for riding the famous trails of Glentress Forest and the exhilarating descents and cross country at Innerleithen, two of southern Scotland's 7stanes mountain biking centres. Glentress Forest has some of the UK's most exciting mountain bike trails, including a black route that has been voted Britain's best. There are also green, red and blue trails that offer everything from family friendly routes to tough and technical track with lung-busting climbs and thrilling plunges, and there is a freeride jumps park for riders to work on their airborne skills. Nearby Innerleithen holds its own challenges for experienced riders, with a red-grade cross country route that provides leg-burning biking along forest trails, and an orange-classed extreme downhill from the summit of Plora Rig. Rosetta Park provides a relaxing retreat after a day in the saddle, and is less than eight miles from both

biking centres. The park has a range of modern static caravans that are comfortable and fully equipped, and there are more than 100 grass and hard-standing pitches for camping, motorhomes and caravans. On park facilities include a children’s playground, and there’s a bar and small restaurant serving tasty, filling meals. With views of the Venlaw Hills and easy access to the River Tweed - one of the best for salmon, wild trout and grayling fishing in the UK - Rosetta Park is relaxing and tranquil. Nearby Peebles is a pretty and distinctive market town with a wide range of independent shops and delightful cafes and restaurants, plus secretive alleyways and medieval courtyards to discover. Holiday prices start from £189 for seven-night static caravan stays and from £15 per night for camping. To find out more visit www.rosettaholidaypark.com or call 01721 720 770.

GB Special Feature - Rosetta Holiday Park Promotional

A BORDERS BREAK FOR THE UK’S BEST MOUNTAIN BIKE TRAILS

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Shetland Camping Böds

For details contact: Shetland Amenity Trust, Garthspool, Lerwick, Shetland. ZE1 0NY Tel : 01595 694688 E-mail : info@shetlandamenity.org The Shetland Amenity Trust is a registered Scottish charity, No:SC017505

www.camping-bods.com aiting w is e r u t n e v d a Your Shetland

Shetland Camping Bóds

Cycling World

S

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hetland. At the northernmost extreme edges of the UK, this series of islands is a world of adventure waiting to be discovered. The Shetland Camping Bód Network is a series of properties which all have important local historic links to the areas they are in. The buildings have been restored and are maintained as low cost, basic accommodation for travellers who wish to explore on a budget, or are just looking for an adventure and the chance to get back to basics. Some properties, such as Nesbister, are only accessible by foot (or bicycle!) and have no electricity or hot water.

The outstanding view from the peninsula is more than enough to compensate for the hardy traveller. Other properties are more conventional with hot showers and cooking facilities, and all have cosy wood burning stoves. Camping Bóds can sleep between four and sixteen people, depending on location and can be booked for exclusive use. Bed spaces are charged from £10 to £12 per person per night (2017 season) and the properties are open between March and October. Daily overnight ferry crossings from Aberdeen mean that Shetland is more accessible than you might think. Visit the website to plan your trip www.camping-bods.co.uk


G

GB Special

rampian Transport Museum recognises that the cycle played an important role in the preservation and development of the road network following the demise of coaches at the start of the railway era. In our exhibition, ‘Cycling to the Bicentenary’, we explain the 1817 origins of the cycle in Germany and work our way through the cycling chronology to the present day. Key machines include a genuine Scottish Hobby Horse of 1820, British Boneshaker, Penny Farthings, Crypto Bantams, various 19th century tricycles, the first safety cycles and Dursley Pedersons, classic sports machines like Flying Scots, Billy Connolly’s Flying Scot, and iconic pop culture machines like the Raleigh Chopper! Guy Martin helps us to bring the cycling story right up to date with the display of his 112mph record holding machine.

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Author: Camille J. McMillan Publisher: Velodrome Publishing Published: Hardback 30/06/2016 ISBN: 9781911162032 Price: £30 Review by: David Robert

Cycling World

All Photographs © Camille J McMillan

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The Peloton at TdeB


Book Review

Circus: Inside the World of Professional Bike Racing

T

his beautifully-produced book reveals some of the many stories career cycling photographer Camille Mcmillan has witnessed. It is an exclusive anthology, with many never seen images, spanning two decades of life at the sharp end of professional cycling. It takes the shape of an entire year in the saddle from the Spring Classics, through Grand Tours to the World Championships. Viewpoints are often at the hub of the action: trackside at Ghent’s Six-Day races; across the unforgiving cobbles of Monuments, amongst the crazed roadside fans of the Tour. Similarly, we see behind the scenes, beyond the gloss and glamour: exhaustion within hotel rooms; changing behind vans, battling the elements in the dusty heat of Kansas or the drenching hills of North England. Some glorious photos of the Tour of Britain are featured here.

Superficially, Circus may be categorised as a 'coffeetable' book due to its large size and weight. However, this category is often used to denigrate a publisher's overproduction of what could be a more simplistic publication. This is certainly not the case. These art quality printed pages are not to be casually flicked through as we are a sharing a lifetime's work and hard graft, fulfilling the book's subtitle 'inside the world of professional bike racing'. In his forward ex-pro David Miller tells us “When you’re in it, you don’t see it.” Perhaps cycling fans have drifted too far into the sport, becoming swamped with magazines, books and phone images; it can dull the joy of cycling photography. This book is sure to awaken the eye and rekindle the pure pleasure of immersion into a photo.

GB Special

Camille has pedigree as both a cyclist and an image maker. A graduate from St. Martin’s Art College, former editor-at-large of Rouleur magazine, he was also a bike racer, competing as a junior in the UK and Europe. Passion, originality and respect for the sport seep from his photos. The occasional texts by Camille, short essays and interviews, are informative and provide context for such a diverse set of images.

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Cycling World

Book Review: Circus: Inside the World of Professional Bike Racing

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Cav. Sprinter. Climber. TdeB Caerphilly Moutain 2012


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GB Special


WORLD

Cycling World

Get in touch now to work with us - editorial@runningworldmagazine.co.uk

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Film Review

Milk Race: On and On

“ON

WE DIDN’T WANT TO STOP, WE JUST WANTED TO GO

AND

ON ”

Director: Steven Green Length: 7.15 mins Available: On selected release and will be available as free download. See updates at http://www. stevengreen.cc/milk-race-on-and-on/ Reviewed by: David Robert

MILK RACE:

ON AND ON...

A FILM BY

T

STEVEN GREEN “MILK RACE: ON AND ON”FEATURING LES WEST, ROGER PRATT GRAPHIC DESIGN STUDIOADE PRODUCED, DIRECTED, EDITED BY STEVEN GREEN

his is a wonderful, short documentary about The Milk Race, The Tour of Britain in its sixties manifestation. It has received popular acclaim is currently showing at The Bicycle Film Festival.

It follows the experiences of two cyclists riding the 1960s Milk Race. Double champion Les West and one of his team mates Roger Pratt reminisce and swap anecdotes about competing in the event. The Milk Race ran for 35years from 1958 to 1993. In the era this film covers, the race was generally two weeks long and covered approximately 1,500 miles and was for amateurs, latterly accepting professional entrants. ‘While one rider had the time of his life, the other faced a stark choice on how far to push a racing career’ director, Steven Green, tells us. Steve produced the film after his idea was shortlisted by Prime &Fire Selects, a competition for new film makers to compete for funding to produce short specialist sports documentaries.

The film features glorious colour 16mm footage recently rediscovered in a loft fifty years after it was shot. It shows the latter parts of the gruelling Aberystwyth to Cardiff stage from the 1966 race, with riders tackling the south Wales mountains. This footage was shot by local cameraman Renato Spinetti (cousin of Welsh Italian comedy actor Victor Spinetti famous for appearing in Beatles’ films A Hard Day's Night, Help! and Magical Mystery Tour.

The film premiered at the BFI Future Film Festival and has screened at bike shows including the inaugural Rouleur Classic, The London Bike Show, Bespoked and Spin London Cycling Festival. It is running at the current Bicycle Film Festival which runs in various city locations across the world. Definitely one to look out for as it will become a free download once it has done the rounds, the milk rounds that is.

GB Special

“I made this film wanting to rediscover the ‘lost’ history of bike racing in Britain. As a long time fan of cycling, it has been amazing to see the sport go through a once in a lifetime transformation in the country. It used to be called a ‘Cinderella’ sport, but now it has broken through to the mainstream of sport and culture like never before. British Tour de France winners are now household names.”

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Cheshire, Wirral and Flintshire

World Class Racing and Family-friendly Cycling

W

orld-class cycling is sprinting its way to Cheshire, Wirral and Flintshire this Septemberso there's never been a better time to come and stay to discover the area's stunning countryside and unspoilt coastlines. Holidaymakers can enjoy an extended break to take in the 2016 Tour of Britain, which will visit Cheshire on Tuesday September 6th, starting in Congleton and finishing at one of the North West's most famous and fascinating historic houses and estates, Tatton Park. The 182 kilometres-long loop features The Cat and Fiddle climb, one of the longest in England, and takes in Crewe, Sandbach, Middlewich, Knutsford and Macclesfield along the way.

STAGE 3

CONGLETON TO TATTON PARK, KNUTSFORD

Tatton Park, Knutsford Alderley Edge

TUESDAY 6 SEPTEMBER

Brickworks

Alderley Edge

tourofbritain.co.uk #ToB2016

Cat and Fiddle

Congleton

Sandbach

Alsager

Cycling Cycling World World

Š Crown copyright Ordnance Survey 2016

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Competitors will also cycle through Flintshire, including Mold and the Clywdian Hills, an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, during the longest - and one of the most demanding stages of the Tour, 217 kilometres from Denbigh to Builth Wells, on Wednesday September 7. Seasoned cyclists are preparing to join top road racing cyclist Mark Cavendish for his second Rise Above Sportive, starting and finishing in Chester city centre, on Sunday August 28. Entrants can choose from three routes - 80 kilometres, 120 kilometres and 160 kilometres - and spectators will be able to watch the action in the city and amid the superb scenery of Cheshire and North Wales, along peaceful forest-lined roads and through

breathtaking landscapes. "We're really excited to be welcoming two top-flight cycling events to Cheshire and Flintshire this summer," said Katrina Michel, Chief Executive of Marketing Cheshire, on behalf of the Cheshire inbound Gateways Partnership. "Both promise plenty of excitement for spectators - as well as a golden opportunity to come and stay for a ten-day break to see both races, then take to two wheels and discover the huge variety of cycling routes for all ages and abilities across the area.� From mountain biking in Cheshire's Peak District and Flintshire to familyfriendly routes in Cheshire, Wirral and Flintshire, there's plenty of scope to explore its varied countryside, canals and coastline at your own speed. Mountain bikers in search of serious downhills and awesome off-roading should head for Cheshire's Peak District, where routes starting at Tegg's Nose Country Park near Macclesfield will put their skills to the test. In Flintshire, they should head for The Clywdian Range, an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, where routes range from easy and moderate to hard and include everything from quiet roads and untamed trails to spectacular climbs with fabulous views. Long-distance cyclists will be tempted by the Cheshire Cycleway, a 282 kilometres long route through some of the county's loveliest landscapes - from rolling fields to rocky ridges and rivers to canals. Starting and finishing in Chester, it can be completed in a week cycling at a reasonable pace - but visitors can also cherry pick suitable sections if they don't want to complete the whole loop. Highlights include the Wirral Way, Delamere Forest, river Weaver and Trent and Mersey Canal, Cheshire's gritstone hill country, the river Dane, Peckforton Hills and Shropshire Canal. Cyclists seeking a less demanding challenge will be spoiled for choice. In Cheshire, Delamere Forest has two traffic-free cycling tracks, suitable for both beginners and riders who want to home their technical skills, while a gate-free route meanders along the leafy tracks and lanes of the Cheshire

Chester Sportive with Mark Cavendish

Beeston Castle


GB Special

Plain through Goostrey village, with views across to Jodrell Bank. Other options are the traffic-free Wheelock Rail Trail and Salt Line near Sandbach; quiet back roads around Antrobus, Great Budworth and Comberbach near Northwich; the Heritage Loop taking in Mobberley and Knutsford and a circular route starting and finishing at Farndon, taking in the Peckforton Hills, Peckforton Castle and Beeston Castle. In Wirral, the Wirral Circular Trail starts and finishes at Seacombe Ferry Terminal, taking in the peninsula's beautiful countryside and coastline and rich history and heritage along the way. The 35-mile long route can be cycled as a complete loop or in sections - the North Wirral Coast, West Wirral (Dee Estuary), South Wirral and East Wirral (Mersey Estuary). Highlights along the way include The North Shore, Leasowe Lighthouse, West Kirby, Thurstaston, Parkgate and Neston, Hooton and Eastham village and Eastham Country Park. Visitors keen to take a well-earned break from cycling will find plenty of other things to see and do across the area. Family attractions include the UK's number one zoo, the recent star of Channel 4's 'The Secret Life of the Zoo', and the exotic deep sea world at Blue Planet Aquarium, Cheshire Oaks, which has one of the largest collections of sharks, fish, spiders and frogs in the country. Another must-see is the former country home of the Egerton family, Tatton Park, with its Tudor Old Hall, mansion, gardens, deer park and working farm. This year, Tatton is celebrating the centenary of the birth of one of the world's favourite children's authors with a packed programme of events and exhibitions showcasing Roald Dahl's Tremendous Adventures. The fascinating history of Britain's waterways comes to life at the National Waterways Museum, Ellesmere Port, also at the unique Anderton Boat Lift at Northwich, built to lift cargo boats 50 feet from the Weaver Navigation to the Trent & Mersey Canal, where tourists can now experience what it's like to be lifted high into the sky. Industrial heritage comes under the spotlight at the Lion Salt Works and Weaver Hall Museum in Northwich and the picturesque Port Sunlight Museum & Garden Village, created by 'Soap King' William Hesketh Lever to house workers at his nearby factory, and also home to outstanding collections at the Lady Lever Art Gallery. Many of the area's cycling routes double as varied and accessible walking trails, and when the sun is shining there's no better place to be than at the beach overlooking beautiful views in Wirral or on miles of uncrowded golden sand at Talacre Beach in Flintshire. For further information, including accommodation options, visit www.discovercheshire.com, www.visitchester.co.uk, www.visitwirral.com and www.discoverflintshire.com. For further details about the Rise Above Sportive and the 2016 Tour of Britain, visit www.riseabovesportive.com and www.cheshiretourofbritain.co.uk

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Cycling Cycling World World


Gregynog Cyclists Accommodation in Mid Wales Gregynog – in the heart of Mid Wales with probably the best cycling in the UK.

Maps and cycle routes advised – different levels of challenge.

Cycling packages on offer with dinner, B&B from £62 pp based on 2 sharing (£124 for 2 people). Menu for optimum cycling performance included.

Beautiful undulating countryside with empty roads.

Group rates available. Secure bike storage.

Contact: 01686 650224 enquiries@gregynog.org gregynog.org

Tour of Britain country (2016 stage 4 is on the doorstep).

Gregynog Hall, Tregynon, Near Newtown, Powys SY16 3PW

Haldon

Forest Punark g 40km of walkin and cycle trails ils Horse riding tra urse Orienteering co ty All-terrain mobili scooter

Cafe, cycle hire! plus lots more

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Try our

Stick Man activity trail

at t more Find ou y.gov.uk/ forestr ckman sti

days Open all year, 7 e th a week! Follow A38 m brown signs fro re info, o m r and A380. Fo 5826 call: 0300 067

forestry.gov.uk/ haldonforestpark

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Family f rest i n t he fo

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Cheshire Ride: Hamlets and Hedgerows Explore quintessential English villages, quaint hamlets and quiet back lanes in this beautiful corner of south Cheshire on this scenic route through gentle hills, woodlands and meres

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he ride starts in Wrenbury, in front of its majestic sandstone church, which dates back to the 16th century. Riding towards the hamlet of Hollyhurst, look out for the obelisk built in 1890 in memory of Field-Marshal Viscount Combermere, who was honoured for his actions in many military campaigns. On a clear day, there are fine views of the Peckforton Hills from the top of Wirswall Hill. Look out for famous landmarks such as Beeston Castle and Jodrell Bank radio telescope. Crowning a rocky crag and boasting spectacular views, Beeston is one of the most dramatically sited medieval castles in England. On a clear day you can see all the way from the Pennines to the Welsh mountains. With a 4,000-year history and a 40-acre woodland park Beeston Castle has something for everyone to enjoy. Jodrell Bank Discovery Centre is a great day out for all the family. Explore the wonders of the universe, listen to the sound of the Big Bang and learn more about the workings of the giant Lovell Telescope. Relax outside in the Galaxy Garden, Space Playground and arboretum, featuring more than 3,000 trees and shrubs. After descending Wirswall Hill, stop a while in Marbury to visit its fascinating leaning church overlooking Big Mere, then ride along the back lanes through Norbury. After cycling alongside the Llangollen branch of the Shropshire Union Canal, ride over the distinctive liftbridge at Wrenbury, then enjoy a well-earned break to watch the narrowboats and admire the fine canal warehouses.

Directions

Cycling Cycling World World

From Wrenbury Church, turn left down Nantwich Road. Turn right by Wrenbury School into Station Road. Turn right at the sharp left-hand bend into Pinsley Green Road. Turn left at Pinsley Green. Turn left under railway bridge. Turn next left at Hollyhurst. Bear right at the next junction. Turn left into Mile Bank Road. Turn next right into Terrick Road and climb Wirswall Hill. Descend the hill and turn right at the T-junction.

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Turn left into Norbury (at this point you can take a detour into Marbury). Take next right at Norbury. Turn right at the next junction. Bear right at the next junction. Turn right over the liftbridge and cycle back into Wrenbury village.

For more information and other cycling routes in Cheshire visit www.visitcheshire.com/things-to-do/explorethe-countryside/cycling-trails

Grade: Moderate Distance: 14miles/22 km Start: Wrenbury Church Map: OS Explorer Map 257 Terrain: Mainly minor roads through undulating countryside


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GB Special


Flintshire Ride: Coed Moel Famau Loop Grade: Easy Distance: 7.5 miles, 12.2 km Start: Moel Famau Forest Car Park

Cycling World

Map: OS Explorer 265

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our of Britain Riders will also cycle through Flintshire, including Mold and the Clywdian Hill, during the longest - and one of the most demanding - stages of the Tour, 217 kilometres from Denbigh to Builth Wells, on Wednesday September 7th. So here is a wonderful Flintshire ride for you to try. This short ride meanders its way through the forest of Moel Famau, climbing steadily to a high point at the edge of the forest with spectacular views over Merseyside and beyond. Then after a great descent you re-enter the forest to ride back to your starting point on the lower slopes of the Clwydian Range.

STAGE 4

DENBIGH TO BUILTH WELLS WEDNESDAY 7 SEPTEMBER

Rhydtalog Mold

tourofbritain.co.uk #ToB2016 Bwlch-y-Safn Newbridge-on-Wye

Denbigh Dyfnant

BUILTH WELLS

Foel Builth Wells

Š Crown copyright Ordnance Survey 2016

Directions : Start at Moel Famau Forest Car Park (fee payable), on a track partially blocked by boulders, near the information board. Climb the track to the north, turning right onto the forest road and beginning the climb through the forest. At the brow of the hill, turn left at the fork in the forest road. Continue straight on at two junctions and at a crossroads with footpath, continuing on the forest road. When the forest road ends, continue straight on to rough track, bearing left approximately 50 metres down, then climb to the forest corner. At the edge of the forest, go through the gate and turn right on the bridleway (Caution: steep descent). Pass through a gate and continue straight on. At a junction with the bridleway, go straight on through the gates. At a road junction, turn right (road becomes unsurfaced by farm). Continue up track through two fords. Re-enter forest and turn left on to forest road. Turn left at the next junction, then continue straight on at the next. At the top of the climb, continue straight on and retrace your route back to the starting point. For further information about cycle routes in Flintshire, ranging from easy family options to serious mountain biking, visit www. ridenorthwales.co.uk

GB Special

Terrain: Forest roads and rough tracks, with steady ascent (450 metres) followed by descent (includes steep section) Look out for the iron age hillforts Moel Arthur and Penycloddiau to the north and Moel Fenlli to the south, and the remains of the Jubilee Tower, which sits atop Moel Famau. Moel Famau Country Park is the gateway to the Clwydian Range and Dee Valley Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, one of only eight protected landscapes in Wales. The Shepherd's Hut offers refreshments at weekends and is located at the top car park at Moel Famau, where you are rewarded with views of the Vale of Clwyd, and the mountains of the Carneddau and Snowdonia. Refreshments are also available daily in the hamlets of Loggerheads and Llanferres, and there are toilets at the start/end of the ride.

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Flintshire

Cycling World

Route Map

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Eat, Sleep, Ride, Repeat. It’s good to get away and see somewhere new. And when you’ve finished a long ride, exploring new places, it’s good to have a little bit of comfort; a cold drink, a hot drink, a microwave, gas hobs, running water, a sofa, double beds with mattresses. The things we take for granted in our own homes. The 6-berth OPUS® Camper Trailer can offer you all of those comforts, plus a whole lot more, including the ability to carry up to 6 cycles on it’s roof. OPUS® takes care of the simple things, leaving you more time to concentrate on your routes.

GB Special

Start planning your next route today with OPUS®

opuscamper.com 01473 601200

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Wirral Ride: North West Cycle Route While we are in the area, here’s a Wirral ride for you to enjoy

GRADE: Moderate/easy DISTANCE: 15miles/24 km (complete route); 5miles/8 km (Wirral Country Park - Ashton Park and back) START: Wirral Way (Wirral Country Park, Station Road, Thurstaston) MAP: OS Explorer Map 266 TERRAIN: Traffic-free and on-road routes with some junctions to cross that can, at times, be busy DIRECTIONS: 1. With the car park behind you, head right down the Wirral Way towards West Kirby. Pass under Station Bridge and Links Bridge, continue through Caldy Golf Course and under Simons Bridge. 2. After passing the golf course, the route drops down a small hill to the junction with Shore Road/Croft Drive. Take care before crossing straight over. Keep to the left, on the bridleway, and continue straight along the Wirral Way to Cubbin's Green. 3. Pause at Cubbin's Green for spectacular views (on a clear day) of Hilbre Island and the North Wales coastline. (Cycling is not permitted here, so please dismount if you enter Cubbin's Green).

Cycling Cycling World World

4. Back on the Wirral Way, pass Ashton Park. Return back along the same path if doing the short route. If not, continue to the end of the Wirral Way and West Kirby Centre.

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5. On leaving the Wirral Way, continue straight on to the junction with Grange Road. Using the toucan crossing, follow the cycle path right and bear left into Orrysdale Road, passing the Concourse Leisure Centre car park and Fire Station. 6. Cross the junction with Bridge Road, past West Kirby Primary School, into Anglesey Road. 7. When you reach a playing field with a small car park, enter the car park and keep left on a shared use path running alongside Hoylake Municipal Golf Course to Hoylake Station.

Thurstaston Beach


Chris Boardman on Wirral Circular Trail

9. Continue along Meols Parade as it turns right up a slight slope to Bennetts Lane. Continue to junction with Park Road. 10. Turn left into Park Road. When you come to a fork, follow the road round to the right into Carr Lane and a level crossing. 11. Take extra care when using the crossing. There is a telephone so you can check with Network Rail that it is safe to cross. Continue along Carr Lane, round to the right, passing houses on your left. Turn left into Carr House Lane. 12. At the junction, turn right into Millhouse Lane and at the traffic lights go straight over into Saughall Road. 13. At the junction with West Kirby Road, turn left when you see a pub on your right. 14. Turn left into Saughall Massie Road following the cycle path past the pelican crossing and turn right into Girtrell Road. You could dismount and use the pelican crossing, walking your bike to Girtrell Road.

15. When the road veers off to the left, continue straight across and over the brook into Wood Lane. 16. Take a left turn, following cycle route 56 signs onto Courtsway West until the junction with Greasby Road. 17. Cross Greasby Road on a toucan crossing onto the Jubilee Route, which merges on to Arrowe Brook Road. 18. Turn right into Arrowe Brook Lane and continue to the roundabout with Mill Lane, Hillbark Road and Mill Hill Road. 19. Turn left into Mill Hill Road and turn almost immediately right into Sandy Lane North. (Sandy Lane can be bumpy and muddy after rain). 19a. Alternatively, continue down Mill Hill Road, turning right into Hill View Road then left into Sandy Lane North. 20. Turn right into Thurstaston Road until you reach the roundabout with Telegraph Road and Station Road. 21. Go straight over into Station Road, turning right and following the road to the left, back to Wirral Country Park car park. For further details about other cycle routes and full details of the Wirral Circular Trail, visit www.visitwirral.com/ attractions-and-activities/cycling-guides.

GB Special

8. On leaving the path, turn left into Carr Lane and cross the railway line. Continue up Station Road to the Kings Gap roundabout. Go straight on towards the coast and on to North Parade, with views of the North Coastline.

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Discover the Dovedale Valley and Peak District by bike, then relax an unwind at the Izaak Walton Hotel…

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he Izaak Walton Hotel is a historic country house hotel which offers comfort and views of outstanding beauty across the Derbyshire & Staffordshire Peaks. Offering easy access to many on road and off road cycling routes, we provide the ideal base to relax and recover. Situated between the picturesque villages of Ilam and Thorpe and nestled within the Derbyshire Peaks, the Izaak Walton Hotel is an AA 3 Star converted 17th Century Country House Hotel offering comfort, history and views of outstanding natural beauty with thirty-eight spacious and well-appointed bedrooms, many of which have views of the Dovedale valley or the hotel gardens. With breath taking views of the Dovedale Valley and creative

interpretations on traditional dishes our AA Rosette awarded Haddon Restaurant is the place to dine in style. Our traditional Dovedale Bar with small low windows, beams and stonework has a warm and cosy atmosphere and serves breakfast, cream teas, light lunches, bar snacks, evening meals and Sunday lunches. We offer excellent rates to all customers and provide free Wifi throughout most parts of the hotel, free parking plus secure storage for bikes. If you are visiting the Peak District and are looking for beautiful accommodation at affordable prices, call us today on 01335350981.

DISCOVER THE BEAUTIFUL DOVEDALE VALLEY... AND THEN RELAX AT THE IZAAK WALTON HOTEL The Izaak Walton Hotel is a historic country house hotel which offers comfort and views of outstanding beauty across the Derbyshire & Staffordshire Peaks. Offering easy access to many on road and off road cycling routes, we provide the ideal base to relax and recover for cyclists wishing to discover the peak district, with additional facilities including:

• • •

drinks (including local ale), food & snacks served daily in our Dovedale Bar with stunning gardens 38 well appointed bedrooms ample & secure storage for bikes complimentary WiFi

To find out about our latest fantastic offers or for more information, please call our reception today on 01335 220 071 or email reception@izaakwaltonhotel.com

The Izaak Walton Hotel, Dovedale, Ilam, nr Ashbourne, DE6 2AY tel. 01335 220 071 email. reception@izaakwaltonhotel.com

www.izaakwaltonhotel.com

%$

% $

GB Special

75


Dartmoor: Desolate Beauty

Cycling Cycling World World

The Tour of Britain will return to Devon after a year's absence. Stage Six will see the world's top teams racing from Sidmouth on the East Devon coast to the summit of Haytor on Dartmoor, the only summit finish. The route is just over 150-kilometres, taking in Ottery St Mary, Honiton, Tiverton, Crediton and Moretonhampstead, before the six kilometre climb to Haytor from Bovey Tracey. CW sent Tudor Tamas to investigate

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Exe Estuary Trail by Devon News Centre


I

t will almost be a repeat of the 2013 stage between the two locations, when Haytor became the first summit finish of the Tour of Britain. The climb now also bears the honour of being the first summit finish to be repeated. The climb will once again be a key moment in this year's route, and coming again on a Friday afternoon, is going to see thousands of cycling fans descending upon Dartmoor to witness the drama first-hand. In 2013 the Devon stage, on the race's 10th anniversary event, was so successful 250,000 spectators turned out. I had a lot on my plate already when Cycling World asked me to represent them on a Visit Devon cycling trip this spring. The tour was planned to start in Exeter in two days’ time and that wouldn’t normally seem to be a problem unless you consider the fact I was based in Sunderland at the time. That meant setting off at 6.00am for a seven-hour journey with three different train services, basically crossing the country diagonally to cover the 360-mile distance – which was fun. You can’t simply decline the chance of cycling in Devon without attracting the hatred of Cycling Gods. It turned out I took the smart decision and managed to stay in the good graces of the bicycle patrons as, totally contrasting the horrible weather from the previous few days, a delightful sunshine accompanied my arrival in Exeter where my contact, Simon Whittam of Onshore, introduced me to the rest of the guys taking part in the trip. On The Waterfront, the Italian restaurant set on the cobbled quayside, was not making the famous crab sandwich, which is pretty much synonymous with Devon,

but it still was a great place for lunch. Literally next-door to our eating place on the Exeter Quay, Saddles & Paddles is offering family-friendly bike and canoe hire services for anybody who wishes to enjoy the many traffic free routes around the area. Children’s bikes, tagalongs and child seats are available, together with the essential kit, maps and route guidance from the friendly owner Heather. She offered a suitable hybrid bike to each one of us, so we set off towards Exe Estuary cycling and walking trail. Almost completely flat, the 26 miles long trail took ten years to be fully restored and is now designed to suit everybody from kids and families to Lycra-clad cyclists. Starting from the most southern point of the estuary in Dawlish Warren, the trail makes a loop around the water through scenic landscape and ends in Exmouth. Also aimed at mobility scooters, it encourages all shared use, frequently displaying signs with the message “Please consider others” and a series of waymarkers shaped like the estuary itself, with brass rubbings for kids to follow and collect. More often than not, it is busy with people but it changes with the time of the day: recreational rides usually on afternoons, commuters earlier. When talking us through the ins and outs of how the cycling path was created, the mastermind behind the project, Roger North, seemed thrilled with his work and had every reason to do so. The project won top South West planning prize in 2015 for its minimum impact on birds and the natural habitat and for successfully integrating the route in the estuary’s sensitive environment, which is a special protection area for birds. When the trail

STAGE 6

SIDMOUTH TO HAYTOR, DARTMOOR

Tiverton

FRIDAY 9 SEPTEMBER Crediton

tourofbritain.co.uk #ToB2016

Cadbury Hill

Chineway Hill

Sidmouth

Haytor, Dartmoor

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Dunchideock

Chudleigh

77 © Crown copyright Ordnance Survey 2016


Exe Estuary Trail All users are asked to consider others when sharing the trail. Please take special care on the on-road sections.

CENTRAL

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Cycling Cycling World World

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was built, the team worked closely with the RSPB to assist in planting bird hides to provide natural screening for birds. In some areas, the cycle trail is on the lower level and the walking path on higher ground so the birds are not disturbed by passing cyclists. The result is quite simply brilliant. Long sections of the trail stretch along the railway tracks connecting the coastal villages of Starcross, Topsham, Exton and Lympstone, thus benefiting of plenty of pubs and inns, most famous of each is the Turf Lock Inn. The old timber-framed building is a hugely popular spot set in stunning scenery, offering a campsite and a fix-your-bike service besides an inviting menu and a wide range of drinks to choose from. Passing by Lympstone Comando Training Centre where the Royal Marines train was totally unexpected but it happened nonetheless as it is situated just near the canal, bordering the cycling path – one of the first sections opened. The best part of the ride, however, was by far and away the Topsham Ferry. At first sight, nothing about the grey-bearded guy running the ferry would hint at his amazing story, but luckily he was in a chatty mood and keen to share it with us. He holds the world record for the most time spent underwater, which is no less than nine (9!) days. Pulling off the feat in the 80s, the guy raised plenty of money for a charity to build a new ward at a Birmingham hospital. Guinness World Records recognise his achievement but would not allow anybody else to have a go because it is considered too dangerous. He slept, drank and ate underwater in an artificial pool, supervised by his team who replaced his oxygen tanks. Proud of his tale, the ferry guy took us to the other side of the estuary despite it being a Tuesday, the only day of the week when the service is not running. Topsham ferry and slipway were both upgraded with the funds for the cycle trail so the boat can now fit up to ten bikes and ten people but, for reasons of safety, it would only usually take four and four. The remake of the trail completely transformed the ferryboat business into an extremely lucrative one for the old record holder, in spite of the rather insignificant fares: £1.15 for adults and 60p for children, pushchairs, bicycles and dogs. After passing through Topsham, a village that still bears a strong Dutch influence due to the trade done locally with sailors coming from the Low Countries in the past, we stopped for a quick pint of the much praised Otter Ale and wasabi-flavoured snacks at the traditional Swann Inn – quite a welcome break for anybody cycling around Exe Estuary. Ten miles north of Dartmoor National Park, the picturesque 16th Century Lamb Inn was the ideal resting place and the Cox’s Rump steak served with Devon Blue Cheese sauce calmed the tremor of excitement in my stomach – it was Dartmoor National Park on the cards the following day and I was about to get atop Haytor climb before the big guns in the pro peloton would do it. The Tour of Britain is back in Devon on the 9th of September after overlooking the county during last year’s edition and the stage is almost a carbon copy of the highly

To Budleigh Salterton

DAWLISH WARREN DAWLISH Crown copyright. All rights reserved. Devon County Council. Licence No. 100019783 2015

Stover Way by Devon News Centre


Cycle the Granite Way in Devon The Granite Way (Part of Devon Coast 2 Coast) Granite Way Cycles with fleet of over 80 cycles (Adult and Junior Sizes). With one of the finest gyms in

Cycle Hire, Workshop & Sales for Giant & Bobbin Bikes. Direct Access to Granite Way with car park and cafe (seasonal) on site.

Okehampton we provide a full range of fitness classes, personal training & Cycle Hire & Sales

much more. Visit www.1life.co.uk

Granite Way Cycles based at YHA Okehampton

01837 53916 (Office) 01837 650907 (Cycle Shop) www.granitewaycycles.co.uk

Email- gmokehampton@1life.co.uk Phone- 01837 659154

Woodmans Huts

Nestling at the southern end of the lovely Rusland Valley you will find two hand built Shepherd Huts one sleeping four and one sleeping two. Sitting neatly in their own garden with gated access & private parking. Secure bike storage with washing facilities for your bikes after a day on the fells. The Woodmans Huts are the very best in Glamping, with their own bathroom and kitchen area. Comfy beds and crisp white bedding. Fully equipped which provide everything you require for a relaxing stay, even down to champagne glasses! Underfloor heating ensures you will be cosy and warm throughout the coldest weather. Ideally located in the South Lakes, four miles from Grizedale Forest - a bikers paradise! Five minutes from the south end of Lake Windermere. Spend a day out on the bike trails which are directly from your front door, to be welcomed back to the BBQ Artic Cabin, with its open fire and reindeer skin seating. A great retreat away from it all but with everything on your doorstop.

    

Woodmans Huts, Haverthwaite, Cumbria, LA12 8AB 07809402484 woodmanshuts@gmail.com /woodmanshuts @woodmanshuts

GB Special

Accommodation

Cycle trailer service for Devon Coast 2 Coast. Take to Bideford, collect at Plymouth and stay at YHA Okehampton.

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Wee Row Hostel at New Lanark Wake up in a World Heritage Site located in the spectacular Clyde Valley. • Group bookings welcome • 1 hour from Glasgow & Edinburgh • 18 rooms with river views & ensuite facilities • Range of facilities including well equipped Kitchen • TV Room, Bike Store, Meeting Room, Free Wifi access

Cycling World

01555 666710 weerowhostel@newlanark.org www.newlanarkhostel.co.uk

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Exe Trail Exmouth to Lympstone by Devon News Centre

GB Special

successful Sidmouth to Haytor from 2013. Some 250,000 spectators created an electrifying atmosphere along the route as they witnessed Simon Yates reaching the Tor summit in Dartmoor, ahead of the likes of Nairo Quintana and Bradley Wiggins, at the end of the 6 kilometres climb with a 6% average grade. Devon has built this reputation of having the Tour of Britain criss-crossing its exhausting countryside in recent years, devising challenging routes that would keep the riders happy and away from motorways, as well as showcasing the county as a holiday destination for families and a cycling region. Devon has so much to offer in terms of beautiful scenery, taverns, micro pubs and flourishing local farming that it’s hard to resist its inviting lands. The hard work of the team organising the Tour of Britain is perfectly mirrored by the excited locals who are always ready to welcome anybody spending their holiday in Devon. The Haytor climb starts in the market town of Bovey Tracey right at the edge of Dartmoor and is easy to reach from the A38. However, for families and anybody who wishes to enjoy an almost completely traffic-free ride before taking in the beauties of the National Park that inspired Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s The Hound of the Baskervilles, the adventure should start with the six-mile long Stover Trail that sets off in Newton Abbot. Although relatively short, the trail passes through some amazing places making it possible to spend a whole day out along its course before heading west en route for Haytor Vale or continuing north where the trail extends towards Moretonhampstead in Dartmoor – the final calling point of Wray Valley Trail when it’s completed. Besides the charming ‘Green Flag Award’ Stover Country Park and the butterflies’ heaven that is Teigngrace Meadow, the Stover Trail also runs through the Stover Canal, home of what’s left of the old Haytor Granite Tramway used to transport granite from quarries on Dartmoor to the Canal. The peculiar aspect about the tramway is that the rail tracks were made out of granite fashioned in such a way to allow the use of horse-drawn carriages. The railway started operated in 1820 and was closed 38 years later as cheaper granite was available from Cornwall. Leaving behind the Stover Trail and the many pubs in Bovey Tracey, we finally made it to Dartmoor and, as we leaned against the rocks that ironically resemble a foot at the top of Haytor climb, we took a moment to breathe in the sheer beauty of this legendary, mysterious and immensely evocative land. Peppered with scary tales that lure 2,25 million people in from across the world every year, Dartmoor has countless unique features that make it an ideal place for an active and entertaining weekend out. Walking is by far the main recreational activity among visitors but there is plenty of

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Halfords Wharf Road Unit 1, Newton Road RetailTQ12 Park 2DA Newton Abbot Newton Abbot TQ12 3HS Tel: 01626 Tel: 01626 362761 438353 www.halfords.com Email: info@procyclecentre.com

Sandygate B3195

Middle Park Yard Gorse Blossom Farm

Hot Pursuit Cycles Unit 6-7, Sandygate Business Park Strap Lane, Kingsteignton Newton Abbot TQ12 3XF Tel: 01626 354082 Email: sales@hot-pursuit-cycles.co.uk www.hotpursuit Pro Cycle Centre

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forPro anyCycle errorsCentre or omissions. The representation on this map of any road, path or Wharf way is no evidence of the existence of a right of way or of Devon County Road Council’s Newtonmaintenance Abbot TQ12responsibility. 2DA Tel: 01626 438353 © Crown copyright and database rights 2016 Email: info@procyclecentre.com Ordnance Survey 100019783 www.procyclecentre.com

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Babcombe Copse

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by Sustrans FourPoint Mapping for Devon County Council.

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Little Bovey Bungalow

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24/03/2016 12:30

Penninn

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3

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cycling and horse riding as well. To make it possible for people who want to hike End through, Dartmoor is the only theirMile way Highweek National Park in England where you’re allowed to wild camp for the night, yet you’re compelled to move on in Newton the Abbot morning. Footpaths, however, don’t tend to be signed and a track could become several all of a sudden, leaving you stranded in the thick of ponies, cattle and sheep roaming over the moors. Wolborough Unless you’re a good navigator it’s better to get a guided walk tour and not keep the rescue services too busy. With hilly routes stretching over a total of 96 miles, there is no shortage of options for all types of cyclists, including for those riding electric bikes who have the chance to take part in tours specially organised for the growing numbers of e-bike users. Dartmoor Brewery, the highest one in the United Kingdom, is an amazing place to stop for a drink and likewise are several old cider houses transformed into holiday accommodation for families, with no electricity or running water, for a totally rustic experience. As we ended the day with a rare tailwind basically propelling us downhill into the sunset, the sun slowly turning into a huge blooded disc, I was thinking just how perfectly suited for cycling the moors are. It is easy to see why the Tour of Britain has chosen to visit Dartmoor again this year.

24/03/2016 12:30

Penninn


15 Located in the beautiful Wye Valley with spectacular views of the Forest of Dean. Fabulous cycling on and off road right from the front door ! On the Lands End John o’ Groats route if coming via South Wales.. The bar has a relaxed atmosphere with a wood burning open fire, a cosy restaurant real ales and a well-balanced wine list of over 75 options including white and sparkling wines from local Monmouthshire vineyards. The Inn welcomes all cycling enthusiasts. Secure overnight bike garage available. We also have dedicated dog friendly accommodation and bar.

January 2016 - The Telegraph Food Team’s 10 favourite British gastro pubs

Penallt, Monmouth, Monmouthshire, NP25 4SE

01600 772765

#thinkhorsethink15

www.theinnatpenallt.co.uk enquiries@theinnatpenallt.co.uk

GB Special

Horses are unpredictable. Passing horses wide and slow can prevent deaths of drivers, riders and horses.

THE INN AT PENALLT - CYCLE FRIENDLY !

1406475

Dead? Or Dead Slow? Your Choice

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Deloitte Ride Across Britain 969 miles by bike from Land’s End to John O’Groats www.rideacrossbritain.com

Cycling World

PHOTOS BY THRESHOLD SPORTS

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Deloitte Ride Across Britain is the largest cycling event of its kind in the UK and last year 93% of all the riders rated it as one of the best experiences of their lives. Cycling the length of the British Isles from one end to the other captures the imagination. It’s one of those challenges, cyclist or not, that appeals to our natural adventurous spirit. It’s incredibly rewarding to see every inch of the British landscape under your own steam, but like everything worthwhile, it’s not easy and it requires grit and determination. Deloitte Ride Across Britain route offers the best cycling in the UK. It takes in the most beautiful parts Britain from barren moorlands and majestic highlands to lush green valleys, winding back lanes and stunning coastal roads. Riders average 108 miles a day and climb around 15,000m over the nine days; the equivalent of 13 times up Alpe d’Huez or almost twice the height of Everest. Route director, Andy Cook, says: “The three main criteria for the Deloitte Ride Across Britain are safety to all participants and other road users; ease of navigation; and ensuring it’s picturesque and scenic. We want the Ride to be challenging but at the same time achievable by as wide an audience as possible.” The Ride is fully supported and there is a battalion of crew making sure riders are fed, watered, massaged, showered and looked after - especially on the bad days.  Each night they come in to a fully serviced basecamp with tea and toast on the go, power showers ready to wash off the mud and sweat, teams of physios and doctors to repair and restore the body and five choices of main course in the catering hall to make sure everyone’s ready for the next day.   There are men and women of all ages from all walks of life with different levels of cycling experience, ability and fitness from the elite cyclists to complete beginners. Jim Davis, 70, and the Deloitte RAB’s oldest participant says, “The Ride exceeded all of my expectations - anxiety, trepidation, excitement, fear, exhilaration, organisation, food, accommodation, route directions, support, safety, satisfaction, achievement.” Many are there to fundraise. The event has raised £3.5 million pounds for 75 charities over six years.  It’s the best fund raising cycling event per capita in Britain.  Deloitte’s official charity is Paralympics GB. The £1.6 million they have raised from the event has

made a significant difference to how well prepared the team were for London and will be for the Rio Paralympics. Challenges like this bring out the best in people. The stories behind the riders are moving; someone finding a degree of solace from the loss of a child or a parent, someone else recovering from cancer and others simply making the most of being completely healthy.   Totti Kay, 40, has lived with bowel cancer since she was 23 and has raised more than £108,000 for Cancer Research. She finished last year’s Ride on a tandem with her best friend Marion Templeman and says: “The Ride was incredibly tough – and it took me a month to recover, probably because my immune system is weaker than it should be – but we had so many great moments. We cried with laughter and we sobbed with pain. It was the best thing I have ever done and Marion and I now have an unbreakable bond.” A few days into the journey a tremendous camaraderie is established, which is affectionately known as the Deloitte RAB bubble.  Everyone has a bad day at some point but there are great acts of kindness between riders and quiet words of encouragement when people really need it. You have to be part of the bubble to really feel it. With the right training and preparation, a healthy dose of respect for the challenge and a half decent bike, anyone can do the Ride and feel the explosion of self-esteem at the finish line.   Next year there will be more ways to take part in the Deloitte Ride Across Britain. As well as the original nine-day Classic package, there will be the Plus option, which covers the same nine-day route but riders stay in hotels rather than camp. In the new Ultra package, those looking for a tougher challenge will cover the route in just five days, staying in hotels. England and Scotland only packages enable riders to complete individual sections of the route and even come back the following year to complete the other part of the Ride. Florence Ware, who finished last year, says, “My advice to anyone contemplating the Deloitte Ride Across Britain? Just go for it! With a bit of training, almost anyone is capable of riding – and enjoying it. It’s an amazing opportunity to take yourself out of your comfort zone, get fit, see the country and meet some great people“. To find out more about next year’s Deloitte Ride Across Britain, which takes place from 9th-17th September 2017, and more about the different packages available, please visit www.rideacrossbritain.com

GB Special

O

n 10th September this year more than 800 cyclists will set off on their very own special Tour of Britain: a nine day, 969-mile journey by bike from Land’s End to John O’Groats. A nervous Cycling World Editor will be among them.

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CHALLENGE YOURSELF 2017

Pyrenees Multisport is based in the centre of the French Pyrenees and is open all year round for Cycling Training, Self Guided and Guided Holidays. Ian & Julie have been organising the most sprectacular holidays and cycle tours for the past 12 years and will personally look after you and support you all the way. They are cyclists and know exactly what you need. Choose a relaxed Self Guided Holiday or any one of our Grande Tours detailed below. ......................... ........................ ........................

CENT COLS - PYRENEES

This is our version of the 100 climbs in the Pyrenees. Registered with the Cent Cols Club organisation and legible for the infamous CENT COLS CLUB certificate. There are only a handful of cyclists registered as completing this challenge, but it is our goal to support all of our riders though this fantastic tour to completion. 10 stages through the most beautiful countryside in France and Spain. For 2017 we have the 1988 Ironman World Champion, Scott Molina, riding our 3rd edition of the event. COME AND RIDE THE ULTIMATE BIKE TOUR

26th to 7th September .........................

TOUR DE CORSE Circumnavigation of Corsica with stunning climbs on this 1 week tour 21st to 28th May

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1 week from the Atlantic to the Med, tackling Aspin Aubisque & Tourmalet

TOUR BASQUE of the COUNTRY

GIRO DOLOMITI

1 Week of Spectacular lumpy riding.

7 Days of Riding 18 passes including Stelvio, Giau, Gavia

Lake Geneva to Nice. 100 hours coast to coast Taking in Alp D’Huez across 18 famous climbs Including the Tourmalet & Col du Galibier

10th to 17th June

25th to 2nd June

5th to 12th Aug

13th to 21st Aug

RAID ALPINE RAID PYRENEAN 10th to 16th Sept

Tel: +33 567 48 51 51 www.pyreneesmultisport.com

Safe bike lock up

Dogs welcome in B&B and on site

Cycling World

Blackthorn Farm is an award winning family run Bed and Breakfast, Camping and Touring site. Situated in an idyllic spot on peaceful Holy Island in North Wales, it is set in 18 acres of outstanding unspoilt beauty with panoramic views encompasing the Irish Sea, the Snowdonia mountains, and the breathtaking coastal views of the Isle of Anglesey.

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Within walking distance of Blackthorn Farm is a beautiful local beach and peaceful coastal trails where you can enjoy the peace and quiet, and more often than not catch a glimpse of some of the local wildlife. Within a few minutes drive is the famous South Stack lighthouse as well as the town of Holyhead which offers rail facilities to the rest of North Wales and high speed ferry services to Ireland. just a few

minutes from the mainline train station, Holyhead

Visit www.blackthornfarm.co.uk Email enquiries@blackthornfarm.co.uk Call 01407 765262


ŠKODA Brings ‘Le Tour’ to British Shores Cycling enthusiasts can complete Tour de France stages using equivalent routes across the UK. Rides can be selected based on location, length and difficulty

GB Special

M

ilton Keynes, Wigan, Stockport, and Swansea may not be the obvious locations that spring to mind when you think of Tour de France climbs, but for UK cycling fans that's about to change thanks to the launch of an innovative new online platform from ŠKODA which brings the world's most famous cycling race to British shores.    For the first time in the world, the ‘Little Bit of the Tour’ tool – now live as BETA on the ŠKODA website – allows cycling enthusiasts to search for UK-based routes that closely match the twists and turns of The Tour de France. And, if they’re up to the challenge, users can complete little bits of all 21 stages of the brutal, legburning race.   All riders need to do is visit the website and enter their postcode, opt for their preferred Tour de France stage, and decide how far they wish to cycle. Within seconds SKODA's interactive mapping tool will reveal equivalent routes in the UK and cyclists will get the chance to give feedback and assist in the development of the tool for other riders.   In addition to thousands of available routes, the tool also encourages friendly rivalry between users. Cyclists can challenge friends and/or fellow unknown lovers of two wheels to beat their times and share their achievements on social media.   Whether it’s Mont-Saint-Michel or Paris' ChampsÉlysées, cyclists don’t need to cross the English Channel to be part of the famous race that has captured hearts of so many since 1903.   To take part in a ride and feedback on the ‘Little bit of the Tour’ tool, visit: www.skoda.co.uk/cycling/littlebit on desktop and mobile.

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Cycling World


UK and Ireland Rides

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GB Special

As part of our UK and Ireland special, Cycling World features riding in some special regions. Isle of Wight is our main feature, a beautiful island made for cycling. We then move onto a county known as Britain’s Hidden Gem, Rutland. The nation’s smallest county is full of rolling countryside and waterside cycle paths. We then escape to Ireland to visit Kilkenny. There's no better place for Irish hospitality than Kilkenny City, with its medieval cobbled streets and old-world charm. Co. Kilkenny is great for bike rides with plenty of cosy cafes and pubs along the way to take shelter in. A great cycle holiday is not far away!

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Cycling World

Isle of Wight: Bicycle Island

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to watch ‘Paddington’ with the

ride and a faster paced section.

to enjoy the wonderful spread


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GB Special


Cycling World

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ocated just a few miles off the mainland and only two hours from the centre of London, the Isle of Wight is the perfect place to unwind and escape the pressures of everyday life. Where else could you encounter fields, rivers, downland and dramatic coastline all in the course of a day’s cycling? Approximately 23 miles long and 13 miles wide, the Isle of Wight is a year round cyclist’s paradise, with over 500 miles of cycle and bridleways weaving their way through dramatic and contrasting Island landscapes. Cycle along quiet country lanes and pathways and discover quintessentially English villages, country pubs, traffic-free paths and unspoilt countryside. The “Bicycle Island” offers something for every cyclist, from multi-day tours to relaxing afternoon rides, making the Isle of Wight an ideal destination for a UK cycling holiday or short break, and we recently scooped top spot in Lonely Planet’s “Top 10 World Cycling Routes." Bicycle Island has added new cycle ways, bike-carrying buses, additional bike hire, baggage transfer, and new cycle parking across the Island, to make your Isle of Wight cycling holiday even easier. So get on your bike and head for Bicycle Island - it’s never been easier to take to two wheels. There are cycling routes to suit everyone, with a choice of challenging off-road bridleways, peaceful byways and level purpose-made tracks on former railway lines. Cycles can be hired from a number of different outlets throughout the Island and there are companies that are able to offer a delivery service, guided on - or off road guided rides. CYCLING ROUTES Bicycle Island is the cycling brand of the Isle of Wight, celebrating our highly reputed status as one of the top cycling destinations in the world. As part of this we have launched a series of new cycle trails and routes for you to explore – www. visitisleofwight.co.uk The Isle of Wight cycling routes can be broken into half-day rides or multi-day rides, depending on what you are looking to do. Many of the half-day rides are quite easy routes that provide great family cycling days out, and explore different areas of the Island. If you want to fully explore the varied landscape and coastline of the Island, and want a more challenging route then you should try one of the multi-day rides, such as the Route. If you want a truly unique cycling experience, then check out the "Red Squirrel Trail". Much of this family-friendly cycle route runs along sections of the Island's former railway track. The unmistakable leg of the trail which takes riders between Merstone and Newport features specially commissioned "Troll" sculptures and picnic benches along its length, along with lots of wildlife friendly installations to encourage birds and other wildlife.


Eden visit

E

den in the county of Cumbria, is a very special area in the north of England, taking in parts of the Lake District National Park, Yorkshire Dales National Park and the North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Taking its name from the beautiful River Eden, which threads its way through the Eden Valley, Eden has an amazing diversity of landscapes in a relatively small area which makes it the perfect place to cycle! Some well- known long distance routes pass through Eden, including the C2C, giving a taste of the area, but there’s lots more to discover on two wheels! A set of free Do in a Day cycle guides featuring circular on and off road routes around Ullswater, Appleby & Kirkby Stephen, Alston and Penrith are available from local Tourist Information Centres and the routes can be downloaded from www.visiteden.co.uk which also features cyclist-friendly accommodation.

GB Special

Penrith has long been a traditional overnight stop on the popular C2C route, but this welcoming market town is an ideal base from which to explore more of the fantastic cycling opportunities that Eden has to offer. The town is also the starting point for the new Lakes and Dales Loop (www.lakesdalesloop.co.uk), a 190 mile circular cycle route through the Lake District, Yorkshire Dales and Eden Valley.

Eden visit

Plan your perfect adventure...

www.visiteden.co.uk

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The Isle of Wight is a year round cyclist’s paradise, with miles of cycle and bridleways weaving their way through dramatic and contrasting landscapes.

www.wight-wanders.co.uk

I

Tel 01983 281662

SPECIAL OFFER Quote code:

CYCLE16 to receive 5% discount on your 2016 booking

¢ Excellent choice of quality assured accommodation ¢ Pre-bookable guest experience packages ¢ Personal service from our experienced team

Cycling World

¢ Quick, simple booking system

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0800 148 8228 01983 619 720 11 Daish Way Newport Isle of Wight PO30 5XJ

Richmond Wight Estates is a leading name in the UK leisure park sector. Our team of experts have many years of experience developing, managing and running high profile parks. The group currently owns and operates an impressive portfolio of holiday parks, luxury lodge parks, residential park home developments and country estates across England and Scotland. Our approach is simple - Acquire, Develop and Grow We provide both institutional and private investors with exposure to the lucrative UK leisure park industry. Our goal is to generate long-term absolute returns which enhance capital and provide high levels of income. Looking to sell? With a generous investor fund at our disposal we can act fast offering a realistic market valuation and the quick purchase of parks that meet our specific requirements.


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GB Special


RED SQUIRRELS WITH WHEELS?

A

lready famous for being one of the few places in the UK where it’s possible to catch glimpse of a red squirrel, the Isle of Wight can promise a lot more sightings from 2016. The only difference is that this particular colony has wheels, rather than big fluffy tails…and will have much more in common with the French postal service, than a cute species of squirrel. New, “Red Squirrel Electric Bikes” are already available for hire on the Isle of Wight. The same make and model of electric bike as used by the French postal service, they are fitted with a small battery-powered motor, giving a subtle power boost which makes riding into wind feel like a gentle breeze, and hills like a gentle slope. In a nut shell, they will allow visitors to “Bicycle Island” the opportunity to cover much more ground and have more time exploring the hidden corners of the Isle of Wight than they would on a conventional bicycle. The bikes offer a range of up to 60 miles on a single charge, and the front wheel motor provides three levels of assistance on speeds up to 15.5 mph, as well as a ‘walk assist’ mode which is useful for pushing the bike up steeper inclines.

Cycling World World Cycling

With a lightweight aluminum frame and front suspension fork, the Red Squirrel Electric Bike comes fully equipped with a sprung comfort saddle, full mudguards to prevent clothes being affected by oil, lights, a useful rear pannier, and even a handlebar mounted USB charging point handy to boost your mobile phone or music player! Braking is taken care of by powerful alloy V-brakes with a battery cut off for efficient stopping in all conditions. There are charging locations across the Island.

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The new colony of Red Squirrels are based at the Guildhall Visitor Information Centre in Newport, on the Isle of Wight, where a friendly team of Travel Ambassadors will always be on hand to offer ideas on places to go, and things to see. Alternatively, details of several well-marked bicycle trails around

the Island can be found at http:// www.visitisleofwight.co.uk/inspiration/ bicycle-island. And everyone hiring a bike will receive a Bicycle Island Isle of Wight Cycle Map, featuring 12 routes from a gentle 5-miles route to Sandown, to a 16-miles run out to Cowes. A separate 66-miles ‘Taste the Island’ route is one of the other trails available to keener cyclists. Once named in Lonely Planet’s Top 10 World Cycling Destinations, the Isle of Wight is a year round cyclist’s paradise - with over 500 miles of cycle and bridleways weaving their way through dramatic and contrasting Island landscapes. The Peugeot EC03 200 bikes make light work of some of the Isle of Wight’s hilly terrain, and offer visitors a great new way of exploring the Island. As the website address says: you’d be “nuts not to”. For further details, visit http://www. nutsnotto.co.uk. Hire charges range from £20 per bike for one person for half a day, to the value-for-money £120 full day hire for four bikes.


Bicycle Island – Isle of Wight Cycle Map (1:46,500)

£4.99 Bicycle Island

© Visit Isle of Wight

Published in co-operation with Visit Isle of Wight

15 colour-coded routes marked on Ordnance Survey sourced mapping

Includes Red Squirrel Trail, Round the Island Route and the Chalk Ridge Extreme

12 shorter rides (5-16 miles)

Distances, track elevations and difficulty ratings given for each route

Includes town plan insets, E-Bike charge points, Tourist Information Points and visitor attractions

Details of cycle-friendly accommodation and bike shops & services included

Full network of cycle paths and bridleways marked, allowing cyclists to join routes together and create their own routes

Heritage House also publish cycle maps of the New Forest and Dorset (routes recommended by Forest Leisure Cycling and Cyclexperience)

£3.50 New Forest by Bike £3.50 Purbeck by Bike

GB Special

Heritage House (Publishers) Ltd Steam Mill Road, Bradfield, Manningtree, Essex CO11 2QT97 Tel: 01255 870595 www.heritage-house.co.uk


SUSTRANS'

TRAFFIC-FREE CYCLE RIDE SANDOWN TO COWES – RED SQUIRREL TRAIL N EW TOW N

TEXT BY WENDY JOHNSON www.sustrans.org.uk/CyclingWorld B 3 4 01

Distance: 15 miles Start: Sandown Pier Finish: Cowes Harbour Train stations: Sandown and Ryde (Island Coaster buses can take up to six bikes each). Reach the Isle of Wight by ferry from Portsmouth Harbour to Ryde, Southampton to East Cowes, or Lymington to Yarmouth. Grade: Moderate

B3399

A3 05 5

Cowes by Jonathan Parker © Sustrans

TERRAIN, GRADIENTS AND ACCESS

Mostly flat but with some gentle gradients. Tarmac path and stony trail, with a wooden boardwalk section at Horringford. Some small road crossings and short, on-road sections at Sandown, Newport, and Cowes.

Cycling Cycling World World

LOOPS, LINKS AND LONGER RIDE

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The Red Squirrel Trail covers 23.5 miles in its entirety, which includes a signed loop via the pretty village of Godshill. Start in Cowes and follow the coast to coast route to Merstone where the route splits. Turn right to reach Godshill, Wroxall and Shanklin. Follow the shoreline north to Sandown before re-joining the coast to coast route and ending back at Merstone. The loop includes some steeper gradients and on-road riding. More experienced riders might also try NCN 67 Round the Island Route, a challenging 64-mile, on-road loop of the Isle of Wight.

EAT AND DRINK

The Beach Café is at Sandown at the start. At Newchurch, try Pedallers’ Cycle Café, The Pointer Inn and The Garlic Farm. The Island Bakers, Blue Door Café and Quay Arts Café Bar are all excellent in Newport. Sails Café in Cowes and Mrs Jones Tea Depot in East Cowes are both nice. Seek out Minghella ice cream, made on the island, and the Isle of Wight’s speciality ‘crab on chips’.

CYCLE HIRE

Isle Cycle is in Sandown (01983) 400055, and in Cowes (01983) 299056 www.islecycle.co.uk or Wight Cycle Hire, Yarmouth (01983) 761800 www.wightcyclehire.co.uk

STAY

WIDER AREA CYCLE MAP

The Caledon Guesthouse, Cowes (01983) 293599 www.the-caledon.co.uk

Nicknamed ‘Britain in miniature’, the Isle of Wight has the most superb coast to coast route in miniature too. Rolling hillsides, wisteria-covered tearooms, thatched cottages

Rosemary Cottage, Newchurch (01983) 867735 www.rosemarycottagebreaks.co.uk

Hampshire & Isle of Wight


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55 and30traditional pubs are all quintessentially British, but the golden beaches, sapphire seas and balmy summer climate are more akin to the Mediterranean, making for a ride like 5 no other. 05 A3

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Start beside the beach3 at Sandown, overlooking the A 3055 sea and chalk cliffs at Culver Down.A Quickly leave the sea behind, however, and head into the wet meadows, woodland and wildflower grassland of Alverstone Mead nature reserve. There are gorgeous views over the lush green hills here, and the viewing hide beside Skinners Meadow offers the best chance of seeing some of the island’s well-loved red squirrels, hence the name of the trail. At Newchurch, a few miles further along the trail, the tangy scent of garlic wafts across the route from The Garlic Farm, which is open to visitors and worth the very short country lane detour. Try the garlic in the popular café, or stroll around the farm to see brown hares boxing in the wildflower meadows in spring. Continue following the course of the River Yar through the beautiful Arreton Valley to Merstone Station, where picnic benches beside the crop fields make a peaceful spot to rest at around the halfway point.

Gently crumpled hills are a beautiful backdrop in the ride’s second half, and you’ll pass beneath a canopy of ash trees at Blackwater, before joining up with the River Medina into Newport. This is the Isle of Wight’s principal town and is well worth exploring. There’s also the option here to follow a short, on-road section of NCN 22 to Carisbrooke Castle, one of the most fascinating historic sites on the island. Leaving Newport reach Medina Riverside Park where the river begins to widen and the extraordinary spires of St Mildred’s church at Whippingham can eventually be seen on the horizon across the water. End in the centre of Cowes, a lovely town for a stroll, and a particularly lively place in August when Cowes Week, its famous annual regatta, takes place. Cowes is divided in two by the mouth of the River Medina, so after exploring the western side of the water take a five-minute trip on the chain ferry to East Cowes (the ferry is free and bikes are permitted) to visit Osborne House, Queen Victoria’s holiday home.

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Wightlink

Wight Challenge

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he sixteenth Wightlink Wight Challenge takes place on the Isle of Wight in September. This popular, quirky, stand-alone event which began in 2004 has grown to become an iconic cycling, canoeing and running island event. Teams of three which stick together for the day, begin with a nineteen-mile cycle, mostly off-road up and over the Downs; on good days the views from the top stretch across the Channel and down to Poole in Dorset. The water section in seventeen-foot open Canadian canoes follows marker buoys up and back on the Newtown River. The National Trust bird sanctuary is on both sides and MOD firing range behind, so general public are not allowed anywhere near and teams have the place to themselves. The third discipline is an eight-mile run, both on and off road and teams must remain together to provide a team time at the end. It is a challenge not a race and in the organiser’s eyes the winners are those who raise the most for charity. For many years the event has supported Wessex Heartbeat, Sail 4 Cancer and The Rainbow Centre, this year the fund raising total should top £250K for money raised since 2004. Wightlink ferries have sponsored the event for six years and offer teams free travel across the Solent, a huge boost for the event, and as a result, two thirds of teams enter from mainland UK, with some teams flying in from abroad. Visiting teams are struck at the friendliness of the event, when one team has a puncture, others often stop to help. The ethos of the event is friendliness, fund raising and enjoyment and are almost more relevant than speed! However, team times are taken and everyone is very keen to be at the top of the list. The Isle of Wight is an ideal destination for UK cycling, there are cycling routes to suit everyone, with a choice of challenging off-road bridleways, peaceful byways and level purpose-made tracks on former railway lines. Within an area of just 147 square miles you will find over 200 miles of cycle routes enticing you into the countryside or along the coast. Cycles can be hired from a number of different outlets throughout the Island and there are companies that are able to offer a delivery service, guided on or off road guided rides. www.wightchallenge.co.uk


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Promotional Feature - UKSA

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Cycling WorldFeature Promotional

KSA’s 3.5 acre campus is the largest purpose-built residential watersports centre in Europe. Our onshore facilities are perfectly set up for individuals and groups of all sizes – with 270 residential beds. The campus provides everything you need on site with facilities including an indoor heated swimming pool, dining room, and bar and coffee shop overlooking the water. UKSA is based in Cowes, Isle of Wight - just a short hop over from Southampton, Portsmouth or Lymington, or make a holiday of it!

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The residential facilities (3-Star rated by Quality in Tourism) can be used as a base to explore the Isle of Wight and all it has to offer. If you are visiting the Island on a family break, a cycling trip or sports event, UKSA’s warm, clean, safe accommodation makes it the ideal choice for somewhere to stay. The dormitory-style accommodation sleeps up to 200 people and there is also a range of en-suite twin and single rooms. Whether you are looking to develop existing skills, learn something new or just have some fun while visiting the Island – you are sure to find something that suits you! UKSA’s team building and multi-activity courses are programmed all year round for

both children (age eight upwards) and adults. This means whole families can have fun together, or adult groups can try something challenging, or parents can book their children in whatever their initial skillset. There are several reasons to check it out for yourselves, and a good start is the range of recreational courses, which can last as long as two hours up to a few days! A variety of disciplines are offered, from dinghy sailing and kayaking, to windsurfing and the latest must-do watersport - Stand Up Paddleboarding. You could even try powerboating! Quality training is provided on either a one to one or group basis, and many of the courses have certification attached to them. Group visits to UKSA have a reputation for being free of hassle and stress. We work hard to make every trip a resounding success, while keeping the workload on group leaders to a minimum. Many groups return year after year because they know and trust what UKSA delivers. Party leaders need no previous experience of water activities - our trained and qualified instructors take care of all activities afloat. For more information on what UKSA has to offer, visit UKSA.org or call 01983 203045


Sea. Change.

From to

staying with us

enjoying the buzz of watersports with us… UKSA’s 3.5 acre waterfront campus is perfectly set up for individuals and groups of all sizes. A self-contained activity centre which sleeps up to 270 visitors, with indoor heated pool, dining room and bar and coffee shop overlooking the water. •

Use as a base to explore the Isle of Wight

Dormitory style 6/8 berth rooms, single and en-suite rooms

Fully residential options

Learn to dinghy sail, keelboat, kayak, windsurf or stand up paddleboard

Team building games and activities

Visit uksa.org Email schools@uksa.org Call 01983 203045

Council for Learning Outside the Classroom

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Quality Badge awarded by

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Recreation

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Isle of Wight Ride Around Cowes Map and boxed text from Bicycle Island Map £4.99 from Heritage House available at www.heritage-house.co.uk

Distance

16 miles / 28km

Starting Point

Cowes, Newport or Parkhurst Forest

Track Elevation 0 – 200 ft (60m)

Difficulty

Confident Cyclists

Route Summary

The off-road Medina Cycleway between Cowes and Newport is ideal for a short there and back ride. The A3054 from St Mary’s Hospital is busy but cycling is permitted on the gravel tracks in Parkhurst Forest, making an attractive variation on the route. Turn right with care into Main Entrance off the A3054, and take the track (left) after the car park. Alternatively follow the A3020 towards Cowes, then left into Noke Common. Another enjoyable extension is the National Nature Reserve at Newtown Creek (access by foot only)

The following text courtesy of Visit Isle of Wight. Please note, the map itself does not include this description.

F Cycling Cycling World World

amed for its rich sailing heritage, stunning Victorian architecture and vibrant festival atmosphere, Cowes is one of the most popular towns on the Isle of Wight with plenty of cafés along the High Street to fuel up before your ride.

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Travelling anti-clockwise, the first stretch will take you along Cowes and Gurnard beaches, great spots to watch the nautical comings and goings of the Solent. Some of the best sunsets on the Island can be seen here too. After meandering through the seaside cabins at the easternmost point of Gurnard Beach, you will head back inland as the scenery seamlessly transitions from seaside to countryside along Rew Street. At the mini roundabout take the 2nd exit following the blue background Round the Island waymarkers. (For a shorter variation of the route through the gravel tracks and woodland of Parkhurst Forest, take the next left). Continuing along the route on your approach to Newtown, you enter the Newtown National Nature Reserve, a beautiful retreat with flowering meadows, rare butterflies and red squirrels. Trees lining the

road on both sides make it feel as if you’re in a leafy green tunnel. Tucked away in the tiny hamlet adjoining the National Nature Reserve, the 17th-century Old Town Hall is the only remaining evidence of Newtown's former importance as a bustling medieval harbour. Leave your bike at the car park opposite the Town Hall to explore the Nature Reserve on foot. At the next junction after Newtown Old Town Hall take a left, leaving the Round the Island Cycle Route on your approach into Newport. Take care along the main road into the town. With a wide variety of restaurants, cafés and pubs, the historic town of Newport is the beating heart of the Island, and the perfect place to slip off the route and stop for a bite to eat and to explore the town. The impressive Guildhall was designed and built by John Nash in 1816 and now houses the Museum of Island History and Visitor Information Centre. The dedicated, traffic-free cycle path back to Cowes is another leafy green tunnel hugging the banks of the River Medina, with some great opportunities to spot wildlife. Keep an eye out for red squirrels, who like to dart through the trees lining the path.


Newtown Creek ©Visit Isle of Wight

Southampton to Cowes Southampton to E. Cowes Passenger Ferry Vehicle Ferry

The Solent

©Heritage House (Publishers) Ltd

Cowes Roads

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Rutland: Loops and Lakes Anita Powell discovers the big allure of the UK’s smallest county

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any of the best cycle routes are loops, taking you on a tour of the countryside and then conveniently dropping you off back where you started. Loops mean you don’t have to turn around and go back the way you came. And what better to make a loop around than one of the largest artificial lakes in Europe? The smallest county in England, surprisingly perhaps, is home to the largest reservoir in the UK (the surface area is larger than Kielder Water which holds more water). Rutland Water has a cycle route – let’s call it a loop - all around the lake, as well as various other appealing local routes and sights, and Steve and I were looking forward to a weekend on two wheels by the water. Things began as always with the preparation stage packing, faffing, fuelling up and fiddling about trying to get a couple of two-wheeled machines attached to a four-wheeled machine. After a bit of a fight with some Velcro straps, we were on our way. Although we opted for taking a car, it’s actually a surprisingly easy journey by train, and lies halfway between London and Yorkshire – the new cycling capital of the UK. Our base for the weekend was Hambleton Hall, a big old Victorian house transformed into a spectacular hotel, complete with its own helipad and Michelinstarred restaurant. A step up from our usual bivi bags and travel pillows, we were welcomed firstly by four bikes standing in wooden racks outside the entrance, and then by the friendly staff. The latter gave us some local cycling maps, and filled up our water bottles for us – even popping in an ice cube to keep it cool. The ice cube was needed, as the sun had just taken his hat off and there was a warmth in the air we hadn’t experienced since last year. We decided to take our own road bikes out for a spin on some quiet country lanes first, before coming back to take the hotel’s bikes out around the Hambleton peninsula; a small, optional part of the full lake lap. The lake loop (17 miles, or 25 with the peninsula) appeals to all, including families and novice cyclists and is one of the best leisure routes in the country - I’d cycled part of it before on a tandem with my mum. It’s just one of many routes in the area that are perfect for different types of riding, and we wanted to try some of the others to get a feel for life away from the water too. We like loops so much we couldn’t resist the lure of the ‘Oakham Loop’, a signed national byway route that looked just perfect for road cycling. We turned left out of the hotel driveway passing bluebells, thatched cottages and a nice-looking pub, and headed back towards the ‘mainland’ getting a beautiful view over the lake to the right as we


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Hambleton Hall

Rutland Waters

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Cycling Cycling World World 108

dropped down a big hill, straight away feeling the wind through our hair and the rush of being on two wheels. Swans slid through the air to land in the field to our left, joining a flock of friends sunbathing away from the masses. Spring really was in the air, with daffodils framing much of our journey and those stalwarts of springtime, frolicking lambs, in abundance in all the fields we passed. We reached a junction on the North West tip of the reservoir, and turned right onto a main road, the A606. The cycle path continues along the lakeside on the right hand side of the road, but as we were on road bikes, we opted for the carriageway, trying to keep up with other lycraclad cyclists. The lakeside path was like an advert for leisure activities – families cycling together, couples of all ages out for a stroll. The lake shimmered to our right, peaceful and serene. A boat bobbed about close to the shoreline, and birds and swans punctuated the calm waters. Before long we came to Barnsdale Lodge on the left, with confusing green hippos outside, standing still on a corner covered in daffodils. Waterbirds flew overhead, a common sight after a while. We started following signs for the Oakham loop, soon discovering that this was perfect cycling territory, a quiet, undulating country lane and smooth surfaces, with woods hugging the road and manor houses hidden down tracks. A major highlight of the trip, the Hambleton Bakery, is on the right along here. It’s also owned by Hambleton Hall, and makes delicious bread which we sampled all weekend at the hotel. There is some really top fuel for cycling here with cheese scones, sausage rolls, treacle tarts, brownies, as well as some of the best bread we’ve ever tasted (and from bread connoisseur Steve that’s quite an accolade). We soon found ourselves in Cottesmore, another quaint village, with pelotons of cyclists passing through, who also appeared to like loops. We stopped for lunch, grabbing some fish and chips and sitting on a bench opposite the lovely church. Although only a village, Cottesmore is Rutland’s third largest settlement after Oakham and Uppingham – in such a small county, I start to wonder how many homes were left after villages were flooded to create the lake. We continued to follow the Oakham loop, turning right towards Ashwell just after leaving Cottesmore village centre. I got quite excited by a brown sign pointing out ‘Rocks by Rail’ - this sounded like it could be quite a fun interlude. It turned out to be a tired-looking tourist attraction offering an opportunity to ride on a fairly unexciting train in a disused quarry. We decided to carry on cycling (it was closed anyway). Just before the hill to the quarry was spectacular, wide angle views around surrounding fields, hazy shades of green, and grand grey and brown buildings spread around, looked over by the occasional wind turbine. The descent was long and sweeping, and accompanied by lots of birdsong from the hedgerows and trees either side of the road. Soon we were in Ashwell, a quiet village without a fish and chip shop, but with a church covered in scaffolding, and an old phone box with a defibrillator in it. This is a village where the old


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meets the new in a very visual way. We came across a junction and pondered which way to go amongst the daffodils – they seem to gather on grassy corners by junctions. All directions sounded appealing, names of little villages and roads winding off into countryside. We took a left, still following the Oakham loop, emerging at a roundabout just before Langton. Here we took the third exit, towards Oakham, but didn’t quite make it all the way to town, as we came upon a nice cycle path leading us and luring us towards the lake and the luxury of the hotel. The path was wide and smooth, with good junction crossings, and I silently praised the local council for their efforts. Walkers passed, with tiny dogs who got angry at our bikes but would never ever win in a fight with them. We needed to do a few map checks at this point, just to confirm where we thought we were, and luckily the map was on our side. Before long we were back approaching the lake, and then climbing the hill back to Hambleton, this time with the water to our left, and viewed through a layer of sweat that hadn’t been there on the way down. Luckily the lake was still pretty, which helped. Back at Hambleton Hall, we prepared for leg two of the day’s riding, swapping our road bikes for the slightly fatter-tyred Giant Roam bikes offered to guests. These also have front suspension and disc brakes and are hence in many ways a more suitable ride for the tracks around the peninsula, as well as the rest of the lakeside path. They’re not serious off-road paths, but there is gravel, and mud, and some surprisingly steep descents and sharp bends. It’s a fairly short (eight mile) leisurely ride around the peninsula but well worth the trip. The water is right there next to you, there are some lovely wooded areas which are potential breeding grounds for nightingales, information garnered from a sign explaining why fences had been erected around coppiced hazel trees. Fishing boats bobbed around close to the shoreline, and as we looped back towards the back end of hotel then we came across an intriguing building called ‘Old Hall’ which looked derelict but had a private property signs up, so probably wasn’t derelict after all. The building itself was quickly overshadowed by the awe of seeing a large density of buttercups and swans playing peekaboo behind reeds. There were lots of little moments like this around the lake –moments that catch your senses. There’s nothing really dramatic or mind-blowing - most of the scenery is very typical ‘English Countryside’, but I found it just really smile-inducing and pleasing to the eye and soul. Back at the hotel, before popping the bikes in the shed for the night, the porter told us a little about life before the reservoir, when Lower Hambleton was a village and there were roads that used to connect through to the other side of the lake. He told us all about the ospreys that nest on the water, a phenomenon so special to the area that it turns out there’s an estate agency called Osprey in Oakham. We had a good soak in the luxurious bath, followed by a dinner fit for royalty, let alone cyclists. Loops and lakes, it must be confirmed, are a lovely way to spend a weekend with your bike.

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STAY IN A CYCLE-FRIENDLY PUB

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ikes, beer and pubs are natural companions, so when Cycling World was offered the chance to ‘road test’ a pub with rooms for its cycle-friendliness, we jumped at the chance.

The pub where we stayed was the Grove Ferry, a former hotel and lavender farm that nestles on the bank of the River Stour just eight miles from Canterbury. It’s great cycling country, with beautiful country lanes to cycle down, and trails running through nearby Seasalter and Whitstable. In fact, from this summer the Grove Ferry is starting to rent bikes out to guests for the day or the duration of their stay. We were invited to the pub by Stay In A Pub www.stayinapub.co.uk a new pub listing website which is, naturally enough, looking for ways to encourage more people to stay in a pub. The website lists more than 1,500 pubs with rooms, stretching from the Scottish Highlands to the tip of Cornwall, and from Norfolk to west Wales. Country inns, traditional town centre sites, historic coaching inns, food-led pubs and cool city drinking spots all feature on the website, meaning there is a pub for everyone and every overnight occasion. Finding a cycle-friendly pub is easy on Stay In A Pub, thanks to an intuitive search function. If what you’re looking for is, say, a pub in Yorkshire that’s close to cycle trails and is also child-friendly, it’s easy to whittle down your search. Descriptions and photographs for each pub help you to choose the one that’s right for your stay.

Stay Cycling Stay In In AWorld A Pub Pub -- Promotional Promotional feature Feature

We arrived at the Grove Ferry on a Friday afternoon. We’d worked up a decent thirst after a long-ish cycle ride, so a pint from the pub’s good selection of beers, including local cask ales, really hit the spot before we checked into our rooms. The Grove Ferry’s six bedrooms have all been fitted to a high spec to provide a comfortable stay but they have a few quirky touches that you wouldn’t find in a chain hotel. After a reviving hot shower, we were ready for dinner downstairs.

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Food is prepared in a new open kitchen, from ingredients sourced locally or even grown in the pub’s allotment. Eggs come from the chickens who are part of the Grove Ferry’s ‘family’ of animals including Pickle the pig and Elvis the rooster. Dinner over, we lingered over one last drink before heading up to our room. As Stay In A Pub point out, one of the joys of choosing a pub is that everything is conveniently sited under one roof, so you can drink, eat and sleep without worrying about transport. Staying in a pub takes you into some of the UK’s most historic, characterful buildings, with attentive, friendly service from the landlord, and the chance to enjoy a sociable drink at the bar as well as food that ranges from simple pub fare to Michelin-starred cuisine. The Grove Ferry Inn, Upstreet, Canterbury CT3 4BP For more information and to book a room at pubs across the UK, visit www.stayinapub. co.uk


Make 2017 Your Year for Cycling Adventure

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f you are planning your time for adventure, why not join one of the exciting fundraising challenges in aid of Princess Alice Hospice. We care for over 3,000 patients and their families from across a large part of Surrey, south west London and Middlesex “Every year our charity spends £9.3million providing our vital services free from charge,” says Mia Patterson from the Hospice’s Fundraising Team. “We have to raise 78% of our running costs and our fundraisers play a huge part in helping us to achieve that. So if you’re looking for a fun challenge on two wheels, then why not sign up for a bike ride to raise money for us.” One of our amazing cycling fundraisers, James Tullett overcame tornados, punctures and packs of dogs as he cycled 4,000 miles across America in just 55 days to raise nearly £8,000 for us. We had cared for James’ Dad, Bob, in 2011 and he decided on the spur of the moment after returning from a holiday in the US to do something amazing to fundraise for the Hospice. “I decided that there was no better time than now to cycle from New York to San Francisco. A week later I was flying back to New York with a new bike and a tent. Of course all my friends laughed at me and Mum was very supportive but quite terrified,” James says. “Dad was diagnosed with Pancreatic Cancer in 2010. When we needed the Hospice the Princess Alice nurses and the medical team were incredible; simply amazing. “Although I knew how to ride a bike I wasn’t what you might call a cyclist and I didn’t really have a plan. In the end I used Google Maps on my phone; I just knew that I had to keep cycling west and that eventually I’d get there. I’m really proud that I’ve, so far, managed to raise nearly £8,000. I have really got the buzz and would really like to take on some more adventurous challenges for the Hospice.”

The deadline for registration is Saturday 4 February 2017 with a registration fee of £399 and a sponsorship pledge of £3,550. For further information on this and other Hospice challenge events please visit our website www.pah.org.uk/challenges. Contact our Fundraising Team on 01372 461808 or email supportercare@pah.org.uk

GB Special

An amazing cycling challenge in support of Princess Alice Hospice takes place in February 2017. The even takes you from Vietnamese Saigon through the rice-paddies and waterways of the beautiful Mekong Delta into Cambodia. On the way from Ho Chi Minh City to Angkor Wat, you will cycle through fabulous rural landscapes dotted with ruins of ancient civilisations and small towns.

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Co. Kilkenny Rediscovering the Barrow Towpath

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Cycling World

y wife is a teacher and often tells me a story about a particular student that had to speak to the class about the subject of the human body. The student referred to a famous doctor

112 Canal in Cartlow by Failte Ireland

who had ‘discovered’ the heart. As the class descended from giggles into raucous laughter the student sensed that she may have overstated the case and corrected herself with the words “well it had actually been

there all along”. Cue more laughter. I often think of this story when people tell me they have ‘discovered’ the river Barrow towpath because, you guessed it, it has been there all along. Quite why it has taken so long for the


a kaleidoscope of reds yellows and brown as autumn approaches. And everywhere the Barrow flows it is followed by a threaded trail reminding us of yesteryear. For the Barrow is an ancient navigation that fostered commercial endeavour back to the middle ages. By the beginning of the 19th century a plan was hatched to improve this routeway and grow trade to new levels. And so the Barrow navigation was constructed. Weirs were built to raise the level of the waterway thus allowing bigger boats that could then carry 40 tonnes of cargo.

Lockgates were installed to get the boats around the newly constructed weirs. And best of all a towpath was put in place the full length of the navigation to accommodate the horses that would then pull the barges up and down the river. For a time business flourished and villages such as Graiguenamanagh, Borris, Goresbridge and Bagenalstown became like a string of hives where small business flourished and the residents were busy like bees. The halcyon days of the cargo trade on the river turned out to be relatively shortlived and railways eventually displaced the river as a commercial routeway. By the 20th century the writing was on the wall and the last cargo barge on the Barrow navigation tied up for ever on New Year’s Eve 1959. There followed many years of neglect and abandonment when parts of the towpath became overgrown and locks and sluices silted up. And that as they say, was that. Or so you would think. But over the past twenty years the Barrow navigation has in fact received a new lease of life. On the river small numbers of private and rental barges began to explore the navigation. Even more small boats such as canoes and rowing boats realised the touring potential of the river. On the banks of the river where the towpath still survived relatively intact the number of people realising the amenity value of the navigation has been even more pronounced. It started with a trickle of walkers and cyclists in the 1980s but has steadily grown in popularity as it is a great example of that elusive and oft used phrase ‘Hidden Ireland’. Now the Barrow Navigation is slowly but surely being ‘put on the map’. The most marked change in recent years has been the growth, although still in its early days, of the number of people availing of the Barrow navigation towpath as a long distance cycle trail. With over 50 km of mixed hard, but mostly grass, trail following the river it really is a place to explore. As it follows the river along gentle valleys the terrain is overwhelmingly flat. Apart from Carlow town the river communities are largely small villages with places like mediaeval Graiguenamanagh now becoming hubs for outdoor activity. In the heart of Graigue, as it is known locally, lies Waterside Guesthouse where owners Brian and Brigid Roberts operate a beautiful ten-bedroom guesthouse and restaurant in a restored 19th century granite cornstore. More recently, in 2012 to be exact, Brian Roberts launched Waterside Bike&Hike, a bike rental and bike

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rest of the world to notice is a bit of a mystery. The river Barrow is Ireland’s second largest river after the Shannon in the west of the country. But the Barrow flows through a much richer landscape than the Shannon and is beautifully framed by green valleys and banks of mature deciduous trees. As it flows south out of Counties Laois and Kildare it reaches the beautiful farmland of South Leinster where it divides Kilkenny and Carlow. Here the trees abound and enrich each season as the valleys flourish with a lush green in summer followed by

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Graiguenamanagh by Failte Ireland

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tour operation specifically targeted at users of the river Barrow towpath. Brian invested in 30 good quality hardtail mountain bikes, perfect for the grass trail along by the river. A small number of electric mountain bikes were also purchased which broadened the scope of potential users of the trail. The company has two offerings, one is a simple rental business where visitors can rent bikes by the day and explore the towpath themselves. The usual standard offering applies with bikes, helmets, hi-viz vests, locks all included in a oneday rental price of €20.00. Waterside Bike&Hike also invested in a custom built 20-bike trailer that allows groups to be dropped off up or down the river to complete a one way trip back to base camp at Graiguenamanagh. Brian Roberts also has a background in science and ecology in particular so the company also offers guided ecology tours of the river Barrow valley to small groups. On these tours Brian Roberts informs his charges of the fascinating history of the Barrow navigation,

of the rich variety of fauna and flora now living in and around the river, and also some of the threats and problems facing the local ecosystem. But it certainly is not just an educational lecture, cyclists can take in as much as they want or just enjoy the scenery. Equally important may be a pit stop at a café on the river bank or sometimes Brian’s wife Brigid pops up at a lockgate somewhere along the way with fold up tables spread with fresh fruit scones and flasks of hot tea. Just the tonic for any group of cyclists after a mighty morning in the saddle. So options abound. You can avail of bike rental, bike tours, or you can bundle the whole experience in with an overnight or weekend stay at Waterside Guesthouse including meals and most likely a visit to one of the famous Graiguenamanagh pubs for the obligatory post pedal debriefing and a few bars of Irish traditional music. The Barrow towpath is suitable for cyclists of all levels but is particularly popular for people enjoying what Failte Ireland terms ‘soft adventure’.

Most of it appears like total wilderness, but the fact that it follows the river means gradients are very slight and so it attracts whole families and small groups where leisurely progress is the order of the day. And the many bridges and access points means you can do as much or as little as one wants. It is the ideal spot for the a la carte cyclist! Bike&Hike@watersideguesthouse.com Facebook; Waterside Guesthouse Twitter @graiguebikehire


Great National Abbey Court Hotel Lodges & Trinity Leisure Spa

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e are a family owned business, set within mature gardens on a five acre site on the edge of the historic town of Nenagh. We are the mid-west of Ireland’s leading superior 3 star hotel with 4 star self-catering lodges, accessed just off the M7 Dublin to Limerick Road, 90 minutes from Dublin and 45 minutes from Shannon. Nenagh’s famed for its Heritage Centre, Franciscan Abbey, Friary Castle, Arts Centre, Local Crafts & Fresh Produce Markets, Woolen Mill, Award Winning Eateries and Boutique Shops. Nearby is the breath taking scenery of both the Arra and Silvermines Mountains looking over Lough Derg with facilities such as boating, cruising, sailing, fishing and adventure centre. Further activities include walking, hiking, cycling, mountain biking, horse racing, greyhound racing, riding, golf and Pitch & Putt Enjoy a leisurely swim or a vigorous workout in the Trinity Leisure Spa. With a 20m swimming pool, children’s pool, hydrotherapy spa pool, sauna, steam room & an extensively equipped gym.

Great National Abbey Court Hotel Lodges & Trinity Leisure Spa

• • • • • • • •

spacious & relaxing guestrooms • 83 Conferencing for 24, 4 Star Modern Self Catering 2-450 Delegates Lodges with 3, 5 or 8 bedrooms on a five acre site with • Located Complimentary Wi-Fi Magnificent Mature Landscaped

• Gardens Events & Banqueting Lockable Bike Store for up to 60

• Bikes 83 Spacious Guestrooms Abbots Steakhouse Restaurant &

children’s pool, sauna & steam room • Onsite Hairdressers Extensive Gym Facilities, Hair Salon & Beauticians & Beauty Spa

• • •

Creche, Rugrats Kids Club, Games Rug Rats Kids Club, Games Room & 4 acre public family park Room & Crèche neighbouring the hotel grounds

Located just off the M7 Exit 24 & • Magnificent Landscaped 3 mins walk from Nenagh Town Gardens Centre

• Ballroom 24 Modern Self Catering for up to 330 guests banqueting Lodges & Baronial Hall for up to

Conferencing Suites • 12 Ultimate Wedding Venue Complimentary WI-FI through-out in Tipperary the hotel

• •

Ample Parking Ample Cycling Routes and Maps

• •

Just off the M7 Exit 24 10 mins from Lough Derg (Irelands

• •

Family Owned Train Station, Bus Routes and

Abbots Bar

450 delegates

free parking for cars & • Ample Abbots Steakhouse & Bar coaches swimming pool, largest • 20m Trinity Leisure Spa hydrotherapy spa pool in Ireland,

90 mins from Dublin, 30 mins

• 4 Acre Public Family Park Limerick, 45 mins Shannon • Next-door 20 minutes from Irelands largest and only Bike Park of its kind Available

largest lake)

centrally located between Irelands • Located on a Five Acre Site Airports

Abbey Court Hotel, Lodges & Trinity Leisure Spa, Dublin Road, Nenagh, Co. Tipperary t. +353 (0) 67 41111 | e. info@abbeycourt.ie | w. abbeycourt.ie

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Cycling Promotional WorldFeature - Bike Events

Bike Events - Cycle Rides for Everyone

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B

ike Events make cycling enjoyable for everyone. Whether experienced rider, cycling newbie or family looking for a fun day out, we offer over 50 day rides and cycling holidays for cyclists of all ages and stages. 30 years experience planning the best routes and arranging everything for the day means that on a Bike Events ride you enjoy a worryfree outing with a high level of support.

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Touring Special

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Late summer is the perfect time for bike touring. To get you in the mood Cycling World looks at Bikepacking: that’s any ride that includes an overnight stay. This could be anything from ultralight singletrack tours to fully loaded dirt road touring. We feature a handy guide on how to pack from a well-seasoned tourer who after six years of riding his bicycle around the world, racked up over 83,000 km in 73 countries. There’s also a review of an impressive steel tourer from The Light Blue. Adventures await you!

caption by Mike Howarth

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Cycling World 120

by Laurence McJannet


Bikepacking around Watership Down TEXT AND PHOTOS BY KEITH GILKS

Who would have thought it would have taken me 42 years to realise my boyhood dream of cycling off into the sunset and sleeping under the stars before returning to home comforts

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The leaders of the trip were going to be no other than Laurence McJannet, the author of the recently published new guide book on the subject; ‘Bikepacking on the Wild Trails of Britain’, and Pete McNeil of Adventure Pedlars, also an experienced bikepacker. Adventure Pedlars facilitate adventures by bike, including the hiring of bikes and equipment as well as holding introduction courses. For this trip they supplied virtually all the equipment needed for our self-supported overnight expedition. All I had to supply was a sleeping bag and change of clothing.

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arental sensibility had initially put a stop to my plans, then in adult life I had discovered the book of ‘Cycling Excuses’ (the chapter covering why one can’t take part in winter training is a particular favourite of mine) and hence my dreams were dashed and virtually forgotten. However, recently I observed my own children taking part in the Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme and completing their own adventures including wild camping. Pangs of envy and memories of my childhood ambition surfaced. So when I was given the opportunity to take part in a mini adventure discovering the joys of bikepacking; the union of mountain biking and lightweight camping, I couldn’t sign up fast enough. My chance had come at last.

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So one late April morning, I rocked up with my four season sleeping bag under my arm, to the prearranged meeting point at Overton Train Station, Hampshire. Here I met Laurence, Pete and fellow journalist Lara. If the silly excited grin on my face could get any wider, it did so when I saw the bikes we would be using; Genesis Caribou fat bikes. The orange rigid beasts looked totally awesome with their 4” wide fat tyres and sturdy frames. Although it must be said, a fat bike is not a total necessity to bikepack. Any rigid mountain bike will do or even a bike with suspension if care is taken to the way bags are attached so they do not foul moving parts. Nevertheless, the Genesis bikes are specifically designed for the UK market and hence are perfect for conditions encountered all over Britain. Their phenomenal grip, low gearing (30/40) and rigid frame make them an ideal choice for this fast growing international trend of backpacking by bike. Bikepacking has essentially been around since the first cyclists camped overnight. However, this particular niche in the cycling world has recently become more popular, resulting in companies producing excellent products to support wild and lightweight camping jaunts, from well-designed bikes and lightweight equipment to specific bags to attach to bike frames. Having funky kit is great of course, but as Laurence points out in his excellent book, the first to be published in the UK on the subject, the best bike and the best kit is what you already have. (I made a mental note to throw away my book of excuses). Pete showed us all the equipment, before we packed it in the brilliant Alpkit bags. There were five bags, more than enough to pack away my sleeping bag and all the clothing I had brought in my 35 litre rucksack. This left me completely free to enjoy the ride without a cumbersome bag on my back. The equipment needed is quite basic, essentially consisting of a bivvy bag, sleeping bag, mat, stove, tarpaulin, head torch, spare tube, puncture repair kit, and bike tool. With the exception of the bivvy bag, most people who have ever camped will have most of the equipment to hand.

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We were going to be loosely following one of the 30 great routes detailed in Laurence’s book; Route 10 - In Search of Elfrafa. The difference being the creation of a loop so we could all return to Overton. The guide book also covers everything the cyclist needs to know to make a successful and safe bikepacking ride; from equipment, planning, tarpology and selecting a suitable camp site.

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We set off on quiet country lanes, giving us a chance to get used to riding a fully-loaded bike. Amazingly the bike didn’t feel or handle that different from before it was weighed down. It took the extra weight extremely well. However, handling a loaded off road bike was new to me and I had taken Pete’s advice and used shoes suitable for flat pedals, instead of my normal set up of being clipped in. It was

by Daniel Start


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Genesis fat bike


As soon as we peeled off onto the rough stuff, Lara and I had a big grin on our faces. Riding a fat bike is so much fun. The chunky tyres absorbing the bumps almost as good as front suspension forks. Incredibly the tyres run with pressures of 8 psi in the front and 10 psi in the rear. Apparently the pressures can be as low as 7 psi for even more grip when necessary. We cycled through a mixture of open countryside, classic single track, wooded trails with bluebell glades and quiet country roads. We passed quintessential thatched cottages made from local stone so typical of the county, and even Hampshire (or were they Saddlebags?) pigs that made dog-like noises. The bikes performed beautifully. I was impressed how they just ploughed through mud prompting Pete to describe them as ‘the tractors of the bike world’. One of the pleasures of bikepacking is that you have the freedom to make the excursion whatever you want it to be. For example, you could use it to get from A to B or just simply explore the countryside, where you may chance upon excellent single track or emerge from a wooded spinney into a small village with a great pub. And that is exactly what happened to us. The village of Ecchinswell has a great pub complete with a visiting Scottie dog wearing a tweed hat. All of a sudden we appeared to be transported into a world created by Richard Adams, the author of Watership Down. You don’t often see dogs wearing hats and I swear it wasn’t the effect of the excellent local beer. As the sun began to set we ascended our final off road climb of the day in search of our wild camp site. We finally settled for open countryside on high ground. As Laurence set to work building the camp fire by carefully removing a sod of earth that was put to one side to be replaced in the morning, and gathering dry wood, Pete gave Lara and I a lesson in the art of ‘tarp tenting’. There are many ways to produce a shelter from a tarpaulin, but the one we were shown made use of the bikes: 1. Remove the front wheel, push the front forks firmly onto the ground, drape the tarp over the handle bars, secure via guy ropes and pegs. 2. Using the front wheel as the other support, spread the tarp over the upright wheel and secure using guy ropes and pegs, and hey pesto you have a shelter. Alpkit also supply a well-designed blow up support mat. This was placed in the bivvy bag along with the sleeping bag. Once the sleeping accommodation was sorted we all settled around the camp fire to chat whilst Laurence made the most delicious chorizo sausage and bean stew served with baked sweet potato, followed by baked banana and chocolate. Who needs dehydrated food packs! We were also treated to the sight of a marvellous golden moon rising above the horizon into the

starriest night sky I’ve seen for a long time. Chatting around the fire in the moonlight, listening to the occasional owl hoot and eating ‘homemade’ food was a truly entrancing experience, one I haven’t taken part in since childhood. All too soon the time came to retire to bed. The weather forecast was for a cold night with temperatures dropping to three degrees. Wearing all the clothes that I had brought I snuggled down into my manmade cocoon and wrapped the bivvy bag hood around my head. The soothing gentle breeze blew around me, and I soon nodded off. Anyone that has ever camped will know that you wake up with the birds and wild camping is no different. Just as well, as we had the pleasure of enjoying breakfast, packing up and putting the bike back together in the dry before a short hail shower. We sheltered a little while waiting for the downpour to pass before heading off for the famous rabbit infested Watership Down. There is something quite special about cycling away from a camp site only accessible by bike or foot, without a shred of evidence to show you were ever there. As we climbed onto the Down the sun came out and the morning developed into a beautiful day. Disappointingly the only rabbits I saw were of the deceased variety, making me wonder if the poisoning of the rabbit population as described in the novel was not only true but still prevalent. Perhaps a sequel to the best seller is on the cards. The lack of bouncing wildlife was more than compensated by the picturesque rolling terrain. This consisted of a mixture of grassland and arable farmland filled with yellow rape seed that contrasted with the blue sky. Inevitably the ancient off road trails came to an end and we were back on quite narrow country lanes leading back to civilization. I returned to Overton Train Station with a heavy heart. Not only would I soon part with the bike I had fallen in love with, but a thoroughly enjoyable stress busting bikepacking adventure had come to an end. Well for now, as I knew for sure I will be bikepacking again, either with my family or with friends or even just by myself. I had fallen in love with the simple pleasure of riding off road and camping. I thoroughly recommend to anyone who enjoys the outside to give it a go. If you need guidance get yourself a copy of Laurence’s book and consider a two-day introduction session with Adventure Pedlars to get you on your way. USEFUL BIKEPACKING INFO Bikepacking on the Wild Trails of Britain by Laurence McJannet £16.99 published by Wild Things Publishing Ltd Introduction to Bikepacking courses: www.adventurepedlars.com Alpkit technical clothing and equipment: www.alpkit.com

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good advice as from the start I felt confident and in control.

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PRODUCT

TOURING Aquapac Handlebar Phone Case £50 This case is very useful if you mount your phone on the handlebars as a navigation aid. Waterproof rating is submersible (no need to test!) and 100% PVC-free. It is made of a special TPU which is thin enough to use your touchscreen, but still impressively strong. The seams are well-bonded and the seal opens and closes with a quick twist of two levers, staying in one piece even when it’s open. Comes with easy handlebar mount in nylon and stainless steel. Two sizes- mini and small- with a good online size guide to fit your phone. Total weight 89g. www.aquapac.net

Blackburn’s Grid 13 Multitool £17.99 With thirteen functions, the tool designs have been carefully thought out with consideration to selection, length, and placement so the right tool is easily accessible for your biking escapades. Robust and pocket size, worth carrying with you at all times

Features Include:

• “L” Bend to get into tight places • 4.mm hex • 2.5mm hex • 1.5mm hex • 3mm hex • 5mm hex • 6mm hex www.blackburndesign.com

• • • • • • •

8mm hex Flathead screwdrivers T30 Torx T25 Torx Disc pad spreader Presta core remover Bonus: Bottle opener

Cycling Cycling World World

Gorilla Bottle Cage and Clip: Cage £24.95, Clip £12.95

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This is an effective way to get an extra bottle on the bike. Actually it’s even more versatile than that. The clip can attach to any frame tube, handlebar stem or your forks. Then you can fit a Gorilla cage that can carry just about anything light and bulky, for example a large bottle, a light weight tent, a sleeping mat, or your cooking system. The clip is also compatible with Monkii carry systems, which include bottle holders and frame bags. Made from Polyamide, it is strong and flexible and the cage only weighs 87g. Max load is 1.5kg and load size is 40cm x 25cm. www.cyclemiles.co.uk


Sealskin Road Ankle £35 This thin-weight, waterproof ankle sock is designed specifically for road cycling and incorporates Hydrostop technology. It is highly waterproof, windproof and breathable made from Stretchdry fabric. The elasticated cuff helps reduce chance of water ingress around sock neck and the Marino wool lining gives warmth and comfort. There is an instep for added support and comfort. Nothing like keeping those feet warm and dry. www.sealskinz.com

Shower Pass Syncline Jacket £99 Named after a popular mountain bike trail in the Columbia River Gorge, the Syncline is not just for biking; it can be used for hiking, camping, and walking in the rain. Made with fully seam-taped Artex Hardshell 2.5-layer waterproofbreathable fabric but is not bulky so can stuffed in a good sized back pocket. It has kept us dry and comfortable, while cross-core vents prevent overheating. It offers good visibility with 3M Reflective trim on the front, sleeves and back. We like the fact it has a hood that fits under a helmet and front pockets. www.showerspass.com

Originally developed to care for babies’ skin these wipes are a cycle touring essential for freshening up on the go. They contain just two ingredients: 99.9% purified water and 0.1% fruit extract. Each wipe is large, thick and extremely watery, so you feel like you have had a real wash and no synthetic fragrance or oily residue remains. Free from alcohol, fragrance and lanolin, which can irritate some, they’re the only wipe to be endorsed by Allergy UK. The only problem is that the wife has taken them to use on the kids I have to use up all the chemical ones. www.waterwipes.com

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WaterWipes: £2.99 (pack of 60)

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How to Pack for a Cycle Tour

Cycling World

by Stephen Fabes

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everal years ago, as I cycled up The Top of the World Highway that spectacularly wends its way from the Canadian province of the Yukon to the vast wilds of Alaska, the shape of a cyclist gathered ahead of me. When I’d caught up - it didn’t take long - I arrived at the most overloaded cycle tourer I’d ever met, or imagined existed. Amongst the grand stash of kit in his overstuffed panniers, trailer and abounding dry bags was a tent which could have been used in a humanitarian catastrophe, a tool kit useful in the event he came across a damaged aircraft carrier, and hanging from the back: a sitar, a mandolin and a didgeridoo. I’m not kidding. What’s more was that this man was smiling as he poured sweat and huffed up the hills. Smiling! It reminded me of one important rule in deciding what to bring on a bicycle tour there are no rules. We all have different priorities and passions, and if you can’t bear to leave the orchestra behind, then don’t, just be prepared for your legs to remember it months afterwards. I’ll be honest, writing an article about how to pack for a cycle tour is a vexingly ambiguous task, a bit like answering the question I’m occasionally emailed: ‘where should I go cycle touring?’ Clearly both depend on a whole slew of factors particular to you. So here then are a few rather wooly guidelines as opposed to rules. Be warned, you will find opinions in this article. WEIGHT Let’s not skirt around the main issue - the elephant in the pannier. But first let me admit a bias: I’m not the type of hardcore gram counter who cuts labels out of their t-shirts, trims the bristles of their toothbrush, removes belly button fluff and donates bone marrow before a cycle tour. I celebrate the fact that the bicycle is designed for weight bearing, and an obsession with grams in my view only befits those racing against a time limit. Whilst its prudent to pay more attention to weight-reduction if you’re set on big mountains, bad trails and steep gradients; you don’t have to enter the realm gram counting.

Those who want to save on money may end up converting their financial savings into extra kilos, as cheaper kit tends to be heavier. But beware of the super-lightweight stuff on the market too, which often comes with an elevated price tag that makes no promise of superior quality, in fact the opposite can be true, though it is nice to have tent pegs that can double as tooth picks. CONSIDER WHAT’S AVAILABLE LOCALLY Wherever you plan to tour, think about what is available locally in terms of bike parts. When things break you don’t want to have to get replacements shipped from home. Tubes with Presta valves for instance are not available in many countries in Asia, Africa and South America. More and more people are touring with odd sized wheels these days and unusual components – so bear in mind these might be

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Like most decisions of great consequence my plan to cycle the length of six continents was made in a pub, mini-atlas in one hand, pint in the other. I’ve been pedaling for more than 80,000 km now, a distance of more than twice around the world, without a break to come home and rest my ailing gear – it is a particularly savage way to prove the quality of what I brought with me. Things have been fraying and snapping and dissolving, and once, actually exploding. I’ve been busily tossing kit confetti-like into the world’s various dustbins. Of the few things I have left there is a ‘sleeping bag’ - in inverted commas because sometimes I wake up to a scene that evokes a fight with a vigorous flock of passing geese. This kit review is then, I hope, hard won wisdom. I write about my travels at www.cyclingthe6.com.

The weight of any item of kit should always be considered in relation to how often something is used, not just in its own right. Foldable chairs for instance, whilst increasingly compact, can be relatively heavy, but if they are used every day perhaps the indulgence is worth the extra weight and cycle tourers often tout them as indispensable. Another example is a good Thermos flask, again quite heavy, but I use mine every day - for tea and coffee when it’s chilly, to keep water ice cold when it’s hot, and to keep water from freezing overnight when it’s really cold. So think multi-functionality, but don’t be obsessed by it. Notice how much more frustrating it is to work with a multitool than a lovely solid set of separable Allen keys?

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tough to replace. If you’re off on a short tour in developed countries with new gear, then perhaps you can afford the risk, but for long tours or for those with well-worn gear, I would keep it simple. ONE SIZE DOESN’T FIT ALL At the risk of sounding trite, clearly what you will pack will depend upon the season, length of tour, availability of accommodation and supplies, your budget, terrain, and the remoteness of your destinations. If it’s going to be cold, make sure your gear is waterproof, because being wet and cold is infinitely worse than being just the latter. Think of what gear will leave you completely stuck if it breaks, and plan for that – in remote places a busted bike pump, stove or cracked rim may mean you can’t keep riding, other bits of kit can break but not threaten your ability to pedal to the next big town. If you’re on a budget, recognise where you can save money. You can of course skimp on everything and still go cycle touring, people who sew together their own panniers and sleep under tarps make me smile, but I like to think there is a rough hierarchy to the kit it's important not to skimp on. You can easily save money on some stuff (for example cycle computer, bike chain, clothing, even bicycle) and you may well regret going cheap on others (your back tyre, tent, rims and racks). Durability doesn’t always cost money though. There are a host of fancy corrosion resistant bike chains on the market which over the life of the chain might give you 30% more mileage but carry a price tag of four times the standard Shimano alternative. There is plenty to be said for keeping things simple: the more newfangled technology you attach to your machine, the less likely that the sole mechanic of Nowhereville will have parts to fix it when it breaks.

Cycling World

STAY SAFE Newsflash: you are unlikely to be abducted, to die of a tropical disease or get attacked by bears, wolves or black widow spiders on a bike tour. So whilst occasionally worth considering, let’s stop obsessing about emergency GPS beacons, bear bombs, malaria prophylaxis and focus more on what matters most: accident prevention. I would strongly recommend a side mirror, which unlike a helmet might actually prevent an accident in the first place, and luminous clothing and good lights are a must. If you are in the habit of stuffing bits of kit under bungees, make sure you don’t have anything flapping or loose that will fall off or get tangled in your spokes – it’s a good way to fall on your face and spoil your subsequent holiday photos. In terms of getting stuff snatched – I have a fake wallet stuffed with old bank cards and worthless notes, stuck somewhere obvious. A thief might take it and cut their losses, leaving the DSLR camera where it belongs – it’s worked for me once already.

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THE BIKE The choice of touring bike runs from expedition-grade monsters to the cheaper point-and-shoot of the bike world, and even branches out into recumbents and tandems. The most popular brands include Surly, Ridgeback, Genesis, Dawes and Kona up to the more expensive Santos and Koga. All have their various merits and drawbacks, and which one you choose will depend upon all those variables I listed above. Mountain bikes will do the job of course and have the advantage of costing less in money and kilograms, but more problems can ensue, especially with regard to weaker frames, and less durable components. Whatever your choice, it’s worth investing in an ergonomic bike fit before you leave which can help give you a more comfortable riding experience.


Normandy Cycle Ride 20th – 24th September 2017 A bespoke 200 mile cycle ride through the Normandy countryside. The cycle ride takes in Utah and Omagh Beaches from the D-Day landings. The 2016 Grand Depart for the Tour De France is in Normandy visiting Cherbourg and St Lo and they have a finish at Utah Beach. Cyclists will therefore be cycling on some of the same roads from the Tour. A registration fee of £150 and a minimum sponsorship target of £1450 is needed to take part. To apply please contact Karen Newton by email karen.newton@each.org.uk

East Anglia’s Children’s Hospices (EACH) – supporting families and caring for children and young people with life-threatening conditions. EACH relies on voluntary donations for the majority of their income and needs your help – www.each.org.uk Registered Charity No. 1069284 – Royal Patron: HRH The Duchess of Cambridge

Dover Port Ferry Parking At Relyon Ferry Parking, we offer safe and secure parking facilities at our site, on the outskirts of Dover's ferry port. Our parking facility is approximately 3 miles from the Port of Dover. Our complimentary shuttle service will take you from our parking facility, to the Port of Dover and upon your return, once you have notified us of your arrival at the port, we will collect you and repatriate you with your vehicle. One of our shuttle buses is adapted to be able to carry passengers and cycles, ideal for those customers who are participating in organised cycling trips or quite simply, looking to amble around the Continent. Our customer base is by no means restricted to Day Trippers. Our typical customers are:

Ferry Parking from £4.50 per day inclusive, when using following DISCOUNT CODE. EASTERN2016.for more information - call us on 01304 201227 or use our Contact Enquiry Form. ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED. NO CREDIT CARD SURCHARGE 24hr manned secure car parking facility in Dover. Go to www.relyongroup to book.

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• Cruise passengers • Coach trippers - Reducing their time spent on Feeder Coaches by joining the coach at the Port of Dover • Anglers - Organised fishing trips to France where the coach meets at the car park Battlefield tours • Cycling trips • We are the only manned 24hr secure car park in Dover

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Morfa Farm bunkhouse is a converted cow shed offering a stylish and comfortable stay. Packed with original features, the bunkhouse has been extensively refurbished to create modern, flexible accommodation for individuals, groups and events.Situated directly on the Ceredigion Coastal Path, it is an ideal stop off point or base for walkers, cyclists and groups exploring the area. Sleeping18 people across three ensuite bedrooms, handmade flexible bunk beds provide rustic charm but also mean we can accommodate most kinds of bookings.

www.morfafarm.co.uk Telephone (01974 202 253) Morfa Farm, LLanrhystud, Ceredigion, Wales. SY23 5BU

A friendly welcome, fresh local food and a comfy bed await you at Barnsdale Lodge. Barnsdale Lodge Hotel is set in a unique rural location in the heart of the glorious Rutland countryside with views of undulating hills and Rutland Water. This delightful, friendly hotel offers a warm welcome, delicious seasonal food, individually styled bedrooms and inviting sitting and dining rooms.

Cycling World

• 45 ensuite bedrooms with lovely bathrooms • Delicious food prepared with fresh locally sourced, seasonal ingredients • Glow hair salon • Country walks • Cycle trails • Why not stay in a luxury self catering Retreat • Local boutique shops in Oakham & Stamford • Activities on and around Rutland Water – cycle & sail

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We offer a special rate for a 3 night stay and complimentary cycle hire from Rutland Cycling! The Avenue, Rutland Water, Nr Oakham, LE15 8AH enquiries@barnsdalelodge.co.uk telephone 01572 724678

www.barnsdalelodge.co.uk

www.rutlandretreats.co.uk


WHERE TO PUT IT ALL Knowing that there are people who opine endlessly on the net over such questions as Trailer verses Panniers, I’m going to simply give my take on the choice: I run with panniers. My bike frame is strong steel (so unlikely to break) and I like to be able to carry my bike loaded across streams and up steps into hostels. I also worry that because trailers have extra parts, these are extra parts that can break: especially that pesky connector, and punctures or snapped spokes in the extra wheel. But if you do prefer trailers, and the choice isn’t clear cut, then the Bob comes recommended, though occasionally I’ll run into a cyclist towing a plastic space-age looking thing made by a local designer: scour the internet and you might be lucky enough to find one. The market leader by a country mile in terms of panniers is Ortlieb, and it’s hard to argue with their combination of high durability, waterproofness, low weight and reasonable price tag. Dry bags are good for compartmentalising inside your panniers, but cheap ones won’t keep stuff dry for very long. Ortlieb also do large thick dry bags for the back rack. I also bring a lightweight rucksack touring which I can use on day hikes or when sightseeing. For racks, on which to hang your panniers, go strong and steel, aluminum versions will quickly bend and snap on unpaved surfaces. In terms of brands Tubus racks very definitely cut the mustard. TOOL KIT AND BIKE BITS My ‘must have’ spares go as far as spokes, brake pads, tubes, a few nuts and bolts, and from time to time, a tyre. Of course cycle tourers should never leave home without a cable tie or ten, I believe this is a legal requirement. If you plan to be away from civilization for some time, or if your parts are nearing their life expectancy, then consider a more complete range of spares. Unless you are particularly dirt-adverse, avoid mud guards, in my experience they just end up getting in the way through bending and becoming maladjusted, or clogged up with the stuff they are aimed at protecting you from. For tyres Schwalbe are the most popular brand for touring, and in my view, after 15,000 km on one tyre through a thorny Africa, deservingly so. The Marathon Tour Plus is their most tried and venerated version. In terms of tools Allen keys, a chain tool and quality needlenose pliers which cut cables are a good idea. Pumps live hard lives, so keep it simple. A simple frame pump is better than a mini-pump. Kick stands can damage the frame and often snap on loaded bikes, a good alternative is the click-stand (a sort of fiberglass stick).

A note about internal gear mechs: plenty of cycle tourers will run with the usual derailleur and cassette external gear system, but more and more are turning to the Rohloff – a German feat of engineering which offers fourteen gears enclosed in a hub. You change the oil every five or ten thousand kilometers, but there’s no other maintenance to do, and apparently they are indestructible, or are they?

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Almost all cycle tourers use the time-tested Brooks saddle, and my previous one lasted something like 60,000 km, which is one and a half times around the world. For those off on rockier terrain, consider the Cane Creek Thudbuster which adds a little suspension to the seat post, and is a hardy bit of kit I’ve tried hard to break, but not managed to yet. What rims you run is very important – the Tungsten carbide Rigida / Ryde ones like the Andra 30 offer quite ridiculous durability.

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It turns out Rohloff hubs are far from the ‘fit and forget’ they’re often considered to be. Plenty of riders are now reporting issues. However, their customer service remains impeccable and if you have a problem the Rohloff team will quickly find a solution, which may involve them posting you a new hub for free (I had one arrive within a few days to both Sudan and Mongolia). There are various advantages to internal gears: from less maintenance, longer lasting chains, no need to replace cassettes and derailleurs, no mud or ice to clog up your gear mechs, the ability to change through multiple gears without pedaling, a stronger wheel and no need to worry about broken derailleurs in trucks or on planes. But… If one goes wrong, it will be a major hassle at the very least. And plainly this happens more frequently than Rohloff would have you believe. They are also very expensive (the hub itself costs around 1200 USD, plus budget in the regular oil changes) and you’ll need to use Rohloff specific parts for replacement sprockets, shifters and cables. The reduced range of gears and absence of a very low gear when compared to the standard setup are also drawbacks. MEDICAL KIT The same rule applies for medical kits as tool kits: bring only stuff you need in an emergency and stuff you know how to use. And like all kit, pay attention to what’s likely to be available locally. Diarrhoea is a particular scourge of the adventurous tourer set on the wilds of Africa and Asia in particular. Generally speaking avoid both Immodium and antibiotics for travellers diarrhea (there are specific exceptions to this rule), but take plenty of oral rehydration sachets. A medical kit can include treatment for allergy, at least one broad spectrum antibiotic, antacids, an anti-inflammatory like ibuprofen, alcohol wipes, dressings, painkillers, and a thermometer. Bear in mind that drugs which are prescriptiononly in the UK can be easily acquired without one in countries in Asia, Africa and South America. A few countries have very strict laws and you can be detained at borders for possessing mild pain killers such as codeine and tramadol. (Uzbekistan springs to mind).

Cycling World

Mosquito repellent: use something DEET based if you're going to the northern or southern latitudes in the summer, where there's a short season and mosquitoes come in clouds (though high concentrations are generally not necessary: 20% will do). In these circumstances natural alternatives in my experience aren’t sufficient, but they might be suitable where there are fewer insects around, and are less likely (though by no means unable) to cause adverse reactions.

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COOKING GEAR I’m a big fan of the screw top gas canisters if you have the option (which these days may be more frequent than you think – they are abundant now across Europe and the US, in places like Chile, Argentina and China too, and in a great number of capital cities all over the world). Using propane/ butane is cleaner, easier, safer, quieter, requires no priming and no stove maintenance when compared to using petrol in a multifuel stove. Luckily plenty of multifuel stoves now have adapters for gas canisters, so you can switch between both. Sometimes petrol is your only option - my personal preference for a multifuel stove is the Primus, which is generally a lot more solid and reliable than its competitor MSR. For carrying water my preference is a two litre bottle holder on the frame, as well as two standard sized smaller ones. Some riders like the camel back water holder, though my preference is to keep my back completely weight free


www.balnabruaich.co.uk

York Racecourse Centre, the only group hostel in York rated 4 star by Visit England offers groups: Located in the stunning • Quality Affordable Accommodation Cairngorms National Park • Close proximity to the attractions of York • Free secure cycle storage on Sustrans Route 7 with • Free Wi-Fi • Free parking superb natural singletrack • Secure, spacious and self-contained location and forest trail adventures • Landscaped gardens From the quality of our breakfasts to the warmth of our welcome, York Racecourse Centre is an ideal base for groups wishing to visit York and the surrounding county. We are located directly on national cycle 66 mak direct from door. Please feel free to call the team on 01904 620911 or alternatively email info@yorkracecoursecentre.co.uk to discuss how the the York Racecourse Centre can provide accommodation for you.

York Racecourse Centre

York Racecourse Centre, the only group hostel in York rated 4 star by Visit England offers groups: • • • • • • •

Quality Affordable Accommodation Close proximity to the attractions of York Free secure cycle storage Free Wi-Fi Free parking Secure, spacious and self-contained location Landscaped gardens

From the quality of our breakfasts to the warmth of our welcome, York Racecourse Centre is an ideal base for groups wishing to visit York and the surrounding county. We are located with easy access to national cycle routes 65 and 66 making us the ideal location for a cycling tour or holiday and with over twenty years of hosting groups we know exactly how to meet guest’s needs.

3 bedrooms / 2 bathrooms Wood burner / TV / WI–FI Washing and drying facilities. Close to Aviemore for bike spares, shopping, pubs and cafes. Laggan and Glenlivet trail centres within easy driving distance.

To enquire please call 07540 050 747 or email bookings@balnabruaich.co.uk Quarter Page Ad (AW).indd 1

15/07/2016 10:18

The High Force Hotel

Please feel free to call the team on 01904 620911 or alternatively email info@yorkracecoursecentre.co.uk to discuss how the York Racecourse Centre can provide accommodation for you.

01833 622336

www.thehighforcehotel.co.uk

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The High Force Hotel is an historic coaching inn located in beautiful Upper Teesdale and the North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and adjacent to High Force, England's largest waterfall. It enjoys a spectacular setting amidst magnificent scenery and a treasure chest of amazing attraction.

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Clouds Hill A treat for cyclists

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he tiny, isolated cottage of Clouds Hill in Dorset was the home of an extraordinary man: T E Lawrence, better known as Lawrence of Arabia. He furnished the rooms of this rural retreat to his own personal taste and they are much as he left them, giving a fascinating insight into the complex personality of the writer, warrior and keen cyclist and motorcyclist. Although he is better known for his passion for Brough Superior motorcycles, Lawrence was a very keen cyclist. As a young man he cycled around England and then much of France, studying medieval churches and castles. When he left the RAF in 1935 he cycled back home to Clouds Hill from Bridlington, in Yorkshire. This year we are celebrating Lawrence’s many journeys, and encouraging visitors to the cottage, which lies between Wareham and Dorchester, to come by bicycle. As a reward for doing so we are giving each cyclist a special Clouds Hill shortbread biscuit. Clouds Hill is open until 30 October, Tuesdays to Sundays, 11am4.30pm. For more details please visit www.nationaltrust.org.uk/ clouds-hill or phone 01929 405616.

Stunning Luxury Holiday Cottages Just a 5 Minute Walk From One Of The Most Beautiful Beaches On The Isle Of Wight

Š National Trust Images. Registered Charity Number 205846.

At the heart of the South Wight Jurassic Coastline lays the small unspoiled village of Brook, home to Brook Farmhouse Cottages. The original stable block for Brook Farmhouse has been sympathetically renovated to provide large and luxurious self catering accommodation. Modernisations include vaulted ceilings and skylights, making the rooms light and spacious. The use of original oak beams mean the cottages retain their cosy feel and period charm. For family holidays, romantic breaks, disabled access or even holidays with pets, our cottages are the perfect base from which to explore the events, attractions and the beautiful coast and countryside on the Isle of Wight.

Clouds Hill

Cycling World

A treat for cyclists

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cycling

T E Lawrence, better known as Lawrence of Arabia, loved cycling. When he left the RAF in 1935 he cycled to his Dorset home, Clouds Hill, from Yorkshire. This year we want to encourage visitors to cycle to Clouds Hill, rewarding them with a special Clouds Hill shortbread biscuit. The cottage is open Tuesdays to Sundays, 11am-4.30pm, until 30 October.

01929 405616 nationaltrust.org.uk/clouds-hill

Call to book your accommodation

01983 740 387 or 07879 680 342


(and as sweat-less as possible) when I’m cycling. TENT AND SLEEPING GEAR The ideal tent is not too heavy, freestanding, fast to pitch, with high quality zips, which will usually be the first thing to fail. It’s also nice to be able to pitch just the inner tent for when you’re in hot climes. If you have money, then I can’t think of a better manufacturer than Hilleberg who use vastly stronger material than the rest. After two years of near constant use of the Hilleberg Staika, rain has been kept at bay, even amid the torrential downpours of the Indian monsoon. Always use a ground sheet if you like to indulge in wild camping, they are cheap and light and could save your tent and sleeping mat from rogue thorns. For sleeping mats Thermorest and Exped are the deserving market leaders, and I always use a rectangular (rather than mummy-shaped) cotton sleeping bag liner inside my sleeping bag which can be easily washed, unlike the bag. CLOTHING I consider padded Lycra shorts essential (I harbor dreams of future paternity) as well as Buff multifunctional headwear which as the name suggests can be worn in a range of ways, in a range of conditions. Sandals rather than shoes get my vote in hot climates, but make sure they have a sturdy sole so that you transfer power efficiently to the pedal (Keen and Shimano do decent versions). Some come with cleats if you opt for clip in. Go for sweat-wicking fabric for your t-shirts, instead of cotton, and when it’s very cold: layer up in breathable garbs – sweat is your enemy. OTHER STUFF Your choice of camera will obviously vary, but for those whom photography is a passion, but who are also looking to save on weight, money and space, then a ‘bridge camera’ is the way to go – the ‘bridge’ coming between the more extreme niches of point and shoot and DSLR. Solar panels and dynamo hubs can be helpful for powering devices, but I find that an electricity supply is never far away in today’s world, even in the wilds of Africa, and it’s usually more economical to carry spare batteries. Finally, don’t use anything that requires a key, which can get lost. Bring combination bike locks and padlocks for hostel lockers. I carry two different bank cards (ideally of the type that don’t charge for taking money out abroad) because one might get rejected or swallowed by the machine, and a stash of 100 USD for emergencies.

A word of caution: the choice of cycling touring gear on the market is mind-boggling. And as any pop-psychologist will tell you, choice does not make us happier. Try therefore not to get too bogged down in the detail of kit selection, there are much more important ways to spend your time, and every minute examining kit on forums and eBay is a minute you could be whistling through the crystal-clean air of a mountain pass on your bicycle.

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THAT’S WHAT TO BRING, BUT HOW TO BRING IT? Stuff you need to grab in a hurry can be put in your headbag or the top of a front pannier. Most cameras beyond the point and shoot variety are not going to easily fit in a headbag unless you have little else in there, so this goes in the top of a front pannier. The puncture repair kit should be easily grabable. My headbag is easy to detach and goes with me everywhere, never leaving my sight, for this reason it homes the really important stuff: money, passport, diary, phone, sun glasses etc. Never put your fuel bottle in the same pannier as your pans – once a hint of petrol hits a pan, every meal will taste of it, no matter how much you wash it, trust me on this!

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Touring Bike Review:

The Light Blue Darwin D Tour £1350 BIKE SPEC

Cycling World

FRAME Reynolds 725 DB Steel Tig welded FORK DB Chromo Steel STEM Gusset Staff HANDLEBAR Genetic Flare FRONT DERAILLEUR Shimano Tiagra 4703 Triple REAR DERAILLEUR Shimano Tiagra 105 4700 10spd CHAIN Shimano Tiagra 4601 10spd CRANKSET Shimano Tiagra 4703 50/39/30 CASSETTE Shimano HG500 11-34T 10spd SHIFTERS Shimano Tiagra 4703 STI Triple BRAKES Avid BB7 Disc Brakes SEATPOST Genetic Syngenic SADDLE Gusset Black Jack – R-Series WHEELS Halo Vapour 32/32 TYRES Schwalbe Marathon Plus 700x38C COLOURS Brushed Galvanised or Flat Black SIZES S/M/L

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he Light Blue are producing a range of high quality, steel bikes designed and assembled in Cambridge. Beginning life back in 1895, with a brand name inspired by the university’s sporting colours, Light Blue has cycling heritage. The Darwin is a full-on expedition style tourer, with huge tyre clearances and a full complement of mounts for guards and front and rear racks. The frame is made from lightweight and

durable Reynolds 725 steel, which is a classic material for sturdy touring bikes being heat treated and tig welded. It has a custom Bi-oval down tube to reduce lateral flex at the bottom bracket area. The frames also have a corrosion resistant black ED base coat. The straight blade forks are lightweight butted Cr-Mo D-sectioned and certainly feel highly stable, even when loaded up, made possible through eyes for racks and mudguards. Racks and mudguards are available, but for an additional

cost. It has a regular 11/8” “Aheadset,” to be expected on something built for reliability. Similarly, no surprises to find a tried and trusted creak-free BSA threaded bottom bracket. The gearing is Shimano's new Tiagra 4703 10 speed triple groupset. With 50/39/30 chainrings up front and an 11-34 cassette at the rear, it has a comprehensive range of ratios to cope with any terrain and heavy loads of luggage. Similarly, Avid BB7 disc brakes guarantee great


Marathon Plus 700x38 tyres giving comfort, grip and puncture resistance. Numerous bosses allow for bolt in cable guides, cages and racks; all much appreciated on a reliable tourer. The Darwin comes with a variety of groupset options including SRAM and Shimano 105. Due to an adjustable ADS-3 dropout system, the frame can to be used for Rohloff hub builds, with a 14 speed Speedhub build on offer. Interestingly the right hand (drive side) seat stay is split, so that frame can also be used for a belt drive

set up with the frame being Gates certified. (The Gates corporation make transmission products of rubber and polyurethane and are forerunners in belt-driven bikes.) So the Darwin comes with multiple personalities, ranging from traditional tourer, through off-road backpacker to everyday commuter. If comes out of The Light Blue workshop, it’s guaranteed to be well-built and comfortable to ride.

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stopping power in all conditions, which we certainly appreciated when we tested on gravely descents with a loaded pannier. An advantage of the Avid BB7s is that you can adjust each piston separately allowing you to set them up to provide reliable, progressive braking without the pads rubbing. Halo Vapour 700c/29er wheels are strong but lightweight, their off road pedigree guaranteeing some adventurous touring. Solidity is emphasized with the Schwalbe

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Touring Bike Review:

The Light Blue Darwin D Tour £1350

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PROTECT YOUR RIDE A Riders Guide to Securing Bicycles

It is estimated that over 330,000 bikes were stolen last year in England and Wales alone (CSEW, 2015).

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Getting a good bike is the beginning of a wonderful journey but make sure you follow our top security tips to keep it safe:

Security experts, Hiplok, offer a full guide to locking your bike securely – check it out at www.hiplok.com.

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Promotional Feature - Weldtite

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Cycling World

ounded in 1940, Weldtite originally began manufacturing tyre repair outfits, then moved on to contract tube and bottle filling. To this day, they still manufacture repair kits at their 30,000 sq/f site in Lincolnshire, fill bottles of lubricants and cleaners for both house brands and own label customers, as well as stocking hundreds of products throughout 8 distinct brands. As one of the oldest companies within the industry, Weldtite have one of the most complete ranges of bike maintenance products available from a single supplier. The range includes TF2 Lubricants, Dirtwash Cleaners, Weldtite Puncture Repair Kits, Cyclo Tools, Jetvalve CO2 Inflators & Mounts, PURE EcoFriendly Cleaners & Lubes, Dr. Sludge Puncture Prevention, and ADIE Cycle Accessories.

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Today, with global product distribution, Weldtite offers packaging that contains 19 languages, with products are sold in more than 50 countries around the world, and in more than a thousand stores within the UK alone. Every year, they produce over 2,500,000 puncture repair kits, and sell more than 350,000 cans of TF2 Ultimate Spray, still one of their best selling lines. With this in mind, Weldtite can regularly be seen not only at shows such as the London Bike Show and the Birmingham Cycle Show, but also international shows such as Eurobike in Germany and the International

Cycle Show in Taipei. With a wealth of new products launched to the international market at last months Eurobike, Weldtite will be showing their new products to the UK Market at this years Cycle Show at the NEC. New products for 2017 will include their brand new TF2 Carbon Gripper Paste. Specifically designed for use with Carbon components, it reduces the required tightening torque on handlebars, stems and seat posts while increasing surface friction to reduce slippage and prevent seizing. Available in both 50g and 10g tubes, it’s sure to be an essential purchase when you pick up your first carbon frame. Also on show will be a new look for the ever reliable Dirtwash Bike Cleaner, now with a stronger Orange colouring and a new, improved trigger. Not only does it dispense 3x more liquid per trigger pull, but the spray pattern can be altered with a turn of the nozzle. Another key product to look out for is the brand new SOS Travel Kit. Not only is it tailor made for cycling holidays with all the essentials you need for quick and easy maintenance, it’s the perfect partner for any saddlebag on longer ride. The kit contains Chain Wipes, Brake Surface Wipes, two tubes of Chain Lubricant, Tyre Levers, self seal patches and hand wipes to see you through any mid-ride mishap. To see these or any of Weldtite’s other products, visit them on Stand H65 at the NEC Cycle Show, opposite CUBE.


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VELOCIPEDIA How To (Not) Draw a Bike by Gianluca Gimini

Cycling Cycling World World

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here is a funny story behind this project. It all started in 2009 in a bar in Bologna when I was chatting with an old friend. We were talking about school memories and I recalled this very embarrassing moment: a classmate was being questioned by our technical education teacher. He was doing pretty badly and was on the verge of tears, so the teacher tried to help him out by asking him to describe his bicycle. The poor kid panicked and couldn’t even remember if the driving wheel was the front or the rear one. My friend laughed at this story and said that anyone who has ridden a bike must know how it’s made. Then he tried drawing one on a napkin and failed miserably. That’s the day I started collecting bike drawings. Like The Little Prince from a favourite childhood story, I would walk up to friends, family and total strangers with a pen and a sheet of paper in my hand, asking them to draw me a bicycle. I soon found

out that when confronted with this odd request most people have a very hard time remembering exactly how a bike is made. Some did get close, some actually nailed it perfectly, but most ended up drawing something that was pretty far from a regular bike. Little did I know that this is actually a test that psychologists use to demonstrate how our brain sometimes tricks us into thinking we know something even though we don’t. I collected hundreds of drawings, building up a collection that I think is very precious. There is an incredible diversity of new typologies emerging from these crowd-sourced and technically error-driven drawings. A single designer could not invent so many new bike designs in a lifetime and this is why I treasure this collection. As a professional designer, this year I decided it was my turn to take part in this project by presenting the potential and beauty of these

sketches. I selected those that I found most interesting, genuine and diverse, then rendered them as if they were real. I became the executor of these two-minute projects by people who were mainly non-designers and confirmed my suspicion: everyone, regardless of his age or profession, can come up with extraordinary, wild, new and at times brilliant inventions. The Editor of Cycling World asked me to provide a step-by-step guide to drawing a bike. I do so reluctantly; I’m not one to stifle creativity.


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WWW.STOERLIGHTHOUSE.CO.UK

Gifts for Cyclists £9.95

Wall Hooks

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£36.00

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monkii cage

£8.95

Pedro’s Bottle Opener

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Notebook £19.95

cyclemiles.co.uk

Cosmetic Bag

£34.95 £29.95

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Coloured Bicycle Cushion

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Embroided Hanging Sign

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For every nasty in the road, there’s the new Durano Double Defense.

Advanced cut resistant SnakeSkin sidewalls and RaceGuard puncture protection. More than a match for your city’s streets.


Some stats:

Total number bicycle drawings: 376 Youngest participant: 3 years old Oldest participant: 88 years old Bicycles facing left: 85 % Bicycles facing right: 15 %

Fun facts:

Some diversities are gender driven. Nearly 90% of drawings in which the chain is attached to the front wheel (or both to the front and the rear) were drawn by women. Though men generally tend to place the chain correctly, they are more keen to over-complicate the frame when they realize they are not drawing it correctly. One of the most frequent issues for participants was not being able to describe their profession succinctly.

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The most unintelligible drawing also has the most unintelligible handwriting. It was done by a doctor.

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ELECTRIC BIKES Sussex

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lectric Bikes Sussex is the only specialist Electric Bike shop in Brighton & Hove and has one of the largest displays nationally.

We are a family run business and strive to offer exemplary Customer Service. We are Open 7 days a week, so visit at your convenience, or we offer booked appointments if you prefer.

Our Services include: ·

Try before you Buy

·

Electric Bike Hire

·

Leasing for Company Fleets

·

Cycle To Work

·

0% Finance

·

National and International Delivery

Here’s what our Customers say: · “The whole team are great and would highly recommend the team and shop and most important an ebike!” – Steven · “I could not believe the service I received from EBS…never pushy, gave advice and guidance to get me to the bike I wanted. Can’t praise them enough.” – David · “Great service and very friendly, helpful staff. From the first visit - a test ride around the Marina, to eventually buying” – Terry · “Best purchase I have ever made, makes cycling even more of a pleasure and staff are very helpful and friendly, highly recommend !!!!” – Hayley ·

“I tend to make online purchases but I’m really glad I bought my bike directly from Electric Bikes Sussex. I felt I was sold the bike that was right for me with no hard sell. A friendly, family run business that goes the extra mile so I can go many extra miles on my great electric bike!” Emma

We are a Bosch Approved Service Centre and have a fully equipped Workshop to maximize your Electric Bike enjoyment. 016 ro ike 2 Haib Allmtn P o r u Xd

GET IN TOUCH 35 Waterfront Brighton Marina Village Brighton BN2 5WA

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Located in Brighton Marina, with free Parking and a wide array of Leisure and Restaurants on our doorstep, a visit to Electric Bikes Sussex makes a great day out. Or we can deliver your Bike to you if that’s easier.

01273 625060 info@electricbikessussex.co.uk www.electricbikessussex.co.uk

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Butler House

Broadmeadows Farmhouse Close to Selkirk in the Scottish Borders, our family run B&B exudes a welcoming and relaxed atmosphere.

Cyclist friendly Secure lock up housing for bikes

www

.selkirkbandb.

co.uk

Two guest bedrooms.

Both double/family sized with own private with exceptional views across the Yarrow Valley Drying facilities for outdoor clothing and footwear. Full private use of the front part of Broadmeadows Farmhouse.

Cycling World

Full access to the sitting room, dining room, shower cloakroom and front garden, use of our cutlery and crockery for any brought in cuisine/ refreshments.

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Butler House 16 Patrick Street Kilkenny City, Ireland

T: +353 (0)56 7722828 F: +353 (0)56 7765626 E: res@butler.ie


Ask Anita Overcoming Fears

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’d love to be able to cycle and explore the world on two wheels, grinning madly like in all the photos in this magazine. But the truth is, I’m scared. I’m scared of the traffic, of being a bit wobbly, of not really knowing what I’m doing. It seems like a crazy world out there on the roads. How can I get rid of my fear? You’re not alone – fear and perception of danger is one of the biggest barriers holding people back from cycling. It can seem scary cycling on the roads, but you’ve as much right to be there as any other road user, whether it’s a motorbike or an articulated lorry. If you cycle confidently and safely, you’ll be just fine. And if you don’t like the busy roads, you can normally find a route that avoids them.  

CONFIDENCE IS KEY

by Federation European Cyclists'

Knowing some key principles for where to position yourself on the road, how to make decisions about making manoeuvres, and how to communicate your intentions and movements to other road users can do a lot to boost your confidence. Most councils do adult cycle training for residents at reduced rates, and there are a whole bunch of independent cycle trainers out there who can do one to one sessions from your home or workplace. I can’t stress how useful this can be – even after years of cycling in London, I learnt heaps from a level 3 Bikeability course.

SAFETY IN NUMBERS

Munich by Federation European Cyclists'

The more people cycle, the less dangerous it becomes. Drivers are expecting to see cyclists and are more likely to be cyclists themselves so understand why you behave the way you do – in the interests of safety for all

rather than selfishness or overconfidence. Add yourself to those numbers and you’ll be helping to move things along.

ROUTE PLANNING

You can often avoid the busiest roads and the nastiest junctions. There are online maps such as Cyclestreets that show routes suggested by cyclists, and many councils also produce their own maps. Often these maps help you to find cut throughs or shortcuts you never knew existed. Sometimes however, you have to accept that if you want a pleasant ride, it’s not going to be the most direct route.

CYCLE WITH OTHERS

Finding a group to cycle with is a great way to boost your confidence and learn from others. If you’re female, Breeze is a good place to start. The British Cycling Skyride site helps you find people local to you to go out riding with. Or perhaps see if you can bring together a group of colleagues, friends, or post something on a local Facebook group or Streetlife social media site. There may be plenty of other people just waiting for someone to suggest it! Above all, face your fears. They may be well founded but the benefits of getting out there, being confident and cycling far outweigh the effects of staying in, watching the world from a box with windows. You see, hear, smell and feel the world, you keep healthy and active, not to mention saving money and the environment.

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A

nita loves discovering new places by bike, having explored many miles of the National Cycle Network, and taken her trusty Ridgeback to roughly twenty countries so far. She does the occasional sportive, commutes by bike in London and Surrey and dabbles in triathlons, mountain biking and visiting cycling cafes. She currently works for the charity Sustrans as a project officer. Anita’s main area of expertise is surrounding herself with experts, whose knowledge she will extract to answer all of your everyday cycling questions…

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NEC

Cycle Show

Tested by science, trusted by sports professionals

STAND G154

David Weir, CBE

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Little drinks with BIG ZING! Cycling Promotional WorldFeature - James White Drinks

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ames White Drinks, makers of the Beet It Sport range (NEC Cycle show - Stand G154) have come up with a new and exciting range of drinks – ZINGERS. Pocket shots that hit the spot and provide your taste buds with a ZING! There are four variants to choose from, inspired by strong natural flavours - Organic Ginger, Xtra Ginger, Lime Chilli and Turmeric Juice.   The Organic Ginger Zinger offers something new and really different - a delicious caffeine free alternative to an espresso. Organic and made with the real thing (26% pressed ginger, 57% apple juice (not from concentrate) and water. With a whopping 40% Ginger juice content reinforced with extra zing from chilli - the Xtra Ginger Zinger is not for the fainthearted! This Zinger WILL excite the senses! Delicious but not for those that can’t take the heat. The Lime Chilli Zinger packs a punch and an 100% organic punch at that with the sharpness of pressed lime juice, hot chilli and apple juice. The Turmeric Juice Zinger is a novel and surprisingly delicious alternative to the turmeric products that are currently offered on the market. James White press the Turmeric in Suffolk rather than using extract or powder. The quality of the taste is refined because of this. They have added black pepper, lemon and a little chilli to give the zing. These pocket shots really hit the spot. The Ginger, Xtra Ginger and Lime Chilli shots are certified Organic by the Soil Association.

Available now in most Waitrose stores and online | www.jameswhite.co.uk RRP £1.49


Training and Nutrition:

Climb Well by Tim Ramsden. Tim is an Association of British Cycling Coaches (ABCC) Level 3 Coach and owner of www.blackcatcyclecoaching.com

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frequent question I receive is “how do I improve my climbing”? With the Tour of Britain happening this month, it seems pertinent to address the specific issue of improving climbing on UK, rather than mountainous European, gradients…. you don’t find climbs of 1 hour at 6-7% gradient in Britain, they are shorter and steeper! The first thing to consider is the amount of weight that has to be transported uphill. At an elite racing level, power-to-weight is the crucial factor in races with any significant climbing: advances in training methods mean that the top riders are at a similar physical level to each other, and all but the smallest gains in power are difficult to attain through training alone. Cyclists have always been lean, and followed strict diets in order to improve, but recently the term “watts-per-kilo” has been synonymous with success. This magic number – over 6.2 W/Kg for a top TDF rider on a 30:00-40:00 climb – can be improved by gaining a few watts…or by losing a few kilos. So W/Kg is the name of the game at the top of the game, but even when dealing with a recreational rider just wanting to go that bit quicker up the hills I always come back to this obvious “coaching point”: if you are enjoying a bit too much of your own company, you will not cheat gravity!! Similarly, if you already watch what you eat but are riding a bike where the wheels weigh more than the rest of the machine…reduce the rotating weight by upgrading the hoops, you should notice a significant difference. Standing up vs sitting down? Well, the smart answer would be sitting down and spinning a lower gear, and that would certainly be better for longer climbs…but in the 80s the Tour of Britain featured a climb known as Rosedale Chimney in North Yorkshire, and it’s 33% sections reduced some of the peloton to walking - even a fit rider will need to be able to climb standing up on 20% plus British slopes in order to keep moving. So – how do you improve? Find a hill, one that always challenges you. Have a good warm up. Over 40? Have 45 seconds warm up for each year of your age, including 3 x 6 second “jumps” at around 90% effort. Aim to ride the hill 3 times the first time you do this session. Alternate in and out of the saddle – stay 15-20 bpm (beats per minute) below your max heart rate until 45 seconds from the top. At that point go at 100% to the top. The best way to do this on a shallower climb is to sit and rev hard in your lowest gear: on a steeper climb do this part out of the saddle on a bigger gear. Make sure that you have at least 3 x the time it took you to climb the hill as recovery – a 2:00 climb would have 6:00 recovery, next time reduce the recovery/add to the reps. If you can do 5 reps, then you are not working hard 155 enough….and twice a week is absolutely all you need for this session. May the road rise to meet you……


From the Workshop

Protect your Chainstay by Isidore and Martial PrĂŠvalet

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Cycling World

enerally, we take care of our bikes but the chain damages the paint on the chainstay. Here is how to make a light, resistant protector of composite fibreglass and polyester. It can also be made with carbon and kevlar

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Martial is a mechanical engineer who has produced articles for car and bike magazines, including Le Sport VĂŠlo, Bike Magazine and Cyclosport.

Here’s the damage the chain does to your chainstay

To work more easily we remove the crankset and rear derailleur cable

Clean the chainstay well

Add grease to protect the chainstay from the polyester resin

Dress the chainstay with aluminium foil to aid removal when dry. Make a cardboard corner to assist further

Cut fibreglass in advance. When the polyester is ready work quickly using gloves to handle the fibreglass


Let dry for several hours. Avoid inhaling

Cut under the chainstay

Cut the edges of the protector to get the desired shape/size

Sand the surface (80 with water to begin). Paint the protector if desired

Apply with double sided bonding tape

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Grease or wax the foil. Prepare the polyester resin. Place first layer then a layer of fibre, applying 3 layers of each, chasing away air bubbles between each layer

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Letter of the Month

Mr D. Reeves of Swindon

wins the Velo Hinge Home Bicycle Storage I started cycling when I was fourteen-years-old and I am now eighty-four. I first got interested in Cycling World about two years ago when I got into tandems as it is one of the only magazine that caters for tandem riders. About a year ago I bought a Dawes tandem and my partner and I have been round Wales, Anglesey, Norwich and Ferry Meadows near Peterborough. Ferry Meadows is lovely for cycling with marked cycle routes, lakes, a miniature railway and good cafes, as well as a good cycle route from the heart of Peterborough. Why not have a Tour De France for tandems, or a similar stage race? It would be fast and exciting and would encourage more tandem riding.

Share your thoughts...

 @CyclingWorlduk  @cyclingworld_uk  Search for Cycling World  Search Cycling World on the App Store  Search Cycling World on Google Play

Letter of the month wins a Velo Hinge Home Bicycle Storage.

Cycling World

by Davy

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Please keep sending your thoughts, feelings, ideas and insights about all things cycling. Send letters to: Email: editor@cyclingworldmag.co.uk Post: Editor, Cycling World Magazine, Myrtle Oast, Kemsdale Road, Fostall, Faversham, Kent ME13 9JL We may edit your letter for brevity and/or clarity. We look forward to hearing from you. Editor


THIS MONTHS

COMEPETITION ......... Win a Cycling Holiday in Andalusia Wheels in Wheels is offering free entry to Spain’s newest Gran Fondo on 27 May 2017, plus a 4-night stay at the 4* Valle Del Este Hotel complex in Mojacar, Andalusia, for two people. The prize includes two event entries, half board accommodation, fully supported rides inc. nutritional support from Clifbar, bike hire if required, and return airport transfers from Almeria airport. The prize does not include flights to/from Almeria or transfers to/from home airport. To be in with a chance of winning this fantastic prize, just answer the question below and return it to Wheels in Wheels (www.wheelsinwheels.com) at entries@wheelsinwheels.com with your answer and full name and address before 31 October 2016.

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Wheels in Wheels ride motto is: A: Ride like a pro B: Ride like a donkey C: Ride like the wind

Summer’s Competition Winner:

Nicky from Wales wins the Simon Taylor Tour de France Print.

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Overseas Riding

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We have been treated to the delights of overseas cycling via the broadcasting of Grand Tours and the Olympics. Dramatic routes through the cycling heartlands of Italy, France and Spain followed by thrilling racing around the exotic landscape of Rio. Cycling World celebrates cycling abroad with a focus on France, looking at some of the top places to ride. We then take a jaunt through South America, enjoying adventures in Columbia and Patagonia. There’s even a trip to Italy, The Boot, to boot. Bon voyage, or viaggio sicuro!

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My First Taste

of Italy Cycling World Editor can’t believe he’s never been to Italy, so visits Emilia Romagna, and discovers the “land with a soul, people with a smile”

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ycling in Emilia Romagna lived up to its promise: riding through this beautiful region certainly filled the soul and riders’ smiles mirrored the locals’. Emilia Romagna is welcoming cyclists, with frequent flights into the capital Bologna and a network of bike-friendly hotels. The area offers diverse terrain for both on and off road, and includes hills so challenging that they have given rise to the region’s own Granfundo. This was the main purpose of my visit, I had been invited to take part in Granfundo degli Squali, a long and everrising race come sportive. As well as cycling there is a wide cultural diversity with the joys of the Adriatic coast, which features the wellknown coastal resort Rimini, and an interior known for its Romanesque and Renaissance cities such as Modena, Parma and Ferrara. May is the perfect month to discover the region, pleasantly warm with a rolling landscape offering up its tapestry of green hues. Our guides were from Terrabici, a consortium of local professionals from the cycle tourism industry. Their mixture of first day enthusiasm and fear that days to come might bring rain, led to an ambitious day of riding: 65 miles with 1370 metres of climbing. We set out from the coastal town of Cattolica where we staying and headed northwest along the coast to Riccione. It was serenely quiet; though warm by UK standards, still not beach weather for the sun-loving Italians. There was evidence of what the high season would bring; the beaches are covered in uniformly laid out umbrella stands and children’s plastic playparks. May is certainly one of the last opportunities to speed along a soon-to-be heaving sea front. After Riccione we took an inland route zigzagging through the interior, leaving the coastal plains behind as we started to climb in the Marecchia valley. Great spurs of rock can be seen overlooking the riverbed, upon which stands Verucchio, a town dating back to the ninth century, though it is its medieval layout that remains today. After an all-to-speedy descent we ground up a long climb

reaching an impressive height of over 650 metres. We climbed for so long that we had literally risen out of Italy into the independent republic of San Marino. San Marino is known as the Most Serene Republic of San Marino and is an enclaved microstate. It’s claim to fame is having the smallest population (32,000) of all the members of the Council of Europe. It also claims to be the oldest surviving sovereign state and constitutional republic in the world being the continuation of the monastic community founded in 301. Our guide Andrea, under a cloud of jealously, informed us of its highly stable economy, one of the lowest unemployment rates in Europe, no national debt and a budget surplus. Then slightly bitterly he told he told us they paid much less in tax and the women rarely married men from outside the region. Despite the disappointment of the unlikeliness of finding a bride and living in tax-free bliss, we still enjoyed the impressive architecture and a well-earned coffee. Our ride homewards was mainly hair-raising descents, through narrow serpentine roads that demanded our attention to be drawn from mesmerising landscapes. The gravityled rhythm was interrupted by a climb to the village of Montescudo, nestled on a ridge separating the plain of Rimini from the route leading to the Apennine Mountains. It is an impressive fortified village, with fortifications dating from the mid fifteenth century, offering an expansive view of the Rimini Riviera. We moved quickly on, swooping down to the river clutching road below, then knocking out a good club run pace along the flat, fast road back to Cattolica. For our second day we requested something a bit lighter, needing to keep something in our legs for the Granfundo of the following day. So today was just a mere 36-miler which still encompassed 790m of climbing. We headed northeast along the coast straight into the climb of Gabicce Monte, which would be the finish of the following day’s Granfundo. The reverse recce then offered some descents which could not be enjoyed in the usual manner- we knew the next


Always cycling in good company

Back in Italy from San Marino

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A tapestry of greens

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day these would be testing climbs at the end of an exhausting ride. Fortunately, we were distracted by a climb to Castello di Gradara, a medieval fortress located in the region of Marche. Our base Cattolica is conveniently located on the border of this neighbouring region, with is divergent yet equally pleasant delights. The castle is one of the most visited monuments in the region, no doubt due to the legend that the castle was the scene of the famous and tragic love story of Paolo and Francesca, caught in each other’s arms and killed by Gianciotto, Francesca’s husband. This love story was immortalized by Dante in his Divine Comedy. Snow globes and fridge magnets safely nestled in pockets bulging with energy bars, our group moved swiftly on, passing the private race track of Valentino Rossi, Italian professional motorcycle racer and nine-time winner of the Grand Prix World Championships. We were headed to a much-talked about wine tasting at a local winery. Family owned, one of the sons had actually joined us for the day’s ride, am extremely tall, skinny man; built like a pro and boasting that his bidons were filled with his own wine. He led us to an area called Croce di Montecolombo where his family’s Agrituristica Fiammetta, with its vineyards and olive groves, flourished. On arrival we were introduced to his family, discovering that the Fiammetta wines are all named after his mother- a typical Italian touch in a family business. Wine tasting in Italy, much to the delight of famished cyclists, is actually a great food fest. Each wine has to be enjoyed with its own particular nourishing partner, be it local cured meats, freshlymade cheese, the farm’s own olive oil drizzled onto flatbread, or an almond cake. Polite acceptance and a curiosity to know regional natural produce overcomes the more temperate thoughts of descending unknown potholed roads under the influence. The ride back proved fast and furious, no doubt due to the high sugar content found in wine. The third day was the main event: The Gran Fundo degli Squali, which means shark as the event starts at Cattolica’s aquarium. Now in its second year, the event attracts 2000 riders due to its challenging hilly routes in a beautiful landscape at a time when the heat is nourishing rather than energy-sapping. There is an ironically-named short course of 84km and 3770ft of climbing, but wishing to eke out as much

as possible from my short time here, I opted for the 136km route with a challenging 7380ft of ascent. Writing about such events is almost as challenging as riding them. You get into race mode, bury the head and pedal, oblivious to the names of the monument-filled places you are ticking off. You have to remind yourself to take the time to glance sideways to enjoy the landscape you are eating up. I know I should stop and take pictures, but there are points when I fear that if I stop pedalling I might seize up and never start again. Food stops could be opportunities to meet the locals and fellow riders, but all you actually do is load calories and get moving again. I hope I’m not portraying the ride as an ordeal because though challenging, it was a luxurious route with dramatic views that I did take the trouble to enjoy, and even photograph, before embarking on ridiculously fast descents, followed by further long, gruelling climbs. In fact, I blame my savouring of the ride and three banquet style food stops on the way for my 136th out of 138 placing in my age cat of VET2, ride time of 6.25.15. The route was a well-signed jaunt through the interior with excellent road closure and junction control. Starting flat from Cattolica through Gradara, it led to a 20km climb to Mont Monte Altevelio. After a rapid decent to Casinina, it climbed again to Urbino, then rollercoasting with climbs to Montefabbri, Montegridolfo, Fiorenzuola di Focara and then climbing to the bitter end of Gabicce Monte. I arrived so near the end that they were removing barriers and packing away the pilchard party; though must confess that partying and eating pilchards was the last thing on my agenda. Plastic medal sporting a grinning shark around my neck, I was thankfully welcomed by some Canadian ride buddies from the previous days. Rehydrated by our varying means, mine being just water feeling queasy after overconsuming sports drinks, we rolled down the hill to a welcoming meal and jacuzzi at our cycling-themed hotel. Most probably sleep or celebrate with numerous beers, but I get to play in the empty plastic playgrounds littering the beaches, having made this into a family holiday. I do so joyfully, using climbing frames to do some stretching. Non-riding time was wonderful family time; riding hire bikes to soak up local delights, be it history, scenery or food and wine.

Cobbled climbs of Castello di Gradara


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BIKE HOTELS

Castello di Gradara

Italy, and Emilia Romagna in particular, has a network of Bike Hotels and Sport Hotels. We stayed at the Hotel Europa Monetti in Cattolica, which is a fine example of what these themed hotels have to offer. Bike Friendly: the hotels can arrange hire of good quality road and MTB bikes. The Europa has its own fleet of city bikes, some with child seats. There was a secure bike storage area with tools and a maintenance stand and excellent free maps of suggested circular routes. Wellness: family comfort catered for with a heated pool, including a kids’ pool, an indoor and outdoor jacuzzi, spa area with sauna and Turkish bath and a gym. Food: Fresh, regional and healthy. A very impressive breakfast buffet which included gluten free, as well as lots of cooked, fruit and sweet options. Pasta, fish, meats, veggie options and fresh salad at lunch and dinner. It’s healthy fuel for your riding. Family: A well-equipped indoor kids’ play area, with supervised hours in the day. Children’s pool and a 4,000m2 area of allocated beach. www.europamonetti.com

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Somewhere in the Granfundo

169 Cattolica, sunny days to come

Hotel Europa Monetti


WHEELS IN WHEELS CYCLING RIDE CAMPS 2016-17

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Cycling World

heels in Wheels have been arranging camps since 1999, originally based on Mallorca until 3 years ago when the Islands roads became too busy and in our opinion a little unsafe. Many of our regular clients first visited the Island when the roads were empty and cafes were easy to stop at without booking and prices were sensible. The professional teams usually find the best locations and Mojocar in Andalusia, was extensively used by the Rabobank/Belkin squad for their camps. You can ride for 30mins and not see another car or climb 2000 metres in the middle of March and come back with bragging rights and the full tan lines to prove it. Our first year was based on a small villa complex, which we required to match our “Ride like a Pro” concept. “Ride like a Pro” This service is to match what a professional gets when they go racing or riding except it is at a pace suitable for all. No saddle bags, if you puncture the team vehicle or motorcycle comes up and a spare wheel is fitted. You want another bottle or gel then ask the ride leader and they radio back and you drop back for one. Yes we can organise camps for professionals, club teams and riders wanting to train for the upcoming season or sportive, but we specialise in the everyday cyclist that wants to ride their bike in

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safe warm conditions and make a holiday of their time with us. We have many experienced partners with a full nutritional support from Clifbar, tyres and wheels from Continental and Shimano and a full mechanical support team at the hotel or en route. Our location in Andalusia is 45mins from Almeria airport and 2hours from Alicante. These airports offer an excellent service from the UK and other parts of Europe. Once settled at the 4 Star Valle del Este hotel, we get you on the road for a short ride along the coast to our favourite café. The Valle del Este hotel is a fitting location for our camps and aligns with our “Ride like a Pro” tag offering everything you should need, with first class twin bedded rooms, a eat all you want breakfast and dinner buffet. A state of the art Spa complex offers sauna, steam room and massage. Wi-Fi is available all over the complex. Wheels in Wheels Ride camps offer a holiday for cyclist of all abilities and aspirations, with all the hassle taken away. Our trips are from 4 nights* up to 14 nights from late February through to May and include Airport transfers from Almeria, half board at the Valle del Este 4 star hotel with secure bike storage. Guided rides, full daily ride nutrition and free bottles, wheels and mechanical support. Prices start from £395* Let us take the pressure of organising your trip to sunny Spain and contact Graham at Info@wheelsinwheels.com for more details


AUTU CAMMN PS

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from 2 to N 2nd Oct ob ovem ber 5 er th

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Discover the alternative

Tour de France TEXT AND PHOTOS BY EXPEDIA.CO.UK

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ave you been inspired by the intense cycling action and beautiful scenery at this year’s Tour de France? Do you fancy lazy evenings spent sampling gastronomical delights and early morning explorations through idyllic countryside? If so, then it might be time to get back on the saddle (or even on the horse saddle) and explore the picturesque sights of France this summer. Every Tour route juggles logistics, history and the need for enthralling racing. If these tick your holiday wishlist but you’re looking to steer clear of the tourist traps and avoid breaking the bank, Expedia.co.uk has put together its top unusual French towns to explore by bike.

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Nantes in the department of Loire–Atlantique: 200 miles of cycle paths Travel back in time with a visit to the Castle of the Dukes of Brittany. Housed within a formidable fortress, the castle stands right in the heart of the city. If history doesn’t take your fancy, why not check out some of the stunning 18th and 19th-century architecture the Graslin neighbourhood has to offer with a bike ride to Place Royal, cours Cambronne and the unmissable passage Pommeraye. Afterwards, take a much needed rest bite at the Hangar à Bananes. Flights to Nantes including a four night stay at the Nantes Berges De La Loire, just £396.

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Cycling World

La Rochelle in the department of CharenteMaritime: 72 miles of cycle paths

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The beautiful Charente-Maritime is nestled in the heart of the Atlantic coast with a maritime tradition that can be seen everywhere. With a fishing port, marina, Old Port, aquarium and maritime museum, the whole city revolves around the sea. Cyclists will be able to enjoy the iodine tang up to the central market, whilst La Rochelle is also a famous seaside resort: golden sand, water sports, seaside promenades and no fewer than three beaches, where you can leave the bike behind and enjoy a relaxed walk across the warm sand. Flights to La Rochelle including a four night stay at La Monnaie Art and Spa Hotel, just £580


3

Beaumont-deLomagne and Castelsarrasin in the department of Tarn-et-Garonne: 22 miles of cycle paths Why not explore the beautiful little town of Tarn-et-Garonne which is renowned for using organic farming methods to produce authentic wine? Not far from Beaumont-de-Lomagne, Castelsarrasin offers cycle paths so you can stretch your legs a little after a few tastings of the good stuff. Flights to the nearby town of Auch with a four night stay at La Villa Toscane, £448

4

Perpignan in the department of Pyrénées-Orientales: 50 miles of cycle paths Perpignan is full of delicious, southern-flavoured treats. This ‘land of plenty’ is home to a whole host of culinary delights that recall both the Pays d'Oc and Catalonia On where you can cycle and sample tasty morsels from the markets. Flights to Perpignan with a four night stay at the Appart’City Perpignan Centre, just £516

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Avignon in the department of Vaucluse: 23 miles of cycle paths

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The former city of the popes, Avignon offers a rich heritage where visitors can lose themselves in the maze of picturesque streets and discover the charming buildings that add to the city's cultural attraction. The Papal palace, the famous Pont SaintBénezet and the city's many churches and museums will delight history buffs, art lovers and those who like to step back in time. Flights to Avignon with a four night stay at the Appart’Hotel Salamandre, 173 from £732


Discover the alternative Tour de France

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Grenoble in the department of Isère: 99 miles of cycle paths When visiting Grenoble, you absolutely must eat in a Savoy-style restaurant and sample at least one of the region's cheese specialities, such as raclette, tartiflette or fondue, to name just a few. Totally unmissable and well deserved after a hard day's cycling. Flights to Grenoble with a four night stay at the Hipark Residence Grenoble, just £616

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Camargue in the department of Bouches-du-Rhône: horse riding instead of cycling

Along the banks of the Étang de Vaccarès in the heart of a nature reserve, various horseback or carriage rides will make your stay here magical. Be sure to get on your bike afterwards to ride along the shore, while admiring the pink flamingos as they take flight... breathe in the salty air and revel in the moment. Flights to Camargue with a four night stay at the Les Hameaux De Camargue, from £333

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Vichy in the department of Allier: 5.5 miles of cycle paths

Cycling World

Spoil yourself after some exercise with spa treatments and relaxation. To get away from it all with the most famous spa treatment in Vichy: the "original" four-hand Vichy shower, which visitors have enjoyed at the Vichy Thermal Spa Les Célestins and Thermes des Dômes since 1896. It's a massage by two perfectly synchronised massage therapists, under a warm spa water shower. Relaxation guaranteed and to be experienced at least once. Flights to Vinchy with a four night stay at the Ibis Vichy, 174£585


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Serre-Chevalier in the department of HautesAlpes et Alpes du Sud: relaxation and hydrotherapy To stay on the theme of well-being and relaxation, the next stop is Serre-Chevalier and its Grands Bains du Monêtier. These baths draw spring water that is naturally warmed to 44°C then cooled to 37°C, with beneficial properties known since the dawn of time. Flights to Serre-chevalier with a four night stay at the Le Grand Aigle Hotel & Spa, £458

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Reims in the department of Marne: 61 miles of cycle paths

To bring your cycling journey to an end, there's no better way than to celebrate with a glass of champagne in Reims. The capital of champagne, Reims owes its former greatness to its age-old royal symbolism. The Kings of France used to come here to be crowned at highly prestigious ceremonies. The Gothic cathedral was where all French sovereigns were crowned since 1027. Cycling enthusiasts can visit one of the many wineries around the city and learn all the secrets of how champagne is made, with tastings also available. Flights to Reims with a four night stay at the Appart' City Confort Reims Centre, £216

Hop on two wheels and explore London further than you can on foot. Soak up the city’s splendour as you whizz by famous landmarks, including the London Eye, Big Ben, Buckingham Palace and Trafalgar Square.

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Should you not be one of those lucky ones heading to the Tour this summer, fear not there are still some great bike rides to try in the Capital from just £24!

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Tour de Force Cycling stages of the Tour de France

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ining up in front of Mont St Michel with around 80 other riders was a sobering moment. Ahead of us stretched 188km of relatively flat roads, winding up the coast to the infamous Utah Beach of the 2nd World War Normandy Landings. OK – that’s a nice big ride by any measure, right? Now how do you fancy doing it again tomorrow … and the day after … and the day after that? And maybe we can throw in some 200+km days? Oh! And perhaps 4,000 metres of ascent? Now you’re starting to get a feel for it. This is going to be no ordinary ride. Mont St Michel seems a long time ago … three weeks, to be exact, and 21 stages. The riders gathered there were taking on the Tour de Force – an event that follows the route of the Tour de France each year, one week ahead of the pros. Most riders take on a so-called ‘Tour Taster’ that can be anything from two days to ten. An intrepid 40 riders tackle the full tour (all 21 stages) and sport the title of ‘Lifers’. They were all there to find out one thing: ‘what does it feel like to cycle more than one stage of the Tour de France’? Several days later, we were hauling ourselves through what may well have been the toughest opening week of the Tour de France in living memory. Huge mileage and unprecedented ascent for the first week made for a tough time. Some filthy weather made it no easier – but then who said this was going to be easy?

Cycling long stages is tough enough, but unlike the pros who take around five or six hours to cycle a stage, we take more like eighttwelve hours. This means that we don’t have the luxury of recovery time like the pros do. We have to do our own kit washing, get massages, phone home to check in, maybe even update a blog. We need to eat … a lot! Burning 6-7,000 calories a day requires regular feed stops (every 40km) and an enormous breakfast and dinner. We need to sort out luggage for the next day, because we’re moving almost every single day as we work our way around beautiful France. There is a seemingly never ending need for bike-faff – alleviated to a great extent by a team of mechanics who deal with ‘unhappy’ bikes while safely tucking up the ‘happy’ ones overnight. Most importantly, we need to sleep. But if you’ve only arrived at the hotel at 7pm (or, on huge mountain days, well after 9pm) then the time for all this personal admin is squeezed. We’re certainly not going sightseeing in the evenings! We eat, sleep, ride, repeat.

Cycling World

Quickly this becomes a way of life. It’s undoubtedly tough but then again, there’s nothing else to worry about. No work worries, no school run, no supermarket shopping or cooking. No paperwork. We’re in a bubble and it’s getting more intense by the day. By the time we hit the Pyrenees, we’re becoming hardened cyclists. Joined there by the fresh legs of dozens of new riders heading out for three to five stages over the mountains, we all know we’re in for a treat. Cheated of views by low cloud, we still beast our way up Tourmalet for an emotional summit early in the day in the bizarre company of llamas that have settled on the col. Plenty more categorised climbs follow. By the time we reach Andorra, the sun has come out and we’re baking on the sticky tarmac.

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Riders come, riders go, but the Lifers keep on spinning. They’re


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becoming invincible – no new rider, no matter how fresh their legs, is able to keep up with them now. They’ve become road hardened, scrawny, focused. They’ve also bonded through this extraordinary shared experience. Everyone gets a tough day and everyone is prepared to sacrifice themselves to help someone suffering more than they are. The camaraderie is extraordinary. On into the Swiss Alps and after a filthy, freezing ride from Berne to the heights of Finhaut Emosson, we head back into France and are rewarded with spectacular scenery and bright blue skies. Cycling doesn’t get any better than this. With Paris in our sights, we still have some serious mountain days to tackle – not least the Etape du Tour stage 20. Unlike the Etape, we can complete the Col de la Ramaz climb (15,000 riders on a road narrowed by concrete barriers set up after landslides was a risk ASO weren’t prepared to take) and head on to the final, epic climb up Col de Joux Plane. A final spin downhill to the red polka-dotted Alpine town of Morzine and we knew we’d made it – just the glory ride into Paris to come. Heading back to our families and friends, high on life and the sense of a colossal achievement, a dream realised, we’re not sure how we’re going to adapt back to normal life. None of us will ever be the same again. What can possibly follow such a huge challenge as this? Well … we could always do it all over again! Sales for 2017 are now open. To get your place, head to www.tourdeforce. org.uk and register your interest to receive your priority booking code. The Tour de Force is a fundraiser for the William Wates Memorial Trust. This year, the tour has raised over £320,000 and counting ... admin is squeezed. We’re certainly not going sightseeing in the evenings! We eat, sleep, ride, repeat. Quickly this becomes a way of life. It’s undoubtedly tough but then again, there’s nothing else to worry about. No work worries, no school run, no supermarket shopping or cooking. No paperwork. We’re in a bubble and it’s getting more intense by the day. By the time we hit the Pyrenees, we’re becoming hardened cyclists. Joined there by the fresh legs of dozens of new riders heading out for three to five stages over the mountains, we all know we’re in for a treat. Cheated of views by low cloud, we still beast our way up Tourmalet for an emotional summit early in the day in the bizarre company of llamas that have settled on the col. Plenty more categorised climbs follow. By the time we reach Andorra, the sun has come out and we’re baking on the sticky tarmac.

Cycling World

Riders come, riders go, but the Lifers keep on spinning. They’re becoming invincible – no new rider, no matter how fresh their legs, is able to keep up with them now. They’ve become road hardened, scrawny, focused. They’ve also bonded through this extraordinary shared experience. Everyone gets a tough day and everyone is prepared to sacrifice themselves to help someone suffering more than they are. The camaraderie is extraordinary.

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On into the Swiss Alps and after a filthy, freezing ride from Berne to the heights of Finhaut Emosson, we head back into France and are rewarded with spectacular scenery and bright blue skies. Cycling doesn’t get any better than this. With Paris in our sights, we still have some serious mountain days to tackle – not least the Etape du Tour stage 20. Unlike the Etape, we can complete the Col de la Ramaz climb (15,000 riders on a road narrowed by concrete barriers set up after landslides was a risk ASO weren’t prepared to take) and head on to the final, epic climb up Col de Joux Plane. A final spin downhill to the red polka-dotted Alpine town of Morzine and we knew we’d made it – just the glory ride into Paris to come. Heading back to our families and friends, high on life and the sense of a colossal achievement, a dream realised, we’re not sure how we’re going to adapt back to normal life. None of us will ever be the same again. What can possibly follow such a huge challenge as this? Well … we could always do it all over again! Sales for 2017 are now open. To get your place, head to www.tourdeforce. org.uk and register your interest to receive your priority booking code. The Tour de Force is a fundraiser for the William Wates Memorial Trust. This year, the tour has raised over £320,000 and counting ...


SET OUT TO CONQUER THE PEAKS OF THE PYRENEES ... ASPIN - TOURMALET - PIC DU MIDI - HAUTACAM - SOULOR - AUBISQUE

LE REXHOTEL

LE NEXHOTEL

... and MAKE A STOP IN TARBES ! YOUR 3 HOTELS DESIGN - TARBES PYRÉNÉES

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NEXHOTEL **/*** Tél: 05.62.360.360 www.lenexhotel.com

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151 rooms

THEY TRUST US EVERY YEAR !

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www.epic-cycling.com | +34 656406244 info@epic-cycling.com | Granada - Spain


Then you think of those coming months with miserable weather in the UK, and where you should head to get a pleasant cycling experience? Surely it comes to your mind destinations such as Majorca, the Canary Islands or Nice. Nevertheless, since all of those are well known destinations, why not try a different location? A place with 300 days of sun every year, with hundreds of miles of quiet roads, suitable for all people from the recreational cyclist to the WorldTour Teams, a place where you can combine the warm climate of the Mediterranean Sea with the highest mountains in Spain, exclusive accommodation and cheaper costs…. We are talking about one of the last real Hidden Gems for cycling enthusiasts. An unknown area for many of us that will put the concept of Cycling Holidays in a different perspective. Probably Andalusia isn’t the first Place that comes to mind when you put cycling and Spain together, but with a privileged basecamp at the World Heritage city of Granada, there is a dense network of roads and mtb trails at your doorstep, with only the Limitation of the amount of time you have available in Andalusia. You could easily join a 2 week Training Camp there, and not touch the same road twice (difficult to achieve in the other island destinations). Good weather isn`t always guaranteed but even in January temperatures above 18 degrees are not uncommon at midday.

There’s more, just a couple of miles away from the city you will find the magnificent Sierra Nevada National Park, the largest in Spain, declared Biosphere Reserve by Unesco, with altitudes ranging from 1.200 to 3.482 meters. There’s outstanding scenery, good road surfaces and virtually no traffic. Home to the highest paved road in Europe, some legendary La Vuelta stages use these mountain passes to push the riders to their limits. Also some famous challenging Sportives such as La Limite take place in Sierra Nevada. What’s wrong with Majorca? Absolutely nothing, in fact it is a great spot for cycling. However it lacks the quality and variety of roads that you will find in Granada, apart from, of course, the endless possibilities that this town offers for the “aftercycling”. With just a very few outsiders cycling in the area, this is really an authentic new experience for those of you that have already been to the other Cycling Holidays spots, or those willing to try a new destination. Planning your next Cycling Holiday in the area is easy as Malaga International Airport is located just 80 miles away. However, we would certainly recommend putting yourself in the hands of the Specialists in the Area: EPIC Cycling, a local Cycling Tour Operator managed by Nacho Orozco, an enthusiastic cyclist.

A NEW DIMENSION OF CYCLING HOLIDAY

After working in Investment Banking for 15 years and having lived in several countries, this mountain lover and entrepreneur, founded EPIC Cycling in the city of Granada. Why in Granada? Because it unites the 3 most important pillars of cycling: great roads, safe roads, optimal cycling conditions all year round.

-Altitude Training Camp: cycling at altitude offers numerous benefits for the performance of the athlete, and in Sierra Nevada you could cycle up to 3.200 meters during the Summer months and beginning of Autumn. This is probably the most challenging Training Camp in Spain and you will be sharing the road with some of the best cyclists in the world as most Teams spend long periods of time here every year. -Endurance Training Camp: this is the classic cycling program, with daily guided rides in groups of different speeds. A mix of flat and hilly terrain looking for the best roads for your enjoyment. Stops for coffee and to admire the nature and the old traditional Spanish Villages. -Women Only Training Camp: this is also a classic cycling program but Only for Women to encourage the female sector to join a Cycling Camp. -Triathlon Training Camp: with several lakes and the Mediterranean sea just 30 minutes from the city, this is the perfect place to train the three disciplines. Running in the mountains will be a pleasure for your quads. EPIC Cycling offer different alternatives, but even the very basic packages includes transfer from the Airport, Premium 4star Hotel, complete cyclist breakfast, and daily cycling picnic bag. With prices starting at just 575 Euros there are no excuses not to jump on board and try cycling in Granada. They also organize short Cycling breaks and bespoke trips for groups.

But this is no ordinary Cycling Tour Operator, it runs 4 types of Camps All year round, some of them quite innovative, so there will always be something adequate for you to join them:

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t is the end of the summer, which means back to the office and the daily routines. However as soon as you sit in your desk you will start thinking about your next holidays, it is human nature, we are not designed to be locked in the office for too long before you miss your bike.

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Summit marker


The Cinglés du Mont Ventoux WORDS AND PHOTOS BY DAVID WILSON-GREEN additional photography by jameshedleyphotography.com

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How can you top a cycling trip to Mont Ventoux having already completed the three ascents over three successive days? Well, you could always aim to join a pretty exclusive club, the Club des Cinglés du Mont Ventoux, by trying to cycle all road routes to the summit in a single day

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reparation for a ride such as this is critical; the dilemma is finding a way to train, living in an area with only short climbs and family commitments restricting spare time. This challenge proved to be greater than Ventoux itself. My plan was to get out on the North Downs every weekend and do some Sportives to maintain focus and give time in the saddle. Mont Ventoux is known as the Giant of Provence. A massive limestone outcrop dwarfing everything around it to such a degree that the land can appear flat in certain light. If this epic mountain is on your bucket list, then doing one climb needs little more than determination and a few hours in the saddle every week on hills to strengthen legs and get used to lactic acid build up. Depending on your bike and size, losing weight off both is good. The best advice I was given for the Cinglés attempt was to get loads of time riding in hills and lose 10% body weight. At 67Kg, I thought I’d struggle losing weight and others in my group might need a little encouragement. I did drop to 63Kg with the increased training and jettisoned a few bike spare parts which undoubtedly helped. Some went overboard on their bikes buying new light weight components, others just trained harder. To give the best chance of enjoying the day, spend time meticulously planning your itinerary ensuring nothing can fall to chance, leaving the risk of weather and the mountain as your nemesis. Consider the weather seriously if you attempt Mont Ventoux. It can bite as the upper slopes are so exposed with nothing to protect it from howling winds that can be in excess of 90km/h for over 240 days per year. The Tour de France stage this year had to be cut short for that very reason. Heat can also be a big factor with an average temperature of around 30 to 350C in June/July. Dehydrating is a real risk so plan to take three large water bottles for each climb. Whether you aim for one climb or all three, don’t underestimate the effort required from your legs going up and your brake blocks coming down.

Cycling World

THE CINGLÉS ATTEMPT Alarm, 3.10am. 3½ hours in bed. Not enough, but after eating we meet in the dark of the hotel gardens to quietly load the cars and head to the Bedoin start point. Half the group made each ascent in 2015; half don’t really know what is ahead but by 4.50am with nervous anticipation building we depart to visit the local baker and get the first stamp on our club cards.

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Still dark, the Bedoin route begins with a leisurely incline making for a useful warm up, passing houses and vineyards until a sharp left turn at Saint-Estève takes us into the forest and a significant increase in gradient. Before emerging at Chalet Reynard in an hour, daylight gradually dawns, but everything remains eerily quiet apart from our breathing and conversations. Emerging into the open, the road provides a brief respite - a short flat section before the gradient steepens again for the last 6km. The vista opens up and the road ahead hugs the upper slopes, climbing with snake-like curves against a parched barren moonscape. Seeing the top is both a blessing and a curse. 6km looks close enough but grinding away in bottom gear means progress is painfully slow. Reaching the top around the last steep hairpin provides a

Team at our Malaucene Hotel

From the new publication

The Cyclist's Bucket List, A Road Bike Journal


sense of elation, knowing that a Tour de France mountain climb has been conquered. Being so early means we have the place to ourselves. We started early from Bedoin for a number of reasons. It helps avoid the heat of the day and means we can descend to Le Domaine des Tilleuls, our hotel in Malaucène, for their fantastic breakfast. As much of the Bedoin route is wooded, starting in darkness doesn’t waste valuable time being distracted by views later in the day, important if you like that kind of thing. It is however quite magical cycling in an eerie dawn light through the forest. We also have an empty road for our first descent. It is interesting to see the change in facial expressions, from pain to exhilaration and I’m still trying work out why the slowest up are the fastest down. Something to do with mass and potential energy I’m told! With spirits high at breakfast I confess that we ate too much. This made the second climb from Malaucène tougher on the stomach as well as the legs. With our hotel perfectly located within 100m of the start, it meant there was no easing back into the ride. That said, we never thought it would be a breeze.

Bedoin climb

The group departed in their own time for the second summit attempt. While less famous, the Malaucène climb does share similar overall statistics to Bedoin, and some argue it’s harder. It is more open and winds up the northern face giving spectacular views, skirting a ski lodge once past a long 4km section in excess of 10% gradient. Being our second climb, I think it is harder, but last year I rode this stretch first and thought it easier. We overtook some of our group who insisted they were just admiring the view but seeing them stretching legs it was clear they were finding it very tough. Most had to find shade and stop. With the temperature reaching over 300C by mid-morning, plus breakfast, gels and lactic acid, a stretch break was very welcome.

Completed Cingles card

The last 2km opens up again to reveal the communications tower way above a near vertical wall of limestone scree, broken only by the road zigging-zagging ever upward. A few hundred metres from the top and the road kicks up again but by this time, scores of other cyclists have accumulated so a herculean effort was needed to look relaxed and nonchalant for the last push. The feeling of elation and jubilation at this point though can’t be underplayed. Whoops, smiles and punching the air was wholly acceptable. Midday and we had completed the two toughest routes.

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It is at this point that the mental training has to kick in. It would be so easy to call it a day, roll back to enjoy the hotel pool but that’s not what we came here for. Time for a private talking-to and once I had ‘manned-up’ we continued our slow grind upward. I’m sure it was about this time that my gear cable must have stretched. I knew I was in first gear, but it didn’t stop me regularly checking, wishing that I hadn’t given away my 32 tooth rear cassette, opting to stick with a 30.

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Mont Ventoux Stats

Eleven from the dozen on our trip had registered with the Club des Cinglés du Mont Ventoux to attempt this monumental ride and by this point ten remained. Our domestique had been supporting us since 5am in one of our logo-clad Mazda6 team cars, ensuring we had enough water and checking up on the Lanterne Rouge. By now he had parked up, changed into his cycling kit and was planning to race us down to tackle the easiest route from Sault. But with so many of us in matching team cycling jerseys, a car adorned with Mont Ventoux and Cinglés logos, we did attract a lot of attention, so it took a while to depart once the photo calls were over.

Distance 21.5km 5.5km 9.5km 6km

Elevation Gain 1,612m 241m 876m 495m

Average Gradient 7,6% 4,4% 9,0% 7,0%

Malaucene Section 1 Section 2 Section 3

21km 9km 7km 5km

1,570m

7,2% 4-6% 9-12% 7-8%

Sault Sault to Chalet Reynard Chalet Reynard to Summit

26km 20km 6km

1,220m 723m 495m

4,5% 3 -6% 6-11%

Bedoin Bedoin to Saint-Esteve Saint-Esteve to Chalet Reynard Chalet Reynard to Summit

The descent to Sault is arguably the most enjoyable. It follows the same exposed route as Bedoin until Chalet Reynard then forks left and meanders down a shallower gradient through pine forest until it opens up into lavender clad farmland, offering not only a less aggressive ride but one with the most fabulous aromas along the way. Sault itself is the prettiest of towns and is positioned on the opposite side of a valley offering views of purple lavender fields and the mountain top in the distance. Because Sault is situated about 300m higher and further away than both Malaucène and Bedoin it is certainly best ridden last. Our lunch, looking out over the valley and locals playing Pétanque, was wonderful, but following the morning’s gastric irritations we all looked to eat whatever our only female team mate ordered, as she had become our dietician. Then, following a quick snooze in the shade of a tree, we departed once again through scented lavender fields and up into the forest. The relaxed gradient only steepens once re-joining the route from Bedoin, winding back past Tom Simpson’s memorial, but despite the day’s muscle torture, pride and exhilaration kept legs turning until the top once more. The summit was almost deserted again, possibly because thunder storms were forecast, but we had been lucky as it remained calm and dry.

Cycling World

It’s all downhill from here, back to Bedoin on the final and most dangerous descent. Very steep, winding roads and with exhaustion there’s danger. Being constantly on the brakes can also heat rims up so much inner tubes can burst with disastrous consequences. We had two such failures but fortunately no accidents.

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Elated and exhausted in equal measure, while celebrating back at our hotel we were chatting with the owner and asked what Cinglés actually meant. He struggled to find the right words, but described a person in a straitjacket and then remembered the word ‘nutter’. Nutters of Mont Ventoux he exclaimed! It was no wonder we had so many people cheering us on! www.hotel-domainedestilleuls.com www.clubcinglesventoux.org Bedoin and Sault side


Cycling for everyone

in ancient, rural France… If you feel like either a gentle or competitive, forest-mountain-river-medieval-gourmet cycling holiday in ancient, rural South West of France, in an ideal road environment, then please read on! holiday destination for individuals, groups or families wishing to combine cycling with a gourmet experience as well as other activities such as walking, canoeing or historic siteseeing. Our cycling clients also enjoy simply relaxing at the hotel terraces shaded by giant Magnolias trees or its new outdoor (and covered and heated!) swimming pool.

Our most popular offerings are:

- The 7 Night Guided program (7 nights of B&B at the beautiful Les Magnolias Hotel, 5 cycling days with a recovery vehicle to the most beautiful of our surrounding villages including the UNESCO town of Albi, Brousse Le Chateau and Ambialet; 5 special lunches or dinners; a Touring day to Millau and the Roquefort cheese caves…)

- The 8 Night Tour De France program (combining the highlights of our Guided program with 3 Tour De France arrivals, passings or departures…) - Our Self-Guided offering enabling individuals or groups to determine their daily activities each day, based at Les Magnolias but always with access to our team and advice on cycling routes, other activities, café stops, restaurant suggestions and historic attractions… Please visit our website or email or call us for any enquiry! www.cyclingmagnolias.com wwww.lesmagnoliashotel.com Telephone: +33 6 33 17 85 01 (April-October); +27 83 603 4954 (October-April)

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ycling Magnolias specialises in guided or self-guided, forest-mountain-rivergourmet cycling holidays in the idydllic cycling environment of the ancient and rural Aveyron and Tarn region in the South West of France. We are surrounded by indigineous oak, walnut and chestnut forests and just 5 minutes away from the magnificent river Tarn. Our cyclists are based at the historic and beautiful Les Magnolias hotel for the duration of their stay in the quaint village of Plaisance and we help them design their ideal cycling program for however many days they wish to explore the area. We have over 40 top-of-the range racing, hybrid and electric bikes as well as customised maps of over 15 green, yellow or red routes, varying widely in distance and difficulty. We are the perfect cycling

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Le Tour de Foot by Tom Sweeney

One man and his single-speed take on France during Euro 2016

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wo thousand kilometres across France, a football-mad nation, gripped by the European Championships and home to the most famous cycling event in human history – Le Tour de France. The stage was set for my very own personal challenge; to follow Euro 2016 from the Round-of-Sixteen in Lens, all the way to the Final in Paris by single-speed bicycle, solo and unaided. I would rely on the generosity of others through the CouchSurfing app, where I would spend the night in the company of a stranger, sleeping on their sofa. The route would follow the circumference of the nation, heading from Lens to Bordeaux via the Loire Valley, then along the South of France towards Marseille through Aquitaine and finally heading up to Paris in the Centre – all in just over two weeks. Le Tour de Foot would be the name of the expedition; and I could not wait to get started. D-Day was upon me and I envisaged disembarking onto the beaches of Normandy, armed with legs like pistons and a fully-loaded singlespeed bicycle as my weapon of choice, ready to take on France. The hull was lowered and, raring to go, I mounted my bike only to realise that I had incurred a puncture at some point whilst boarding the holding deck of the DFDS Seaways Ferry. After visions of a hero’s welcome accompanied by fanfare and waving flags, my reality was far less glamorous; stuck next to the ferry in a dingy port, fixing my bicycle, to later be escorted off the premises by stoney-faced security guards in a Renault Clio. Back on track, or so I thought, I headed on into the bleak countryside of Northern France. What would occur over the first few days were a (Molotov) cocktail of problems with five punctures, a broken set of panniers and the need to buy two new tyres. It seemed that my anticipated “V-Day” was a long way off and in my moments of despair, I felt like leaving the bike in a bush and

getting the next ferry home. Were it not for the random acts of kindness by strangers, it is exactly what I would have done. After receiving multiple lifts, spare inner tubes, a second-hand tyre, a screw for my faulty panniers and lots of food and water from an array of different faces, my faith in humanity, and the French, was restored. Regardless of the howling winds and more shades of grey than even Dulux could contemplate along the Nordzee Route in Normandy; enduring monsoon rain travelling through the Picardie region on towards Chartres from Beauvais; and feeling as though my legs might give-way along the well-worn pilgrim’s road to Santiago de Compostela, on route to Tours - the scenery had remained stunning. As far as the eye could see, were rolling fields and abandoned agricultural equipment, farming outhouses and the occasional tractor. With no visible signs of life on the horizon, it was hard to understand how anything survived apart from the rows upon rows of golden crops that populated the surrounding area. I travelled further south, through endless wild poppy fields, whilst butterflies played a dangerous game of “chicken” between my spokes. The climbs became more difficult as

I approached the undulating hills on the outskirts of Cognac, perfect for the vineyards that would make the region so well-renowned. Despite my tired legs pleading with me to stop; as my kneecaps began to feel as though they were about to burst having covered over 800 kilometres, all without a day’s rest in between, I pressed on to Bordeaux. I would hit my first official milestone of the trip, entering the city over the Pont de Pierre, as dusk approached with the Bordeaux’s skyline a beautiful silhouette against the shimmering Garonne river. As night fell, I shared in a glass of wine or two with my latest host, anticipating a busy day of sight-seeing ahead, as the QuarterFinals approached. I awoke the next morning to a city sprawling with German fans, heading to Bordeaux to watch their side’s victory over Italy;


to stop my throat from closing, the uphill ride to Marseille was a true test of character. Desperate to get into the city before the semi-final between France and Germany began, I stepped it up a gear (if I’d have had any), pushing on to meet my latest host, before kick-off on the 7th July. I sped through Marseille, past its port and through the narrow, steep streets; weaving through cars, buses and trams whilst the sun glared down on me from behind the famous basilica that presided over the city, clearly in fury of my reckless navigation. I had made it just in time, and we headed off to the Fan Park in much anticipation of a game that would be known as the match of the tournament, France versus Germany. Flares painted the night sky crimson, whilst a sea of red, white and blue flags bellowed below. A win for the French had the sour-krauts leaving the arena to a rendition of La Marseillaise, as the crowds spilled onto the streets of Marseille, flags flown from every balcony and chants of “Allez les Bleus” from all around. Having racked up 1700 kilometres in just under two weeks, my legs were heavy and all I wanted to do was sleep. Paris and the final awaited however and one last push was needed. Waking early the next morning, I darted to the train station in Marseille, down wide, empty highways as the city endured a nasty hangover from the celebrations of the night before. I battled my way onto a train bound for Paris, fending off competition for a bike rack from other sleepy-eyed cyclists. I hopped off about 160km outside of Paris in Sens, to finally make my way north to the

Eiffel Tower. With over one hundred miles to travel, I had time to reflect on just how far I’d come throughout this whole experience. I had cycled the circumference of the country on a single-speed bicycle; around two thousand kilometres, burning 50,000 calories and meeting dozens of new faces along the way. Though I had been battered by winds and occasionally ravaged by rain; nearly wilting in the heat and almost beaten by punctures and broken screws – I had made it. As I stood under the magnificent steel-framed arches of France’s signature construction, I couldn’t quite believe my adventure was almost over. This trip was about making the ordinary extraordinary, making something out of nothing and highlighting that truly anything is possible. In a political climate that tells us to not trust anyone, and that perhaps we’re better off alone; one man and a beat-up bicycle could tell you that such a notion couldn’t be further from the truth. Le Tour de Foot was testament to what can be achieved when people come together, a triumph of humanity. I would sink a few cold ones in the company of strangers one last time as the night fell upon Paris, with smiles and cheers all around, enjoying the end of a tournament that had brought so many together. www.letourdefoot.wordpress.com

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the atmosphere fully-charged. Songs of “Super Deutschland” filled the air, while the few Italians that had turned up, paraded around in style, effortlessly. The game was uneventful, with the Germans going through on penalties (how else?), but the atmosphere remained with football chants and horns blaring right through the night. The company I had kept on this first leg of the journey was just as colourful as the scenery that I had been surrounded by. In the North, I had encountered police dog-handlers with a penchant for growing marijuana and ex-football hooligans who had given up that previous life to become customs officers. In Tours, I met an unassuming office worker who hosted heavy-metal rock concerts on weekends; whilst in Chartres, a woman was planning on running away to marry a twenty-year old Moroccan from the desert. In Cognac I stayed with a former French Army officer who had rubbed shoulders with NKVD agents during the Cold War; while in Bordeaux I shared a beer with a couple of professional rugby players, one of which had made their debut for the Springboks only a couple of weeks earlier. Only six days had passed, and already I had enough tales to tell my yet-to-exist grandkids for life. After resting up, the South of France beckoned; the landscape changing dramatically from the rolling fields of golden maize and the emerald green pastures of quaint French farms in the North, to the dusty and scorched, undulating terrain populated by hordes of crickets and nothing else, in the South. I had heard that here was wholly different to the rest of the country, in terms of their approach to life, or more accurately, their poor regard for it on the roads. I would find myself during the next few days experiencing the South’s hospitality, or rather lack of. I found myself being almost rear-ended by impatient lorries and undertaken by edgy motorcyclists, as I raced along to the Semi-Finals in Marseille via Agen, Carcassonne and Montpellier, along the corridor of the Côte d’Azur. The days went on and the heat began to rise, so much so that even the crickets became quiet; tired of rubbing their legs together, obviously chafing in the stifling heat. My body began to struggle, as the temperature rose on consecutive days from 35oC all the way into the mid-40s. I became one with the bicycle, as sweat caused by the hot sun soldered my rear-end to the leather of a Brooks saddle. Uncomfortable, out of breath and needing to drink every ten seconds

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COLUMBIA: The Old Cycling Nation Becomes More Cycle-friendly Cycling World

Ex-residents Steve and Anni Gregson catch up with old friends, try their aging legs on monumental climbs and check on children’s hospital equipment

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Puente la Negra cattle ranch, between Medellin and Puerto Berrio


From Chia, down, down, down at 33mph into a cauldron of heat for mile after mile round sweeping bends. Cyclists " in heaven". However, we paid for it next day with 1000m of climbing and heavy traffic. On to ''our'' Rio Magdalena, sadly very low (El Nino/ global warming) and with only a few fishermen now earning a living with their hand nets in Honda a hot, beautiful and historic colonial town. We had lived on the Magdalena in 1977-79 and come to love it. Three days of hard climbing to 3500m, and over the Alto de Lettras Pass, with views west towards even higher mountains. Dogs are not so vicious in these parts and uplifting music played as we passed quiet homesteads perched precariously above steep drops. In Manizales, a visit to the first of the many children's hospitals, the equipment was in good condition and really appreciated and we are shown a video and given a tour of the hospital by the Director.  In the afternoon, a heavy shower and suddenly the 5000mt plus Nevada De Ruiz is clearly visible, but without snow this time of year. Leaving Manizales, lots and lots of cyclists pass the hotel early in the morning, racers, mountain bikers of both sexes. Cycling is still going strong in the land of Cochise, Lucho and now Quintana, although nowadays often on MTBs with slicks and in the towns at night with lights (to avoid heavy traffic and the heat of the day.) MANIZALES TO MEDELLIN A dreaded tunnel. As we stopped to put on a rear light, a six-axled "tractomulle" slowed right down, held up a line of traffic and put on his flashing lights, we took the hint and set off right behind him, safely passing through the dark tunnel and waving him onwards. How caring and professional are these kings of the

road, nowadays. In the afternoon, after yet another 1000m climb in 40C temps up to Rio Sucio, we are rewarded by finding a central Plaza hotel and even using the room that Lucho Herrara had previously slept in. Perhaps some of his climbing ability will rub off, after all I do have photo of him and myself on a 200m long Essex hill. Later that evening we stumble across the Carnival del Virgen of Candalaria with a procession, fireworks and lots of kids running around in the sparks. The next morning a visit to the Rio Sucio hospital where four FOCSA donated incubators were checked together with calibration, maintenance and doctors' training certificates. All in good working order. Lots of climbs, gradients the usual 5%, then 7,9,10 even 11% and the heat 27C then 30,35,39,40, 42 and topping 43C in the sun. Good for losing weight 63kg, then 62,61… Great descents follow and we see small steel-wheeled trucks carrying bamboo, with their Flinstonesque brakes which are lorry tyre rubber stood on by the driver! We spend overnights at La Pintada and the lively hill town of Sta. Barbara where a terrace overlooks distant mountains and Rio Cauca before the long fast bendy descent to Medellin. There, six FOCSA equipment locations are visited as well as ex-racing friends from the late '70s. Mechanicals so far: two tyre problemssolved with new Schwalbes; a broken brake cable but more time consuming was after a road-works where they let us sneak through but we rode over new, hot, wet tar which rose up 1cm with all the grit, glass etc. stuck to the tyre and still partly attached after a few days! An own goal but our old Raleigh and Hill Special 10 speed traditional tourers still going strong. MEDELLÍN TO BARRANCABERMEJA: BACK POCKET NOTES Leaving the Dodgem Car racing that was Medellín, a run between buses, motos, taxis and bicycles took seventeen miles until open country and, what's this, a dedicated cycle path all the way to Barbosa. On to a cattle ranch stay after a windy, rolling day on a treelined road. There, treated to a tour of natural swimming pools, breeding sheep and cattle plus a personal show of how fighting cocks are trained-  a mixture of ballet and brutality.  Sad news RIP- a dear Essex cycling friend. This was balanced out by the first-time fatherhood of an Austrian 'boy' himself born in our digs when we were ski instructors in 1969.

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t 0430 the Baggage Reclaim area of Bogota airport was a quiet place to build up the bicycles before heading towards the centre on dedicated cycle-paths that dipped under junctions-"tricky to construct" said a civil engineer. On to a meeting and lunch with Friends of Colombia for Social Aid ( www.FOCSA.org.) President Maria Cristina. Our 9th Colombian tour was in order to ride again the wonderful mountain roads, to meet ex-BarrancaBermeja racing friends now spread out over the country and visit, check out and meet the users of hospital equipment used by Colombia's poorer children.

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At San Jose de Nus, how pleasant to sit beside the river enjoying a beer before a short day to Caracoli. Arriving in the afternoon, the submanagement declared the hospital 'Super- Happy' with the infants` medical equipment. The main street there is a riot of happy activity; trotting horses, card playing, motos weaving in and out of Sunday strollers. No helmets, no lights, no drunkenness. A Christmas spent there would be a treat. Another day of 3000ft climbing followed, half on unmade roads and a steepness we had not experienced until now, so we resorted to pushing the bikes. In Puerto Berrio, the heat of the Rio Magdalena valley hit 37C, but the ferocious highway was second choice to a mini-train that works its way through low hilled ranches, its once a day timing dictated by the school run when English speaking travellers are quite a novelty. Surely one of life's great pleasures is to sit by an open rail carriage window on an inside bend watching the scenery go by. 'Welcome to Barrancabermeja. 35-40C ' says the sign. It is one of the hottest towns in Colombia, famously so, but once you get used to it, it gets under your skin with its friendliness and vitality. Here we had a challenge to get the town hospital to request FOCSA equipment for infants. Four years ago we had failed.  On to Puerto Wilches, a flat ride but a rough surface but at the end a new hotel, luxury and quite a quiet town. The Tienda Garabato is the centre of our evening relaxation.

Route to Cepita near Bucaramanga

The next day a visit to San Pablo but too many loud motos so we cross the river in a canoe and back to some luxury in Pto W. Then back to Barranca where we stay in the heritage Hotel Pipaton, once of ill repute. Leaving Barranca, after regular visits over the last 38 years since working there, it was with heavy hearts and lumps in our throats. Even at 43C would it be the last time? Bucaramanga is a tough 78 miles and 1835m of ascent, what used to be a one-day ride is now (at our age) one day plus two half days. With air-con barely functioning we woke after the first night (Lizama) absolutely ringing wet, worse, it was raining heavily so we couldn’t even leave the poor road-side motel.

Cycling World

Stop Press- the Barranca hospital equipment for infants came through. False alarm! Nothing on the digital form! That's Barranca-frustrating. Also frustrating are Internet cafe computers which insist on translating everything, even the surnames on the 'send to' list. 

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BUCARAMANGA AND AROUND Bucaramanga is surrounded on the south side by high mountains and the 30-mile climb towards Venezuelan border is popular on Sunday mornings with large numbers taking part. Certainly the 6% gradient is not hard and the 20 miles freewheel back from 2400m after a two-hour training session is most exhilarating. Soon it was time to think of the next FOCSA hospital visit which was to Malaga but colleagues said the route was impossibly steep

Rio Sucio, a home-made truck carries bamboo


Whalley Abbey is set in stunning grounds on the banks of the river Calder in the beautiful Ribble Valley, with easy access to road and rail networks. The Abbey is a unique and peaceful location at any time of the year, away from passing traffic and in the heart of an attractive and historic village.

Contact tel; 01254 828400 e-mail; office@whalleyabbey.org website; www.whalleyabbey.co.uk

Elite Cycling Holidays

I

On the site of the 13th century Abbot’s lodging, later converted to an Elizabethan manor, the house is set in extensive grounds amidst the remains of a medieval Cistercian monastery.

n the province of Almeria with its stunning beaches, landscapes and charm you can find Elite Cycling Holidays. Here lies a land of culture and beauty just waiting to be explored by bike, a mild climate in winter making it ideal for training. Elite Cycling Holidays knows what it takes to make a great route, you can experience riding along quiet roads, conquering first category climbs along pro race routes and spectacular descents. We specialise in Winter and Spring Training Camps the perfect way to get into shape for the cycling season and guided cycling holidays. If it’s good enough for the pros, then it’s good enough for you.

We have 17 four star, en-suite bedrooms all comfortably furnished, with TV, phone, tea and coffee making facilities and free wifi connection. We have safe indoor storage for your cycle overnight and offer midweek 3 nights for the price of 2.

Your trip with us includes 5 or 7 nights at 4* all inclusive beach front hotel, daily guided rides, optional bike hire from Matthews Elite Bike Shop in Garrucha and airport transfers. Visit our website www.elitecyclingholidays.co.uk Mention CyclingWorld for discount on group bookings of 6+

Clunebeg Lodge

ELITE CYCLING HOLIDAYS

Loch Ness

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Escape, Relax, Explore - Comfort in Stunning Surroundings A warm and friendly welcome awaits all guests staying at Clunebeg. Set within the breathtakingly beautiful surroundings of our own estate, guests can enjoy our landscaped gardens, meadows, woodlands, streams and walkways including the Great Glen Way.

4 STAR ALL INCLUSIVE BEACHFRONT HOTEL ACCOMODATION AIRPORT TRANSFERS BIKE HIRE ESCORTED DAILY RIDES STAY FOR 5 OR 7 NIGHTS GROUP MINI BUS

• 2 rooms – self catering – cabins at the rear of the main house, can accommodate up to 5 people • All facilities of the lodge are available to be used by the occupants of the cabins • A restaurant & bar available. Email: info@clunebeg.com Tel: +44 (0)1456 450 097

Clunebeg House and Clunebeg Lodge Drumnadrochit, Inverness IV63 6US

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and rough. It was only when hard-riding Barranca cyclists said they had set off at dawn and by dark had still not arrived and there was nowhere to stay that we took a bus trip with two Bucaramanga friends. Again the equipment at the hospital was well-appreciated. The next day, it was back on two wheels for our final two weeks in the mountains. A plunge down into the Canyon Chicamocha (the second largest in the world) to Cepita, then half way up the other side before another plunge down into the canyon on a newly tarmacked (partly!) road left us exhilarated and wanting to spend an extra day in the interesting riverside village, but time was getting on and the March 10 flight home nearer. Overnight heavy rain had swept small rocks over the road so the ride up was nice and quiet, only two-wheeled traffic could get through. There is plenty of history and decent accommodation in the Mogotes, Valle de San Jose and Chaharala area both boast recently tarmacked roads, so good progress was made in the high mountains until Barichara was reached. This town is now a popular tourist destination with Boutique Hotels. It also has an infants’ monitor in the small country 'hospital' which we had visited in 2013, when the staff thought we had come to take it away! It was still in good order and appreciated. The staff certainly remembered our previous visit. Onwards then for three days in the most dramatic and unmade steep roads so far, and we had to ask where there was accommodation and food. After a rest day in Zapatoka ahead of the final huge drop (1879m) and climb (1198m), there appeared a lone, US, young, female cycle-camper awaiting her friend who was six hairpins behind and walking. Imagine our surprise, when after nine tours in Colombia, and only a handful of cycle tourists ever met, when five minutes further down were an Austrian couple riding from Costa Rica to Tierra del Fuego! We must have spent a good two hours chatting. Onwards again, through fertile pastures to Bucaramanga and two more FOCSA equipment visits, a guitar concert, lunch and dinner invitations, finding a box for the plane home, not to mention best of all, meeting up with friends from 38 years ago. Some final observations: hygiene has much improved, no tummy upsets and we drank the natural delicious water-based fruit juices daily. Traffic discipline has also much improved, no longer do the oncoming vehicles overtake without considering us. Cycling is alive and well, although there are more mountain bikes and a lot of riding the streets in the dark (with lights) when they are quiet. Accommodation is better than ever. The economy is booming, thus there are many more -'motos' and less walking, but this has a health downside. Beautiful Colombia is a real bargain for tourists and with improved security you would not be disappointed. Some final statistics: 1779km covered, 3000ft of ascent covered on each of the fifteen days. Four punctures, seven other cycle tourists met which is more than in all our nine previous tours put together! San Jose del Nus

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Sunset over Rio Magdalena at Honda

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South America by Bicycle

Cycling World

Ushuaia to Bogota By Nathan Bell

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he 8,000mile bicycle ride along the Andes mountain range from the most southern tip of Argentina to the top of Colombia was never going to be an easy feat; three young lads excited for the adventure of a lifetime, we were perhaps a little naïve as to the challenge we were embarking on. However, we were given a very early introduction to the adversity we would face throughout our journey before we even set off on our bikes, with our flights from London being delayed and it taking 48 hours for us to arrive in Ushuaia. On arrival we weren’t surprised to hear that both our bikes and baggage had not yet arrived, the airline told us to head into the town and our equipment would be delivered in a few hours. It didn’t get delivered. Instead we were forced to head back to the airport to gather our belongings and set up our bikes, It soon became apparent that my Brooks saddle which I had bought especially for the trip had been stolen from the bike box – this would lead to further problems. Our first week of cycling in Patagonia was possibly one of the most difficult introductions to cycle touring one could imagine. Each day seemed to get progressively harder with the wind “el viento” (Spanish we quickly learned) reaching up to 80kph and making it near impossible to cycle in a straight line as it tried with all its might to persistently push us off the side of the road. In addition to the harsh winds we were faced with desolate land with no civilization and not even nature being able to grow above ankle height; it is safe to say in these early days that our down jackets and food were our closest of friends, providing small comfort and satisfaction at the toughest of times. After just the first week of riding our bodies felt extremely tired and fatigued with one of the team members suffering excruciating pain in his knee, threatening to finish a dream journey before it had even really begun.

Departing from Coyhaique half way up the Carretera Austral we soon got back into rhythm planning four days cycling followed by a rest day. As we pushed forward back into Argentina returning to the Ruta Nacional 40 we were ecstatic to say goodbye to the “ripio” (unpaved roads) we had encountered for large portions of the early part of the trip, allowing us to pick up pace, where 100kilometre + days were

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With rest the persistent injuries faded and with a bit more of a push north so too did the harsh and desolate climate. With drive and determination the team made it to Villa O’Higgins where they would begin the famous Carretera Austral – a 1200km stretch of road passing through Patagonian Chile, home to some of the most breath-taking scenery South America and even the World for that matter. Unfortunately, for the most part of the 1200km stretch the surface is less than perfect and in parts would be a struggle for a 4x4, let alone your standard car. Despite resistance from our chariots, the unruly gravel surfaces led to significant damage, with the front pannier rack completely shattering on two of the bikes as well as an unfixable rim on the other. Whilst this damage was extremely frustrating, particularly with a lack of good quality bike shops in Chile, when the team got back on the road we were back with a vengeance.

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quickly becoming the norm. In our time riding between Chile and Argentina before reaching Osorno where we would begin our assault on the Panamerican highway to Santiago, we made sure to put our rest days to good use. We managed to incorporate all the activities your average backpacker sets out to visit, including: • Camping in Torres Del Paine national park and watching the sunrise • Road trip to Perito Moreno Glacier – the worlds only glacier that is still growing • Treating ourselves to chocolate in Bariloche – should be titled the World’s chocolate capital • White water rafting in Futaleufu – one of the top five spots in the world • Bathing in Termas Geometrics – the most natural hot springs location in South America Although the ride from Osorno to Santiago on the Panamerican Highway didn’t embrace us with the inspirational scenery we had become accustomed to, it did however provide us with the tools necessary to crank out some serious distance– which is what we required to make it to Santiago for Christmas. It was our first day on the Panamerican highway where we set our record day for the trip thus far, covering 192km – not a bad distance considering much of the day we were riding in 25-degree heat and bikes weighing in excess of 40 kilograms.

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After enjoying a much needed rest in Santiago for Christmas and heading to Valparaiso on the coast for what is regarded as the largest fireworks display in South America for New Year’s Eve, the time was quickly back upon us to return to the road life, and what beckoned was no easy re-introduction. In the four-day ride from Santiago to Mendoza we would face the Cristo Redentor pass; an ascent deemed by Red Bull as one of the top ten hardest climbs in the world, rising up to 3,800m and climbing 1600m in the space of 50km.

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From Mendoza we headed North on the Ruta Nacional 40, entering the desolate Northern Argentina where the climate resembled that of the desert. In seven days we hit 1000km taking us to Cafayate – a town renowned for its Bodegas and vineyards. During the seven-day ride we experienced real culture of Argentina outside the major cities and tourist attractions; it is safe to say that it is a drastically different way of life to that we live in the UK. The towns are centered around the main plazas, however outside of this houses are often dirt shacks and buildings resembling something out of Slumdog Millionaire. There were often times on the bike when we passed young children playing outside their shacks of homes and realizing how fortunate we are in the UK. Nevertheless, I still believe we could learn a lot from their principles of life, as although in Chile and Argentina they may live a slower pace of life and don’t have as much, they often seem quite content.


LONDON TO PARIS 2017

19-23 JULY

Spend 4 days cycling 300 miles between 2 cities. Then celebrate by watching the finish of the iconic Tour de France on the Champs Elysees. AT THE MOMENT, FOR EVERY YOUNG PERSON WE SUPPORT, THERE’S ANOTHER WE CAN’T.

Take on this once in a lifetime challenge, so that together we can reach more young people with cancer.

REGISTER TODAY Visit: www.teenagecancertrust.org/london2paris Teenage Cancer Trust is a registered charity: 1062559 (England & Wales); SC039757 (Scotland)

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Cycling has become my passion and has completely changed my life. Being out on the road is incredible, but knowing that I am raising money for the charity that supported my daughter through the hardest time of her life is even more rewarding. I plan to keep training and potentially take on the iconic London to Paris ride. I’m determined to push myself to the limit and raise more money for the charity close to our heart. Join #TeamTeenageCancer and take on London to Paris in 2017 www.teenagecancertrust.org/ london2paris

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ust two years ago my daughter’s life was turned upside down when she was diagnosed with cancer aged just 22. She underwent gruelling chemotherapy and an operation to remove the tumour- as a Father it was the hardest thing of my life to watch. However, she couldn’t have got through it without the support of the Teenage Cancer Trust unit. My family, friends and I began fundraising tirelessly for the charity but I soon wanted to challenge myself. Inspired by others who were doing amazing challenges, and by my daughter who got through such a horrendous illness, I decided to sign up to RideLondon 100.

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Men and women of the Royal Navy and Royal Marines serve their country, often at times of danger. Established in 1922, the RNBT helps non-commissioned Sailors, Marines and their families (The RNBT Family) throughout their lives. Your donation will help us to help them.

Cycling World

Castaway House, 311 Twyford Avenue, Portsmouth, Hampshire, PO2 8RN T: 02392 690112 F: 02392 660852 E: rnbt@rnbt.org.uk www.rnbt.org.uk

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The ride into Cafayate made for an interesting morning as our maps indicated that the Argentinian national motorway would take us through a river knee-deep in parts. So as we drove the legs in an attempt to power through, a couple of us almost ended falling over sideways into the muddy swap, only at the last second being able to clip out of our cleats. The motorway then turned from river into bumpy ripio, which we thought we had escaped. However, these soon became the least of our worries when we arrived in Cafayate only for one of the team members to realize the tent poles had fallen off the back of his bike during the bumpy ride; with no outdoor shops in Cafayate this posed a bit of a problem. The only option was to camp rough for one night until we arrived in Salta where they had two outdoor shops.

RIDE STATS • Total Kilometres ridden = 6000 - Equivalent to cycling from London to Leeds over fifteen times, or if cycling around Richmond Park 550 times • Approximate number of hours spent in the saddle = 300 • Longest day riding = 9 hours in the saddle • Hottest temperature when riding = 42 Degrees Celsius • Strongest wind when riding = 80kph • Highest point reached on the bike = 4100m • Total Metres Climbed = 23,220

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Our last week or so riding in Northern Argentina took us up to 3,600m with a few days of constant climbing to reach the heights of Bolivia; it also provided us with some amazing views and landscapes and some lasting memories. One of these experiences being when we arrived in a small town called Abra Pampa in the early afternoon and decided to have a short day. With no camping available we had a lot of time to waste before trying to find somewhere to wild camp. We began fixing a puncture, which had become common practice over the past few weeks as our luck in this department was dwindling, leaving us with only one spare inner tube out of the seven we initially brought with us. A couple of young Argentinian lads on their bikes took interest. We got chatting in our broken Spanish and seeing opportunity we asked whether they would be interested in having us over for a barbeque. Before we knew it another four lads had arrived and we had been invited back to one of their houses (consisting of little more than rooms made of brick walls), where we got showered up. With communication difficulties between the two groups we interacted the best way possible – alcohol and cards. After a few hours the sun went down and the group took us up to one of the mountains that literally lay ten-minute walk from their doorstep. Whilst only a small city the view from the top was beautiful, even if our lungs were having to work overtime to accommodate to the 3500+ meters of altitude we were now at. Returning to our new friends house we shared home-made pizza before being offered a room to sleep for the night. Departing the next day for Bolivia our last few encounters with Argentinians definitely left a fond memory of their country and people scorched into our minds

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In the heart of fantastic cycling country on Route 66 and midway in the northern stages of 'Le Tour '14' ...plus more quality off-road routes than you can shake a stick at... Hebden Bridge (5 minutes walk) has a thriving cafe and pub culture. Comfortable, cosy, secluded, accommodation (breakfast inc.) at budget prices.

Gentle cycling holidays since 1991 Suffolk & Norfolk France, Austria, Germany, Italy & Spain Use our bikes or bring your own Please call to find out more: 01449 721555

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PLACES AVAILABLE FOR PRUDENTIAL RIDE 100

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Martlets Hospice in Sussex has places available for the Prudential Ride London-Surrey 100 which takes place on Sunday 31July.   Starting in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, the course follows a 100 mile route on closed roads through the Capital and into Surrey’s stunning countryside; before returning to finish in the Mall.    With leg testing climbs and a route made famous by the London 2012 Olympics, it’s a truly spectacular sponsored ride. 

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www.themartlets.org.uk Contact Clem Hunnisett events@martlets.org.uk

01273 718780

114 Cycling World

February 2016

We are a family run business based near TRIATHLON Bridlington operating 5 custom built cycle ZONE trailers catering for your cycle transfer needs

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. Cover against Accidental Damage, Theft and Loss for all types of bikes

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