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ANNUAL REPORT 2014 – 2015

CALIFORNIA POLYTECHNIC STATE UNIVERSITY

Inspiring all students to embrace their unlimited possibilities.


TABLE OF CONTENTS Overview

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Contributions to Division’s Core Values

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Contributions to Division’s Visionary Goals

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Contributions to President’s Goals 2022

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Contributions to CSU System-wide Initiatives

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Moving Forward

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OVERVIEW Inspiring all students to embrace their unlimited possibilities.

The Dean of Students has experienced significant change and organizational restructuring this past academic year. Most notably, the team has increased from 12 full-time staff (2013/14) to 25 (2014/15) full-time staff and expanded from the Julian A. McPhee University Union into Building 52. The organization has successfully filled vacancies and secured several new positions to meet the growing needs of students, including (2) Assistant Dean of Students, (3) Coordinators for Cross Cultural Centers, a Coordinator for the Center for Leadership & Service, and a Title IX Investigator. The new organizational structure brings together a comprehensive portfolio of programs and services, support and advocacy, and campus safety to best serve students and enhance student success. To guide the organization’s work, a new Strategic Plan was

developed which identifies the mission, vision, core values, and initiatives of the Dean of Students. The Strategic Plan was a collaborative effort that included students, faculty, staff, and other stakeholders. The Dean of Students is comprised of Clubs and Organizations (Clubs and Club Sports); the Cross Cultural Centers (MultiCultural Center, Pride Center, and Gender Equity Center); Student Support, Success & Retention; Leadership & Service (Center for Service in Action, Center for Leadership & Service, and Fraternity & Sorority Life); the Sexual Assault Prevention Center (Safer), Student Rights & Responsibilities; the Student Community Success Program; Title IX Outreach, Support & Investigations; and the Veterans Success Center.

Embrace Your Unlimited Possibilities ­— Dean of Students Annual Report 2014 – 2015

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CONTRIBUTIONS TO DIVISION’S CORE VALUES Championing the student: • The Veterans Success Center opened on April 2, 2015. The Veterans Success Center conducts outreach to military veterans and dependents in order to address their needs in mental health, career services, and advocacy. • Safer’s student staff has steadily increased from 2 (2010/11) to 18 (2014/15). Educational outreach efforts increased from 12,000 (2013/14) to 14, 000 (2014/15) students served.

Creating visionary programs & services: • Center for Leadership & Service was launched in Spring 2015. A full-time coordinator was hired and relationships with future collaborators are being developed.

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• The Pride Center added intersectional programming, including a monthly social space for students who identify as Queer People of Color and a biweekly discussion group for students who identify as Queer and female. The Gender Equity Center hosted the Spanish-language production of Los Monologos de la Vagina on February 21, the first of its kind in Cal Poly history. Los Monologos de la Vagina had a sold out crowd, with over 150 audience members in attendance. The production created a more inclusive community for Latino Students and Students of Color at Cal Poly and addressed issues that are often not talked about in communities of color. The monologues not only impacted Cal Poly campus, but also the San Luis Obispo Community.

VETERANS SUCCESS CENTER OPENED ON APRIL 2, 2015

UNIVERSITY JOINT EFFORTS BROUGHT LAVERNE COX TO SPEAK AT CAL POLY

SAFER HAD RECORD ATTENDANCE AT TAKE BACK THE NIGHT MARCH

Embrace Your Unlimited Possibilities ­— California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo


Sustaining meaningful partnerships & collaboration: • Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities worked with Academic Senate, Academic Departments, Deans, and the Library to establish a process of reporting academic dishonesty and promoting integrity before, during, and after a disciplinary event. • Assistant Deans of Students presented to over 20 academic departments, student organizations, and student support services. The Assistant Deans of Students engaged in outreach activities in order to create the infrastructure and build campus wide awareness for these newly established positions. Outreach included Housing, College Advising Centers, Mustang Success Center, Student Academic Services, Financial Aid, Student Accounts, Center for Teaching, Learning & Technology, and Office of the Registrar. • The MultiCultural Center launched the university-wide #IAmCalPoly Campaign, involving Student Affairs, Academic Affairs, and Kennedy Library. Working with students, faculty, and staff, this campaign supports on-going dialogues on how to create a more diverse and inclusive campus. A photo display

depicting the many individual identities on the CP campus was exhibited at the library during Spring quarter; and will be on display in the UU during WOW and the first week of classes. • PolyCultural Weekend 2015 expanded its outreach efforts this year to Queer, Muslim, first generation, and low-income students. New partnerships for hosting participants included the Pride Center, Muslim Student Association, and Brothers Sisters United. • The Pride Center hosted the 8 th annual Lavender Commencement, with an increase in participating graduates from 14 to a record 21, representing five academic colleges. • The Gender Equity Center collaborated with Office of University Diversity and Inclusivity and ASI to bring Laverne Cox to speak at Cal Poly. The speaker was part of a larger program with the GEC entitled: Don’t Put Me in a Box, and an gallery show depicting how students challenge gender stereotypes in every-day situations. Over 100 students participated as photo participants for the gallery and over 1000 students attended Laverne Cox’s keynote speech and the art gallery on May 14th. The impact of the gallery and keynote resonated strongly

on campus emphasizing important messages on diversity and intersectionalism. Ciao approached the GEC asking to keep the gallery up in their lobby for the remainder of the school year, in addition to possibly having it redisplayed during WOW. • Safer has strong relationships across the campus to ensure a seamless experience when serving the students to connect them with programs and services. Safer partnered with President Armstrong as a celebrity walker for the annual Walk a Mile in Her Shoes community event. Safer reaffirmed its commitment to work closely with ROTC, including a review of the MOU, and attending the sexual assault prevention program offered at the Naval Academy in Monterey this last winter. The Safer staff worked with the PULSE Director collaborating on future events for 2015/16 academic year. The staff also worked closely with the Environmental Management and Protection department to create a Sexual Harassment in the Workplace 3-part series for staff, faculty and students to attend. Along similar lines Safer worked closely with the Cal Poly Corporation to offer 3 presentations on preventing gender-based violence and Title IX education.

Embrace Your Unlimited Possibilities ­— Dean of Students Annual Report 2014 – 2015

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Safer’s student staff has steadily increased from 2 (2010/11) to 18 (2014/15).

The Pride Center hosted the 8th annual Lavender Commencement

Fraternity & Sorority Life staff advised student leaders on developing the Students Taking Action Towards University Safety (STATUS) Plan to enhance student safety during social gathering.

Cultivating continuous learning: • Service Learning partners with faculty in all six colleges to offer service learning courses. In 2014–2015, 28 classes placed students in local community partner agencies, which was an increase from 18 classes in 2013– 2014. • The Alternative Breaks program organized the 8th annual New Orleans trip during winter and a new trip to Chicago in spring. The program hosted 22 students with representation from 18 different majors and from all six colleges. Through travel and service in these locations, students explored new ideas, learned to appreciate diverse cultures, became more adept at handling new experiences, and became more self-aware global citizens. • Safer took students outside the classroom and into the streets in record numbers at the 2015 Take Back the Night March. Student participation increased from 55 students (2013/14) to 250 students (2014/15).

Promoting ethics, integrity & respect: • Fraternity & Sorority Life staff advised student leaders on developing the Students Taking Action Towards University Safety (STATUS) Plan to enhance student safety during social gatherings. The process was collaborative across many areas of the university in response to high-risk events taking place off campus. This is the first time this type of plan has been developed with primary responsibility remaining with the Greek student leadership. • Safer worked closely with IFC/ Pan/USFC to ensure that the STATUS plan was ethical, respectful and honest. • Student Community Success met with 139 students regarding off-campus alcohol violations and nine students regarding second noise violations. Students with off campus violations participated in a 90-minute workshop on community-campus relations and impacts of alcohol.

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Embrace Your Unlimited Possibilities ­— California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo


• The Veterans Success Center developed the VET NET Ally program, which exposes faculty, staff and other students to the intricacies of military veteran service, as well as helps them learn how to foster a campus atmosphere that supports the academic freedom and professional, personal and social success of service members and veterans. • The MultiCultural Center developed new programs supporting Middle Eastern populations in 2014–2015, bringing visibility and support to more under-represented groups on campus. • In 2014–2015, 44 reports of gender-based discrimination (including sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, dating violence, domestic violence and stalking) were reported to the Dean of Students Office. Reports resulted in 20 formal complaints that were investigated promptly, fairly, and thoroughly. This is a 60% increase from the investigations conducted in 2013–2014. • Dean of Students coordinated development and implementation of the Bias Incident Response Protocol, which is a university-wide program that applies a team approach to advise on the best practices to address high level and sensitive situations.

The Alternative Breaks program organized the 8th annual New Orleans trip during winter and a new trip to Chicago in spring. The program hosted 22 students with representation from 18 different majors and from all six colleges.

Embrace Your Unlimited Possibilities ­— Dean of Students Annual Report 2014 – 2015

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CONTRIBUTIONS TO DIVISION’S VISIONARY GOALS

Building a culture of excellence & innovation: • The Center for Service in Action continued to produce high quality programs which resulted in being recognized by the President of the United States as a recipient of the 2014 Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll. • The PRISM Peer Counseling team was awarded a President’s Diversity Award in recognition of the program’s efforts to create a more inclusive campus for LGBTQIA students. • Safer continued to be innovative in its focus on men and masculinity, bystander intervention, socialization, consent, healthy sex and sexuality, sex trafficking and many other topics that are leading the charge for other universities in the CSU (CSU Chico, Sacramento, Pomona) and across the nation (Harvard, UC Berkeley). Safer developed and implemented an intersectionality module within Safer Advocacy Training, further exploring race, ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, and ability.

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Enhancing campus life & student success: • Fraternity & Sorority Life reviewed and approved 216 registered Greek parties (Spring 2014– Spring 2015) in an effort to advise students of risk management practices and safety off campus. • Cross Cultural Centers expanded staffing and hired three full time coordinators to deepen programming and services for ethnic specific populations and intersectionality. • The Gender Equity Center celebrated the grand opening of its new space on April 8, 2015. The space has greatly aided in the creation of a community for the GEC. The GEC now has a strong community that regularly utilizes the space for meetings, hanging out with friends, studying, attending programs, and as a space for students to use as their second home. Student feedback indicates the new space has been an incredible milestone for the center and has made a phenomenal impact.

Embrace Your Unlimited Possibilities ­— California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo


In an effort to create a more diverse and inclusive campus environment, the annual CultureFest moved to campus for the first time resulting in over a 50% increase in attendance and participation. • The Pride Center developed identity specific programming, including events and services for students who identify as Trans, Genderqueer, Gender Non-Conforming, and Asexual. • Safer participation and crisis counseling increased significantly. Quarterly Safer advocacy trainings increase from 48 students (2012/13) to 110 students (2014/15); and Safer confidential crisis counseling consultations have increased from 45 students (2012/13) to 208 students (2014/15).

Engaging partners to ensure our future success: • In an effort to create a more diverse and inclusive campus environment, the annual CultureFest moved to campus for the first time resulting in over a 50% increase in attendance and participation. Over 45 clubs, organizations, and departments participated with an attendance of over 500. • Safer facilitated the first Safer study abroad workshop called “Crossing Consensual Borders” for over 20 students. Safer assisted in creating a new website for Study Abroad with student safety information while abroad (www.studyabroad.calpoly.edu/resources/ safety.html).

Embrace Your Unlimited Possibilities ­— Dean of Students Annual Report 2014 – 2015

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Embrace Your Unlimited Possibilities ­— California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo


CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PRESIDENT’S VISION 2022

Creating a vibrant residential campus that connects academic & social lives & serves as a core of the Cal Poly experience: • In the past three years, Club Sports has grown from 1049 (2012–2013) to 1185 (2014–2015) students participating in one of the 25 club sports. In 2014-2015, Cal Poly hosted a total of 36 home game events, including six tournaments. Cal Poly has one of the largest club sports programs in the CSU system. • In 2014–2015, Cal Poly had 327 chartered organizations. The department processed 3,211 event plans, performed 1,120 risk assessments, and approved 438 travel requests. Participation in student clubs fosters outcomes including effective communication, realistic self-appraisal, enhanced self-esteem, and clarified values.

Enhancing student success: • Over 9,000 meal vouchers were distributed through the Hunger Program at over 40 locations. • The Assistant Deans of Students for Student Success, Support, and Retention created tracking and reporting systems for the Cal Poly Cares program, which launched in Spring 2015. Cal Poly Cares awarded 15 students with grants totaling $20,007, and an additional 40 students were granted Commencement Fee waivers. • In 2014–2015, the Assistant Deans of Students met with 511 students. In Fall, 221 students were served. In Winter, an additional 151 students were served. In Spring, 139 additional students were

served. Assistant Deans of Students provided care management to students facing various threats to their success, including but not limited to: psychological health (202), academic performance (75), physical health (49), and financial concerns 38). (see attachment)

Increasing support for teacher-scholar model: • The Assistant Dean of Students for Title IX Outreach, Support and Investigations facilitated/co-facilitated presentations and provided consultation to staff, faculty, and community members, including the Electrical Engineering Department, Academic Advising, Mustang Band, and Greek Life. • Safer worked closely with faculty from KINE, Ethnic Studies, PSY, and RPTA to ensure students are learning by doing by acting as positive bystanders. • Assistant Deans of Students presented “Dean of Students Office: A Resource for Faculty” at the New Faculty Community Breakfast and also presented at various department meetings, including Chemistry, Electrical Engineering, and Aerospace Engineering. Assistant Deans of Students have presented at Deans Council meetings, including College of Engineering and College of Liberal Arts. Presentations have included information on responding to students in distress, resources available through Cal Poly Cares, and the roles of the Assistant Deans of Students. Assistant Deans of Students provide ongoing consultation to faculty regarding students of concern.

Embrace Your Unlimited Possibilities ­— Dean of Students Annual Report 2014 – 2015

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CONTRIBUTIONS TO CSU SYSTEM-WIDE INITIATIVES • The Center for Service in Action (CSA) developed a Service Learning Strategic Plan in collaboration with academic partners in response to the Chancellor’s Office Call to Service. • The Dean of Students responsibility to investigate student complaints of gender-based discrimination against students was assigned to a newly created position, Assistant Dean of Students for Title IX Outreach, Support & Investigations, with the primary role of ensuring a fair, timely, well-documented investigation process in compliance with Executive Orders 1095-1097. • Safer continued to be a model program across the CSU with education and crisis services offered to students, faculty and staff. Medical Director of Chico State Student Health visited Safer in April to get information concerning how to build a program like Safer. Cal Poly Pomona Sexual Assault prevention Director contacted Safer in August 2014 to ask for tips on how to build a program like Safer, and a UC Berkeley graduate student contacted Safer to ask for tips on how to build a program like Safer.

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Embrace Your Unlimited Possibilities ­— California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo


MOVING FORWARD PRIORITIES FOR 2015–2017 The following goals are outlined in the Dean of Students Strategic Plan. *The objectives specific to the 2015–17 academic year are in bold and italics* 1. Focus new and existing programs on student success and retention. a. Create early interventions for veteran students, focusing on student success and retention to graduation. i. Conduct outreach to faculty, staff, and students to raise awareness of potential issues facing veteran students, and to increase knowledge of available resources. b. Create a focused, proactive and responsive Safer Men & Masculinity program. i. Develop and deliver a presentation for incoming students to assist with positive masculine identity development focused on lowering sexual violence. ii. Implement a campaign of Greeks and Athletes against sexual assault with the intention of changing cultural beliefs and attitudes around alcohol and sexual assault. c. Increase Title IX outreach efforts to students, faculty and staff to promote further awareness of sexual violence reporting procedures, and campus and community resources. i. Facilitate presentations and educational trainings on University reporting and compliance procedures to faculty and staff including athletic coaches and student workers consistent with their roles.

Embrace Your Unlimited Possibilities ­— Dean of Students Annual Report 2014 – 2015

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ii. Develop supplemental annual trainings on sexual harassment and sexual violence including rape awareness to student athletes, all student members of fraternities and sororities, and identified student organizations. c. Bolster efforts around student care management to include expansion of the Dean of Students Office role in support of a wide range of students in crisis. i. Develop outreach and marketing materials for students that ensure students know support services are available. ii. Identify areas of risk in student populations and create intentional ways of reaching at-risk students, i.e. students on academic probation. 2. Design and implement a campus-wide approach to student leadership and development. a. Develop international and domestic Alternative Breaks programs for the general student population and for specific groups that create mentorship opportunities and develop leadership skills. i. Increase access to service trips by funding and offering scholarships to those most in need. b. Create opportunities for student leaders across campus to connect, share experiences, and find common purpose. i. Assess student leaders across campus for common skill development. ii. Bring student leader groups together once per quarter to meet and learn from each other. 3. Create a campus culture that helps Cal Poly retain, support, and advocate for diverse students. a. Create a model for the Cross Cultural Centers that helps provide programs that promote retention and facilitates the successful degree completion of diverse students.

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Embrace Your Unlimited Possibilities ­— California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo


The Center for Service in Action (CSA) developed a Service Learning Strategic Plan in collaboration with academic partners in response to the Chancellor’s Office Call to Service.

i. Enhance promotion and marketing of cross-cultural opportunities, including those that would reach current and prospective students. b. Enhance opportunities for support and retention of underrepresented students through Dean of Students programs. i. Expand support for the United Sorority & Fraternity Council and cultural clubs and organizations. 4. Develop successful partnerships on and off campus to increase student success and broaden the student experience. a. Strengthen community relations with the City of San Luis Obispo and local non-profit agencies to increase positive community engagement opportunities that promote student citizenship and civic engagement. i. Track and assess student participation in community service and voter registration. 5. Build long lasting relationships to support a culture of giving to Student Affairs. a. Cultivate a culture of giving to support underrepresented students to attend Cal Poly. i. Collaborate with the Vice-President for Student Affairs Advancement Officer to create a fund that supports diverse students to participate in fee-based programs like Alternative Breaks. b. Develop methods for ongoing communication with program-affiliated alumni. i. Collaborate with the Vice-President for Student Affairs Advancement Officer to create and collaborate on signature events to encourage alumni to reconnect with programs to build alumni base. 

Embrace Your Unlimited Possibilities ­— Dean of Students Annual Report 2014 – 2015

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Dean of Students Annual Report 2014-2015