Page 1

Graphic Standards & Style Guide 2012-13


Table of Contents

Introduction

Welcome Letter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Delivering the Mission. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Graphic Identity Elements

All marks shown in this publication are the property of Christ Presbyterian Academy and may not be reproduced without permission. Updated August 2012 Christ Presbyterian Academy Communications Office 2323-A Old Hickory Blvd. Nashville, Tennessee 37215 tel 615-373-9550 fax 615-370-0884 www.cpalions.org Š2008, 2012 Christ Presbyterian Academy. All rights reserved.

Color Palette. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CPA Crest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 CPA Signature. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 CPA Abbreviated Signature. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 CPA Banner Shield . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 CPA Full Mascot. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 CPA Lettering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 CPA Mascot. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 CPA Logo Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Logo Restrictions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Typography. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

Marketing and Communications

Design and Production Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . Production Process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Official Materials. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Letter Writing Guidelines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Proofing and Approval. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPA Brand Arch Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

29 30 31 33 34 35

Grammar and Style Guide. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

2

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

3


Introduction


Introductory Letter

Delivering the Mission

The CPA brand is more than a collection of official logos, colors, phrases and typefaces; the brand represents who we are, for what we stand, and for Whom we stand. We are parents, teachers, administrators, students, and coaches who make up different and unique parts of one Christ Presbyterian Academy.

August 2012 munity,

Dear CPA Com

foundation for nt to provide a ea m is de ui ently, and with G e clearly, consist rds and Styl y da tit an en her St id ic y’s ph m ra de This G language, and ot g the Aca zing CPA logos, g and presentin ili in ut at r ic fo un ce m ur m so co e re a comprehensiv blic image. distinction. It is ed, coherent pu ifi un a to te bu ntri images elements that co inal words and sed on the orig ba e than a year of or lly m na ed io lv nt te vo in in e ly ar al ts iti en in s em es and external . The proc All of the el k with internal or hool’s founders w sc d e an th , by ity ed un establish our comm ng program. sion throughout d overall brandi an research, discus e id gu is th produce h graphics or professionals to usually throug is ne less eo m so elements, regard e have with CPA’s identity mmunication w of and co e ts st us en fir d m e te rt th na e pa Sinc and. All de t and coordi br en ist y’s m ns co de ca ls, A ia e an ational d aining th printed mater rtant for maint ments for inform po ele y im tit is , en m id s iu A’ ide. of the med should use CP esented in this gu d organizations the guidelines pr ith w CPA-sanctione ce an rd co rposes in ac e and facilitate promotional pu ines is to overse el id gu y tit en e, volunteer, in the id ic, administrativ unications’ role em m ad om ac C ner. lp of he ce to ffi The O distinctive man e available an effective and entation. We ar act in em nt ts pl co en im se t em ea ec el pl rr n co this guide, s use desig in ea d ar se ic es et dr hl at ad t d fine arts, an ecific needs no questions, or sp If you have any hip. rs for your partne us. Thank you Sincerely, unications Office of Comm

1

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

When we have a cohesive message going forth from our school, it allows us to grow stronger in our mission as we guide students toward the character of Christ and reach out to the greater community. We have a chance to do this every time a student sees our logo on printed materials, a prospective parent notices it on a uniform shirt, or a person driving to work views it on the back of a car. This is the reason why it is so important to protect the CPA brand. Much time and energy has been spent to make sure that we represent the Academy in the best and most authentic way possible. We value the excellent education with which our students are equipped. We value the distinctively Christian worldview that they go out into the world proclaiming. We value the selfless hearts of our faculty and parents who devote so much of themselves into making CPA the place that God has called it to be. Thus, we place a great amount of value on upholding the CPA brand. All members of our community are called to excellence, and this guide is a next step in living up to that call. The following text and graphic elements serve one purpose: to deliver the CPA distinctives found in our mission statement, motto, and summary boiler plate text.

Mission Statement

Christ Presbyterian Academy, an educational ministry of Christ Presbyterian Church, assists Christian families in helping students come to know God, evaluate all knowledge and all life by His truth, and live lives transformed by His truth for His glory.

Motto

Soli Deo Gloria­­—To God Alone be the Glory

Summary Boiler Plate Text

Christ Presbyterian Academy is a Preschool-12, coeducational, college-preparatory school dedicated to excellent education built on a Christian worldview. Founded in 1985, CPA is a ministry of Christ Presbyterian Church (PCA) in Nashville, Tennessee. Serving 1,200 students, the Academy offers an extensive program designed to meet the diverse giftings of its students.

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

2


Graphic Identity Elements


Color Palette

Images

Color is one of the most significant identifiers of CPA. Purple and gold were established as the official school colors at the Academy’s founding in 1985.

• PURPLE is the color of royalty. It was the most precious of the ancient dyes and was the color •

of royal robes, including the one placed on Jesus before the crucifixion (Mark 15:17). Purple represents the royalty of Christ as the King. GOLD is a most precious metal. It was used extensively in the construction of the tabernacle, representing the presence of God (Exodus 25). Gold also symbolizes that which is majestic and valuable—the unsearchable riches of Christ (Ephesians 3:8).

The official CPA purple is Pantone Matching System (PMS) 2617*, and the gold is PMS 4515*, supplemented with the neutral colors of white, black, grey, charcoal, and tan. These colors are to be used for choices of materials, apparel, and printed ink colors. Using unauthorized colors to represent the Academy is not allowed. For more color usage information, see Design and Production Guidelines (pg. 29).

Spot color: Pantone® 2617 Process: C79 M100 Y0 K15 Thread: Purple Accent 5731 RGB: 84 / 35 / 127

Spot color: Pantone® 4515 Process: C0 M9 Y50 K24 Thread: Rice Paper 9125 RGB: 203 / 182 / 119

Supplemental colors

White

Black

Charcoal

Gray

The images put forth by our school, whether logos or photographs, speak about who we are without using many words. They are recognized in the community and directly impact the outside world’s perception of what we are about. That is why so much time and energy has been put into developing these images and the guidelines that accompany them. The following pages provide examples of each of the CPA logos—examining the meaning within their components and their intended use.

Just as the consistent application of these logos provides continuity, so do the photographs that we choose to represent the Academy. The people that make up the CPA community are what sets this use for inhouse printing ONLY school apart. As much as possible, we want to accurately capture the heart of our community in the pictures that we choose to display. Media/Promotional Release On each enrollment form, there is a section for parents to sign giving permission for their student to appear in photographs both within our school’s communication and in the media. Whenever images are used, we try to include multiple students so that the message is primarily the school and activity above simply the individual. Photography needs differ based on each project, but here are some general guidelines: • Capture more than one student in a picture • Show action • Include students performing a task that represents a certain aspect of the school • Appear unstaged and natural • Show vivid colors

Tan

Thread colors are derived from Robison-Anton Super Brite Polyester. *Pantone Inc. has not evaluated the colors shown in this guide. They may not match the PANTONE color standards. Consult the current PANTONE publications for accurate color. PANTONE is the property of Pantone Inc.

5

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

6


CPA Crest

CPA Crest Color Usage

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

The CPA Crest may only be placed on materials of an official, formal or ceremonial nature, such as diplomas or commencement programs.

Components of the Crest

• The CROSS symbolizes God’s method of salvation to all who will believe on His Son. The Lord Jesus Christ achieved this for mankind through His crucifixion. The Cross of Christ is the Academy’s foundation.

• The MOTTO BANNER, “Soli Deo Gloria,” is Latin for “To God Alone be the Glory.” This serves as the center of the Academy’s goal as it trains children in spirit, mind and body.

• The LION is the school mascot. Jesus Christ, in Scripture, is called the “Lion of Judah.” The three lions represent the attributes of knowledge, wisdom, and truth.

• The SHIELD brings all of the crest’s components together. As in the Full Armor of God, the Shield of Faith helps the Academy be strong in the Lord and in His mighty power.

• The OUTER RING contains the full name of Christ Presbyterian Academy, the year it was established, and encloses the rest in unity.

Please Note:

Never add or link other elements or unauthorized tag lines with the Crest.

1 inch

7

Minimum size Never use the Crest at a size smaller than 1 inch high.

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

23

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

8


CPA Signature Color Usage

CPA Signature

vertical configuration

horizontal configuration

The CPA Signature is the primary graphic identifier for CPA. It appears on letterhead, business cards, brochures, the website, and most other forms of communication. It is the primary mark to be used by administrative and academic units and may be used for any recognized student organization or program. This logo may be used for other purposes with permission. The components of the Signature should not be separated. Because the font was customized for the wordmark, it should not be reset.

1

9

2

10

3

11

4

12

5

13

6

14

7

15

8

16

Components of the Signature

• CPA shield logo­—This shield represents the same one that is found in the CPA Crest. As in

the Full Armor of God, the Shield of Faith helps the Academy be strong in the Lord and in His mighty power. The lion also represents the three lions on the shield in the Crest. The lion is the school mascot because Jesus Christ, in Scripture, is called the “Lion of Judah.”

• CPA wordmark—“CHRIST PRESBYTERIAN ACADEMY” set in all caps, set in the customized Minion font, with the “C” and “R” in Christ custom-altered.

Please Note:

The CPA font was customized for the wordmark, so NO PART OF THE CPA SIGNATURE SHOULD BE RESET. Also, the components of the Signature should not be separated. CPA shield logo

1/2 inch

9

CPA wordmark

Minimum size Never use the 1/2 inch Shield at a size smaller than 1/2 inch high.

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

10


CPA Abbreviated Signature Color Usage

CPA Abbreviated Signature

When alternate text, such as the Academy’s motto, tag line, or the name of a department is included with the CPA Signature, the abbreviation “CPA” should be used instead of the full school name. The Abbreviated Signature may be used upon approval by administrative and academic units, as well as any recognized student organizations. The components of this logo should not be separated. Because the font was customized for the wordmark, it should not be reset.

1

9

2

10

3

11

4

11 8 12

5

13

6

14

7

15

8

16

Components of the Abbreviated Signature

• CPA shield logo—This shield represents the same one that is found in the CPA Crest. As in

the Full Armor of God, the Shield of Faith helps the Academy be strong in the Lord and in His mighty power. The lion also represents the three lions on the shield in the Crest. The lion is the school mascot because Jesus Christ, in Scripture, is called the “Lion of Judah.”

• CPA abbreviated wordmark—“CPA” set in all caps, in the customized font. • Additional text—Common usage includes but is not limited to the Academy’s motto, year established, and departmental names.

Please Note:

If there is no additional text, the shield logo may not be used with the abbreviated letters. Likewise, the letters may not be used by themselves. Additional text must be in title caps.

1/2 inch

11

Minimum size The Abbreviated Signature should not be used at a size smaller than 1/2 inch high.

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

12


CPA Banner Shield

CPA Banner Shield Color Usage

1

2

3

4

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

21

22

23

24

5

When standing alone, the CPA shield features a banner at the bottom with the school letters. This logo’s main use is on academic, vertically oriented pieces, such as banners, brochures, and school uniforms. This logo may be used for other purposes with permission of the Office of Communications.

Components of the Banner Shield

• CPA shield logo—This shield represents the same one that is found in the CPA Crest. As in

the Full Armor of God, the Shield of Faith helps the Academy be strong in the Lord and in His mighty power. The lion also represents the three lions on the shield in the Crest. The lion is the school mascot because Jesus Christ, in Scripture, is called the “Lion of Judah.”

• The banner—This is the same banner found on the shield in the crest. “CPA” is set in all caps, set in customized font.

Please Note:

The CPA Banner Signature stands alone and should not be paired with any other logos or words.

1/2 inch

13

20

Minimum size Never use the Banner Shield at a size smaller than 1/2 inch high.

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

14


CPA Athletic Lettering

CPA Lettering Color Usage

Christ Presbyterian Academy LETTERING LOGO

PMS 2617

1

15

30

45

52

2

16

31

46

53

3

17

32

47

54

4

18

33

48

55

5

19

34

49

56

6

20

35

50

57

7

21

36

51

58

8

22

37

52

59

9

23

38

53

60

10

24

39

54

61

11

25

40

55

12

26

41

56

13

27

42

57

14

28

43

58

29

44

59

PMS 4515

The CPA Lettering logo alone has a great deal of visible presence on athletic-related apparel and other spirit/fan promotional items. It is often paired with the CPA Full Mascot, the Mascot, the word “Lions,” as well as specific group/team names. Depending on the context and the material that it’s being placed upon, there are several options for this logo, including a solid single outline and a double outline. Approval is necessary for creating new combinations of the lettering with other logos or words.

Components of the CPA Lettering

• CPA Lettering — The font and slight arch were customized for CPA and should not be altered •

in any way.

Official colors — The colors and their messages are a very important part of this logo, with the colors symbolizing royalty and the unsearchable riches of Christ.

Please Note:

Any fonts used in conjunction with this logo must be approved.

1/2 inch

15

Minimum size The CPA Lettering should not be used at a size smaller than 1/2 inch high.

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

16


CPA Full Athletic Mascot

CPA Full Athletic Mascot Color Usage

The CPA Full Athletic Mascot is an iconic presence on the campus and on athletic-related apparel and other promotional items. This logo is intended to stand alone and should not be used for use for inhouse printing ONLY academic or formal purposes.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

Components of the CPA Full Mascot

• The lion – The lion represents the three lions on the shield in the Crest. The lion is the school •

mascot because Jesus Christ, in Scripture, is called the “Lion of Judah.” CPA Lettering - This logo can be paired with the lion or stand alone. The font and slight arch were customized for CPA and should not be altered in any way.

3/4 inch

17

Minimum size Never use the Full Mascot at a size smaller than 3/4 inch high.

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

18


CPA Athletic Mascot Color Usage

CPA Athletic Mascot

1

2

3

4

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

18

19

20

5

The CPA “lion head” mascot has a strong visible presence on athletic-related apparel and other promotional items. It is often paired with the athletic CPA Lettering, the word “Lions,” as well as specific group names.

Components of the CPA Athletic Mascot

• The lion – This is the same lion as the one in the CPA Full Mascot logo. It also represents the

three lions on the shield in the CPA Crest. The lion is the school mascot because Jesus Christ, in Scripture, is called the “Lion of Judah.”

Please Note:

This logo may not be combined with any other logos other than the ones mentioned above. Likewise, it may not be paired with other fonts besides the CPA font without proper approval.

1/2 inch

19

17

Minimum size The CPA Mascot should not be used at a size smaller than 1/2 inch high.

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

20


Logo Applications

Logo Applications

One of the official logos should accompany all printed materials associated with CPA activities or programs. The logo demonstrates the Academy’s approval and relationship. Also, each official logo is a trademark of Christ Presbyterian Academy and should use the TM when appropriate. According to the United States Patent and Trademark Office, “A trademark is a word, phrase, symbol, or design, or a combination of words, phrases, symbols, or designs, that identifies and distinguishes the source of the good of one party from those of others. Any time you claim rights in a mark, you may use the ‘TM’ designation to alert the public of your claim.” While we would typically not use the TM on a diploma or uniform, there are instances when materials are more visible to those outside of our community, like on a T-shirt or other promotional items. In this case, we would use the trademark symbol, at the discretion of the Office of Communications.

21

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

* Sizes may fall outside of the minimums and are placed for display purposes only. 9

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide 10

11

12

22


Logo Restrictions

Logo Restrictions

The various configurations and color standards of the CPA logos are intended to meet most design standards. Exceptions to the guidelines in this document may be made only with the approval of the Office of Communications. The graphics here are not intended to illustrate all incorrect examples but should serve as a guideline to some of the most common misusages.

Do not remove required elements. Do not use any colors other than approved.

Do not combine elements of different logos. Never use full lion independent of the shield as a logo. Could be used as a graphic element with approval.

Do not use the Abbreviated Signature without additional text under CPA.

Do not reposition, resize or alter approved colors in any logos.

23

Do not pair the CPA Lettering with the shield logo.

Do not place any logos over or combine with busy backgrounds or patterns.

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

Do not skew any part of the logo or lettering. Do not alter background of logo.

Do not use alternate fonts in approved logos.

Do not use alternate fonts or incorrect outlines.

Do not distort the logos in any way.

Never pair or overlap logo with other graphics or words.

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

24


Typography

Official fonts that are used in regular Academy communications are the Helvetica (Arial for PC) and Palatino (Minion if available) family of fonts. In order to keep a consistent look, all printed materials must use the official fonts when creating new advertising or promotional items and everyday communications. Select print communications may use outside fonts with prior approval. Examples of these may be school themes, special events, plays and fine arts productions, or individual publications.

Branding Fonts:

These fonts are are used in the logos and must be used in all official materials without alterations or variations of any type.

Minion Font Family

Usage: Headline, Emphasis and body copy Minion Pro Regular ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 0123456789 Minion Pro Bold ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 0123456789

Typography

General Use Fonts:

Font used in letters, communication and all other general use.

Palatino Family Font

Usage: General Use, letters. Palatino Regular ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 0123456789

Palatino Bold ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 0123456789

Helvetica font family

Usage: Headline, Emphasis and body copy Helvetica Neue 57 Condensed ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 0123456789

Helvetica Neue 57 Condensed ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 0123456789

Helvetica Neue 67 Medium Condensed ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ Abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 0123456789

Helvetica Neue 67 Medium Condensed ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ Abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 0123456789

Helvetica Neue 77 Bold Condensed ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 0123456789

Helvetica Neue 77 Bold Condensed ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 0123456789

CPA Headline Font

Usage: Headline Regular ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ Bold (.25 stroke) ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ BERTHOLD CITY Usage: Numberals combined with headline font Regular 1234567890 Bold (.25 stroke added) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0

Ceremonial Font:

This font will only be used in special ceremonial situations. For example, academic awards, diplomas, certificates of achievement and similar documents.

Helvetica Neue Helvetica Neue Extended

Usage: Headline and emphasis Helvetica Neue 53 Extended ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 0123456789 Helvetica Neue 63 Medium Extended ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 0123456789 Helvetica Neue 73 Bold Extended ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 0123456789 Helvetica Neue 93 Black Extended ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 0123456789

Goudy Text MT

25

Usage: Ceremonial situations ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 0123456789 Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

26


Marketing and Communications


Design and Production Guidelines

Production, Proofing and Approval Process

Christ Presbyterian Academy’s materials should encourage and enrich the experiences of its students, families, and staff while also presenting the Academy well in the community. While letterhead, brochures, uniforms, and T-shirts cannot serve to represent all aspects of the Academy, it must also be considered that in some situations such materials may be the only lens through which CPA is viewed. Creation of all materials, such as brochures, T-shirts, posters, and apparel, should begin with a concept that is driven by the overall desired message it should convey. From the message comes the design, which includes the graphic choices, copy (words), and color. All materials can be classified in one of two categories: group related and event related.

The group-related category includes all materials that are used to identify a connection

to a school-sponsored group. Groups include, but are not limited to, the overall Academy, athletic teams, fine arts groups, a grade, a school, a class, or a specific club. Group-related materials, because they represent a group within the Academy, should be unified through the official design choices of color, graphic fonts, and logos adopted by the Academy.

The palette of official colors is purple, gold and white and is supplemented with the neutral colors of black, grey, and khaki. These colors are to be used for choices of materials, shirt colors, and printed ink colors. (No gold and black).

The event-related category includes all materials that are used to identify the wearer’s connection to a school-sponsored event, and the material specifically refers to the event. Events include, but are not limited to, field trips, school activities, class and extracurricular events. Event-related materials, because they represent a connection with an event that has its own unique character, are able to utilize a broader palette of colors for materials, shirt colors, and printed ink colors. Discretion should be exercised because the apparel is still representing CPA, but it is also important to convey the substance and tone of the event in good design form. Therefore, graphic and color choices should represent the event’s theme and message. For example, a Fourth of July poster could include red, white, and blue colors. Likewise, a field trip T-shirt to Nature’s Classroom could utilize various earth tones. Any concepts that are deemed questionable may be reviewed by the Academy’s Office of Communications and Leadership Team for approval. Spot color: Pantone® 2617 Process: C79 M100 Y0 K15 Thread: Purple Accent 5731 RGB: 84 / 35 / 127

Spot color: Pantone® 4515 Process: C0 M9 Y50 K24 Thread: Rice Paper 9125 RGB: 203 / 182 / 119

Supplemental colors

White

29

Black

Charcoal

Gray

Tan

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

The Office of Communications is available to assist in the design and production process of group and event-related CPA materials. Each job requires that a Communications Project Form (see below) be turned in along with department head approval before it will begin. A Communications staff member will assist in the completion of the form. The project will be discussed and then added to the production calendar. Production Process: 1. Purpose of the material is identified 2. Message to be wwcommunicated is articulated 3. Copy is written 4. Graphic design ideas are generated 5. Message, copy, and design idea are presented to the department head, principal, head coach, etc. for approval. 6. Proofing by the faculty or staff member 7. Concept is presented to the CPA Communications Department 8. Design is produced 9. Final approval 10. Design is sent to a vendor for material creation if necessary

Proofing & Editing: All of the Academy’s written communications reflect CPA’s quality. When materials are sent out to students, parents, or the community at-large, the accuracy of spelling, punctuation, and grammar are descriptive of a CPA education. The proofing and approval process provides the support and accountability of always having two other sets of fresh eyes to catch mistakes. While accuracy is of high importance, the primary benefit to the process is that it helps with internal communications by ensuring that the appropriate administrator of a program is informed of the information included in the written material. Finally, the Office of Communications coordinates the process and is able to look for additional opportunities to share the included information through other means. These means could include the website, press releases, or other Academy materials.

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

30


Official Materials

Official Materials

Business stationery is one of the largest, most frequent use of the CPA identity. Each piece of business stationery provides the opportunity to visibly solidify the CPA brand. Materials have been designed and are available for all official Academy business. These materials include letterhead, note cards, envelopes, postcards, and business cards.

• For mass mailings, a black-and-white version of the letterhead is often used with a two-color printed envelope.

• For correspondence that involves individual communications, the two-color letterhead and envelopes should be used.

• To order business cards, please email your request with any changes to the Office of Communications.

Email Signatures An email signature is often the first encounter that someone will have with the Christ Presbyterian Academy brand. To provide consistency, all email signatures for CPA faculty and staff should be written in Helvetica (Arial), with black type only, and must look as follows:

John Doe Job Title Christ Presbyterian Academy 2323-A Old Hickory Boulevard, Nashville, TN 37215 Office: (615) 555-5555 Mobile/Text: (615) 555-6666** Email: john.doe@cpalions.org Web: cpalions.org Soli Deo Gloria —To God Alone Be the Glory

Christ Presbyterian Academy LETTERING LOGO

Richard B. Anderson Headmaster 2323-A Old Hickory Blvd. Nashville, TN 37215

tel 615-301-3532 fax 615-370-0884 www.cpalions.org richard.anderson@cpalions.org

PMS 2617

PMS 4515

**Mobile number is OPTIONAL

Note: For coaches, the following ATHLETICS option is also acceptable, also in Helvetica, and also only in black type:

Jane Doe Coaching Title Christ Presbyterian Academy 2323-A Old Hickory Boulevard, Nashville, TN 37215 Office: (615) 555-5555 Mobile/Text: (615) 555-6666** Email: jane.doe@cpalions.org Web: cpalions.org Soli Deo Gloria —To God Alone Be the Glory

Equip with Knowledge Lead with Wisdom Live in Truth www.cpalions.org

2323-A Old Hickory Blvd. | Nashville, TN 37215 | tel 615-373-9550 | fax 615-370-0884 | www.cpalions.org

31

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

32


Letter Writing Guidelines

Vendor Protocol

CPA Vendor/Order Protocols Vendors may only produce materials bearing CPA logos/graphics, and/or items that represent any aspect of the Academy, if contacted directly by the CPA Office of Communications, by Melanie Barrett of The Roar Store (who will have secured approval from Communications), or by Kevin LeGate of Athletics (in the case of Nike/uniform items).

Date line starts 1-1/4” from top

July 12, 2012

Mr. John Smith 2804 Opryland Dr. Nashville, TN 37214

These are the only channels through which such items may be ordered. This excludes other CPA faculty/staff, coaches, and CPA parents.

Dear John, This letter demonstrates the proper style for communications coming from Christ Presbyterian Academy. Please pay special attention to the formatting. It is important Indent should that we present a consistent image whenever we correspond with our families, alumni, not exceed friends, and the community. 1” from edges

The font size is 12pt and should be from either the Palatino or Helvetica font families.

Indent should not exceed 1” from edges

Should a vendor be contacted by anyone outside the approval loop, the Academy asks that the vendor contact one of the official approvers before proceeding. Items produced outside of this protocol, and which do not meet the Academy’s graphic-identity standards, will not be accepted or disseminated.

Body justified The dateline begins two inches from the top of the page, with one-inch side margins. left Double space between date, address, salutation, paragraphs and closing

The end of the letter should not be longer than one inch from the bottom edge. After the date, press return twice to type in the address, twice for the salutation, and twice again for the body of your letter. All letters should be typed in the full block. The full block style is the standard for business letter formatting. In the full block style the entire letter is left aligned, with one line space between each component or paragraph and four spaces for the signature. Thank you for taking the time to review this guide. By making the extra effort to maintain consistency, we demonstrate the importance of the little things. Please feel free to let us know if you have any questions or concerns. Sincerely,

Office of Communications

Letter should not exceed 1” from bottom edge

33

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

34


CPA Brand Arch Design

CPA Brand Arch Design

The CPA Brand Arch an option for use for CPA advertising. There are various configurations of the brand arch shown. The single brand arch is inteneded for horizontal ads (as shown below) and the dual brand arch is recommended for a more vertical configuration (opposite page). When the arch is used, CPA logo is always placed within the arch with copy to the right or left.

35

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

36


Grammar and Style Guide Note: CPA follows Associated Press (AP) Style except in certain situations, particularly academic usages in which Chicago Manual of Style Standards provide more appropriate guidance.


Grammar and Style Guide

Grammar and Style Guide

A-B academic and administrative titles — Capitalize and spell out formal titles such as Head Soccer Coach, Instructor of Chemistry, Director of Finance. Example: Head Soccer Coach John Smith; Betty Smith, Instructor of Chemistry. In general reference, titles remain uppercase when referring to a specific person and lowercase when referencing a group of people: The Headmaster has decided to let class out early tomorrow. The teachers and principals were in agreement on the issue. Always identify faculty members by their academic title in published materials. If a faculty member holds several academic titles, use the one that has a direct bearing on the story/document. academic year — Use a hyphen when writing out an academic year: Online applications are available for the 20013-14 academic year.

a.m., p.m. — Lowercase, with periods. Use figures to designate time using a.m. and p.m.: 4 p.m. For noon and midnight, use the words noon and midnight without the figure 12. Avoid redundancy such as 10 a.m. this morning. See also time. apostrophes — In plural possessives: CPA girls’ basketball. Boys’ tennis.

Academy — On second reference to Christ Presbyterian Academy, always capitalize: In 1985, the Academy opened its doors to K-2 students.

assure, ensure, and insure — “Assure” means to inform with a view, removing doubt. “Ensure” means to guarantee. “Insure” means to establish a contract for insurance of some type.

Additionally — When beginning a statement, use “In addition, ...” instead.

athletic stadium/stadium complex — Typically lowercase unless referred to as the Den.

addresses — The Academy’s address should be typed as 2323-A Old Hickory Blvd. Nashville, TN 37215. Note that there is a dash in between the numbers and “A.” Use the abbreviations Ave., Blvd. and St., etc. only with a numbered address: 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Spell out and capitalize when part of a formal street name without a number: Pennsylvania Avenue. Lowercase and spell out when used alone or with more than one street name: Massachusetts and Pennsylvania avenues. Always use figures for an address number: 9 Morningside Circle. Spell out and capitalize First through Ninth when used as street names; use figures with two digits for 10th and above: 7 Fifth Ave., 110 21st Ave. N. Use the abbreviations NW, NE, SE, and SW in city addresses after the street name. See also streets.

Bible, biblical — Uppercase Bible when referring to the religious text. However, lowercase when used as a figure of speech. Lowercase biblical in all instances. Example: The Harvard Medical Encyclopedia is the hypochondriac’s bible. The course will discuss different books in the Bible.

adviser — Not advisor.

C-D

affect, effect — Affect, as a verb, means to influence: The game will affect the standings. Affect, as a noun, is best avoided. Effect, as a verb, means to cause: He will effect many changes in the company. Effect, as a noun, means result: The effect was overwhelming. It was a law of little effect.

campus — Lowercase. Example: The seniors will have lunch on campus today.

After-school — (adjective). The Academy offers many after-school opportunities.

Christ Presbyterian Academy — Appropriate first reference is Christ Presbyterian Academy. Appropriate second references are CPA (no periods), the Academy, or Lions.

ages — Use figures. When used as a modifier or a noun, use hyphens: A 5-year-old boy received the award. The camp is for 3-year-olds. The boy is 5 years old. The boy, 7, has a sister, 10. Applies also to inanimate objects, animals, etc.: The 8-year-old building is scheduled for demolition this week. See also numbers. alumnus — “Alumnus” is not the same as “graduate.” A graduate must have earned a degree from CPA, while an alumnus is any person who has attended CPA. Alumnus refers to a man; plural is alumni. Alumna refers to a woman; plural is alumnae. Use alumni when referring to a group of 39

men and women. Use the abbreviation alum advisedly. Identify alumni by their class years with an apostrophe before the year and no comma between the name and class year: Jane Doe ’12 attended CPA for 12 years.

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

Board of Trustees — The Board of Trustees refers to the governing body as delegated by the Christ Presbyterian Church Session. Always uppercase when referring to CPA’s Board of Trustees or the full name of any other named board. On second reference, the group can be referred to as “the Board.” buildings — Uppercase when referring to the different buildings in the Academy. Example: The middle-school students will have a meeting in the lobby of lower Building B at lunch today.

chair — Preferred title for the presiding officer of a department or committee. Avoid chairperson.

Christ Presbyterian Church — Appropriate first reference is Christ Presbyterian Church. Appropriate second reference is CPC. class — Capitalize when referring to a specific class: the Class of ’94. Lowercase when referring to different courses except in cases with capitalized names such as English and Spanish: Mrs. Smith’s math class is going on a field trip tomorrow.

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

40


Grammar and Style Guide

coach, head coach — Generally, follow the rule for academic titles: Coach Charlie Chaplin or Charlie Chaplin, Head Football Coach. Example: According to Head Football Coach Charlie Chaplin, the team is ready for Saturday’s game. When Coach Chaplin speaks, his players listen. coeducation or coeducational — Not: co-ed. Always use as one word (no hyphens). colons and semicolons — A colon (:) usually serves as an introducer—of a list, an example, an explanatory phrase or sentence, etc. Example: The instructor made three suggestions for the essay: to shorten it, to use more vivid examples, and to double-check the statistics. There was one person Mabel could not forgive: herself. (In the above examples, dashes would be acceptable in place of the colons.) A primary use for the semicolon (;) is to join the elements in a compound sentence. Example: You don’t need to submit original documents; photocopies are sufficient. A common error is using a comma in a compound sentence instead of a semicolon. This mistake often occurs when a transition word such as however, thus, or therefore is involved. Example: Bell’s flight was delayed; therefore, the concert was rescheduled. Incorrect: Bell’s flight was delayed, therefore, the concert was rescheduled. Use semicolons to separate items in a series when the items are long or complicated and commas already serve another purpose in the sentence. Example: Professor Barbour has included in her cookbook such delicacies as fresh blueberry and lemon cream tart from the Limestone Grille in Bloomington; shrimp brochette with roasted corn salsa from the RockWall Bistro in Floyds Knobs; and apple fritters with caramel sauce from the LaSalle Grill in South Bend. Some overlap exists between semicolon and colon use. For example, a colon may be used to join the elements in a compound sentence, especially when the second half of a sentence is “introduced” by the first half. Both ways of punctuating the following sentence are acceptable. Example: All of our faculty members serve on committees: nine, for example, are on the presidential search and screen committee. All of our faculty members serve on committees; nine, for example, are on the presidential search and screen committee. commas — Always use commas with coordinate conjunctions. Example: Mary counsels students, and she volunteers at the hospital. John planned to invest in his tax return, but he bought a computer instead. Do not use comma before conjunctions that link phrases other than complete sentences. commencement — Capitalize when referring to the CPA event. Lowercase general references. Example: CPA’s Commencement will be cybercast live. A school’s commencement is a special opportunity. course titles — Capitalize official course titles in running text. No italics or quotation marks are necessary. Example: Frank was hoping to get into a new math course, Probability and Statistics. courtesy titles — Use Dr. when necessary and generally do not use courtesy titles such as Mr., Mrs., Ms., etc., unless on second reference. Example: Contact Sally Smith, Academic Coordinator, for your class schedule. Mrs. Smith will have them available by the end of August. 41

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

Grammar and Style Guide

CPA — All caps, no periods CPA Elementary School CPA High School CPA Middle School CPA Preschool — Capitalize formal name; lowercase on second ref: the preschool. Correct usage for preschool curricula: AskMeWhoOo, WEE Learn, Zoo-phonics. cross-country — (n., v., adj.) dates — Always use Arabic figures, without st, nd, rd, or th. Set off day and year with commas. In consideration of your readers, it is important to include publication dates on all your printed and electronic materials: He was born May 25, 1950, in Wichita. When including a day of the week with the date, set off the date with commas: The reception will be Wednesday, Sept. 10, at 5 p.m. For multiple years, use: 2013-14. ’13-’14 is also acceptable. Do not set off date without year with comma: The exhibit will open Feb. 15 at the Fine Arts Gallery. There is no comma when it is just the month and year: May 2013 When writing a span of dates, do not combine a preposition with a hyphen. Wrong: Spring break will be from March 7-14. Right: Spring break will be March 7-14. Right: Spring break will be from March 7 through March 14. For more formal uses, do not abbreviate months. See also months and days. days — Generally days of the week should not be abbreviated. When writing a day and date, set off with commas. Example: The reception will be held Monday, Jan.19, in Fellowship Hall. Do not set off days or dates with commas when they stand alone. Example: The reception will be held Jan.19 at the Fine Arts Gallery. For publication on a Web site, include the date, not just the day, so that the information remains timely and clear. For example, if you write John Smith visited on Tuesday, that statement will be outdated and confusing within a week. Instead, write John Smith visited on Tuesday, Oct. 26. decades — When abbreviating, precede with an apostrophe, not a single quotation mark. Do not use an apostrophe between numbers and “s.” Example: Every year the eighth graders celebrate ’40s Day. Eighth-grade parents always enjoy coming to ’40s Day. Wrong: not 20’s or 1920’s Right: ’20s, ’60s, 1960s the Den — An appropriate reference for the athletic stadium, capitalize, but lowercase “the” except to begin a sentence. “The Den hosted a game...”

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

42


Grammar and Style Guide

department — Capitalize only when using the full, formal name of department. Example: the Department of History — the history department; the Department of English — the English department; the French and English departments; the Departments of French and English. disabled, disability — Preferred terms, rather than handicapped. Use “people first language” that describes what a person has, not who the person is. For example, rather than writing “she is autistic,” instead write “she has autism.” Avoid: victim of, suffers with, afflicted by, wheelchair-bound, etc. Instead use: people with disabilities, people without disabilities, she has autism, he has a physical disability, person with a brain injury, people with mental illness, accessible seating, accessible parking, or the disabled community. Use separate instead of special in such phrases as separate bathroom, separate bus.

E-F e.g., i.e. — The abbreviation e.g. means for example (exempli gratia) and introduces an illustrative instance or a short list of names or other items. The abbreviation i.e. means that is (id est) and introduces a repetition in different words of the ideas just discussed, or an amplification that would be appropriate after an ordinary that is. The two expressions are always set off by commas.

etc., et al. — In strict usage, et cetera (and the rest) is neuter and can refer only to things, and et alia (and others) can refer only to persons. Do not end a list of persons with etc.; instead, use and others. Using etc. at the end of a list introduced by for example, such as, or a similar expression is also incorrect. (Note: A comma is required after etc. unless it ends the sentence. Also note that et does not require a period but al. does; et is a word, al. is an abbreviation.) Event Center — Formerly the E/MS Gym. Located on the lower level of the Elementary School building. exclamation point — Use sparingly. Never use in a news release. expose students to... — When possible, choose another word/phrase such as familiarize students with, introduce students to, or provide opportunities for students to learn about. Facebook — Social-media site. The Academy encourages our community to “Like” our official CPA page by searching “Christ Presbyterian Academy” at facebook.com. ’40s Day — Use a close apostrophe before 40 and no apostrophe before the s. Not: Forties Day, or 40’s Day.

elementary reception desk — This is the correct name for the elementary reception area. It should not be referred to as the “bird house.”

fall break, fall semester — Lowercase. See also seasons.

elementary school — Only capitalize when paired with the school name. See High School language. Examples: CPA Elementary School puts on Grandparents and Special Friends’ Day each year. The elementary school wears uniforms. The uniforms are worn by elementary school students. (ES)

farther/further — Farther refers to physical difference: He walked farther into the woods. Further refers to an extension of time or degree: They decided to research the issue further before making a decision.

ellipsis — Three dots (periods) used to indicate a pause or to indicate word(s), sentence(s), or paragraph(s) omitted from quoted material. Ellipses should be preceded and followed by a space: I ... have trouble ... collecting my thoughts. If the words preceding an ellipsis constitute a grammatically complete sentence, a period should precede the ellipsis: I had a very good time. ... But I wouldn’t want to go back. email — (n. and v.) Lowercase. Don’t set off email addresses with a colon. In running text, italicize or bold email addresses to help distinguish them from the surrounding text. Example: For more information, e-mail joe.schmo@cpalions.com. emeritus, emerita — Note that emeritus is the singular, masculine form; for references to women, use emerita (singular) or emeritae (plural). Emeriti serves as the plural for a group that is composed of men only or of men and women together. These terms are not synonyms for retired. The titles represent a special status conferred on some faculty members at retirement upon recommendation. When combined with a name, the word is set off by commas and capitalized: Pastor Emeritus, Dr. Charles McGowan. 43

Grammar and Style Guide

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

Fellowship Hall — The official term for the space used as a cafeteria and meeting/event room, typically uppercase. Not: the Fellowship Hall. field house — Two words, typically lowercase. fiscal year — The Academy’s fiscal year runs July 1 through June 30, and carries the numerical designation of the latter year, e.g., July 1, 2005, through June 30, 2006, constitutes FY06. FY acceptable on second reference. fractions — Spell out amounts less than one, using hyphens: two-thirds, four-fifths, etc. Use figures for precise amounts more than one, converting to decimals whenever practical: 1.5 miles, not 1 1/2 miles. freshman — Use this singular form (not plural freshmen) as the adjective. Example: the freshman representative, all the freshman residence halls. full-time, full time — hyphenate as an adjective: She is a full-time employee. Otherwise, two words, no hyphen: He works full time. Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

44


Grammar and Style Guide

Grammar and Style Guide

G-H GPA — No periods and all capitals. It is acceptable on first reference to either use GPA or to spell out grade point average (lowercase without hyphens). grades — Capitalize letters used for course grades (A, B, C, D, F, I) and grade names such as Incomplete and Pass. Do not put quotation marks around grades. Form the plural by adding apostrophe-s. Example: He received three B’s last semester. Headmaster — Always capitalized. Richard Anderson serves as the Headmaster of Christ Presbyterian Academy. Richard Anderson, Headmaster, said… high school — Only capitalize when paired with the school name or used to describe the physical building. Examples: CPA High School participates in Career Day every spring. The high school will dismiss early tomorrow. Several high school students traveled to Mexico for a mission trip this summer. The meeting will be help in the High School building. (HS) He/His (“God pronouns”) — Capitalize pronouns referring to God (He, Him, His You, Your, Thee, Thou, His Holy Name, etc.) except when quoting another source in which they appear lower case. his/her — Current practice recommends that masculine pronouns not be used for generic references to non-gender-specific persons. You can avoid the problem by pluralizing the reference or eliminating the pronoun whenever possible. Instead of writing: A patient should fill his prescription immediately after his appointment, instead write Patients should fill their prescriptions immediately after appointments. hyphens — Use a hyphen to join two or more words serving as a single adjective before a noun, a one-way street, a well-known author; use a hyphen with compound numbers, forty-five, eightyseven; use hyphens to avoid confusion or an awkward combination of letters; re-sign a petition, shell-like; use a hyphen with the prefixes ex-, self-, all-, between a prefix and a capitalized word, and with figures or letters, ex-chairman, self-assured, mid-1980s, anti-American. Examples: middleschool students. Fifth-grade girls. The 10th-grade curriculum. But: Sixth graders (noun).

I-J in-service — Hyphen between the two words without capitalizing the “s” in service. Internet — Always capitalized. irregardless — Should be regardless. The negative is expressed by -less; adding the prefix ir- makes a double negative.

Jr. and Sr., II and III — Abbreviate as Jr. and Sr. with no comma between the name and the Jr./Sr. Example: Cal Turner Jr. founded the program in moral leadership. George Washington III pioneered the foundation for orphans. For alphabetical listings by last name, follow this format: Doe, John, Jr. Likewise, with roman numeral designations: Doe, John, II or Doe, John H., II.

K-L lie, lay — Lay means to put, place, or prepare. Lie means to recline or be situated. In senses involving what people do with their bodies, use the forms lie (present), lay (past), lain (past participle), lying (present participle). For what people do with objects, use lay (present), laid (past), laid (past participle), laying (present participle). Lions — The lion is the official school mascot representing Christ as the “Lion of Judah.” The three lions represent the attributes of knowledge, wisdom, and truth. Also refers to both boys and girls sports teams.

M-N main stage — describes the fall and spring CPA Fine Arts productions. Hyphenate as an adjective: the next main-stage production. middle school — Only capitalize when paired with the school name. Example: The CPA Middle School donated 13,000 books for a library in Belize. The middle school is going on a field trip tomorrow. The art was created by middle school students. (MS) middle school gym — Should be called the elementary / middle school gym because it is used by students from both schools. See also elementary / middle school gym. months — Some months are abbreviated when used in an exact date: Nov. 11, 1918. Months with fewer than six letters in their names are not abbreviated. The following are abbreviated: Jan., Feb., Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov., Dec. The following are not abbreviated except in spacing restraints: March, April, May, June, July. Months are spelled out when used alone or with the year only: January 1993; notice that there is no comma between the month and the year. For more formal text, all months can be spelled out. most important — not: most importantly in uses such as: “Most important, we hope to glorify God.” multi-purpose field — The correct name for the utility field in between the baseball field and the driveway, typically lowercase.

it’s and its — The word “it’s” (with an apostrophe) is used only as an abbreviation for the phrases it is or it has. The word “its” is the possessive form of the pronoun it and is used as a modifier before a noun. It’s a beautiful day outside. The airline canceled its early flight to New York. 45

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

46


Grammar and Style Guide

names — On first reference, use the person’s full first name and last name and title. Generally, do not use a courtesy title (such as Mr. or Ms.), except for doctors and then use Dr. only on first reference. On second reference, use only the last name, without title and without courtesy title. Example: With the recently announced funding, Assistant Professor John Smith will continue his research on next-generation design. Smith is taking a new approach. newspaper and periodical names — Names of newspapers and periodicals are italicized. When a newspaper or magazine is mentioned in running text, an initial the in the publication name is lowercase (unless it begins a sentence) and is not italic. Where location is needed but is not part of the official name, use parentheses. Example: The editor of the Tennessean will participate in the panel discussion. The article about Coach Johnson in the Huntsville (Ala.) Times caught the student’s attention. nonfiction — (n., adj.) The branch of literature comprising works of narrative prose dealing with or offering opinions or conjectures upon facts and reality. nonprofit — (n., adj.) Not: non-profit. not only, but also — Whenever you use the phrase “not only,” it must be accompanied with “but also.” Example: The students not only wrote their own plays, but also performed them for the entire school. numbers — Spell out whole numbers below 10 or at the beginning of a sentence; use figures for 10 and above. For ordinals, spell out first through ninth (example: seventh grade); starting with 10th, use figures (example: 10th grade). Exception: for percentages, dimensions and ages, use figures, even for 1-9. Avoid starting sentences with numbers; if you must, spell the number out. When writing a span of numbers, do not combine a preposition with a hyphen. Right: The classroom could accommodate 15-25 people. Or: The classroom could hold from 15 to 25 people. Incorrect: The classroom could hold from 15-25 people. The choice of how to handle numbers may be determined by the nature of the publication in question, its audience, formality, longevity, etc. Spelling out numbers is the more formal choice.

O-P

PDF — Abbreviation for portable document format. Use all uppercase unless appended to a file name to designate type of file extension. Example: His assistant emailed a PDF of the schedule. The filename is schedule.pdf. percent — Spell out the word percent; do not use the symbol (%). Use figures with percentages: 9 percent, 0.6 percent. Note that in some cases, such as in tables or scientific and statistical copy, the % symbol may be appropriate. p.m., a.m. — Lowercase, with periods. Use figures to designate time using a.m. and p.m. For noon and midnight, use the words noon and midnight without the figure 12. Avoid redundancy: not 10 a.m. this morning. Example: The lecture begins at 11 a.m., followed by a reception at 1 p.m. The committee meets at noon. Exceptions may be made upon approval for documents with limited space. postgame postseason prefixes — Generally, do not use a hyphen when using a prefix with a word starting with a consonant. Except for cooperate and coordinate, use a hyphen if the prefix ends in a vowel and the word that follows begins with the same vowel. Do use a hyphen before capitalized words or numerals or in awkward constructions that might be misleading or difficult to read such as non-nuclear. Example: multistory building, nonprofit organization, non-nuclear plant, postdoctoral research, antiwar movement, antebellum, re-establish, pretrial hearing, pre-election debate, pre-Columbian, pre-1914. See also hyphens. preseason — no hyphen preschool— see CPA Preschool program — In general, uppercase formal names of programs, but do not capitalize the word program. Programs have directors, not chairs. When referring to the program as a major or minor, do not capitalize (except for proper nouns).

offseason — no hyphen.

Q-R

over/more than — Use over to describe spatial relationships: The airplane flew over the mountains. Use more than with figures: The cost was more than $300.

quarterfinal(s) — a contest in the round of eight remaining competitors. Don not hyphenate.

parentheses — Place a period outside a closing parenthesis if the material inside is not a sentence: I will leave at noon (if I finish this punctuation guide). Place the period inside the closing parenthesis if the material inside is a complete sentence: (This is an independent parenthetical sentence, and therefore the period comes before the closing parenthesis.) part-time, part time — Hyphenate as an adjective: She is a part-time employee. Otherwise, two words, no hyphen: He works part time. 47

Grammar and Style Guide

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

re-enrollment—hyphenated. room — Capitalize before a room number, but do not capitalize specific room names such as chapel, cafeteria, dance. Example: The class is in Room 242. Auditions will be held in the dance room. RSVP — Use uppercase letters without period for this abbreviation of the French phrase repondez s’il vous plait ( = respond if you please, please reply). Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

48


Grammar and Style Guide

S-T schools — Capitalize the full names of schools and colleges. References to “the school” are lowercase. See also elementary school, middle school, high school, preschool. seasons — Do not capitalize winter, spring, summer or fall, unless part of a formal name like Winter Olympics. Do not capitalize seasons as part of an academic period: spring semester, spring break. semifinal(s) — a contest in the round of four remaining competitors. Do not hyphenate. semester — Lowercase: spring semester, fall semester. Soli Deo Gloria — The school’s motto, translates from Latin “To God Alone be the Glory.” Always capitalize and italicize; the Latin phrase does not need quotation marks. spacing — Periods and colons should be followed by one space only. states — Spell out the names of states when they stand alone in a sentence. Example: More visually impaired students in Tennessee are receiving special education services this year. When using a city and state in a sentence, set off the state with commas. Example: Jane Smith, a native of Cleveland, Ohio, arrived yesterday. Abbreviate the following when they are used with a city: Ala., Ariz., Ark., Calif., Colo., Conn., Del., Fla., Ga., Ill., Ind., Kan., Ky., La., Md., Mass., Mich., Minn., Miss., Mo., Mont., Neb., Nev., N.H., N.J., N.M., N.Y., N.C., N.D., Okla., Ore., Pa., R.I., S.C., S.D., Tenn., Vt., Wash., W. Va., Wis., Wyo. The states Texas, Hawaii, Ohio, Idaho, Alaska, Iowa are never abbreviated. Do not use postal abbreviations unless giving a mailing address. It is preferable to spell out state names when they stand alone and in more formal writing.

time — Use figures: 11 a.m., 3:30 p.m., except for noon and midnight. For noon and midnight, use the words noon and midnight without the figure 12. Omit the :00 following the hour (not 11:00 a.m.). Do not use o’clock. When using a span of time, use a hyphen if not using prepositions. If using “from” use “to” instead of a hyphen. Wrong: The grand opening begins at 5 o’clock. The open house is from 5-7 p.m. Right: The open house is from 5 to 7 p.m. A reception honoring the artist will be held from 3 to 4:30 p.m. The meeting will be Thursday, April 13, 3-4 p.m. titles of works — Italicize the names of books, newspapers, magazines, record albums, movies, plays, periodicals, works of art, and operas. Examples: Bye Bye Birdie, War and Peace, Thriller, Les Miserables. Use quotation marks (“”) for TV shows, articles, poems, songs, photos, and essays. Examples: “The Brady Bunch”, “Midnight Train To Georgia”. Twitter — Social-media site, The Academy encourages our community to “follow” us and receive our “tweets” by visiting @cpalions at twitter.com.

U-Z unique — Don’t use qualifiers (more, most, less) with unique. Unique means without equal or the only one of its kind.

street — Use abbreviation only with numbered address: 110 Webster St. See also addresses.

upperclass student — Refers to CPA students in 11th and 12th grades. Use instead of upperclassman.

Summer Scholars — an enrichment program for qualifying middle-school students.

website — one word.

T-shirt — not t-shirt or tshirt.

Westminster Shorter Catechism — spell out, italicize and capitalize each word on first reference. Second reference, “the shorter catechism” is acceptable.

teams — Do not capitalize the team names. Example: The CPA varsity girls’ basketball team will play tonight. Always place the apostrophe AFTER the “s.” Also, “boys” refers to male sports teams, and “girls” refers to female teams. Do not say “men’s” or “women’s.” theater, theatre — Use theatre in reference to CPA theatre productions, as this is CPA Fine Arts’ preferred spelling. For general purposes, use theater. In proper names of programs and buildings, maintain the spelling used by that entity. Example: Tennessee Repertory Theatre sometimes performs in TPAC’s Polk Theater. there, their, and they’re — The word “there” can be used to point out a place, stage, moment or point, introduce a clause or sentence, and indicate an unspecified person in direct address. 49

The word “their” is the possessive form of the word they. The word “they’re” is a contraction that shortens the phrase they are. Examples: Do not sit over there. Stop there before you make any more mistakes. There are numerous items on the agenda. He congratulated their accomplishments. They’re ready for the meeting at noon.

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

who, whom — Use who when it functions as the subject or as a predicate after some form of the verb to be (to whom it may concern). Use whom as an object of a verb or preposition or as the subject of a complementary infinitive (the woman whom I took to be your sister). When you are unsure about which to use, try substituting a personal pronoun (he/she or her/him) in the sentence. If he or she is correct, use who; if him or her is correct, use whom. Use who and whom when referring to persons. Use that and which when referring to animals and inanimate objects. ZIP code — Use all caps for ZIP, because it is an acronym for Zoning Improvement Plan; code should be lowercase.

Christ Presbyterian Academy Graphic Standards and Style Guide

50


Christ Presbyterian Academy

2323-A Old Hickory Blvd. | Nashville, TN 37215 | tel 615-373-9550 | fax 615-370-0884 | cpalions.org

CPA Graphic Standards & Style Guide  

CPA Graphic Standards and Style Guide, 2012-13

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you