Page 1

T.W. Paterson: 1928 was a boom year in Cowichan Valley logging

LIVING, Page 10

Sports icon and dedicated dad Les Mann mourned by family, friends WEDNESDAY

SPORTS, Page 13

DUNCAN HOSTING CHINESE ACROBATS /8

Serving the Cowichan Valley

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Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Joined on the panel by Seine Road resident Beth Crawford, left, Phil Jennings of the Somenos Marsh Society and biologist Tim Kulchinsky from Cowichan Tribes, North Cowichan Mayor Jon Lefebure says he knows the Somenos diking is controversial and he wants to hear what the public thinks. For video and photos from the forum, scan this page with the Layar app on your smart phone or go to www.cowichanvalleycitizen.com [LEXI BAINAS/CITIZEN]

Hundreds vent over marsh changes DIKES: Flood plain has residents ‘deeply concerned about our homes and the parkland’

Dustin Descoteau died after his truck rolled off the Coquihalla Highway, the BC Coroners Service has confirmed. [SUBMITTED]

Crash claims Chemainus father of four SARAH SIMPSON CITIZEN

LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

From those worried about the loss of marshland and fish habitat, to those angry that their homes are now in a newly created 200-year flood plain, 350 residents gave the Municipality of North Cowichan and other panelists a piece of their minds at a big public forum Sept. 27 about the possible effects of the new diking being placed around Somenos Marsh. The Somenos Marsh Society booked the huge Cowichan Theatre and emcee Tamara Leigh thanked the big crowd who took time on a Friday night to come

out and discuss the subject. North Cowichan Mayor Jon Lefebure, one of eight onstage panelists, told the crowd, “We know we’re involved in a controversial issue. The more opinions, the better. We’re here to listen.” One group demanding to be heard was the residents of nearby Seine Road and Quamichan Park. Beth Crawford, speaking for those homeowners, went straight to the heart of what is worrying them. “We’re deeply concerned about our homes and the parkland,” she said, telling Lefebure and a group of North Cowichan officials who

were also there to answer questions that her group had been formed out of “frustration and fear” at the way they’ve been treated by the municipality. “Due to the diligence of a couple of neighbours in the early part of the summer, the residents of Seine Road and Quamichan Park discovered our homes were under the new 200-year flood level. This change occurred without any notice or any consultation,” she said. Their homes backed onto a park, Somenos Creek and a cornfield in the agricultural land reserve. The cornfield has been “effectively eliminated”, the dikes are

closer and higher and “the privacy and peace we once had” has been affected, Crawford said Of great concern is the future of homes that are now within the newly created 200-year flood plain, Crawford said. “We are in a no-win situation. It’s caused a great deal of anxiety.” Later in the evening, North Cowichan engineering manager Clay Reitsma said that the municipality was in the process of contacting all those residents about their situation. From Lakes Road west North See Dikes ‘strangling’ • page 4

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A celebration of life for Dustin Raymond Descoteau will be held at Maple Grove (3800 Gibbins Rd.) on Oct. 4 at 4 p.m. The 29-year-old Chemainus father of four was killed on Sept. 25 after his pickup truck rolled off the Coquihalla Highway, the BC Coroners Service has confirmed. “Dustin came to the Island on his days off from work in Castlegar to spend time with his family and kids,” said his sister Paula Phillips on Monday. “He had two amazing days with his kids and the rest of his family. He was traveling back See His last day • page 5

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Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Howling winds cut power to thousands

3

CAR SNAPS HYDRO POLE

SARAH SIMPSON CITIZEN

Nearly 5,580 customers in the Cowichan Valley were without power at some point on Sunday and you can thank the first big fall storm for that. Strong winds blew through the region and the result was tree after tree taking out power lines. The largest single outage, Sunday, came when just over 2,400 customers were left in the dark about 7 p.m. That outage was restored by 9:45 p.m. Just over 1,265 customers north of Elford Road, south of Cobble Hill Road, east of Monastery Road and west of Telegraph Road were out from 5:50 p.m. through to about 9:15 p.m. as well. Those two outages anchored a host of others, including small groups in the 4200 block of the Trans Canada Highway, the 2700 block of Worthington Road, the 4900 block of Cowichan Lake Road and those in the Phipps/Colvin/Riverside Road areas, who were affected anywhere from 4:30 a.m. right through until early Monday morning. Vancouver Island Hydro spokesman Ted Olynyk called the storm an anomaly. “We don’t expect stuff like this until November. This is not a typical storm for September,” Olynyk said Monday, just three hours after all of the power was restored

A large Garry oak lies on a property on the north side of Cowichan Bay after it was felled by winds on Sunday, mercifully missing the nearby house. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN] to Cowichan homes. “Overall we hit a peak of about 30,000 customers out on the Island at 7 p.m.,” he noted, adding Cowichan residents accounted for 5,583 of affected Island customers. By 10 p.m. crews had restored power to all but about 600 customers within the CVRD and by 6 a.m. Monday morning everybody was back on the grid. If people want information during storms such as this weekend’s, bchydro.com/outages is accessible by smart phone, Olynyk said.

Sunday, Sept. 29, on a very wet day in Shawnigan, a woman slammed the car she was driving into a hydro pole on Refrew Road. Emergency crews attended and found her with minor injuries. She was transported by ambulance to hospital. [GABI SHWECHUK SPECIAL TO THE CITIZEN]

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News

Wednesday, October 2, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Court rules against commercial crematorium SARAH SIMPSON CITIZEN

The Cowichan Valley Regional District is pleased with the BC Supreme Court victory last week against a commercial crematorium in Sahtlam but maintains the Sikh community is more than welcome to carry on with its religious traditions in the region. While a ceremonial cremation facility at 4695 Cowichan Lake Rd. was permitted to operate for many years, the court found last week that the Paldi Khalsa Diwan Society’s change to a commercial crematorium in 2011 contravened the P-1 (Parks and Industrial) zoning and was thus not permitted. “I am satisfied that a commercial crematorium is not permitted within zone P-1,” Justice Lance Bernard wrote in his Sept. 26 reasons for judgment. “I am not persuaded that it can reasonably be maintained that a crematorium fits within the ordinary meaning of ‘institution’,” he wrote. In August 2010, the Diwan Society applied for a building permit to construct a modern, gas-fired crematorium on the site they’ve owned since the mid-1960s. Their wood-burning operation, they said, had grown obsolete and the CVRD’s understanding was that use of the wood-burning oven would be discontinued. The group was granted permission and went on to construct the new oven as well as to prepare for a second high-tech cremator. With no conspicuous clues, the CVRD and neighbours were later shocked to learn the facility was quietly being used commercially and in contravention of the land’s zoning.

FLAMES ERUPT AFTER CRASH

“...things changed dramatically for the local community when the facility began being used for commercial purposes.” ROB HUTCHINS, CVRD board chair

The CVRD wanted it shut down; the Society wanted to keep it running. The issue could not be resolved without the courts. In his reasons for judgment Bernard said, “It is clear from the whole of the evidence that the CVRD was willing to accept the wood-burning crematorium, and what it understood to be its gas-fueled replacement, as a non-conforming use, taking into account: (a) that the wood-burning crematorium pre-existed the zoning bylaw; and, (b) that the crematorium was a rarely used aspect of some religious rites performed at the temple,” he wrote. “This was a concession which, as I understand it, the CVRD is still willing to make.” It’s a victory for the CVRD according to board chair Rob Hutchins. “We are very pleased with the court’s decision. We have always welcomed the Sikh community’s continued traditional crematorium use, however, things changed dramatically for the local community when the facility began being used for commercial purposes,” he said. “It is important that the CVRD uphold its land use bylaws and processes so we can provide certainty and assurances to property owners and the community at large about what can and cannot happen on lands in a neighbourhood.”

PROPOSED INTER-COMMUNITY BUSINESS LICENCE BYLAW NO. 3081, 2013 The Council of the City of Duncan hereby gives notice, in accordance with Section 59 of the Community Charter, of an opportunity for citizens and businesses to make representation to Council with respect to the proposed "INTER-COMMUNITY BUSINESS LICENCE BYLAW NO. 3081, 2013". The purpose of this Bylaw is to create one business licence fee for qualified mobile businesses doing business in one or more participating municipalities; thereby eliminating the need for businesses to purchase separate business licences for each municipality in which they operate. As an example, if a contractor is based in Duncan, the contractor is required to have a Duncan Business Licence; currently, if the contractor wished to do business in Parksville or Qualicum, the contractor would need to also purchase business licences in each of these municipalities. Under the proposed bylaw, a business would still purchase a Duncan Business Licence, but would only have to purchase one additional licence at a cost of $150.00 which would enable a business to do work in all participating municipalities.

A truck and a car collided on Cowichan Way Friday morning, then burst into flames, which were put out by firefighters. There were no serious injuries. For more photos, scan this page with the Layar app on your smart phone or go to www.cowichanvalleycitizen.com [ANDREA RONDEAU/CITIZEN]

Dikes ‘strangling’ marshland From page 1 Cowichan has identified three affected homes and there are five others in the Rosewood area, all side by side, Reitsma said. Panelist and Cowichan Tribes biologist Tim Kulchinsky reminded the crowd that Somenos Creek actually flows both ways during high water and careful management is needed to ensure that “absolutely crucial” habitat for coho salmon in maintained. It’s also important to the Cowichan people as there was a village located near the site of the forest museum at one time. The other panelists were just as uncompromising. Phil Jennings of the Somenos Marsh Society said that the areas north and south of the new dike are not separate: they are still related to each other. He was the first of many to take strong exception to locating a new police station on the Marsh. Naturalist David Polster said he was worried that “degrading the watershed” would result in a loss of resilience in a sensitive area. “Don’t dike areas that don’t need protection, such as agricultural lands or flood plains,” he urged.

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The proposed bylaw is scheduled to proceed to Council for their consideration at the Regular Meeting to be held at City Hall, 200 Craig Street, Duncan, on Monday, October 21, 2013, at 7:00 p.m.

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Delegations requesting permission to speak to "INTER-COMMUNITY BUSINESS LICENCE BYLAW NO. 3081, 2013" at the October 21, 2013 Council Meeting are required to submit a written request to the Corporate Services Department by October 16, 2013. Applications to appear as a Delegation can be found at http://www.duncan.ca/duncan_city_hall/meetings.htm

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The proposed bylaw, in its entirety, can be found on the City’s website (www.duncan.ca) and is available for viewing in person at the City Hall, 200 Craig Street, Duncan BC.

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For more information about the proposed "INTER-COMMUNITY BUSINESS LICENCE BYLAW NO. 3081, 2013", please contact: Talitha Soldera, Director of Finance, (250) 746-6126 or Talitha@duncan.ca

The Cowichan Agricultural Society’s Dan Ferguson was blunt, calling for “an attitude adjustment” on ALR development. “If it’s once put under pavement, we’ll never have the opportunity to use it,” he said. Biologist Brian Tutty had an equally straightforward message. “Salmon don’t vote,” he said and went on to explain that coho in particular must have the peace and quiet of the Somenos backwater to escape the rush of winter flooding. Questions from the public indicated the crowd was not happy that North Cowichan was trying to change Somenos Marsh. Glen Spicer said, “We’re strangling the Somenos Marsh with these dikes. Each council seems to eat away a little more of it.” Jennifer Lazenby worried about the effect on wildlife of both construction noise and the continued noise from the RCMP station and other concentrated development planned for University Village. Lefebure replied that getting a replacement for the RCMP station is the responsibility of the municipality, not the police, adding, “We own this site. There would be no additional cost. It has good access to a highway through a controlled intersection.”

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News

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Cougars spotted at Lake

His last day was with his kids

LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

From page 1

Lake Cowichan has been buzzing the last couple of weeks about at least one cougar that’s been seen in the area. Facebook has been alive and BC Conservation officer Scott Norris said Friday that his office has also heard about the problem. “There’s been at least two sightings right in town that I know of, but we’re also hearing anecdotally of people who have seen them as well,” he said. “We get quite a few cougar sightings in Lake Cowichan. They’re often just moving through and don’t hang around town, generally speaking, but we do get quite a few calls in Youbou and Lake Cowichan, in fact all the way down right to Duncan,” he said. But, if you haven’t seen one, that doesn’t mean the big cats that are sometimes called pumas or mountain lions are not out there, according to Norris. “Remember, cougars want to stay hidden. They don’t like to be seen so they try not to be seen. People who do get to see them are usually lucky unless they are that unlucky person that gets attacked. And those people usually don’t even see them either until they are on their heads.” Should residents of likely areas do something special to avoid them? “Move to Toronto! No, I mean they are always going to be around and all you can do is be vigilant and be cautious when you’re in the woods and don’t let little kids run off by themselves a lot, keep them close by,” Norris said. He had some simple tips for dealing with a cougar if you encounter one. “You want to talk in a calm voice, you want to pick up any small kids, you want to make yourself look large so hold your hands above your head, and make sure the cougar knows you are dominant, that you are not prey. Obviously the cougar’s approaching you, you should be getting to a safe location if you can or picking up sticks, rocks, whatever you can to deter that cougar from coming closer. “Never run from a cougar. Back away slowly. Don’t stare it in the eyes, just back away slowly but the key is never to run because

to work when the tragedy happened. He spent his last day with his kids having a picnic.” Descoteau leaves behind four young children: Austin, Steven, Isabella and Kaleb. “He deeply loved his family and he treasured every minute he spent with them,” reads his obituary. “Dustin was at a very happy place in his life and experienced more in his 29 years than most do in a lifetime.” The fatal incident occurred about 11 p.m. on Sept. 25. “Mr. Descoteau was the driver and sole occupant of a flat-deck pickup truck, which went off the Coquihalla Highway and rolled down an embankment about four kilometres south of the Inks Lake exit south of Kamloops,” Interior Region

that triggers that instinct that you’re prey and they’ll chase,” Norris said. “It’s definitely not easy to do, but there have always been circumstances where this might happen. There will always be cougars in the area. They’ll come to the edge of town or even into town because there are lots of deer around. They’ll follow their favourite prey around. Last week, when I was up there investigating one of the sightings, right where the person indicated the cougar had been, there were two deer sitting there. And that was right in town.” Conservation officers have so far not seen the animals themselves in Lake Cowichan; they are just going by reports that have come their way. “But, there definitely could be a cougar around town. We haven’t had any sightings reported to us since last week so it may have moved on or it could be just staying secretive like cougars usually do,” he said. The chances of seeing them drops as autumn’s early evenings close in. “Daylight is shrinking now. We usually get more sightings in summer because it’s light for so long. People are outside, the cougars are moving around more in a time when they are likely to be seen. Now, it’s different. They are most active between dusk and dawn so now that dusk is seven o’clock instead of 11 o’clock, the chance of people seeing them goes down but they are still around. They’re generally not interested in people as prey but as you might have heard recently there have been two attacks on the Island this summer: north of Campbell River and Floors Island near Tofino,” Norris said.

COLOUR

Coroner Larry Marzinzik said in a press release. “Mr. Descoteau was deceased at the scene.” Details are sparse because police will not comment about the case, but an RCMP media release shortly after the incident suggested Descoteau had been northbound in a 2002 Ford F-350 pickup. It said he was in the passing lane when the truck drifted over onto the left shoulder. Descoteau tried to reposition the vehicle on the highway but it skidded across two lanes and struck the cement highway barrier. The impact caused the truck to jump the barrier and roll down the embankment several times. The RCMP release also noted Descoteau, who was not wearing a seatbelt, was ejected from the vehicle. With files form the Kamloops Daily News

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Man charged in ATM theft, B&Es KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

Police have arrested a man connected with several thefts and break-and-enters in the Cowichan Valley, including the theft of an ATM in August. Andrew Gundersen of Cobble Hill was arrested and charged with the crimes following a joint investigation by the Shawnigan Lake and North Cowichan/ Duncan RCMP detachments. Gundersen has been charged in connection with the theft of an ATM from the Cobble Hill Market on Aug. 13, the theft of

cigarettes from the Co-op Gas Station on the Trans Canada Highway in Duncan on Sept. 10, and the theft of a vehicle from a Duncan residence that same day. He faces charges including break and enter and theft, possession of stolen property, and theft of a motor vehicle in relation to the incidents.

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Wednesday, October 2, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

OUR VIEW

Grant funding shouldn’t be popularity contest e’re seeing it more and more here at the Citizen newspaper. Groups are requesting us to urge people to vote for them — on Facebook, or some other online venue — so they can beat out the competition and get a grant. This seems to be the latest way that organizations are deciding who they’re going to give cheques to, and we’ve seen everyone from the Marine Mammal Rescue Centre to schools hoping for playground funding caught in this popularity contest. This is not, in our opinion, the

W

way that grant money recipients should be decided. While we are happy to help community organizations, as the ones we’ve heard from are certainly all worthy causes in need of the cash up for grabs, we think there’s a certain amount of abdicating of responsibility by the donors in question when they turn to online voting to make their decisions for them. Because that’s what they’re doing. We certainly don’t envy them their jobs in trying to decide which of the cash-strapped nonprofits, charities and commun-

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ity projects most deserve their money. I’m sure now, more than ever before, they are deluged with an avalanche of applications from hopefuls to whom even a couple hundred bucks is a lifeline. But come on, just throwing up your hands and turning it over to the masses is not the way to do it. We think that merit should play a larger role. Surely these organizations had to submit applications that explained their project and its repercussions on the public. And while it can be argued

that community support for an endeavour is an important criteria, online voting is a notoriously poor way to gage said support. Surely it is not the only criteria, either. Sometimes the projects that can end up having the biggest impact are not the flashy ones that will catch the public’s evershifting eye. Not to mention that online voting tends to favour larger communities (more people to vote), groups with a younger audience, and/or a group with lots of family and friends who can be prodded to make a few clicks.

13-year-old gone too soon

Cowichan Valley Citizen is a division of VI Newspaper Group Limited Partnership., 251 Jubilee St.., Duncan, B.C., V9L 1W8 Phone: 250-748-2666 Fax: 250-748-1552

Sometimes we read articles in the paper that just makes our heart sink, or least I do! Such as animal cruelty someone shooting a cat with a pellet gun for no apparent reason or a young life cut short way too early, even if I never met the person in the news. This week it was the latter for me. Parents are not supposed to bury their kids, not their 13year-old about to start Grade 8. I found that news about the poor girl struck by two cars in Duncan heart-wrenching and really hard to swallow and apparently so do a lot of other people. Seems she was well-liked judging by the Facebook comments mentioned in the paper. My condolence goes out to the family and friends of 13-year-old Selena N. Joe though I never met her. May her soul rest forever more in heaven!

Publisher Shirley Skolos Editor Andrea Rondeau Customer service manager Dawn Heggie Production supervisor Alice Brownbridge Newsroom 250-748-2666, extension 235 news@cowichanvalleycitizen.com Advertising 250-748-2666, extensions 223, 227, 228, 229, 230

Andre Mollon Langford

Classified ads 250-748-2666, extensions 221, 222 Copyright information This newspaper’s contents are protected by copyright and may be used only for personal, non-commercial purposes. All other rights are reserved. Commercial use is prohibited. Opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the newspaper. Complaint resolution If speaking to the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about a story we publish, contact the B.C. Press Council, which examines complaints from the public about the conduct of the press in gathering and presenting the news. Send your written concern and documentation within 45 days to: B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C., V9R 2R2. Website: www.bcpresscouncil.org.

Some of these online polls even encourage people to vote as often as they can, rather than one vote, one person. What kind of useful results could any organization get from using such a method? While considering some online voting (a demonstration of community support) as part of your method to determine grants could be useful, it shouldn’t decide the whole shebang. We’ll continue to let folks know when and how to vote for groups in our community who face this kind of thing, but we hope it’s a passing fad.

Love and support from two communities much appreciated Words seem inadequate to express our sincere gratitude and deep appreciation to all our friends, family, neighbours and the community for your overwhelming outpouring of love and support. The tremendous generosity shown to us from all of you is absolutely humbling. Your gifts of meals, sandwiches and sweets were wonderful symbols of your friendship and meant so much to us. The beautiful flower arrangements added a bit of brightness to our days, making them more bearable.

Your visits that began each day at 9 a.m. and continued throughout each day gave us strength as we shared the loss of our friend together. The cards, full of your kind and loving messages, help make it easier to get up each morning to face another day. A heartfelt thank you to all the professionals who provided services and donations and helped plan the service: Pat and James of Haywards Funeral Home, Liz Anderson for conducting the service, Michelle Severn and the Community Gospel Church, Barry and the Farmers Institute for stalling the Fall Fair organizing to allow us the use of the facility, Charlotte and Mike at Thrifty Foods for the flower arrangements and donations, the

Waldes of Fresh Coast Catering, Paul and Country Grocer, Mike and Colleen of Sidney Bakery for the wonderful desserts, Duncan White Spot for hosting a fundraiser and Hans Stoffelsma and family of Arbutus Grove Nursery for donating seedlings to be planted in memory of Ryan. We are so very fortunate to call Salt Spring home and to be surrounded by such a caring community. Ryan was lucky enough to be a part of two communities — the one we lived in and the one he worked in. We would also like to thank Mt. Sicker and the logging community, the Cowichan Valley Minor Hockey Association and all our friends in the Cowichan Valley for your kindnesses and sym-

pathy; there are no words that could express the depth of our gratitude. Ryan was a wonderful husband and father and we are grateful for the time we had with him. He will always be with us in loving memories. Thank you so very much for your expressions of love and sympathy. Chelsea, Isaac, Garrett, Mackenzie and Heidi Burch and the Byron family

Send us your letter: write 300 words or less on the topic of your choice and email news@cowichanvalleycitizen.com


Opinion

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, October 2, 2013

contact us

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Publisher, Shirley Skolos

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NOTICE OF INTENT TO AMEND ZONING BYLAW ZONING AMENDMENT BYLAW No. 3728 Applicable to Electoral Area E – Cowichan Station/Sahtlam/Glenora

The E&N tracks at Cowichan Station look abandoned. [LEXI BAINAS/CITIZEN]

E&N funds should be concentrated I was saddened to read the article ‘Things are not standing still’ on Island Corridor, CVRD told. Being a founding member of the Island Corridor Foundation it appears the fallback position and emphasis is now on trails. Efforts to fund the upgrades to the corridor are falling on deaf ears, and equally to blame, the foundation is not clearly stating how a measly $15 million will do the job that previously $100 million plus was identified as needed. If the $15 million is all that is available then a better plan needs to be put in place and it should be an incremental one. Take the money available ($15 million) and concentrate those funds in an area that has the most chance of success namely the Western Communities into Victoria. The $15 million is more than enough to do any upgrading necessary to run service on that part of the line. With success there, one can then move upIsland a section at a time and expand and improve the service and opportunities one step at a time.

Smart meter objections all just rhetoric The letter from Annette Lampson had me thinking, please, not again. When will people get past this? Ms. Lampson, the only way out for you to avoid a smart meter or a fee to read an analogue meter is to take yourself off the grid. Find your own sources of power because if you don’t then BC Hydro is your only alternative and, yes, they do have the right to impose a fee if you opt out of a smart meter. Read the legislation and realize they can pull your meter and you will have no hydro at all. I would object to BCH burying a surcharge in my bill to subsidize the decisions of those who opt out. All decisions in life have consequences. Pay a fee or have your service terminated. Having taken the time to research smart meters and sorted out the biased science from the unbiased, smart meters are less an issue than the average cell phone with one distinct difference. We won’t be holding a smart meter to the side of our heads any time soon. Unless those opposed are prepared to give up their cell phones, their wireless phones, Wi-Fi networks, Bluetooth devices, their microwaves etc. then all this rhetoric about smart meters is just that because these devices are more a problem than a smart meter. However, let’s think outside the box. Ontario has had smart meters for some

There are municipalities and individuals ready and willing to support and assist that kind of effort and once success is achieved further opportunities will emerge. We have a valuable people-moving opportunity that is not being handled properly. I would recommend that the federal and provincial governments, as well as the regional districts, who have put forth funding initiatives, insist on this incremental approach so that viable transportation opportunities can be clearly identified and built on over a period of time. Opportunities should also be given to various other types of operations and operators, such as tourist trains, to run on the line which would provide additional sources of revenue. This is not rocket science, just using a little common sense to build a reliable, viable and supportive operation or really multiple operations in this case. Multiple operations are necessary to ensure the viability of the rail corridor. Let’s get on with it, PLEASE! Jack Peake Lake Cowichan

time. They bill at three levels. Off Peak at 6.7 cent/kwh, Mid Peak at 10.40 and On Peak at 12.4. The blended rate is 8.45. The mid and on peaks periods shift with the seasons. (www.ontario-hydro.com/index. php?page=current_rates) My friends have found that they can adjust their consumption quite easily to take full advantage of the off peak rates without disturbing their lifestyles. Dishwashers get delayed starts. Laundry is done in the evenings or weekends. Kids shower at night. It isn’t difficult. It just takes some thought. Smart meters help manage this. BC Hydro charges tier 1 at 6.9 cent/kwh and tier 2 at 10.34 and a blended rate of 8.62. It is inevitable the smart meters will lead to a similar system as Ontario so ask yourself the question. If you break you tier 1 and tier 2 usage down to the same periods Ontario uses how much can you save off your current bill? More to the point, how much can you offset the bills you will be getting once this 26 per cent increase in hydro rates is imposed over the next three years by using technology to manage your consumption? Model your consumption and look for savings opportunities. By doing so we will reduce consumption and make the resource more viable in the long term. Can we please get by this issue? It would be appreciated. Alex Currie Chemainus

As per Section 890(4) of the Local Government Act, the Cowichan Valley Regional District Board of Directors has reviewed the above noted bylaw and found it to be consistent with the policies of the Electoral Area E – Cowichan Station/Sahtlam/Glenora Of¿cial Community Plan No. 1490, therefore, the Public Hearing has been waived and the Board has directed that this Public Notice occur in its place. Bylaw No. 3728 received ¿rst and second reading at the July 31, 2013 CVRD Board meeting. NOTICE is hereby given that the CVRD Board of Directors will consider reading a third time and adopting the above noted Amendment Bylaw at the regular Board meeting of October 9, 2013. Zoning Amendment Bylaw No. 3728 proposes to amend Electoral Area E – Cowichan Station/Sahtlam/Glenora Zoning Bylaw No. 1840 by deleting the list of permitted uses presently in the Heavy Industrial (I-2) Zone (summarized as follows): (1) auction grounds; (2) automotive repair, sales, body repair, painting, wrecking, storage, salvage; (3) café, restaurant, take out service, catering; (4) clothing and garment manufacturing, laundry, dry cleaning, repair and storage; (5) contractor’s workshop, yard and storage; (6) electric and electronic equipment manufacturing; (7) equipment repair, sales, storage and rental; (8) feed, seed and agricultural supplies, sales and storage; (9) food and candy products manufacturing, storage, processing, packaging, frozen food locker, cold storage plant, but excluding ¿sh cannery and abattoir; (10) industrial processing, manufacturing, repair, storage and packaging; (11) kennels for the keeping, boarding, raising, training and/or breeding of cats and dogs and animal hospital; (12) laboratory; (13) lumber and storage yards, sale of wholesale and retail building supplies; (14) modular or prefabricated home structure and truss manufacturing and sale; (15) parking garage, recreational vehicle storage and sale; (16) processing and sale of gardening and landscaping supplies and materials; (17) publishing; (18) retail and wholesale sale of petroleum products and accessory storage of petroleum products not exceeding 455,000 litres; (19) secondary processing and manufacturing of wood products, including the making of cabinets, furniture, plywood, lath and particle board and similar products; but excluding sawmills, pulp and paper mills and log storage and sorting; (20) recycling, sorting and storage of substances or materials, including in-vessel composting; (21) warehouse, including mini-warehouse, freight handling and storage; (22) welding shop; (23) retail sales accessory to a principal use permitted in Section (1) to (22); (24) dry land log sorting; (25) forest products processing, milling, and storage, excluding pulp and paper mill; (26) manufacturing, processing, repair, treatment and storage of products, materials, fabric or compounds; (27) of¿ce accessory to a principal use permitted in Section (1) to (22) and (25) and (26); (28) one single family dwelling per parcel accessory to a principal use permitted in Section (1) to (22) and (25) and (26). and replacing the above list with the following list of permitted uses: (1) Dry land log sorting operation; (2) Sawmilling; (3) Storage and maintenance of forestry machinery and equipment; (4) Uses customarily incidental to forestry operations; (5) Single family residence; (6) Buildings and structures accessory to a permitted use. The purpose of Zoning Amendment Bylaw No. 3728 is to bring the list of permitted uses into compliance with the Cowichan-Koksilah Of¿cial Community Plan. If Zoning Amendment Bylaw 3728 is adopted, the range of permitted uses on the two parcels that are in the Heavy Industrial 2 (I-2) Zone would be considerably narrowed; however, single family residential use would become permitted as a stand-alone use under the proposed amendment, something that is not permitted in the present I-2 Zone. The subject properties or portions thereof that are in the Heavy Industrial 2 Zone are identi¿ed on the maps below:

Legal descriptions and street addresses of the affected parcels: 1. That part of Section 8, Range 2, QuamichanDistrict, lying to the east of the right of way of the Canadian Northern Paci¿c Railway Company, except Parcel A (DD 38366I and DD 56015I) and Parcel C (DD 89280I) thereof, and except parts in Plans 4701, 6992, 7049, 7867, 8335 and 25654 (4885 Waters Road) 2. Parcel A (DD 42118I) of Section 10, Range 1, Quamichan District, except part in Plans 20284 and VIP63884 (4005 Rowe Road) A copy of the Amendment Bylaw and relevant support material may be inspected at the Regional District Planning and Development Department of¿ce, 175 Ingram Street, Duncan, B.C., from Friday, September 27, 2013, to Wednesday, October 9, 2013, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. A copy of the bylaw and supporting material may also be viewed on the CVRD website at the following address: http://www.cvrd.bc.ca/index.aspx?NID=1282


8

250-748-2666 ext. 225 arts@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

Wednesday, October 2, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

A&E

Duncan hosting exclusive Island stop for Acrobats LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

Talented singers of all ages can be soloists in Christmas sing-along but the Consort is also looking for Beethoven enthusiasts. [LEXI BAINAS/CITIZEN FILE]

Consort looking for crop of soloists LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

If you’re a choir singer in the Cowichan Valley, you may have already heard that the Cowichan Consort is performing Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony this fall. Now, the group is looking for soloists for this massive event, scheduled for Nov. 16, and also for the Consort’s annual Christmas Favourites Sing-along concert Dec. 7. Both concerts will be held at the Christian Reformed Church in Duncan. What is needed for the Beethoven event are four soloists: soprano, alto, tenor, and bass, who must be available for rehearsals with the orchestra and massed choir Wednesday, Nov. 13 and Friday, Nov. 15. For Dec. 7, the group’s Music Director and Conductor Robert Mari would like many soloists for selections from Handel’s Messiah, as well as popular secular

WĂůŵ ŽƵƌƚ

and sacred, modern, jazz and classical Christmas repertoire. For the past two years the Consort has showcased more than 10 soloists perform for this special community event. Not all have been adults, either. Auditions are scheduled for two successive Wednesdays, Oct. 2 and Oct. 9 at 6:30 p.m. at Sylvan United Church in Mill Bay, and finally Saturday afternoon, Oct. 12 from 1-3 p.m. at Robert Mari’s studio in Shawnigan Lake. Consort accompanist Ron Killian will be available for all auditions. The Consort also needs more trombonists. There are three needed in the Ode to Joy movement in the Beethoven Ninth symphony. For more info or to book a time slot or to talk to the conductor about your prowess on the trombone, contact Maestro Robert Mari at rmari@syntonic.com or call 250-743-9839.

2013 - 2014 SEASON

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Strength, agility and sheer daring combine in the Shangri-La Chinese Acrobats show coming to the Cowichan Theatre Monday, Oct. 7 starting at 7:30 p.m. It’s been years since any troupe of China’s legendary acrobats came to Duncan and that was such a snowy night that only a small crowd came out. So if you loved them before or have never seen them, now is the time to get those tickets. This is indeed a special event, according to Brian Kroeker, publicist for the Cowichan Theatre. “They are amazing. We’re really proud to have it and we hope to have even more exclusive shows in future,” he said recently. Theatre manager Kirsten Schrader agrees. “We are delighted to be the exclusive Vancouver Island engagement for this world renowned Chinese acrobatic troupe. It’s a familyoriented show and we think it’s important to have that option in our seasonal lineup at the Cowichan Theatre,” she said. “It’s such a great opportunity to see a show of this calibre, right at home.” For more than 30 years, the amazing performances of the ShangriLa Chinese Acrobats have offered wonderful, high-energy entertain-

The Shangri-La Chinese Acrobats promise a spectacular night of entertainment for the whole family. [SUBMITTED] ment for the whole family. Under the direction of Chinese acrobatic legends, the Hai Family, this company flawlessly interprets the grace of an ancient art form. Their precision has been honed by years of training and discipline. It’s a multi-faceted and multicultural production and features dazzling acrobatic displays, formidable feats of daring and bal-

ance, explosive Kung Fu, brilliant costumes, and even a touch of Chinese comedy. If that sounds like a winning combination to you, hurry to get those tickets. They’re going fast. Tickets are $45 each for adults and $30 for children or $135 for a family of four. Get them online at www.cowichantheatre.ca or call the Cowichan Ticket Centre at 250-748-7529.

Pocket-sized Prairie powerhouse heads to Garage LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

Clear the deck! On Wednesday, Oct. 2, starting at 8 p.m. Little Miss Higgins, that pocket-sized powerhouse from the Prairies, takes to the stage at the Duncan Garage Showroom.

She’s known for music influenced by old-time country blues, jazz and folk. “Whether it’s songs about passion or songs about panties, she writes about real things in a rooted and poetic way. Do your homework and you will be here,” Lon-

gevity John Falkner said when talking about her last week. Her new album, Bison Ranch Recording Sessions, was released just and she’s touring this fall across Canada to promote it. Tickets for the Duncan show are $25 at the door or $20 in advance.

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A&E

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Music weekend goes Romantic

YOUNG MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK

LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

“What’s so Romantic about the Romantic?” ask the members of the Cowichan Valley Music Teachers group. They’re back with another of their autumn music history weekends and this time they’re featuring the Romantic period. There are workshops on singing, dancing and instrumental music with a windup concert evening. The event runs from Thursday, Oct. 17 to Saturday, Oct. 19. Everything takes place at St. Peter’s Anglican Church and Hall located just off Maple Bay Road. “They’re really fun and the price is very affordable,” according to Valley music teacher Susan Doughty. Sessions are planned for ages 11 and up, but all are welcome. If you have a music teacher or choir director, you can probably register with him or her, but if you don’t, it’s easy to email Marilyn Rummel at marilyn@harpcanada.com for more information and then to register. There’s an early bird price of $95 for the entire weekend but that’s only until Oct. 5. It’s also possible to attend individual workshops. Check out cowichanmusicteachers.com for all the registration information. As usual, a g reat g roup of experts is leading the sessions, including Bruce Vogt (piano), James Mark (strings), Susan

Youth Jammers moves to Garage Showroom They’ve moved through a few venues in recent years but the Cowichan Folk Guild’s Youth Jammers Coffee House is now setting

Skyler Dhaene is 14 and in Grade 9 at Cowichan Secondary School. He has had two years of band with Joy Ann Bannerman at Mt. Prevost and looks forward to playing his main instrument, the banjo, in band class this year. He also plays guitar. His favourite band is Nickelback. Skyler enjoys making music with family, friends, and at school concerts. COWICHANMUSICTEACHERS.COM

COWICHAN THEATRE PRESENTS

Shangri-La Chinese Acrobats®

Bruce Vogt, head of the Piano Department at University of Victoria, will be leading the piano sessions. [SUBMITTED]

“An enthralling show!”

Young (vocal music) and Elizabeth Volpe Bligh (harp). The event also includes The Soirée on Friday, Oct. 18: an evening of the sort favoured by iconic Romantic composer Frederic Chopin and his friends, offered in salon style, with beverages and treats. “This will be a rare concert

indeed, an unusual event, like a moveable feast: first, music beautifully performed by the clinicians, in the church, then dancing, eating, poetry readings and harp/violin music in the hall, and a return to the church for the finale. It’s a spectacular, 19th-century evening,” said music teacher Ann Mendenhall.

up shop at the Duncan Garage Showroom, with a night for young local talent, Saturday, Oct. 5 from 7-10 p.m. It’s all about offering a coffee house setting for younger performers to take the stage in a great set-

ting with a casual format. Tickets are $5 each for the audience and only $2 each for jammers. A similar evening is planned for Saturday, Nov. 2.

— The Cleveland Press ONLY ISLAND PERFORMANCE

Monday Oct 7, 7:30pm TICKETS ON SALE NOW Call (250) 748-7529, buy online at the all new cowichantheatre.ca or drop by the ticket centre at 2687 James Street, Duncan (in the Island Savings Centre).

Lexi Bainas, Citizen

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A Zombie Love Story The fierce dancers of Ballet Victoria bring beauty to a love story from beyond the grave. Expect the unexpected, after all – it’s the most wonderful time of the year for zombies and monsters…. October 18th, 7:30pm Tickets: 250-748-7529 www.cowichantheatre.ca

Thursday, October 3rd at 2 pm with Old Time Radio Show Join us for an afternoon of fun! Everyone is welcome

Enjoying the Good Life! Living at Sherwood House means enjoying the good life…delicious, chef ƉreƉared meals, a variety of acƟviƟes and ouƟngs with new friends, while services are delivered with a smile from the Ɖrofessional and caring staī͘ We are always having fun at Sherwood House͘ thĂƚ Ăre LJou wĂŝƟŶŐ Ĩor͍͊

:oŝŶ us Ĩor LJour ĐoŵƉůŝŵeŶƚĂrLJ ůuŶĐh Θ ƚour͊ CĂůů ƚodĂLJ ƚo ďooŬ LJour reserǀĂƟoŶ ϮϱϬͲϳϭϱͲϬϭϭϲ 280 Government Street | Duncan, BC V9L 0B5 | 250-715-0116

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Living

Wednesday, October 2, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

50

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1928 was a boom year in Cowichan logging

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ell, the trucks serve the diminishing are back on supply of merchantthe road in able timber in the convoys and local province. mills have resumed Last week was “Save operation after several the Forest Week” and hard years. Dare we the appeal for carefulhope that the logging ness throughout the industry is back on its dry summer months CHRONICLES feet, for real this time, should fall upon recepT.W. Paterson after years of decline? tive ears in Cowichan, There was a time, not to which lumbering so long ago, that logging was the means much. Over 30 concerns, Valley’s economic engine — so employing over 2,000 men, are much so that some people truly operating in the district, turning believed that the industry would out a volume of lumber and logs continue, full-tilt, forever. This, which, in return, brings in an despite increasing signs, even annual payroll estimated at 2 ½ then, that it simply couldn’t. million dollars as well as much So let’s look back to 1928 when other business... the Cowichan Leader made an The greatest activity is cenambitious effort to describe tralized in the river valley and the industry as it was, and its Cowichan Lake area. At the immediate outlook — oblivious, lake the Empire Lumber Co. of course, to the Great DepresLtd., through its subsidiary sion which was little more than a companies, controls the largest year away. operations there at present, with It’s a day-and-night difference Mr. C.C. Yount as the general to today’s scenario. To put things manager of all activities. Mr. G.B. in historical context, the CNR Bouton is president. [For whom and E&N Lines to Lake CowiYoubou is named—Ed.] chan (to Youbou in the case of The principal subsidiary is Elco the former) had just opened. Logging Co. Ltd., through which What follows is an edited, somethe operations of Cowichan Lake what tightened version. Please Logging Co. Ltd. and Youbou remember that it’s in present Sawmills, Ltd., are handled tense as it was written, 85 years under contract, the equipment ago: being the property of Elco. In Spring brings May 1st and the addition to transport of their closed season for burning, one of the many precautions to preSee Numbers painted • page 15

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12

Wednesday, October 2, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

HOCKEY POOL

HOCKEY FANS ENTERTO ENTER TO WIN…

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ONLINE ENTRIES ONLY | TO ENTER LOG ON TO:

WWW.CITIZENNHL.COM Make your 2013-14 NHL regular season hockey pool selections and then watch this newspaper for weekly standings each Wednesday starting October 16/2013

HOCKEY POOL RULES ONE ENTRY per person. Actual name please (no team name). You must reside within the distribution area of the Cowichan Valley Citizen newspaper to be eligible for prizes. Participants must be willing to accept one email per week. Contest winners agree to have their name and photo published in the newspaper at the conclusion of the contest. Participants will accept pool manager’s judgement as ¿nal. Any tie breaker will be determined by ¿rst, total number of goals scored. Secondly by total number of goals scored by last place player on team. Finally, if necessary, by a mechanism determined by pool manager.

Entry Deadline for this on-line Hockey Pool - Friday October 11 - Midnight


Sports

250-748-2666 ext. 236 sports@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, October 2, 2013

13

Nine points for top line as Isles get back on track KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

Les Mann, who did last Saturday, played several key roles in Cowichan Field Hockey. [SUBMITTED]

Sports icon mourned DEDICATED DAD: Les Mann’s

contributions were many KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

Tributes are pouring in for a longtime supporter of the Cowichan Valley field hockey community and dedicated father who died suddenly last Saturday. Les Mann, who served Cowichan Field Hockey as a coach and technical director for several years, had a heart attack in Victoria while watching his daughter, Miranda, play field hockey for the University of British Columbia Thunderbirds — one of the things he loved to do. Mann was 54. His brothers, Chris and Brian, on behalf of the family, provided some insight into how much sports meant to him. “Les grew up with sports, at the supper table on TV, at breakfast, sports was always the topic of choice, so it was no wonder Les would make coaching it, his gift to the Valley,” they said. “Les started with school sports then moved into community sports, playing football, which he loved, plus he tried his hand at karate, lacrosse, snow skiing — anything with sports. Once he got his Level 3 in coaching, he put it to good use, coaching minor football and then women’s football, taking several teams to championships. “He met his wife Lana in the midst of his journey to becoming a great coach, and they had two children, Miranda and Colton. Les would coach Miranda and her friends for many years in soccer, field hockey and indoor hockey, taking them to many provincial championships. “Les believed commitment was everything and he was committed in whatever he did, from building two homes, to work, to his family and friends. His newest challenge was working with his son Colton on his musical journey, which meant sound

“Les believed commitment was everything, and he was committed in whatever he did, from building two homes, to work, to his family and friends.” CHRIS AND BRIAN MANN, Les’s brothers

rooms, equipment, voice lessons, band members, and like coaching, Les was involved to the max. “We are all going to miss Les for his enthusiasm, for life and all the things we can accomplish in our time here.” Mann first got involved in field hockey when Miranda started playing, coaching her teams from the U13 level on — a group that sent several players to post-secondary teams, including Miranda. He was also involved in the building of the turf field at the Cowichan Sportsplex, doing extensive research into what the surface required. “He was a big part of what we have now,” said Kara Joyce, current president of Cowichan Field Hockey. “Most of all, he was very dedicated to both Miranda and Colton.” Cowichan Secondary School head coach Jen Budding knew Mann through both the high school and community programs. “Les was a big supporter of field hockey in the Valley,” she said. “He was a passionate dad who wanted the best for his kids. He gave back to the community by being involved in the Cowichan Field Hockey Club. He helped coach many athletes in the Valley whether it was in the indoor or outdoor game. He and his contributions will be missed by those in the field hockey community” Denise McGeachy, the president of the Vancouver Island Ladies Field Hockey Association, has asked teams to take a moment of silence prior to their games on Oct. 5 and 6 to honour Mann.

A road game against the Oceanside Generals may have been just what the Kerry Park Islanders needed to get back on track in the Vancouver Island Junior Hockey League season. The Isles rebounded from tough defeats a week earlier to thump the Generals 5-1 on Saturday night in their only contest last weekend. “The boys responded well to the two losses,” said owner Mark Osmond. “They stayed disciplined and played to more of their potential. It was a good game. We actually showed how we can play.” Leading the way for the Isles was the line of Alex Milligan, Braedan Cross and Corey Peterson. Milligan recorded a hat trick and one assist, Cross had a goal and two helpers, and Peterson chipped in with two assists. Cody Short scored the team’s other goal. David Bittner had two assists and Matt Osmond added one. In goal, rookie Leighton Williams stopped 24 of 25 shots to earn his first junior B victory in his third game. “He played an excellent game,” said Osmond. “He made some excellent saves when we needed them.” Williams’s fellow netminder, veteran Jackson Jane, retrieved the game puck from the referee and presented it to Williams in the dressing room.

Braedan Cross had a goal and two assists in the win over Oceanside. [CITIZEN FILE] “That was a classy, classy thing on Jackson’s part,” said Osmond, who noted that the move was typical of the Isles’ team mentality. “Everyone is looking to help everyone else out.” The Isles will visit the Westshore Wolves on Wednesday and the Saanich Braves on Friday before playing host to the Peninsula Panthers at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday. “We’ve played all three of those teams, and the games have been close,” said Osmond. “We had a big lead against Westshore. If the boys play like they did against Oceanside, there’s no reason we can’t put some wins together.”

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14

Sports

Wednesday, October 2, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Caps drop three on tough Interior trip KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

The Cowichan Valley Capitals’ return home was delayed Sunday when ferries were cancelled because of the weather, prolonging what had already been a difficult weekend. “It was a pretty trying road trip, but there are no excuses,” said head coach Bob Beatty, whose team went 0-3 on the trip to the Interior. “Things didn’t go our way. We had two one-goal losses in games I thought we could have been successful in.” The Caps fell 3-2 to the Trail Smoke Eaters on Friday, were shut out 5-0 by the Penticton Vees on Saturday, and were edged 4-3 by the Merritt Centennials on Sunday. The first game saw the Caps create plenty of chances, only to miss out repeatedly. “We weren’t sharp,” said Beatty. “We had quality scoring opportunities, but we didn’t bury the puck.” The Caps fired 34 pucks at Trail goalie Dustin Nikkel, but were denied 32 times, with only Mason Malkowich and Kyle Horsman able to convert their chances. Robin Gusse stopped 20 of 23 shots in the Cowichan net. Things weren’t as bad for the Caps on Saturday as the score indicated, particularly in the opening 20 minutes, said Beatty. “We didn’t have a bad first period,” he said. “We were out-shot, but I didn’t think the puck possession time was that different.” The Caps generated just 18 shots on Olivier Mantha’s net. Gusse faced 26 in the Cowichan end, and the five that got past him were a season high. “We gave up a couple of powerplay goals, and that will happen if you go to the penalty box with these guys,” said Beatty. At Merritt, the Caps tied the score three times in the third period only to see the Cents pot the deciding goal with 43 seconds left.

for

Just 17, Matt Fracy is among the top trials riders in Canada. [COURTESY MATT FRACY.COM]

Fracy finishes third in Canadian trials KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

Mason Malkowich finished the trip with a goal and two assists. [CITIZEN FILE] “That was a real heartbreaking loss,” said Beatty. “It’s a difficult way to end a road trip for sure.” The Centennials won a late faceoff in the Cowichan end and put the puck on the net where it fooled screened goalie Francis Marotte. “They know how to play in their rink,” Beatty acknowledged. Blueliner Taki Pantziris scored two goals against Merritt, and Myles Powell had a goal and an assist. Steen Cooper had two helpers. Marotte turned aside 38 of 42 shots. The Caps have an important weekend coming up, visiting the Nanaimo Clippers on Friday, then hosting another divisional opponent, the Powell River Kings, at 7 p.m. on Saturday. Finally, they host the West Kelowna Warriors, who are tied for the league lead, at 2 p.m. on Sunday. “It’s a pivotal weekend for us,” said Beatty. “We can’t change what happened last week, but we can refocus and start over.” The team expects to get injured defenceman Jarrett Brown back this weekend. Forward Adam Moody is still a couple of weeks away from returning.

At just 17, Shawnigan Lake’s Matt Fracy finished third in Canada riding at the top level in the sport of motorcycle trials. Fracy rode his Beta Evo 300 in four of the six stops on the national championship schedule as he clinched third place, including two stops in B.C.: the Shuswap region, in May, and Port Moody’s Ioco site. The season isn’t quite yet over, and Fracy will be pushing to beat out the other two top riders in Canada in local Victoria Motorcycle Events. In addition to the events in B.C., Fracy

attended the first four U.S. national stops in New York and Vermont, taking four thirdplace finishes in the high school class. “It has been a very good year for Matt and the whole team, and many plans are already being made for next season,” said his dad, Steve. Helping Matt to his impressive season were his many sponsors, including Mountain Motorcycle Ltd., American Alloy, Tryals Shop-Boyesen Reeds, TrialsCanada, R2wtrials.com, Outlaw Trialsport, and Opti 2. To keep track of Fracy’s further accomplishments, visit mattfracy.com

Martin guides United to Div. 2 victory KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

With his own Division 1 team on a bye week, Glen Martin was happy to take the reins of Cowichan’s Div. 2 squad last Friday in the absence of their usual coach, Neall Rowlings. The arrangement worked out favourably for both sides, as Martin coached Cowichan United to a 3-0 win over former league leaders Gorge. “The boys played well,” said Martin. “They have a good starting lineup, the same lineup from the week before, and they are gelling well. They looked like a solid unit. It was pretty impressive.” The victory was Cowichan United’s second in a row, and moved them to fourth in Div. 2, just back of Gorge. Jordan Korven scored the first two goals of the games,

breaking a scoreless draw late in the first half, then doubling the lead midway through the second half. Jose Muro rounded out the scoring with a goal off his chest with about 10 minutes left to play. Darian Achurch wasn’t busy in the Cowichan net, but fended off any Gorge scoring chances. Martin remarked about how close the teams in Div. 2 are, compared with Div. 1, where three or four teams tend to dominate the pack. “That league is so tight; the way teams beat each other is unbelievable,” he said. “There is a lot of parity.” Martin will be back behind the Cowichan FC bench next Saturday when his team visits Prospect Lake. The Div. 2 squad will be at home that day, hosting Westcastle on the Ladysmith turf at 6 p.m. Like our page for photos and breaking news: facebook.com/ CowichanCitizen

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Living

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, October 2, 2013

15

Numbers painted a rosy picture of logging in 1928 From page 10 own output, this concern handles the towing and loading out of all logs from the several companies which dump into Cowichan Lake. Two tugs work day and night, using two crews. At the foot of the lake is the loading-out trestle, containing two tracks and two cranes. Mr. Dave Madill [another famous name in logging] handles the loading under contract and 20 men are employed. On April 16th a record was made when 99 cars were loaded in 7 hours 15 minutes, the crew then running out of cars. The logs, loaded direct onto [E&N] cars, go by this route to Crofton, where the booming is done by Elco, with Mr. Gordon Mallory in charge of a crew of 15 to 20 men. During March 14 million feet of logs were boomed by this crew. The Crofton Booming Co., with Mr. Harry Patterson in charge, handles about 1 ½ million feet a month, shipped down by the Island Logging Co. Ltd. The product from all the other lake camps is boomed by Elco. The extensive operations of the Cowichan Lake Logging Co. Ltd. are carried on under contract by Mr. Gilson and Mr. Wade McCoy, with a personnel of 195 men. Three Ledgerwood skidder sides are running, with a monthly output of about 8 ½ million feet. The 1927 output totalled 70 million feet. There was a two-week shut-down in July and another at Christmas. The logs were hauled by locomotive to the lake for dumping. Ten cars and a gasoline donkey were added to the equipment last year. Youbou Sawmills, Ltd. is run under contract by Mr. Frank Bevan, Extension, B.C., and Mr. Wm. McIntyre, Vancouver, with Mr. Deboe as mill manager. Two shifts are run, employing some 70 men and turning out about 1 ½ million feet a month. The mill ran continuously in 1927, with but four weeks’ shut-down, and turned out 15 million feet. A new engine and new boiler were added to the equipment. A feature of the operations at Camp 6 [Caycuse] is the life safety campaign which is a good example of the movement in this direction among all lumbering concerns. There are five first aid men scattered throughout the camp’s work, all of whom are paid extra for first aid service. In addition there is a revolving committee upon which everyone serves in turn, the appointments being made at general “safety” meetings, which are well attended. The committee’s duty is to meet each week, discuss ways and means of making the work safer, and call attention to any defects in work or equipment. In general the campaign is directed towards making the men “accident conscious.” Bulletin boards record accidents, and their reasons; and “safety” posters are displayed around the operations.

“A feature of the operations at Camp 6 [Caycuse] is the life safety campaign which is a good example of the movement in this direction among all lumbering concerns.” COWICHAN LEADER, 1928 look at forest industry

The McDonald Murphy Logging Co. Ltd. ran through 1927 with a break of only two months, cutting a total of 50 million feet, an average of five million a month.

Mr. Neil McDonald is in charge of the woods operation and Mr. A.E. Munn, M.L.A., is secretarytreasurer. Two sides are operated, one slack line yarder and one high lead, and 120 men are employed. If market conditions warrant, the company’s output will be increased by 20-40 per cent during the latter part of 1928. Their present limits being nearly cut out, the company recently acquired Block 75 at Lake Cowichan, containing 600 to 700 million feet. (To be continued) www.twpaterson.com

Workmen’s Comp would have a fit if it saw loggers hitchhiking atop a loaded logging truck today! —TWP


16

Wednesday, October 2, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Your Community

MARKETPLACE Book your ad ONLINE:

classiďŹ eds.cowichanvalleycitizen.com

Or call to place your ad:

250-737-2527 Monday - Friday 8:30am - 5:00pm Email: classiďŹ eds@cowichanvalleycitizen.com Fax: 250-748-1552 469 Whistler St., Duncan, BC V9L 4X5

DEADLINES:

Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Paper - Monday at 4:30pm Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Paper - Wednesday at 4:30pm Circulation: 250-748-2666 or 250-715-7783

REMEMBRANCES

COMMUNITY

IN MEMORIAM

OBITUARIES

ANNOUNCEMENTS ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS When you are sick and tired of being sick and tired. Call us. Cowichan Valley AA. Toll free 1-866-233-5255 (24-hours)

NIJAR - Gurbakash Kaur DESCOTEAU, Dustin Raymond March 16, 1984 - September 25 2013

OBITUARIES

PROCTOR, HAROLD JUNE 08, 1926 â&#x2C6;&#x2019; SEPTEMBER 03, 2013 The family of Harold Proctor invites you to a gathering in his memory on Saturday, October 5, 2 pm â&#x2C6;&#x2019; 4 pm Maple Bay Rowing Club, Beaumont Ave., Maple Bay Please bring your stories.

Dustin left us far too soon due to a tragic motor vehicle accident. He leaves behind his beloved children : Austin, Steven, Isabella and Kaleb. Parents Brenda and Steve Smith ; Paul Descoteau (Amy). Sister Paula, Nate and Farrah Phillips, brother Derek Descoteau. Grandparents Ray and Irene Ellison and Alice Descoteau. He is predeceased by grandfather Paul Descoteau and great grandmothers Violet Carlson and Jean McPherson. Dustin shared his magnetic personality and contagious smile with everyone he met. He deeply loved his children and he treasured every moment he spent with them. Austin, Stevie, Isabella and Kaleb adored their Daddy with all their hearts. Dustin enjoyed playing his guitar around a campfire, fishing with his kids and his new found life as a cowboy in Kamloops with girlfriend Leslie. Dustin was at a very happy place in his life and he experienced more in his 29 years than most do in a life time. He was an extremely hard worker and very talented at his trade as a fabricator. His mom will deeply miss his 6 am phone calls just to chat, his big hugs and smiles. Dustin will be sadly missed by his many relatives and friends. An outside Celebration of Life will be held on Friday October 4th at 4:00pm at Maple Grove, 3800 Gibbins Road. In lieu of flowers the family has set up a trust account at Island Savings for the 4 Descoteau children, account#2314961.

GRIFFITHS, WILLIAM (BILL) F. AUGUST 09, 1917 â&#x2C6;&#x2019; SEPTEMBER 22, 2013

Bill was born in Brandon, MB. He served his country in WWII. Bill was a printer by trade and owned his own business in Winnipeg for many years. He and beloved wife Renee moved to Chemainus about 20 years ago. He is survived by his loving wife Renee, daughters Doreen (Jim), Elaine (Ty) and son Alan, stepâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;daughters Gwen (Gerry), Jill (Ken), many grandchildren and great grandchildren. Bill loved horses and the races in Winnipeg and Victoria. He had an interest in cards at the casinos. Bill had a great sense of humor and a funâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;loving nature which he shared with Renee. Rest in Peace Bill

            

  

           !   " #

$ % & '   ( )))*    *   " # +*



   

        

It is with love and great sadness that we announce the passing of Gurbakash Kaur Nijjar on Sept 24, 2013 at the Cowichan District Hospital. She died peacefully surrounded by family. Gurbakash Kaur is predeceased by her father Basant Singh Hair, mother Raou Kaur, sister Gurbachan Kaur Sall, and brother Sarban Singh Hair. Loving wife to her late husband Nirmal Singh Nijjar; caring mother to daughters, Jasbir (Amrik Tung), Rajinder (Tirath Bhopal), Gurninder (Harjit Sandhu); sons Manjeet (Janice), Sukhjeet (Janice); proud grandma to Ravi, Indy, Mark (Aman), Michael (Balbir), Karen (Jessie), Neeta (Mike), Reena (Paul), Amanda(Steve), Amee, Jordan, Naveen, Jeevan; great-grandma to Jayden ,Kylene, Maya, Ethan, Abigeyle, Izibeyle, Winnie and her newest great grandson Brenden. Gurbakash was born in Moranwali, Punjab, India on January 27, 1928. She came to Canada in 1960 and returned permanently in 1967. The family originally lived in Lake Cowichan and moved to Duncan in 1969. Gurbakash was a great homemaker and provided everything her family needed. She was an avid gardener growing many fruits and vegetables that she shared with family and friends. She spent a lot of her time being of service at the Sikh Temples; reading the Sri Guru Granth Sahib, volunteering tirelessly in the kitchen, cooking and cleaning. Gurbakash was known for her hard work ethic and amazing memory. She will be deeply missed by all family and friends. Our family would like to thank Dr. Griffin, the ER staff and 2nd floor nurses at the Cowichan District Hospital, and the staff at Cairnsmore. A funeral will be held at on Saturday October 5, 2013 at the Christian Reform Church at on 11:00am at 930Trunk Road. Followed by cremation at Cowichan Valley Crematorium and the religious ceremony at Duncan Sikh Temple. Online condolences may be offered at www.hwwallacecbc.com

CRIMINAL RECORD? Canadian Record Suspension (Criminal pardon) seals record. American waiver allows legal entry. Why risk employment, business, travel, licensing, deportation, peace of mind? Free consultation: 1-800-347-2540

FOUND FOUND IPhone at Olson & Seaview Cres., Saltair. 250â&#x2C6;&#x2019;245â&#x2C6;&#x2019;3528 to identify.

LOST MISSING last seen Fri. Sept. 27 sleek and solid tabby cat with one black blind eye, he is willy but not a stray Campbell St. , Marchmont, Chaster, Beech area. 250â&#x2C6;&#x2019;701â&#x2C6;&#x2019;7984.

PSYCHICS TRUE PSYCHICS For Answers call now 24/7 Toll free 1-877-342-3032 Mobile: #4486 www.truepsychics.ca

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FIREWOOD AAA Quality dry firewood guaranteed. Call 250-7460105 or 250- 732-6163

PRIME, JAMES EVERED MAY 18, 1930 â&#x2C6;&#x2019; SEPTEMBER 26, 2013

James Evered Prime age 83 passed away on September 26th, 2013 at Duncan BC. Jim was predeceased by his wife Mary in January 2013. He was born on May 18th, 1930 in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan to May and James Prime. At the age of one year his family moved to Hamilton ON and then onto Surrey BC when he was six. Jim married Mary Faith Hemming in 1952 in Vancouver. They were happily married for 60 years. In 1963 the family moved to the Kootenays settling in Rossland. After retirement Mary and Jim moved to the Lower Mainland, Ladysmith and finally Duncan. Mary and Jim spent many a happy days sailing on the Arrow Lakes and the Gulf Islands. They enjoyed sailing so much they even did the circumnavigation of Vancouver Island in June and July of 1980. Jim did volunteer work with the Canadian Power Squadron in Castlegar. He was also a long time Ham Radio operator as VE7BDD with time spent with the original Civil Defense. Jim also enjoyed his time as a leader with the Boy Scouts of Canada in Rossland. In his life Jimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s greatest joy was his four children â&#x2C6;&#x2019; Kathy, Tom, Vince and Glenda (Bagg); 17 Grandâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; children and 13 Greatâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;grandchildren. A Celebration of Life will be held in Crofton with family and friends. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to: British Columbia Heart and Stroke Foundation of BC & Yukon, 1212 West Broadway, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6H 3V2.

GARAGE SALES Parentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Unite Garage Sale Huge event with 66 tables of childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s toys, clothing & family goods. Saturday, Oct 5 9:00 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12 noon Island Savings Centre Multi-Purpose Hall Tables still available: $20 For more info call: 250-748-7529

THRIFT STORE 7th-day Adventist 3rd & 4th Sunday of October 10 am - 2 pm. Thursdays 11 am - 1 pm Join us for Bible Study Thursdays 10 - 11 am. Refreshments 10 am 3441 Gibbins Rd.

´ KIWANIS FLEA MARKET ´ Every Saturday, from 9am til 2pm Girl Guide Hall, 321 Cairnsmore St. For info phone: Pat at 250-748-1200 or Dave at 250-746-3616

Firewood Kiln Dried Bricks, No binders or chemicals, Burns hot & clean 90 boxes = 720 bricks for only $200. Pick up at 5120 Polkey Road Near Windsor Plywood. Local Deliveries available. 250-748-5595

FOR SALE - MISC BUTCHER SUPPLIES, Leather + Craft Supplies and Animal Control Products. Get your Halfords 136 page Free Catalog 1-800-3537864 or Email: order@halfordhide.com Visit our Web Store: www.halfordsmailorder.com

PETS 7150 INDIAN ROAD Household items, Christmas decorations, golf bags/clubs, books, movies and more. Saturday, Oct. 05, 8:00 AMâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;1:00 PM. Rain or Shine

PUPPY PATCH. Vacations or just for the day. Loving in my home care for your small best friend. Judy 250â&#x2C6;&#x2019;748â&#x2C6;&#x2019;8323.


Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, October 2, 2013 CELEBRATIONS

EMPLOYMENT

BIRTHS

            

                        !"# $"!% & '$!

EDUCATION

CLASSES & COURSES

DELI FRONT END PERSON must be available days, eves, weekends. Suit mature peson.Apply with resume to: Masonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Store, 1855 Renfrew Rd., Shawnigan Lake.

FOODSAFE COURSES Level-1. Sat, Oct 19, Nov 16 $70/prsn. Location: Island Savings Centre. (250)746-4154 to register. www.saferfood.ca

DUNCAN TAXI Ltd. hiring part time graveyard dispatcher. Must have exceptional communication skills and excellent knowledge of Duncan and surrounding areas. Fax resume to 250-7464987. No phone calls or walk ins please. FULL TIME FELLERâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; BUNCHER OPERATOR â&#x2C6;&#x2019; ISLAND FIBRE LTD. Required immediately, Feller â&#x2C6;&#x2019;Buncher Operator, Port Alberni area, close to town, Union rates & benefits.

ENGAGEMENTS

P/T BAR SERVER, must have Serving It Right & Lotto Clearance, hours & duties to be discussed. Resume a must: drop off at Legion, 25 Kenneth St, (next to City Hall) after 2pm, or email: rcl53bcy@shaw.ca

!" 

              

Royal Alexander Apartments 1 & 2 Bdrms, quiet, secure & newly renovated. Over looking lovely garden. Seniors welcome. 2575 Alexander St. Call 250-746-6442 www.royalalexander.ca OCEAN VIEW COWICHAN BAY. New 2Bdrm/den, 2 Baths. 2 patios, S/S appli. $1350/mo. Avail. Oct. 15. Rent to own option. 250â&#x2C6;&#x2019;701â&#x2C6;&#x2019;0521.

MAPLE GROVE APARTMENT $100 OFF 1st Monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rent 3271 Cowichan Lake Rd 2 and 3 bdrm units. Heat and hot water included. Family orientated. Clean and quiet. Renoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d units. Indoor pet welcome. On site laundry facilities. To view 250-710-7515 or 250-748-3412 www.meicorproperty.com

$   % 

)  (   $#     $&  ' % 

 #     * (# CITIZEN CARRIERS

   % 

#   

RETIREMENT Apartments, All Inclusive. Meals, transportation, activities daily. Short Leases. Monthly Specials! Call 877-210-4130

   ! "  

&+ *

    (

   * !          

SHAUGHNESSY GARDENS

  ( $

          

TRADES HELP

$100 OFF 1st Monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rent!

        REAL ESTATE

a

Wescon Doors is looking to add a CNC Operator to our team. Good math and communication skills are a necessity. a Preference will be given to those with woodworking experience and computer skills. We offer competitive wages and benefits package. a Please drop resumes off between 9:00am & 4:30pm at: Wescon Cedar Products Ltd. 5120 Polkey Road Duncan, BC aa

  

 

RECREATIONAL PROPERTY CANCEL YOUR TIMESHARE. NO RISK program. Stop Mortgage & Maintenance Payments Today. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Free Consultation. Call us Now. We can Help! 1-888-356-5248



      

  

        !"#$%

  

        

       

     

  



3251 Cowichan Lake Rd Clean 1 & 2 bdrm unit. Full size fridge, stove & dishwasher. Carpet & linoleum, window coverings, fireplace. Quite, well maintained building with elevator & sauna. Close to schools & hospital. Pet friendly. To view 250-710-7515 or 250-748-3412. www.meicorproperty.com Springridge Manor, has a fresh new look. 1 BR steâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clean & bright $590/mo. 3 BR steâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s totally renoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d $900, near University, ns/np Call 250-732-1839

  

ClassiďŹ eds

Continues on next page

HOME SERVICES

RENTALS

HOUSES FOR RENT

SUITES FOR RENT

DUNCAN lrg 3Bdrm, computer rm, laundry rm, mud rm entrance, new kitchen. Carport w/workshop. Sm fenced front yard & more. Pet considered. $1250/mo. incl. lrg screen TV, hydro and util. 250â&#x2C6;&#x2019;701â&#x2C6;&#x2019;7923.

 

(   #  $

  $

$       

DUNCAN Clean, large 2Bdrm basement suite. $800/mo. hydro included. N/P. Available now. 250â&#x2C6;&#x2019;466â&#x2C6;&#x2019;4959.

    

%  &  '

    

   

COBBLE HILL sm. 1Bdrm. Oct. 1. Newer, no steps, suit 1 mature person. Laundry, no dogs, N/S, ref req. $550/mo. Heat/electric included. 250â&#x2C6;&#x2019;743â&#x2C6;&#x2019;4010 250â&#x2C6;&#x2019;743â&#x2C6;&#x2019;4154.

       

!"#$      

  

    

                                    !      " #   !  $ #                           "           

LOCKWOOD VILLA Chemainus bachelor $625/mo. 1Bdrm $650/mo. Avail. Oct. 1. Close to shopping/bus. 250â&#x2C6;&#x2019;246â&#x2C6;&#x2019;1399.

        ! "  

DUNCAN DC519153 â&#x2C6;&#x2019; 53 Papers Belcarra Rd. â&#x2C6;&#x2019; Haida Rd. Call Audette: 250â&#x2C6;&#x2019;715â&#x2C6;&#x2019;7783

          

   

    

   

SALTAIR DC519253 â&#x2C6;&#x2019; 42 Papers Gardner Rd. â&#x2C6;&#x2019; South Oyster School Rd. area.

                                            

3 BDRM Apt, York Rd, 1.5 bath, 3 appl, n/s, refs reqâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d, NOW $800, (250)246-1650

#    

  

 

   

       

   

              

GENERAL EMPLOYMENT

APARTMENTS/ CONDOS FOR RENT



  

RESTAURANT/ HOTEL

contact don@islandfibre.ca 250â&#x2C6;&#x2019;597â&#x2C6;&#x2019;2555

  

EMPLOYMENT

RENTALS

GENERAL EMPLOYMENT HELP WANTED - LOCAL PEOPLE NEEDED!!! Simple & Flexible Online Work. 100% Genuine Opportunity. F/T & P/T. Internet Needed. Very Easy.No experience required. Income is Guaranteed! www.ezComputerWork.com

17

DUNCAN Private entr., modern 1Bdrm. Cable/net/util incl. W/D. Hosp. area. Avail immed. $650/mo. quiet person. 250.701.0069 or 250.710.6998

SHAWNIGAN LAKE. large 2 bdrm, above ground, recent upgrades, $900 incl utils, ns, np, w/d, NOW (250)715-6951

FOR ONE PERSON Cowichan Bay near 4â&#x2C6;&#x2019;way. Levelâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;entry bsmt. Bright/spacious. Covered patio/Quiet/private. Ideal for mature lady. N/S, N/P, N/L. $500./mo. util. incl. 748â&#x2C6;&#x2019;7704.

DUPLEXES FOR RENT

LADYSMITH new bright 1 Br oceanfront, laminate flrs, all appls, d/w, laundry, prkg, NS/NP. $700 incls hydro. Immed. 1-604-984-0836

CLEAN 3 BR, 1 bath, Side by Side duplex, includes washer/dryer, large yard & deck, near bus, lake near by. $750 + utils, avail Now, 1250-380-2026 or text /call 1-250-891-2803

2BDRM in Chemainus, near golf course. Suit working couple. 1â&#x2C6;&#x2019;250â&#x2C6;&#x2019;724â&#x2C6;&#x2019;1397.

SHARED ACCOMMODATION MILL BAY Completely furnished room in large quiet home. Off road parking. $375/mo. incl. many extras. 250â&#x2C6;&#x2019;733â&#x2C6;&#x2019;0905.

CLEANING For all your cleaning, cooking and laundry needs. Island Domestic has experienced housekeepers. We also do apartment, offices and one-time cleans. Serving Mill Bay to Ladysmith. Bonded, Insured, WCB, registered with DVA. 7100864 or 866-749-0213. www.islanddomestic services.ca Kaeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cleaning - House cleaning + yardwork avail. $25.00/hr, min 2 hrs. Call Angie 250-510-5498

HANDYPERSON .

SARAH & CO. PROPERTY MAINTENANCE Free-Estimates Seniors-Discount Lawn-Care Packages, Landscaping & Design, Powerwashing, Carpentry/Deck-Work, Eavestrough-Cleaning, Moss-Removal, Hauling/Rubbish-Removal, Painting Small-MovingJobs, RECYCLING .

Sarah 250-732-3591

PAVING/SEAL COATING ALLEN ASPHALT concrete, brick, drains, foundations, walls, membranes 250-751-0310 OR 778-269-1113

RUBBISH REMOVAL A YARD OR TWO DELIVERY SERVICE All Gravels, Mulch, Garden Soils. JUNK & RUBBISH REMOVAL 250-246-0333 ayardortwo.com


18

Wednesday, October 2, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

$

10 Buffet

Wednesday & Thursday Evenings starting at 5 pm PLUS... Receive a Pull Tab to WIN $5 - $50 in

FREE

SLOT PLAY!

Join us in our Players Bar & Grill 9:30 am - 10:00 pm

PLAYERS is now Fully Licensed

250-746-6300 436 Cowichan Way, Duncan

■ PAPER BINGO ■ ELECTRONIC BINGO ■ SLOT MACHINE ■ NEW HOURS: Sun - Thurs 10 am - Midnight • Fri - Sat 10 am - 1 am

Call to place your ad:

Business at a

GLANCE

Purely Optometry BESIDE DIAMOND EYECARE

EYE EXAMS Family Eye & Vision Care Call for most reasonable rates

250-597-1011 159 Trunk Road, Duncan www.davidgaleconstruction.ca

ALL CERTIFIED TRADES

David Gale

Trained Architectural Technologist

CONSTRUCTION Additions • Renovations

• Decks • Doors • Basement Suites • Foundations • Windows 20 YEARS • Kitchen • Bathroom IN THE VALLEY • Drywall • Plumbing • Electrical Estimates, Plans

FREE

250.746.9956 Leave message

250-748-2666 Monday - Friday 8:30am - 5:00pm Email: classifieds@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

JAC KO ’ S Concrete Finishing Form Work • Prep • & More

FREE ESTIMATES Phone: (250)

733-0884

...come experience ! the maejic

102-440 Whistler Street, Duncan

★ 250-701-0375 maejic@cow-net.com

Reach over 48,000 homes a week CREATIVE ADVERTISING at a reasonable rate!

Call 748-2666

Dave, Darin, Heather, Katherine & Vi will be at your service

The Metropolitan Opera Live in HD: Eugene Onegin

Cowichan Marine Services Specializing in: • Yamaha • Mercury • Mercruiser All Makes & Models 10 years Experience

SAT OCT 5, 9:55AM More information at www.cowichantheatre.ca

TICKETS ON SALE NOW Phone (250) 748-7529 2687 James St., Duncan

Sacha Lepage

5175 Koksilah Rd. Duncan, BC Cell: 250-710-3001 • EMERG: 250-732-4408 cowichanmarineservices@shaw.ca

50% off ★★★ from CONCEPT to COMPLETION!

COWICHAN THEATRE PRESENTS

ALL FRAMES DIAMOND EYECARE 159 Trunk Road at Brae, Duncan 250-597-1011 EYE EXAMS

There’s No Place Like the Perfect Home …and we’re here to help you find find it!

Coronation Market A Great Convenient Store to pick-up your TV Scene, fresh produce and groceries. Hours : Weekdays 7:30 am - 8:00 pm Saturdays 8:30 am - 8:00 pm • Sunday 9:00 am- 8:00 pm 607 Coronation Ave, Duncan - Just down from M&M meats 250-748-6655

Real Estate Guide


Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Spend $250 and

receive a

FREE 25 $

u

FREE

one time use cash card u

With this coupon and a purchase of $250 or more before applicable taxes at any Real Canadian Superstore location (excludes purchase of tobacco, alcohol products, prescriptions, gift cards, phone cards, lottery tickets, all third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners, etc.) and any other products which are provincially regulated) and we will give you a one time use $25 Real Canadian Superstore cash card. Cash card is not a gift card and can only be redeemed at Real Canadian Superstore within the specified effective dates. See cash card for complete redemption details. Limit one coupon per family and/or customer account. No cash value. No copies. Coupon must be presented to the cashier at time of purchase. Cannot be combined with any other coupons or promotional offers. Coupon valid from Friday, September 27th until closing Thursday, October 3rd, 2013. 924433

4

SUPER SPECIAL

.97

Bakeshop crusty French bread or Italian bread unsliced, 450 g 227060 46038347442

Huggies club size plus diapers size N-6, 100-216â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 579226 3600036484

33

56

our gas bar and earn

Or, get

bone in ham portions shank or butt portions 445561 1702

Nestle confectionary frozen dessert selected varieties, 1.5 L 156998 5500040360

ea

LIMIT 4

AFTER LIMIT

44.99

7 3.5

Fuel up at

ea

10000 03864

¢

per litre**

Lysol No Touch 1â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 408403 1920000785

in SuperbucksÂŽ value when you pay with your

¢

2

king crab legs frozen, 680 g up to $24.98 value

u

Spend $250 or more before applicable taxes at any Real Canadian Superstore location and receive free king crab legs 680 g. Excludes purchase se of tobacco, alcohol products, prescriptions, gift cards, phone cards, lottery tickets, all third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners, etc.) and any other products which hi h are provincially i i ll regulated. l The retail value of up to $24.98 will be deducted from the total amount of your purchase before sales taxes are applied. Limit one coupon per family and/or customer account. No cash value. No copies. Coupon must be presented to the cashier at time of purchase. Valid from Friday, October 4th until closing Thursday, October 10th, 2013. Cannot be combined with any other coupons or promotional offers. No substitutions, refunds or exchanges on free item. 10000 04101 7 907480 4

Valid until Thur. Oct. 3

1

88

/lb 4.14 /kg

Atlantic lonster tail 142-170 g 847858 13906

3

99

7

ea

LIMIT 4

AFTER LIMIT

6.97

97

ea

LIMIT 4

AFTER LIMIT

14.99

selected varieties, 10 kg

Pyrex glass storage set 10 pc 321916 7116006115

5

98

6

14

ÂŽ

per litre**

**Redeem your earned SuperbucksÂŽ value towards the purchase of Merchandise at participating stores (excluding tobacco, alcohol, lottery tickets, gas and prescriptions). With each fuel purchase when you use your Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Choice FinancialÂŽ MasterCardÂŽ or Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Choice FinancialÂŽ debit card as payment, you will receive 7 cents per litre in SuperbucksÂŽ value. When you use any other method of payment, you will receive 3.5 cents per litre in SuperbucksÂŽ value. SuperbucksÂŽ value expires 60 days after date of issue. SuperbucksÂŽ value are not redeemable at third party businesses within participating stores, the gas bar, or on the purchase of tobacco, alcohol, lottery tickets and prescriptions. SuperbucksÂŽ value has no cash value and no cash will be returned for any unused portion. IdentiďŹ cation may be required at the time of redemption. See SuperbucksÂŽ receipt for more details. ÂŽ Trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. Š2013. â&#x20AC; MasterCard is a registered trademark of MasterCard International Incorporated. Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Choice Bank a licensee of the mark. Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Choice Financial MasterCard is provided by Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Choice Bank. Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Choice Financial personal banking products are provided by the direct banking division of CIBC.

Prices are in effect until Sunday, October 6, 2013 or while stock lasts. Quantities and/or selection of items may be limited and may not be available in all stores. No rainchecks. No substitutions on clearance items or where quantities are advertised as limited. Advertised pricing and product selection (flavour, colour, patterns, style) may vary by store location. We reserve the right to limit quantities to reasonable family requirements. We are not obligated to sell items based on errors or misprints in typography or photography. Coupons must be presented and redeemed at time of purchase. Applicable taxes, deposits, or environmental surcharges are extra. No sales to retail outlets. Some items may have â&#x20AC;&#x153;plus deposit and environmental chargeâ&#x20AC;? where applicable. ÂŽ/â&#x201E;˘ The trademarks, service marks and logos displayed in this flyer are trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. All rights reserved. Š 2013 Loblaws Inc. * we match prices! Applies only to our major supermarket competitorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; flyer items. Major supermarket competitors are determined solely by us based on a number of factors which can vary by store location. We will match the competitorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s advertised price only during the effective date of the competitorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s flyer advertisement. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES (note that our major supermarket competitors may not). Due to the fact that product is ordered prior to the time of our Ad Match checks, quantities may be limited. We match identical items (defined as same brand, size, and attributes) and in the case of fresh produce, meat, seafood and bakery, we match a comparable item (as determined solely by us). We will not match competitorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;multi-buysâ&#x20AC;? (eg. 2 for $4), â&#x20AC;&#x153;spend x get xâ&#x20AC;?, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Freeâ&#x20AC;?, â&#x20AC;&#x153;clearanceâ&#x20AC;?, discounts obtained through loyalty programs, or offers related to our third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners etc.). We reserve the right to cancel or change the terms of this program at any time. Customer Relations: 1-866-999-9890.

ea

AFTER LIMIT

10.99

00

ea

LIMIT 2

AFTER LIMIT

7.97

97

ea

LIMIT 3

AFTER LIMIT

29.99

Agropur Anco Gouda cheese Made with pasteurized milk, Gouda Anco is a lactose-free, ďŹ rm, cooked and pressed cheese. It has a creamy yellow colour and is dotted with small holes.

3

96

5 lb BOX

LIMIT 6

â&#x20AC;

Redeem Superbucks towards purchases made in-store.**

superstore.ca

no name club packÂŽ ďŹ&#x201A;our 408722 6038301376

in Superbucks value using any other purchase method ÂŽ

Starting4 Fri. Oct.

Spend $250 and receive

u

19

seedless Mandarin oranges product of China 716013 1770

Kraft Cracker Barrel natural cheese bar selected varieties, 400-500 g 748466 6810003171

assorted 232542 5870316771

your choice

When you purchase Anco gouda cheese, assorted varieties, 200 g

ea

LIMIT 4

AFTER LIMIT

8.99

4

00

Everyday Essentialsâ&#x201E;˘ metal bakeware

ea

1

save $

see in-store for more deli cheese coupon starting Oct. 4, 2013

5

97

ea

00

Save $1 when you purchase Anco gouda cheese 200 g, assorted varieties, at Real Canadian SuperstoreÂŽ where products are sold. $1 will be deducted from the total purchase amount before sales taxes are applied. Limit one coupon per family and/or customer account. No cash value. No copies. Coupon must be presented to the cashier at time of purchase. Valid from October 4 until closing October 17, 2013. Cannot be combined with any other coupons or promotional offers. 605928 

 




20

Wednesday, October 2, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Why Pay More?

7-0424

Drive a Little, SAVE A LOT!

3 25205-05-4978-760

Comprehensive Vehicle Inspections

2006 FORD E-350 XL CUBE VAN 5.4L V8 TRK Grey/white 80,839 miles. Stk #D14823 16 Foot BOX with Mom's Attic over cab. 81,000 miles and lots of recent work make this unit a smart choice for your business.

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

$

T R ADE S WELCOME PAID FOR OR NOT!

5 door hatchback 6-A/T, 1.6L, 41,024 km Stk #D14903

2008 NISSAN ROGUE S AWD, 2.5L 14 CVT SUV Grey

$

R/T 5.9L V8 4 A/T 4 WD Stk #T15092

14,288

GLS Sedan 1.6L 14 4 A/T FWD Stk #T15114*

$

$

$8,988

2006 HUMMER H3 3.5L, V6, 4-A/T, 4WD Stk #D14814A

62,000 kms

2007 CHEVROLET COBALT LT

$

15,388

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

2011 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4WD 3.7L 4AT Stk #D15162

$

22,888

2012 MITSUBISHI RVR Stk #D14845A

$

22,888

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

7,888

2007 FORD RANGER Club Cab Stk #14312C

$23,988

$17,788

7,888

$

SUV Stk #P15131

$11,988

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

orange, 59,454 km STK# D14765B

9,888

2013 DODGE JOURNEY

Stk #P15124

$

2008 PONTIAC WAVE

(+ $499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

2013 CHRYSLER 200 TOURING

$

(+ $499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

+ $499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

Stk #D114664A* (Not exactly as shown)

$16,388

9,388

Coupe, Black 62,223 km. Stk #D15095

11,188

2005 CHRYSLER 300

Sedan, 1.4L 14 Turbo 6 A/T Stk #D15087

(+ $499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

75,0000 kms

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

2012 CHEVROLET CRUZE LT

TURBO

Van, Brown, 141,210 km Stk #P14791A

15,688

2003 DODGE DURANGO

R/T 4WD

$

2007 HYUNDAI ACCENT

2008 CHEVROLET UPLANDER

*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

Stk #D14925B

(+ $499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

17,388

DIVORCE? BANKRUPTCY? BAD CREDIT? NO CREDIT? NO PROBLEM, WE CAN HELP. GET APPROVED.

$

12,488

$

Stk#D15293

– L O C A L LY O W N E D & O P E R AT E D –

Stk#P15124

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

5.7L HEMI Quad Cab SLT w/sunroof,side steps and rear sliding window. This unit is ready to go. Hurry in today and see why we are the #1 choice for Vancouver Island

Your Island’s First Credit Choice • 12 Retail Lenders to Choose From

2013 CHRYSLER TOURING 200

2011 FORD FIESTA SE

4x4, 5.7L, 5-A/T 140.5"WB

On All Our Vehicles

11,888

CREDIT ISSUES??? WITH OVER 450 VEHICLES, WE GET YOU APPROVED AND OFFER SELECTION.

AWD

SALE OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK PRICES IN EFFECT UNTIL OPEN: Mon.-Thurs. 9-7; TUESDAY Sat. 9-6 & Sun. 10-4 OCT. 8TH 2007 DODGE RAM

Diesel

2007 FORD F350

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

2007 GMC ACADIA SLE, AWD 3.6L V6 6-A/T 8 SEAT Stk #D15158

Stk# D14738A

$23,988

$

23,988

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

2007 HYUNDAI ACCENT

2008 DODGE RAM SLT

Stk #P14855A D14909

$

8,388

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

QCab 4x4 5.7L 5AT 140.5 WB Stk #D15105A

$

22,288

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax) (*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax) All payments are based on 4.99% and include the $499 Documentation fee. Subject to approval of credit. STK # D14903 $108 bi/weekly $0 down, 4.99% 72mns total cost to borrow $2324.12 STK # P14955A $118 bi/weekly $0 down, 4.99% 84mns total cost to borrow $3398.08 P14791A $96 bi/weekly $0 down, 4.99% 60mns total cost to borrow $1467.80 STK #D14765B $82 bi/weekly $0 down, 4.99% 60mns total cost to borrow $1228.26

www.galaxymotors.net 7329 Trans Canada Hwy. Duncan

Open Sundays 11-4

DL#31033

October 2, 2013  

The October 2, 2013 edition of the Cowichan Valley Citizen

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