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T.W. Paterson’s Chronicles: There really is gold in them there Island hills

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Wednesday, September 4, 2013

Death of teen on trail shocks friends and family SARAH SIMPSON CITIZEN

Beach-goers at Cowichan Lake’s Marble Bay check out a float plane that was towed to shore after it flipped on the lake on Sunday afternoon. For more photos from the incident scan this page with the Layar app on your smart phone or go to www.cowichanvalleycitizen.com [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN]

Float plane hits boat wake, flips KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

Boaters and beach-goers rallied to help a Duncan pilot after his float plane flipped over on Cowichan Lake Sunday afternoon. John Howroyd, 68, and his 44year-old daughter suffered cuts and bruises in the incident at Marble Bay, but weren’t seriously injured. They expressed sincere gratitude to the people that came to their assistance. “The big story isn’t about us,”

said Howroyd. “It’s about all the people that pitched in so much. It shows the wonderful people that we have in this country.” Howroyd was just taking off in the plane when the incident occurred. “I was operating the aircraft in a normal way,” he said. “It hit a huge boat wake, and the aircraft responded, unfortunately.” Howroyd was able to free himself immediately, but his daughter couldn’t get out because of

the seatbelt assembly. A retired Vancouver police officer was able to help her get out before the air in the upside-down cockpit ran out. The plane incurred some minor damage, including a shattered windshield, but Howroyd downplayed the seriousness of the occurrence. “We had an incident out there that people have with boats,” he said. “It just happens to have wings on it.”

A celebration of Kaitlin Brooke Heidelbach’s life will be held at Queen Margaret’s School at 1 p.m. on Friday. Ladysmith Search and Rescue found the 16-year-old’s body in the Twin Falls trail area near Ladysmith on Aug. 30. About 6:30 p.m. on Thursday night, Heidelbach had texted her father saying she was going for a walk and would be home in a couple of hours, police said. She never returned. The teen was familiar with the trail system and it was out of character for the girl to be out of touch. Just before 1 a.m., search and rescue teams were sent out to help RCMP look for Heidelbach. At first light the RCMP’s helicopter joined the search. Heidelbach’s body was found about 9:30 a.m. She had fallen down an embankment. The loss has stunned her family, who described the girl as “the love of our lives”. “Highly motivated, energetic, driven, a natural leader and independent she was destined to succeed,” said her obituary. “Kaitlin excelled at everything whether it was games, sports or school — she wanted to be the best at everything she did.”

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Kaitlin Heidelbach [RCMP HANDOUT] Heidelbach was to start the year in Grade 11 at Queen Margaret’s School as House Captain and Sports Captain. After spreading the word online that she was missing, a work friend of the teen later took to Facebook to mourn her loss. “I can’t believe that one of my friends, the same age as me with the same job just lost her life. So young, she was going to be a Doctor too…,” said Taylor Rand, her See Teen aimed • page 5

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Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, September 4, 2013

Victoria Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oďŹ&#x192;cial: residents man dies at ďŹ le contaminated Cowichan soil dumping appeal Lake after swim SARAH SIMPSON CITIZEN

SARAH SIMPSON CITIZEN

A 50-year-old Victoria man was pronounced dead en route to the hospital after a late night swim in Cowichan Lake. About 3 a.m. on Sept. 2, Lake Cowichan RCMP and paramedics were called to the boat launch area of Heather Campground to assist a man who was in medical distress. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The male was seen to be swimming then collapsed in shallow water,â&#x20AC;? said a press release issued by Cpl. Warren Potter. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He was brought to shore where witnesses performed CPR until paramedics arrived.â&#x20AC;? He did not survive. The manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name is being withheld pending the notification of next of kin. Foul play is not suspected in this case.

Shawnigan Residents Association members arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t taking the granting of a permit to dump contaminated soil at a proposed remediation facility in their watershed lying down. As promised, on Monday, Aug. 26, the SRA filed an appeal of the permit issued to South Island Aggregates by the Ministry of Environment. Fearing the worst, the residentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; group retained the services of Sean Hern and Robert Anderson QC of Farris LLP prior to the permit being issued. It meant the appeal could be filed without delay. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We expect this to be a tough fight given governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s support of this project, but on our side we have the overwhelming support of a community opposed to this facility,â&#x20AC;? said SRA director Calvin Cook. But at least one level of government is on the side of the residents. The SRA is not alone in their appeal, as the Cowichan Val-

ley Regional District has also retained counsel. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The residents of Shawnigan Lake have clearly indicated extensive concern for the security of the Shawnigan public water supply and the lack of support for taking additional risks. The ministry has made the wrong decision and the CVRD will be appealing directly to the Environmental Appeal Board,â&#x20AC;? Shawnigan Lake area director Bruce Fraser said. Together the CVRD and SRA will argue that the risk of the landfill failing to contain the contaminants and thereby poisoning the watershed and lake is too high. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our concern is that this highrisk decision was not made with the interests of our community in mind, and that inevitably there will be leakage into our drinking water, the health and economic impact of which will be devastating,â&#x20AC;? Cook said. The next step for both groups is to apply for a stay that would see SIA unable to move forward until the appeals are heard.

A NEW YEAR IN A NEW SCHOOL

Students in Mme Harrisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s class discuss their new surroundings on Ă&#x2030;cole Mt. Prevostâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first day as an elementary school as the new year began on Tuesday. School District 79 is experiencing a plethora of changes for the 2013/14 school year. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN]

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News

Wednesday, September 4, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Nanaimo-Cowichan MP Jean Crowder, Catherine Pinhas Mulcair, and Tom Mulcair receive gifts fresh from the garden. For more photos from Mulcair’s visit to Cowichan scan this page with the Layar app on your smart phone or go to www.cowichanvalleycitizen.com [SARAH SIMPSON/CITIZEN]

Federal NDP leader gets down to grass roots SARAH SIMPSON CITIZEN

Federal NDP Leader Tom Mulcair sipped on green tea while he and his wife Catherine toured Kinsmen Neighbourhood Park on Friday morning on their way through town to Victoria. The park now features a greenhouse, row upon row of gardens, a volleyball court and more recently, it’s the home of Cowichan Green Community’s Youth Urban Farm. “It’s so smart. The idea of a park is to have something for kids to do and then you realize, well, we need to do a little bit more and this is it. It’s amazing,” Mulcair said. Flanked by Nanaimo-Cowichan MP Jean Crowder and Cowichan Green Community’s Judy Stafford, the Mulcairs marvelled at how well everything was growing in the fledgling urban farm. The downpour the previous night at least made everything look its best. But the park was not always the pride of Alderlea Street and beyond. At one time it featured a wading pool and was central to the community but over the years as the community expanded the park lost its lustre and the park became a gathering place for ne’er-do-wells. Stafford explained a 2006/7 task force set to work to change the focus of the park and breathe new life into the space. The gardens were one of the recommendations. With the help of the CGC and members from all corners of the community, the project took off and hasn’t looked back. “There’s been, I don’t know, hundreds and hundreds of people that have either volunteered or

“My friend and colleague Jean Crowder has been doing an amazing job here. We’ve met the people who have put this park together. We understand they’ve been having challenges getting the federal funds. It’s incredible that something that’s producing such a great result should have so much trouble getting their money. Jean and I will work very hard this fall to try to make sure that the funding’s there.” TOM MULCAIR, NDP leader

donated and the enthusiasm and the community benefit that happens along with the skills training is just amazing,” Stafford said. Ideas and plans keep snowballing so there’s no end in sight, she added. The project has been backed by some federal dollars, particularly through the Skills Link program, but that could be drying up. “Our vision always has been to create a lot more growing space here, so with federal money,” Stafford said glancing with a grin at Mulcair, “the intention was to create this project not only to give skills to the youth that participate but also have a community engagement piece.” Stafford said the next pot of federal funds the Cowichan Green Community has applied for is directed at drug prevention — to help catch kids before they get interest-

ed in illicit drug activities. “We have submitted a proposal to Health Canada’s Drug Strategy Community Initiative’s Fund to set up a F.O.O.D Rebels: Farming over Drugs program that will provide dollars to increase the capacity of staffing at the farm so there is a place for kids to come in their ‘out of school’ time where they can learn about growing food, preparing food, and where they can share the food they have helped to grow and cook with their families,” she said. “We think this kind of programming will help to support some of our youth who are struggling — we want to create a safe place for them to come and hang out. ” Mulcair said he and Crowder would work to help keep the funds flowing, saying he’s an “incredibly strong supporter” of Cowichan Green Community’s work. “My friend and colleague Jean Crowder has been doing an amazing job here. We’ve met the people who have put this park together. We understand they’ve been having challenges getting the federal funds. It’s incredible that something that’s producing such a great result should have so much trouble getting their money. Jean and I will work very hard this fall to try to make sure that the funding’s there.” Crowder said it’s a great example of solid community leadership. “People are so passionate about our community,” she said. “We’ve got the City of Duncan, we’ve got the CVRD, we’ve got North Cowichan and we’ve got people like the Cowichan Green Community who are passionate, caring and committed and they just draw people in. It’s an amazing example of what can happen in a community.”

Clark Ablard, Kendall Lawson, Jean Crowder, Catherine Pinhas Mulcair, Tom Mulcair and Judy Stafford in front of a sign welcoming the federal NDP leader. [SARAH SIMPSON/CITIZEN]

Get rid of senate: Mulcair SARAH SIMPSON CITIZEN

Cowichan Green Community’s Kin Park youth urban farm and community garden is a practical example of where Senate money could be better spent, according to federal NDP Leader Tom Mulcair. “When you see this park, this small amount of money that’s been doing miraculous work with young people who are in need of a first break for a first job, you don’t need to be convinced that the $100 million that we’re spending on the Senate could be put to better use,” the politician told media during a short visit to the Duncan park on Friday morning. “I’d love to bring some of those senators here and ask them to give up their salary to help the kids who could be working here.” The NDP is pushing hard to eliminate the Senate — a body Mulcair said is a “pure waste”. “It’s a relic from the past, it has no business in our democracy,” he said.

The NDP hopes to make it vanish within two years. “For the next election we’re going to be seeking a mandate to clearly deal with it and the good part is the Supreme Court is hearing a reference case this fall in November that’ll give us the how,” he said. “The problem is something that the NDP has talked about for over 50 years — that in a democracy you don’t make unelected people make laws for the rest of us.” The silver lining to the financial scandals surrounding senators Pamela Wallin, Mike Duffy, Patrick Brazeau, and the recently retired Mac Harb, is that Canadians are standing up and taking notice of the need to put an end to the antiquated government body, he added. “One of them was kind enough to retire so one down, 99 to go. It’s just a place to put your old friends and it costs almost $100 million bucks a year. It’s unelected, it’s unaccountable and it’s under indictment.”


News

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, September 4, 2013

5

Teen aimed to be a doctor From page 1 coworker at Walmart. A volunteer at Cowichan Hospital and St. John Ambulance in Duncan, Heidelbach had goals of making a difference in the world. “Ever since Kaitlin was five years old, she said she wanted to be a doctor and never once wavered from this goal. Her plans were that after she completed medical school she wanted to spend the first two years of her career working with Doctors

Cowichan Lake Salmonid Enhancement Society president Bob Crandall speaks with North Island MP John Duncan following the funding announcement. For more photos from the event, scan this page with the Layar app or go to www.cowichanvalleycitizen.com [SARAH SIMPSON/CITIZEN]

Funding announced for fisheries restoration SARAH SIMPSON CITIZEN

CVRD parks committee chair Mel Dorey and Cowichan Lake Salmonid Enhancement Society president Bob Crandall have let it be known just how important federal dollars are to local fisheries restoration projects. The duo was part of a group gathered at the Cowichan Estuary Nature Centre Friday afternoon to hear North Island MP John Duncan announce that six Cowichan-based fisheries projects were selected to receive upwards of $203,000 thanks to the federal government’s new Recreational Fisheries Conservation Partnership Program. The first round of funding will see $1.9 million allotted to 28 projects in B.C. alone over the first two-year phase of the $10 million nationwide program. “This funding sends a message to other partner groups for each project that we can count on the federal government being part of it,” Crandall said. “The fact that you are on board sends a clear and strong message to some other groups that were sitting on the fence and who now may step forward and jump in.” Dorey said the federal money coming forward helps to draw other money from other places, including local government. “If you hadn’t put up the money and if you hadn’t come here, the money from the regional district might not have gone to those projects. It does stir the pot and it gets people cooperating and it does form a lot of good partnerships,” Dorey said.

Local projects receiving money include: • Restoration of the Oliver Creek Fish Passage and habitat restoration around Youbou Road (Pacific Salmon Foundation) • Beaver Lake dam maintenance (Cowichan Lake Salmonid Enhancement Society) • Restoration and enhancement of critical fish habitat in Cowichan Region creeks (Cowichan Land Trust) • A floating island and bubble aerator rehabilitation for the Quamichan Lake recreational fishery project (Quamichan Watershed Stewardship Society) • Redevelopment of the Sandy Pool boat launch and fisheries restoration on the Cowichan River (BC Wildlife Federation) • The Salish Sea near-shore marine recreational fisheries project (SeaChange Marine Conservation Society). Representatives from each project were on hand for Duncan’s announcement. “This new program will see that the Government of Canada partners with local groups to implement a variety of projects to restore, rebuild and rehabilitate recreational fisheries habitat,” he said. “That’s how we get the most for our dollar, the most for our resources. “We all know there are limited resources,” Duncan added. “I think the feeling was we were putting a lot of resources into some things that didn’t matter too much and missing the big picture.” He hopes that this program will help turn that trend around.

Andrea Rondeau, Citizen

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Locals join board of Economic Alliance Early this summer, two Cowichan Valley residents were elected to the board of the Vancouver Island Economic Alliance. Lisa De Leeuw, manager of a Coast Capital Savings branch in Nanaimo and active member of the Ladysmith community brings her expertise to the position of director. She is joined by Duncan’s Darrell Paysen. Paysen is with the Vancouver Island Real Estate Board.

Without Borders,” her obituary said. In lieu of flowers, donations in Kaitlin’s name will be accepted at Queen Margaret’s School (660 Brownsey Ave., Duncan, B.C. V9L 1C2). The donations will go towards a scholarship that will be set up for students wishing to pursue an education in medical studies. RCMP Victim Services are available to anyone impacted by this tragedy. This free service can be reached by calling the Ladysmith RCMP detachment at 250-245-2215.

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Wednesday, September 4, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

OUR VIEW

Nuclear power not the clean energy answer s we look for green energy solutions to replace the “dirty” energy sources we rely heavily on now (fossil fuels, coal), we come across arguments on a fairly regular basis for the expansion of nuclear energy. We think all it takes is a cursory look at Japan’s Fukushima nuclear plant to see what a bad idea this is. It would not be hyperbole at this point to call the problems surrounding the plant a nuclear disaster. The plant became a serious environmental and health danger during the earthquake and

A

subsequent tsunami that struck Japan in 2011. The plant was badly damaged and workers scrambled to fix problems as radiation levels rose dangerously. Now, years out from the quake, problems at the plant have yet to be resolved. The latest catastrophe is the ongoing leakage of radioactive water that is spilling into the ocean. Yes, that would be the Pacific Ocean — on the other side of which is Vancouver Island. Remember all that tsunami debris that washed up on our

ABOUT US

OTHER VIEWS

shores? You see how this quickly becomes a concern for more than just Japan. The operator of the nuclear plant says that hundreds of tons of radioactive water have been leaking into the sea daily since the crisis. That amounts to contamination on an almost unimaginable level. Things have come to such a pass that they’re now planning to try to stop the leaks with an untested subterranean “ice wall”. This would be a system of pipes carrying coolant that would freeze the ground, thus stopping the leakage.

Unless we want to be trying something equally sci-fi in the years to come, we really have to ditch any notion that building a nuclear power plant on the West Coast is a viable energy option. All of the available science tells us, after all, that it’s only a matter of time until the Big One hits. But it’s not only the risk of a disaster striking — natural or not. Generating nuclear power creates nuclear waste. There’s no escaping it. That waste is highly dangerous and toxic for lifetimes. Just like any other kind of waste, it has to go somewhere.

Imminent war on Syria by U.S.

Cowichan Valley Citizen is a division of VI Newspaper Group Limited Partnership., 469 Whistler St., Duncan, B.C., V9L 4X5 Phone: 250-748-2666 Fax: 250-748-1552 Publisher Shirley Skolos Editor Andrea Rondeau Customer service manager Dawn Heggie Production supervisor Alice Brownbridge Newsroom 250-748-2666, extension 235 news@cowichanvalleycitizen.com Advertising 250-748-2666, extensions 223, 227, 228, 229, 230 Classified ads 250-748-2666, extensions 221, 222 Copyright information This newspaper’s contents are protected by copyright and may be used only for personal, non-commercial purposes. All other rights are reserved. Commercial use is prohibited. Opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the newspaper. Complaint resolution If speaking to the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about a story we publish, contact the B.C. Press Council, which examines complaints from the public about the conduct of the press in gathering and presenting the news. Send your written concern and documentation within 45 days to: B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C., V9R 2R2. Website: www.bcpresscouncil.org.

Now that’s truly something nobody in their right mind would want in their backyard. The only solution is not to produce it in the first place. In Canada there are currently four working nuclear power plants, located in Ontario and New Brunswick. We hope the safety at these plants has been seriously reviewed since Fukushima displayed the consequences of vulnerability. The conclusion is inescapable. We do not have the expertise or technology to truly make nuclear energy safe at this time. We must look elsewhere for clean energy.

Unions have made workers’ lives better On Monday, Sept. 2, Nanaimo Duncan & District Labour Council, representing nearly 13,000 members, celebrated Labour Day at Transfer Beach in Ladysmith. Labour Day is an opportunity to recognize working people and the contributions they have made in building a better Canada. We celebrate how unions have made life better for all workers by standing up for fairness in the workplace. NDDLC as an affiliate of the Canadian Labour Congress is launching a new campaign — “Together Fairness Works.” This campaign is an opportunity to talk to our union members,

and to the public about the positive contributions unions have made to the lives of workers in Canada. The union advantage has improved the lives of workers by providing fair wages, medical and dental benefits, safer workplaces, fairness, respect, and a decent pension. This is good for our communities too. In B.C. union members earn $5.12 more per hour than non-union workers — that is an extra $100 million each week that goes into local economies. We want to help raise the bar for all workers and ensure a living wage for families. We advocate for safe and affordable housing, childcare and equal pay. Our members appreciate diversity

and respect the many voices that make up our community. Together we can build a bright future, one full of opportunity and hope. Tommy Douglas said it best “Courage, my friends; ’tis not too late to build a better world.” Happy Labour Day! Together Fairness Works! Ellen Oxman President, Nanaimo Duncan & District Labour Council

Send us your letter Write 300 words or less on the topic of your choice and email news@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

I read the news headline “Air war in Kosovo seen as precedent in possible response to Syria chemical attack”. I ask myself on what authority is the U.S. going to destroy the Syrian civilization because of an internal atrocity committed by Syrians against Syrians? Is this not an internal problem to Syria? And if intervention is considered necessary, should it not be a police action or peacekeeping function under the UN? Who authorizes the U.S. to unilaterally conduct a war of shock and awe to destroy this sovereign nation? We now know that the shock and awe war imposed on Iraq was based on lies. When the U.S. government admitted this, it was not held accountable and the war on Iraq continued. Why is the U.S. allowed to deliberately and systematically destroy the entire infrastructure of nations such as Iraq, Libya? The U.S. systematically destroys power stations, bridges, roads, water systems. This creates indescribable hardships on those who survive the assault by air delivered weapons. Soon we will see this repeated in Syria and Egypt. Who is paying for the rebuilding of Iraq, and Libya? Should it be by war reparations levied against the U.S. which destroyed these nations? When are the peoples of the world going to raise this criminality as an issue? When are we the peoples of the world going to force our governments to reign in the unilateralism and exceptionalism of the U.S. empire and subject it to the rule of law? Gerry Masuda Duncan


Opinion

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, September 4, 2013

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Staff pay needs a public airing

The CVRD and the Shawnigan Residents Association are challenging the dumping permit given to SIA. [CITIZEN FILE]

Dirty dirt not a passing issue Hi, everyone. Some people say those of us who are protesting the dump of Victoria’s contaminated soil in our Shawnigan Lake watershed are alarmists and NIMBYs. You know... those who say “Not in my back yard.” I am not protesting something as transient as a legal grow-op in my neighbourhood. I am not protesting a fleeting few weeks of people laying down copious amounts of rubber from their car tires while peeling around on Shawnigan Lake roads. I am not protesting the noise of jet boats on the lake. These are temporary, small irritants that everyone lives with as being part of a community, and they’re worth little of my time and attention. I am protesting the plan to dump hundreds of thousands of tonnes of contaminated waste into our lake’s watershed. This is not transient or fleeting, and this is not temporary. These contaminants will be

in our environment for hundreds, thousands of years. There is no way to protect our environment from this poison, and so I protest. This is worth my time to discuss and deliberate. Please join in the dialogue and debate the decision amongst yourselves. We need you! We are told there will be stringent monitoring practices in place. Good to know, except that once the monitors pick up the failures, it will be too late to save our lake. We are told that engineers and specialists have given the go-ahead, deeming the risk to be small. Easy to say if you don’t live here. This dump could in no way, shape or form be set in the Sooke Lake watershed. I ask for you to join me, to ensure it doesn’t happen in Shawnigan’s, and that it doesn’t happen in any watershed serving as a primary drinking source for thousands of people now, and in the future centuries.

A while back an explanation (letter) was offered as to how Cowichan Valley Regional District remuneration, particularly for senior CVRD staff, has been whip-sawed, ratcheted, and spun upwards with the aid of human resource operatives and utilizing comparisons to other local governments, all chasing our tails — never quite catching up — a fool’s game, and we are now all caught up in it. Union employees play the comparative game as well in negotiations, playing one local government settlement off against another, an everescalating upward benchmark the goal. The history is the history, plain and simple in hindsight for all to see — even if it was all done incamera, or closed sessions, behind locked doors. As stated before, federal, provincial, and private sector wages, remunerations and benefits are all on a different pathway, a completely differ-

ent reality, a reality that is disconnected from the local governments all across the province, or for that matter, Canada as a whole. My point — comparisons and anchoring needs to be linked to the other three relative sectors, at a minimum. No more chasing the tail of the neighbouring local government alone. CVRD management and union rank and file will not want to be compared to others in the federal, provincial and particularly the private sector but that exercise has to happen before meaningful realignment can be targeted. This is a necessary first step, and needs to be both presented and debated in open session at the CVRD board table, and must be fulsome enough to be scrutinized rigorously by the press and public. And commented upon by the public and press. Remember the Dingwall quote: “I am entitled to my entitlements.” Remember the 2008 economic nosedive,

The Cowichan Valley Citizen is a division of VI Newspaper Group Limited Partnership. A copy of our privacy policy is available at www.van.net or by contacting 604-439-2603.

recall the changing meaning to the words Greek tragedy. These sort of real world constraints have not been measured in the local government arenas in any sort of meaningful way, but should have been. But many property taxpayers are subject to these sort of forces and restraints and will continue to face such realities — another disconnect. Expect resistance, formidable resistance, to any wage and benefit restraints, but the public interest is

greater than the individual interests here. Here I could rant, but will not at this time. Expect your politicians to be managed, cajoled, and weaved and bobbed around if possible, expect a Herculean effort to keep the whole remuneration dialogue in closed session, and if anything is shared, that to be modest in content. That will not be adequate to some of us, and definitely not the press and public. We are truly at a crossroads here, closed or open.

Be prepared to be offered a hybrid — the agenda, but not the content. These are my opinions, and are about rational, and effective open process, to fix what is, or perceived to be, broken or skewered — grandstanding aside and not helpful, we need to start somewhere. These broad comparisons to all other sectors are that good place to start as well as with openness and transparency. Loren Duncan Area E director

COUNCIL MEETING DATE CHANGE Please be advised that the Regular Council meeting scheduled for Monday, September 16, 2013 has been cancelled and rescheduled to September 23, 2013. Location: Time: Date:

Council Chambers, City Hall 200 Craig Street, Duncan, BC 7:00 p.m. September 23, 2013 (Monday)

City Council has rescheduled the date to accommodate the 2013 UBCM Convention. If you require further information, please contact Karen Burley, Director of Corporate Services, at 250-746-6126, or karen@duncan.ca

Hometown Store

Watch for our

FLYER in the

Elaine Fitch Shawnigan Lake

THIS FRIDAY We must look unemotionally at E&N Re: the E&N issue: Michael Smith accurately and incisively dis-

7

patches this matter in his Aug. 23 letter while Walt Hatcher’s emotional letter is redolent of steer manure. Pat Mulcahy Saltair

September 6, 2013 2724 Beverly Street, DUNCAN 250-746-7111 (Old Canadian Tire building next to Liquidation World)


8

Wednesday, September 4, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

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Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, September 4, 2013

9

There really is gold in them there hills

R

ecently, while for a distance of six renovating my miles and found “from basement, I two to six colours of found my gold pans. gold in every pan of All five of them. gravel washed”. Their Hadn’t seen them for efforts were curtailed years! by the high water They set me to thinklevel. This, I should ing about my prospectpoint out, was at the CHRONICLES ing days, such as they time of the Cariboo T.W. Paterson were, before I traded gold rush. my gold pan for a typeIt’s known, too, that writer and began to prospect for Cowichan Bay’s notorious Sam stories rather than for the flour Harris went in search of a gold and flake gold one usually finds mine reputedly used by natives in southern Vancouver Island to mould gold bullets in 1862. creeks. The former British Lifeguard, But make no mistake. There’s who has been described as “one gold in most Island streams of Cowichan’s real trailblazers,” and, thanks to recent record made several trips to the Cowiprices, gold mining and prospect- chan Lake country for this puring have enjoyed a resurgence pose but details are lacking. As throughout the province and he died impoverished in Victoria elsewhere. Many of the claims just a few years later, we can being reworked or at least being draw our own conclusion as to reinvestigated have long historhis success. ical roots, particularly those of The fact is, however, “almost Sooke’s historic Leech River and every creek and river on Vancoutributaries. It’s there, according ver Island shows at least one or to government records, that gold two colours to the pan” accordwas first officially discovered on ing to an old government report. the Island in 1864. Those waterways which originLegend tells us otherwise, that ally yielded the greatest treasure it was the Spaniards who, in the were the Leech, Sooke, China late 1700s, first reported finding Creek and (appropriately) Gold gold on the Island’s West Coast. rivers. Other promising sites There’s supposed to be documen- were the Cameron, Nanaimo tation in the Spanish Archives of (site of a government-run prosa single shipment of gold from pectors’ training camp in the the Island during that period. Its Depression), Nitinat, Cowichan value, if further legend can be and Franklin rivers, and China, believed, was three-quarters of a Shaw and Granite creeks, as well million dollars! as the black sands of capes CorThere are other great legends morant and Scott. (speaking as a storyteller) of lost As far as the Leech and its Spanish gold mines, including tributaries were concerned, steps carved into a mountain in wrote mining engineer W.M. the Leechtown area. True or not, Brewer in his 1899 report to the they make great fodder for my minister of mines, “There is no word mill. question but that the origin of There’s at least one recorded this placer gold was local. The reference to exploration for gold river channels cross-cut the belt earlier that predates the Leech of slate and undoubtedly, the River. A single paragraph in the gold was contained in the lenses April 13, 1861 Colonist refers to of quartz as intercalations in the return to Victoria of five the slates. Through erosion and “explorers” from an eight-day decomposition the gold in these expedition during which they lenses of quartz became freed, ascended the Chemainus River and naturally was washed into

the beds of the streams. “Erosion has continued to such an extent that at the present time the level[s] of the river beds are in places several hundred feet lower than the summits of the mountains on each side. There has been such an enormous quantity of material carried away through the erosion process that, at a rough calculation, some $2 million in placer gold [in 1899 value] must have found its way into Leech River alone. “Of course, some $50 or $60,000 were won by the placer miners... This amount is only approximate because no reliable statistics were kept of the results of operations on these rivers.” Although determined efforts have been made to develop “lode” mines in this belt of mineral-bearing slate, the chances of a major strike being made in this manner are considered to be extremely slim. Because of the belt’s irregular structure, and the fact that the gold-containing lenses contain such small values to the ton, “no propositions at all likely to develop into mines of value have been found,” Brewer concluded. Such was his verdict in 1899. Nevertheless, over the past 114 years, the search went on. Although hundreds of smaller placer claim operations have been conducted about the Island (some claims on the Leech River have been worked almost continuously since 1864 if only on a hobby level in modern times), what gold has been recovered has been in isolated pockets — with notable exceptions, such as the fabulously rich Privateer Mine in Zeballos. We could add the Tyee and Lenora Mines on Mount Sicker which were copper mines at the turn of the last century but which produced significant quantities of gold as a happy byproduct. In short, there really is gold in them there hills, podner, and

HONEST JOHN

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ZONING AMENDMENT BYLAW No. 3730 Applicable to Electoral Area E – Cowichan Station/Sahtlam/Glenora As per Section 890(4) of the Local Government Act, the Cowichan Valley Regional District Board of Directors has reviewed the above noted bylaw and found it to be consistent with the policies of the Electoral Area E – Cowichan Station/Sahtlam/Glenora Official Community Plan No. 1490, therefore, the Public Hearing has been waived and the Board has directed that this Public Notice occur in its place.

Facebook page: ‘Cowichan Valley Citizen’

NOTICE is hereby given that the CVRD Board of Directors will consider reading a third time and adopting the above noted Amendment Bylaw at the regular Board meeting of September 11, 2013.

Twitter: @Cowichan Citizen

Zoning Amendment Bylaw No. 3730 proposes to amend CVRD Electoral Area E Zoning Bylaw No. 1840, by adding “Health and Wellness Studio” to the list of permitted uses in the Light Industrial (I-1) Zone, and by adding the following definition: “Health and Wellness Studio” means a facility where persons may undertake health-related and wellness-related activities either with or without instruction or coaching, which may include accessory treatment of health conditions or injuries, and accessory offices. The purpose of Zoning Amendment Bylaw No. 3730 is to allow “health and wellness studio” as a permitted use in the I-1 zone.

Bob Carfra

Barristers

• ICBC CLAIMS

Solicitors

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Notaries Public

• Over 36 years experience • 1st office visit is free

Mediation Services

151 Fourth Street Duncan, BC V9L 5J8

www.jsg.bc.ca

www.twpaterson.com

NOTICE OF INTENT TO AMEND ZONING BYLAW

JOHNS SOUTHWARD GLAZIER WALTON MARGETTS

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Free Miner’s License (it’ll cost you $50), confirm that you’re not claim jumping and don’t trespass on private property.

Call 250-746-8779 Toll Free 888-442-4042

A copy of the Amendment Bylaw and relevant support material may be inspected at the Regional District Planning and Development Department office, 175 Ingram Street, Duncan, B.C., from Friday, August 30, 2013, to Wednesday, September 11, 2013, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Monday, September 2nd being the Labour Day holiday. A copy of the bylaw and supporting material may also be viewed on the CVRD website at the following address: http://www.cvrd.bc.ca/index. aspx?NID=1282. For further information, please call Rob Conway, Manager, Development Services Division, at 250-746-2620 or toll free at 1-800-665-3955.


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Wednesday, September 4, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

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REGISTRATION

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, September 4, 2013

Queen of Angels Catholic School Accepting Registrations For Preschool to Grade 9

Piano Voce Music Studio PIANO

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Offering Exceptional Education To All Students Inclusive Classrooms Where Faith and Knowledge Meet An Affordable Investment In Your Child’s Future Where Children Love to Learn and Learn to Love For more information please contact the school office at (250) 746-5919 www.queenofangels.ca

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For more information and to register contact Susan Doughty,ARCT,AVCM Doughty, ARCT, AVCM

250-746-2326 www.pianovocemusicstudio.com

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REGISTRATION • Wednesday Sept 11, 2013 COWICHAN AQUATIC • Thursday Sept 12, 2013 CENTRE • 5:00pm - 7:00pm

Give your child the music lesson advantage

Contact info:

Bursaries Available

colleen@duncanstingrays.com or learntoswim@duncanstingrays.com 250-710-3278

to find your new Music Teacher visit:

www.cowichanmusicteachers.com DUNCAN

BASKETBALL

REGISTRATION Wednesday September 11th 6 pm - 8 pm ISLAND SAVINGS CENTRE MULTI PURPOSE HALL

ASSOCIATION

• BOYS & GIRLS Grades 2-11 Season runs from the end of September to mid March Cost: $130 • Learn team & individual play • Build confidence • Develop skills • Exercise & Fitness • No uniform deposit or fundraising Beginner & advanced players are welcome Questions? Contact the Registrar

Sharan Doman 250-715-8454 email: sdoman@telus.net

www.duncanbasketball.net

• Prepare for the Road Ahead • ICBC Approved Program • Easy Payment Options

Upcoming Classes in Duncan Mon. & Wed. Evenings Double Weekend Classes – 6 to 8:45 pm - 9 am - 3 pm Sept. 9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25, 30 • Oct. 2, Sept. 21, 22, 28, 29 • OCT. 19, 21, 23, 28, 30 • Nov. 4, 6, 11, 13, 18, 20, 20, 26, 27 • Nov. 23, 24, 30 25, 27 • Dec. 2, 4, 9, 11 • Dec. 1 Driver Evaluations, Road Test and Senior Refresher Packages Available

DUNCAN - Call 250-597-1138

WWW.YD.COM

Jjohnson@youngdrivers.com

11


12

REGISTRATION

Wednesday, September 4, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

ELSA Classes - September 2013 English Language Services for Adults Morning and Evening Classes start September 3 Learn more at our OPEN HOUSE Tuesday, September 17 2-4pm To Register and For More Information: 250-748-3112 or demy@cis-iwc.org

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ALL UNDER 1 ROOF! REGISTRATION WEDNESDAYS 1:00 - 6:00

www.adagestudio.com

Register now for the one or more of our exciting Fall programs Learn to Skate. First Lesson Set starts Sept 13!! Preschool Levels 4 to 5 yrs Fri Sept 13th to Oct 11th • 3:15 to 3:45 pm • 5 Lessons $38 Code: ISC-1475 Fri Sept 13th to Oct 11th • 3:50 to 4:20 pm • 5 Lessons $38 Code: ISC-1476

REGISTER NOW

School Age Levels 6 to 15 yrs Fri Sept 13th to Oct 11th • 3:15 to 3:45 pm • 6 Lessons $45 Code: ISC-1483 Fri Sept 13th to Oct 11th • 3:50 to 4:20 pm • 6 Lessons $45 Code: ISC-1484 Elder College A Ladysmith Waterfront Heritage Experience Instructor: Shirley Blackstaff • Sat 10:30am to 2:00pm Aug 31st 1 session/$10 Code: ISC-1418

PERFORMING ARTS CLASSES

Carve a Half Life-sized Peregrine Falcon Instructor: Ed Raaflaub • Tuesday 12 noon - 4:30pm September 3rd to December 10th 15 sessions/$90 Code: ISC-1419

BALLET, JAZZ, TAP HIP HOP, MODERN MUSICAL THEATRE, ACTING PIANO, GUITAR & VOICE

Come get your Fall 2013 Guide Now! We have exciting programs for all ages!! New this Year!! Kiddie Kapers, Tango, GLEE Club Ukrainian & Russian Cooking, Russian and Ukrainian Languages Drop in Sports!! Check our Guide for more programs

ALL UNDER 1 ROOF! REGISTRATION WEDNESDAYS 1:00 - 6:00

www.adagestudio.com

For more information or to register

250.748.7529

REGISTER NOW Tours & Info available for enrollment at Duncan Christian School Preschool to Grade 12 Contact for a tour:

250-746-3654 LIKE US www.facebook.com/ duncanchristianschool

495 Beech Ave., Duncan

FOLLOW US @duncancschool

www.duncanchristianschool.ca

250-746-3654


REGISTRATION

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, September 4, 2013

BACKPACK SAFETY CAN PREVENT SERIOUS INJURIES Trips and falls on the playground may account for the majority of injuries that send school children to the nurse’s office. But backpacks cause their fair share of injuries as well. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission estimates there are more than 7,300 backpackrelated injuries per year. Children routinely carry more than the recommended weight in school backpacks and, compounding the problem, also carry their bags incorrectly.

The American Academy of Pediatrics and other medical agencies recommend that a child’s backpack should weigh no more than 10 to 20 percent of the child’s body weight. However, this figure should be adjusted based on a child’s fitness level and strength. That means that the average sevenyear-old second grader who weighs between 55 and 60 pounds should be carrying no more than 11 to 12 pounds in his or her backpack. A backpack that is too heavy may cause * red marks on the shoulders or back from the straps * tingling or numbness in the arms and back

* changes in posture when wearing the backpack, and * pain anywhere in the back. To compound these problems, which also may include nerve damage resulting from pressure on nerves in the shoulders, children should lighten their loads and carry backpacks correctly. The following tips are some additional ways youngsters can prevent backpack-related injuries. * Carry only necessary items. Children should only carry what is required for that particular school day in their backpacks. If teachers routinely have students carry home many heavy books, parents

can consult with the teachers to see if there are other options. * Distribute weight evenly. Items in the backpack should be spread out to distribute the weight across the entire back. Heavier items should be at the bottom of the pack. * Use both straps. Using only one strap shifts the backpack weight to one side, causing the back and shoulders to strain. Many orthopedists have reported treating children with back or shoulder pain as the result of carrying backpacks incorrectly.

KERRY PARK SKATING CLUB

Tuesdays: Pre-Can, Canskate & Seniors Wednesdays: Seniors, Jr Academy & Juniors Thursdays: Junior & Seniors Saturdays: Senior, Junior/Jr Academy & Canskate www.kerryparkskatingclub.ca

Registration:

Thurs., Sept. 5th 6:00–8:00 p.m. Kerry Park Arena, Mill Bay, BC

CONTACT: DEB 250-743-5476 REGISTRAR

VIU COWICHAN CAMPUS PROGRAMS ARE STARTING SOON! FALL 2013 Starting September 3, 2013 tUniversity Courses – First and second year, day and evening courses available for credit or audit

 tAdult Basic Education – Full or part-time study

TO ASK HOW YOU CAN APPLY

CALL 250·746·3509

Hospital Unit Coordinator Certificate starts September 16

Animal Care Aide Certificate starts September 21

SPRING 2014 Carpentry 8-months, full-time, starts February 3 Get equivalent of 1st apprenticeship Carpentry in this foundation program

Professional Cook 1 & 2 10-months, full-time, starts February 5 Certificate and apprenticeship training

Administrative Assistant 10-months, full-time, starts February 11 This program is designed to provide students with technical, administrative and human relations skills required in today’s office environments.

Health Care Assistant 6-months, full-time, starts March 17

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Get educated to get to work! www.cc.viu.ca


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REGISTRATION

Wednesday, September 4, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Establishing a positive homework environment for your student Though it might not be something students look forward to, homework is an essential element of the learning process. Homework allows kids to apply the lessons they learned in the classroom while giving educators a chance to determine if students are grasping the concepts discussed in class or if certain lessons need to be revisited. Students often seek their parents’ help when doing their homework, but parents can start helping even before their children bring any assignments home. Creating a homework environment where kids can concentrate and put forth their best effort is a great way

to help them throughout the school year. The following are a few tips for parents who want to ensure that home is as conducive a place as possible for students to do their best on homework assignments. * Find a quiet space with little or no distractions. A quiet place in the home where kids can concentrate is essential when kids are doing homework. While a youngster’s bedroom might have sufficed years ago, today’s children tend to have bedrooms that mimic the showroom floor of an electronics store. If kids have televisions, video game consoles and stereos in their bedrooms,

Martins 33 Station Street Downtown Duncan

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then that’s likely not the best environment for them to do their homework. Kids can too easily grow distracted, so find a quiet area where kids can focus on their studies without being tempted by television, video games or other distractions not conducive to studying. * Designate a time each day when kids do their homework. Another way to make your home more amenable to homework is to designate a time each day when kids will study. Let other members of the household know that this is a quiet time in the house so kids aren’t distracted. Once kids get comfortable in this routine they likely won’t need much prodding to do their homework, and this designated quiet time in the household can be a relaxing time for other members of the household as well. * Have healthy snacks available. Few people do their best work on an empty stomach, so if kids will be doing their homework immediately after school, make sure you have some healthy snacks on hand. Elementary and high school students tend to eat lunch earlier than adults, so they’re liable to be

hungry when they arrive home from school in the mid- to late-afternoon. Have plenty of fresh fruit on hand so kids can satisfy their hunger. Less healthy snacks might satisfy youngster’s hunger pangs, but such snacks may also make kids drowsy, negatively affecting their ability to concentrate and indirectly hindering their schoolwork as a result. * Let kids know their work will be checked nightly. Parents who want to create an environment where their children approach homework seriously should let their kids know their work will be checked each night, and they will need to redo any assignments that were not completed correctly. This prevents kids from rushing through assignments without giving their best efforts. Few youngsters look forward to homework. While parents might not be able to change their kids’ attitudes toward homework, they can change their home to make it as positive an environment for kids to pursue their studies as possible. BS137287

Carlson’s School of Dance “Inspiring Generations of Dancers Since 1955”

Director: Sheila Hilton Johnson

Accepting New Members Boys and Girls aged 7 - 17, by audition

Three Levels: Junior Choir Concert Choir Chorale

Rehearsals: Thursdays Auditions and Registration Thursday, September 5, 3:30 - 5:00 pm in the chapel at Providence Farm For more information please call 250-597-0114

3274 Sherman Road, Duncan 250-746-6456 website: www.carlsons.ca

STILL TIME TO REGISTER • Ballet • Tap • Jazz • Modern • Hip Hop • Musical Theatre • Contemporary • Stretch & Strength • Zumba • Zumbatomics for Kids • 2 Years to Adult NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY

Registered Teachers in:

R.A.D. I.S.T.D. A.I.D.T.


Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, September 4, 2013

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Cowichan Valley Game Schedule Team: Cowichan Valley Capitals www.Brad-Taylor.com 250-732-4556

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250-748-2666 ext. 225 arts@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

Wednesday, September 4, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

A&E

Making a name for herself: Christine Allan paints her way to Italy LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

Christine Allan is soon heading to Italy, one of four artists who will representing Canada at the Chianciano Biennale. [LEXI BAINAS/CITIZEN]

NEW to the Cowichan Valley!

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Chemainus artist Christine Allan is heading to Italy to be part of the prestigious Chianciano Biennale. Allan is one of four chosen to represent Canada. “I am very excited to be part of this international event. I live in a small town, I never dreamed I would be going to Italy with my art,” Allan said. “I joined the Canadian Federation of Artists, the Vancouver chapter and they had this event posted on their website. I applied with some new pieces of art that I had been working on and was quite pleased to get accepted into the show. “The exhibition runs from Sept. 7-14 and I will be there, taking my art with me. There are events all through the week. It’s a great opportunity and from it there’s another chance to go to a show in London because the people that put this on also curated shows in London and other parts of Europe,” she said. It’s been a busy couple of years for the artist. She began showing her work in Chemainus and built from there. Allan said she’s grateful for the support of the Chemainus Theatre Festival gallery, where she works one day a week and which allowed her to submit her art for a show. In June 2012 she was chosen to be part of a billboard exhibit in New York City’s Times Square. Allan was among the 3,500 who got into the exhibition but when you consider that 35,000 people applied to take part, she is justifiably proud of the achievement. Even more, Allan was one of a couple of hundred artists who were chosen to be part of a just-released book entitled Art Takes Times Square. Her experience with the Billboard Exhibit led to group shows in NYC and Rio de Janerio and some of her small works have been part of fundraising events in London and Los Angeles. Recently, Allan received honourable mention from Artist Portfolio Magazine for a piece that will be part of an international traveling show when it hits L.A. and she will be featured in an upcoming issue of the magazine. The busy artist will be part of an exhibit in Toronto this October and is heading to Los Angeles with her art in the spring. Although she now calls Chemainus home, Allan is originally from Winnipeg. She has been creating and learning art in one way or another for most of her life and said she is very thankful for all the support and encouragement she has received over the years from teachers and other artists. “My Grade 2 teacher in a one room school house in Manitoba entered my finger painting in a contest that won me second prize,” she said. Once relocated to B.C., Allan studied archaeology and art history at Simon

Entitled Blue, this is a mixed media painting on canvas. [WWW.CHRISALLANARTGALLERY.COM] Fraser University and took some fine art classes at Emily Carr University. “But I feel my real art education began in Ahousat on the west coast of Vancouver Island.” She lived there for two years with her RCMP husband and their two daughters and got a great opportunity to expand her artistic vision. “My daughter’s art teacher let me come in and sit in the classes and he was teaching me native art. I sold one piece to a friend while I was there and all the people in the community started introducing me as an artist so that’s when I first really felt like one.” Moving around with her Mountie husband has been a challenge, but he’s very supportive and it did allow her the freedom to follow her dream, she said. Allan has overcome other challenges, including cancer, but says her art has helped her through them all. “I think that’s a lot of the reason why I did this. After I recovered from my surgery, I went ahead. I’d always wanted to pursue my art but always made excuses, you know: the kids, not enough time, work. I decided, this is what I’ve always wanted to do. I’m just going to do it. All through my recovery I worked on new pieces. And this is what it’s come to.” To give back, she donates a percentage of proceeds from the sale of her art to environmental causes, animal welfare organizations such as the World Wildlife Foundation, Cops for Cancer and the Sick Kids Foundation. Interested in learning more? Find out about her work and upcoming exhibitions on her website: www.chrisallanartgallery. com


Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, September 4, 2013

Yellow Point, Ladysmith, Chemainus, Crofton, Duncan, Maple Bay, Genoa Bay, Cowichan Bay, Lake Cowichan, Honeymoon Bay, Youbou, Mill Bay, Cobble Hill, Shawnigan Lake, Malahat

Top 5 Culinary Things To Do Celebrate all things food and wine! It’s worth the drive to experience Cowichan culinary destinations.

2

1

Sample award winning wines, ciders, brandies, vodkas and craft beers where they’re made. Many locations have onsite bistros, delis or restaurants too! Photo: Merridale Ciderworks

Dine at a waterfront restaurant and enjoy your favourite libation which was created just a stone’s throw away.

3 Celebrate food at several annual festivals – Spot Prawn Festival, Wine & Culinary Festival, Salmon & Mushroom Festival, two Lavender Festivals and Maple Syrup Festival… just to name a few. Photo: Cowichan Bay Spot Prawn Festival

Did you know...

5

How about some local bread to go with our local wine? Artisan bakeries are found throughout the region and most offer organic and gluten free options. Photo: Merridale Ciderworks Bakery

4

100 Mile Diet? Try 100 metre diet! Whether you like white linen service, rustic farmhouse or urban chic ambiance, Cowichan restaurants cater to every taste. You’ll find fresh, local and seasonal are on the menu. Photo: Amuse Bistro/ Sean Fenzl Photography

• Gourmet sea salt is crafted in Cowichan.

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• Cowichan’s award winning blackberry and sparkling wines can be either sweet or dry and pair well with dessert or savoury dishes. • Teas are blended with Cowichan herbs and aromatics.

15 7 r e b Septem w

an.n h c i w o c . ines

For even more reasons to explore Cowichan visit or call

tourismcowichan.com | 1-888-303-3337 |

Scan the page to watch ‘Once Upon a Day…Cowichan’. An award winning 5 minute glimpse into the beautiful Cowichan region.

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A&E

Wednesday, September 4, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

First Nations funnyman headed to the Cowichan Theatre LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

Hilarious First Nations comic Don Burnstick is coming to the Cowichan Theatre Saturday, Sept. 28. And that means the fun is back. Burnstick manages to turn all life’s wickedly pointy situations into grist for his own hilarious mill, drawing from the crowd the kind of laughter that can only come out when one’s secrets are kindly but firmly exposed to the light of day. It was that way when he was last in the Valley a few years back. The audience’s chuckles, at first half hidden, as if no one really wanted to admit they felt the emotions he was describing, emerged joyfully and then grew into full out belly laughs. Everyone in the audience realized that the joke was on all of

Palm Court adding to repertoire as they work to build audience LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

Don Burnstick, comedian them together. Burnstick’s humour shines a light on the daily struggles, joys, problems and pleasures that go with being of First Nations heritage. This year, he’s calling his trademark show, “One Night Stand in Cowichan Valley” so be ready for it to be a blast. Tickets are $22 each. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. with showtime set for 7:30 p.m. Go online to cowichantheatre. bc.ca or call the Cowichan Ticket Centre at 250-748-PLAY to reserve your tickets now.

YOUNG MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK Rita Frank is 14 and entering Grade 9. She has had two years of band class with band director Joy Ann Bannerman. Her love is the flute but she also sings and plays piano. She looks forward to a wonderful year with music.

COWICHANMUSICTEACHERS.COM

The Palm Court Light Orchestra is taking its listeners on a trip to the sunny south to start is 27th season Sunday, Oct. 20, a season in which they’ll be trying out some new things in a bid to expand their audience. A show entitled Flying Down to Rio, featuring accordion soloist Peter Soave, begins at 2:30 p.m. at the Cowichan Theatre. “The challenge for us is that we’ve always had an old audience, there’s no arguing with that,” explained Palm Court conductor Charles Job. “The symphony has as well. And most art things have had a senior audience. I’ve never really worried about that. But in recent years, of course it’s become more and more difficult to find the new retirees because they don’t identify with this music. “Theatres have changed significantly. There are now nostalgia band guys who cover Neil Young; even Shania Twain is done now. We’ve got huge nostalgia at the moment but unfortunately it’s not nostalgia for our stuff so we have to look around us for new ideas,” he said. So this season, the orchestra is delving into Latin music. The tango, although still considered a sensuous Latin dance today, dates back more than a century and few “palm court” bands were without Latin selections in their repertoire back in the day. And as for bossa nova, paso doble and samba: you all know those from watching So You Think You Can Dance or Dancing with the Stars. Now, enjoy even more of this great music. The show’s title, Flying Down to Rio, comes from the MGM film starring legendary hoofer Fred Astaire. Even thinking about Rio, everyone can visualize Copacabana and Ipanema beaches, Sugar Loaf Mountain, Christ of the Andes and, of course, the colourful costumes and festive music of Carnival.

Carmen Miranda reminds of the history of Latin influence in Palm Court. But, the orchestra also visits Buenos Aires, a steamy place indeed in Palm Court days, along with side trips to Mexico, Venezuela and Puerto Rico, ending up back in New York with selections from West Side Story. With Soave, one of the most accomplished accordionists of his generation, expect a tasty afternoon of music. In December, the orchestra moves in an entirely different direction, presenting a concert tribute to Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops. Music lovers will hear selections by Leroy Anderson, Morton Gould, Richard Rodgers, Henry Mancini and John Williams. The orchestra will also present music by Canadian composers Robert Farnon, Victor Davies and Vancouver composer Michael Conway Baker. Valentine 2014 is a long way off but it’s still time to mark the calendar as the Palm Court welcomes back delightful tenor Sunny Shams with his friend, Mexican soprano Shadan Saul Guerrero. Solos and love duets from opera and operetta including pieces from La Boheme, The Merry Widow and The Student Prince — we told you to make a note on your calendars. Put a big heart beside it. According to Job, the group is simply reflecting what was the pop music of its day. “If there were Palm Cour t Orchestras now, they would be

playing contemporary things. They always did,” he said. This concert is also a bit of departure but the orchestra is adapting to the times. “It’s probably true in a sense that we have to get away from Palm Court these days. It’s hard to attract an audience.” It’s surprising, said Job, what people don’t remember. “Consider our Boston Pops style concert with the music of Leroy Anderson. Once Leroy Anderson was a staple of symphony pops but you just don’t hear him any more. And that’s not that far back. That’s the 1950s. That music is disappearing really quickly now. “In fact, symphony pops are having to bring in circus performers and have them swinging overhead. The audiences have changed and people of the Baby Boomer generation are more likely to respond to the Beatles, that’s the nostalgia stuff for them. Those lookalike acts; the theatres are full of them now.” There are two ways to buy your tickets for the Palm Court. If you purchase their entire series of three concerts, you can get the lot for $84 for adults, $81 for seniors and $33 for students. Single concert tickets will cost you more: $32 for adults and $14 for students. Either way, you can book at the Cowichan Ticket Centre online at cowichantheatre.bc.ca or by phone at 250-748-7529. Find us on Twitter: @CowichanCitizen Facebook: ‘Cowichan Valley Citizen’

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Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, September 4, 2013

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Wednesday, September 4, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

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Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, September 4, 2013

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VALLEY Calendar Miscellaneous • Free genealogy class, South Cowichan library in Mill Bay Centre, Sept. 12, 6-7:30 p.m., Discovering Your English Roots with Carol Stiles, Duncan Family History Centre. • Terry Fox Run, Sunday, Sept. 15, Saywell Park, Lake Cowichan, registration 9 a.m., run 10 a.m. No entry fee, no minimum distance, collect pledges or make personal donation. Pledge forms at Cowichan Lake Recreation, Country Grocer, Honeymoon Bay and Youbou Community Halls. • Terry Fox Run, Sunday, Sept. 15, BC Forest Discovery Centre, Duncan,

registration 9 a.m., race 10 a.m., variety of course lengths, cyclists and dogs on leashes welcome. No entry fee. • Chemainus Legion: Saturday Mystery Night, Legion Lounge, Sept. 21. • Chemainus Legion: back by popular demand Jake’s Gift, live theatre, tickets $20 call 250-246-4532. • Chemainus Legion: Tour de Rock breakfast, meet and greet 7:30 a.m., call 250-246-4532 for advance tickets. Proceeds to Tour de Rock. • Valley Seniors Organization 6th Annual Craft Fair, Nov. 2, 9 a.m,-2 p.m., Seniors Activity Centre, 198 Government St., Duncan. Free mini totem

tour. Eight foot table rental $15. Info: 250-746-4433 or 250-246-4746.

Meetings • Cowichan Valley Arthritis Support Group monthly meeting 1 p.m., Monday, Sept. 9, St. John’s Anglican Church Hall, Duncan. Speaker: Charl Young, occupational therapist for Victoria Arthritis Centre, on issues of arthritis in hands and fingers. • Chemainus Garden Club meeting (previously the Mt. Brenton Garden Club) Tuesday, Sept. 10, 1 p.m., Calvary Baptist Church, 3319 River Rd., Chemainus. Door prize, brag table, $2

drop-in fee. Info: 250-246-1207. •Environmental Stewardship Bible Study — learn more about environmental concerns while building your faith. Led by atmospheric scientist at St. Peter’s Anglican Church. Starts Thursday evening, Sept. 26, open to all. For information or to pre-register free, contact Geoff at 250-710-8011.

Seniors • Chemainus Seniors Drop-in Centre choirs start Sept. 9 and 13. Mens Choir Mondays, 9-10:30 a.m., Sept. 9; Ladies Choir Mondays, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Sept. 9; Mixed Choirs Fridays 10-11:30

a.m., Sept. 13. • Chemainus Seniors Drop-in Centre dance with Happy Hans, Sept. 28, 7 p.m., Lunch included, $9.

Arts • Crofton Art Group Show and Sale, Cowichan Bay Maritime Centre, Aug. 25-Sept. 14, l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. Selection of paintings, hand painted greeting cards, jewelry. • Duncan Choral Society at the Christian Reformed Church starting Sept. 9, 7 p.m. No auditions, all welcome. Info: Everett 597-2531 or www.duncanchoralsociety.wordpress.com


22

250-748-2666 ext. 236 sports@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

Wednesday, September 4, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Braithwaite and co. reach B final at worlds KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

Although he was competing in a different event, Duncan’s Mike Braithwaite finished in the same place at the 2013 Rowing World Championships as he did at the 2012 Olympics. Braithwaite and his partner from the men’s double sculls in London, Kevin Kowalyk, moved over to the men’s quad for the 2013 worlds in Chungju, South Korea, joining forces with David Wakulich and Matt Buie, again finishing in 12th place. The Canadian quad crossed the line sixth in the B final, 12th overall in the event. Italy won the B final to place sixth overall, while Croatia, Germany and Great Britain placed first through third in the A final and overall. The Canadians finished fourth in their heat as they opened the competition on Saturday, Aug. 25, then finished third in the repechage on Aug. 27 and sixth in the semifinal on Aug. 29. The same foursome finished 10th overall at the 2013 World Cup in Lucerne, Switzerland, in July. Canada did not have an entry in the men’s quad at the 2012 Olympics.

KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

Duncan rower Mike Braithwaite. Braithwaite is a product of the Maple Bay Rowing Club and graduate of Cowichan Secondary School. He rowed for the University of Toronto, and was named the 2009 Oarsman of the Year at the Canadian University Rowing Championships. Internationally, Braithwaite won a bronze medal in the single sculls at the 2009 Under-23 World Championships, Canada’s first medal in the single sculls at that event, and another bronze in the same single sculls at the 2010 World University Games.

COWICHAN LAKE RECREATION PROUD TO PRESENT:

YOUBOU LANES 8550 Hemlock St. Youbou BC 250-745-3431 Licensed Facility Mini – Museum and History on site. Bowling league program information: To Register call 250-749-6742 (Please Pay before you Play –program registration must be accompanied by payment) Sunday Night Mixed 10 Pin Sept 8 – Dec 15 7 p.m. Cost is $108

Saturday Family (doubles) 5 pin Oct 5 – Nov 23 11 a.m. Cost is $48 per person

Tuesday Afternoon 5 Pin Sept 17 – Dec 3 3:30 p.m. Cost is $108

Drop-in Bowling Information:

Youth 10 Pin Sept 17 – Dec 3 4:00 p.m. Cost is $84 Tuesday Men’s 10 Pin Nov 5 – Dec 17 7 p.m. Cost is $63 Thursday Ladies 10 Pin Sept 12 – Dec 12 (start-up meeting Sept 5) 7 p.m. Cost is $126

Caps set roster as BCHL showcase approaches

Friday Family Bowling Sept 13 – Dec 27 6:30 – 9:30 p.m. $3.75 adult/game & $2.50 child/game Loonie Night Family Bowling First Friday of each Month 6:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. $1/ game Saturday Adult Bowling Sept 7 – Dec 28 7:30 – 10:30 p.m. $3.75 adult/game Toonie Night Adult Bowling Third Saturday of each Month 7:30 – 10:30 p.m. $2/game

After weeks of evaluation and six exhibition games, the Cowichan Valley Capitals have decided on the group they will move into the B.C. Hockey League regular season with. “We’re good to start,” said head coach and general manager Bob Beatty. “There are a few last-minute details to iron out.” Those last-minute details included a trade on Tuesday that sent forward Jeremy McNeil to the Grande Prairie Storm of the Alberta Junior Hockey League in exchange for defenceman Devin Henes. Henes will join just two returning players — Rylan Bechtel and the injured Jarrett Brown — on the Cowichan blueline. Newcomers include Patrick Arnold, Rylan Ball, Rylan Bechtel, Alex Bilodeau, Reilly O’Connor and Taki Pantziris. Up front, Mitch Ball, Steen Cooper, Dane Gibson, Kyle Horsman and Jesse Neher are back from the 2012/13 Caps, joined by Sam Curleigh, Brayden Gelsinger, Colton Kehler, Mason Malkowich, Myles Powell, Jordan Topping, Armand Uomoleale and Daniel Wanner. Adam Moody remains sidelined with a broken jaw sustained in exhibition play. Backstopping the Caps will be the goaltending tandem of Robin

Reilly O’Connor picks up a loose puck during the Caps’ pre-season finale against the Victoria Grizzlies on Saturday. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN] Gusse and Francis Marotte. Including the injured players, the group includes six 20-yearolds and three players bound for college next fall. Players spent the 2012/13 campaign with teams in five provinces and one U.S. state, ranging from prep and midget programs to the major junior ranks. “This is what we have to start,” said Beatty. “It’s been a long process, a busy two or three weeks. It hasn’t been without a lot of

consideration.” The Caps will start the season on Saturday and Sunday, when they play the Prince George Spruce Kings and Trail Smoke Eaters at the BCHL Showcase in Coquitlam. The team’s home debut is set for Sept. 14 against the Alberni Valley Bulldogs. “Obviously we want to start the season, as everyone else does, on the right foot,” said Beatty. “It’s important for us to get off to the right start.”

Sherwood House

Furnish Bedroo ed One Respite m Suite welcom e!

Independent Retirement Living with Services

Beach Party !!! I

Wednesday, September 4th at 2 pm with Andy McCormick Join us for fun in the sun! Everyone is welcome

Enjoying the Good Life! Living at Sherwood House means enjoying the good life…delicious, chef ƉreƉared meals, a variety of acƟviƟes and ouƟngs with new friends, while services are delivered with a smile from the Ɖrofessional and caring staī͘ We are always having fun at Sherwood House͘ thĂƚ Ăre LJou wĂŝƟŶŐ Ĩor͍͊

:oŝŶ us Ĩor LJour ĐoŵƉůŝŵeŶƚĂrLJ ůuŶĐh Θ ƚour͊ CĂůů ƚodĂLJ ƚo ďooŬ LJour reserǀĂƟoŶ ϮϱϬͲϳϭϱͲϬϭϭϲ 280 Government Street | Duncan, BC V9L 0B5 | 250-715-0116

www.sherwood-house.com


Sports

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, September 4, 2013

23

The Mid Island Lightning run drills in a recent practice at Evans Park. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN]

Lightning ready for their biggest year KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

With the season less than two weeks away, Mid Island Field Lacrosse is looking for a few more players to round out its rosters. The Lightning are planning to field two U16 and two U14 teams, as well as one in the U12 age bracket, and they need a few more players to round out the older groups. “The more we have for U16 especially the better,” said Kelly McLaughlin, president of Mid Island Field Lacrosse. The players who are already signed up are raring to go, having already been out in force at optional practices. “Most of these guys are dedicated players,” said McLaughlin. “They want to play. They’re out here before the season has even started.” Players don’t need any experience. In fact, the Lightning have six new players at the U16 level alone. “They can certainly learn as they go,” said McLaughlin. “We’ve got the coaches

to teach them.” And while the vast majority of players are boys, there is at least one girl playing for Mid Island this season, and more would be welcome. Field lacrosse is different from box lacrosse, McLaughlin noted, in that it is played outdoors on a larger surface, with nine players and a goalie on the field. “It’s great exercise,” she said. “My kid is in the best shape of his life after a season of field.” In addition to players, the Lightning are also looking for additional coaches for their U14 and U16 teams. The season will get underway with exhibition games at the Lightning Strikes Rally Sept. 14 at the Cowichan Sportsplex, which is open to spectators. McLaughlin is eager for the teams to take the field. “We have a lot of talented kids here,” she said. “This is our biggest year. We’ve never had five teams in three divisions before.” Visit www.midislandlacrosse.com for more information.

OPENING GAME

GO TEAM GO!

VS

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2013 7:30 PM

www.kerryparkislanders.ca

The Cowichan Valley’s own Matt Evans carries the ball during Canada’s win over the U.S. in Toronto on Aug. 24. [CAITY MCCULLOCH PHOTO]

Evans helps Canada to 2015 World Cup KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

Thanks in part to players with Cowichan Valley connections, Canada will be back in the Rugby World Cup in 2015. Matt Evans, who grew up in the Valley and played for the Cowichan Rugby Football Club and Shawnigan Lake School, had a pair of starts on the wing as Canada beat the U.S. 27-9 in South Carolina on Aug. 17 and 13-11 in Toronto on Aug. 24 to easily earn a berth in the 2015 tournament.

Aaron Carpenter, who calls Brantford, Ont., home but who has played extensively for Cowichan, served as team captain in both games, starting at No.8. Lindsay, Ontario’s Doug Wooldridge, who came in as a substitute at the end of both games, has also played for the Piggies. Evans and Carpenter were both on the Canadian squad at the 2011 World Cup in New Zealand. Canada has competed in every Rugby World Cup since its inception in 1987.

HOME OPENER

GO CAPS GO!

vs

Saturday, September 7th 6:30pm

WWW.COWICHANVALLEYCAPITALS.COM


24

Wednesday, September 4, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

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September 4, 2013  

The September 4, 2013 edition of the Cowichan Valley Citizen

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