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Two Valley stars make cut for YTV’s ‘SuperGroup’

NEWS, Page 8

Cowichan Piggies play to unusual pair of draws

SPORTS, Page 16

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Salaries frozen at CVRD in 2014

Bamboletta Dolls owner Christina Platt cuddles one of Bamboletta’s own creations alongside her cherished childhood doll, Elisa Liza. Bamboletta was honoured at last weekend’s Small Business BC Awards for Best Community Impact. For the full story see page 3. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN]

Editor’s note: This is the first article in a series the Citizen will be running. Over several weeks, the Citizen will take a deeper look at local government spending. The Beggar’s Checklist is a 10point rundown of suggestions for municipal governments to manage costs before relying on raising property taxes or seeking assistance from other levels of government. It was introduced by the Canadian Taxpayers’ Federation, an advocacy group promoting accountable government and lower taxes. LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

Macaulay told the courtroom filled with Noble’s family and his many friends. “I doubt that the altercation or the blow would have occurred but for the lack of inhibition or control that too frequently occurs when young men consume

Salaries are frozen in 2014 for the Cowichan Valley Regional District’s upper echelon of employees but the board of directors is still pushing further to find ways to trim excess fat from them and bring them into line with the private sector. According to the CVRD’s employee remuneration and expenses statement for the year 2012 — the most recent list available — the CVRD paid 43 people more than $75K per year, plus expenses, and

See ALCOHOL, Page 4

See PUBLIC CONCERN, Page 5

Noble’s killer gets 2-year sentence LOUISE DICKSON TIMES COLONIST

Brandon Carl Huth has been sentenced to two years less a day plus three years probation for the manslaughter of Shawnigan Lake’s Tyler Noble in downtown Victoria on Nov. 26, 2011. In just over one minute, the two young men who had never met

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and who had both been drinking, engaged in a brief but fatal argument outside the McDonald’s at Douglas and View streets. Huth, who was 24, struck Noble with a single blow to the head. Noble immediately fell backwards, striking his head on the sidewalk. The 20-year-old died in hospital a few hours later from blunt-force

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head injuries. In his judgment on Tuesday, B.C. Supreme Court Justice Malcolm Macaulay sent a message to young people that alcohol-fuelled aggression on city streets after bar closing is unacceptable. “The liquor intake by both Huth and Noble played a significant role in these unfortunate events,”

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Friday, March 7, 2014 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

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Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, March 7, 2014

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Valley dollmaker wins Small Business BC honour “We put a lot of effort and time into the dolls, a lot of love into them.”

KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

At first glance, Bamboletta Dolls doesn’t meet the stereotypical image of a business, let alone an award-winning business. Natural light streams through enormous windows of the workshop at Whippletree Junction, while women sit around on comfy chairs and couches, sewing and stuffing dolls, adding brightly coloured yarn for hair, chatting casually like the good friends they are. That’s the secret to Bamboletta’s success, however. Honoured at the Small Business BC Awards last Friday for Best Community Impact, Bamboletta has found an international market for its all-natural, one-ofa-kind dolls, while remaining true to its roots. “It was a nice nod of recognition for the choices I’ve made in running the business this way,” owner Christina Platt said. “It felt nice to be recognized.” Platt started making dolls in her basement 12 years ago. She wanted to buy a Waldorf doll for her newborn niece, but couldn’t find the right one, so she bought a book — in German — and cut up her Ikea rug for materials to make the first one. Six years ago, she turned it into a business. Now Platt has 34 local employees, mostly stay-at-home moms who work out of their homes, allowing them to earn money and stay with their kids. “It’s so surprising that something I did in my living room is supporting so many women,” Platt said.

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Christina Platt, right, and Brooke Cannon stitch dolls in the cozy atmosphere of Bamboletta’s shop at Whippletree Junction south of Duncan. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN] “I really love these ladies.” The business has grown organically, allowing Platt and her employees to move along comfortably, which is reflected in the product. “I really think — and this is going to sound cheesy, but I really believe it — because of the way I’ve chosen to grow my business, we’ve really infused the product with love,” Platt said. “It’s something that can’t be bought.”

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Platt isn’t the only person at Bamboletta who feels that way. “We put a lot of effort and time into the dolls, a lot of love into them,” said production manager Brandi Teufel, who got to know Platt when she worked at the post office, then started working part-time at Bamboletta, moving gradually to full-time.

“We hug them and gush over them.” Nothing at Bamboletta is outsourced or done overseas, but the company still turns out 70 to 80 dolls a week, selling 98 per cent of them online and 90 per cent to customers outside Canada. Eighty per cent are snapped up within 10 minutes of being posted to Bamboletta’s website. Not all of the dolls are sold, however. Every year, Bamboletta donates hundreds of dolls to Ronald McDonald House, BC Children’s Hospital, Canuck Place and Jeneece Place, as well as to local individuals. The ladies who sew the dolls have mixed feelings about parting ways with something they have put so much effort and love into. “You do fall in love,” said Shauna Devlin, who has worked for Bamboletta for four years. “I do shipping sometimes, and there are some dolls that you’re like, ‘I just want to keep you.’ It never ceases to amaze me.” The fact that someone else will love the dolls makes parting with them easier, though. “We know most of them will be played with by a child,” Teufel said. “It’s great seeing them come in here, so excited to get a doll. It’s super cute.”

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News

Friday, March 7, 2014 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Alcohol consumption played significant role in tragic events NOBLE’S KILLER, From Page 1

Tyler Noble

alcohol to excess. I also doubt that death would have ensued from the blow if Noble had not struck his head on the sidewalk.” Huth, standing alone in the prisoner’s dock, did not react when his sentence was imposed. Although the defence had asked the court to impose a suspended sentence to allow Huth to care for his ill father, Macaulay did not accept that Huth’s personal circumstances warranted one. “I am satisfied that general deterrence and denunciation require me to impose a jail sentence,” Macaulay said.

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The judge gave Huth credit for 10 days pretrial custody, meaning Huth must serve a sentence of two years less 11 days. Macaulay will ask the authorities to allow Huth to serve his sentence at the Brannen Lake facility on Vancouver Island to be closer to his father. One of the painful ironies in the case, Macaulay said, is that both young men were accomplished athletes, gainfully employed, with many admirable personal qualities. The judge acknowledged the loss the Noble family has suffered. Tyler’s mother, Laurie, continues to live with horror, agony, empti-

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“Tyler Noble died as a result of a single, intentional forceful blow that Huth delivered when he should not have done so. It was not a consensual fight. It was not a case of self-defence.” MALCOLM MACAULAY, B.C. Supreme Court Justice

ness, despair and confusion, the judge said. His sister, Samantha, now an only child, experiences overwhelming grief. Macaulay acknowledged the strength of Noble’s father, Ken, when he read a haunting victim impact statement aloud in court last week. The judge called Huth a young man of good morals and values. “He is a good son, good to his friends and associates and prepared to assist others as needed,” Macaulay said. “I would go one step further: Huth’s willingness to help without question likely motivated his agreeing to the request to help deal with Noble, who was very drunk and argumentative. Unfortunately, Huth had also been drinking and his judgment as to how to intercede was undoubtedly impaired.” Macaulay emphasized that Noble’s death was not an accident or even close to one. “Tyler Noble died as a result of a single, intentional forceful blow that Huth delivered when he should not have done so. It was not a consensual fight. It was not a case of self-defence.” Macaulay accepted that Huth is remorseful and has excellent prospects for rehabilitation. “It’s hard for us,” said Shayne Stewart, Tyler’s lifelong friend, outside court. “But at the end of the day, nothing’s going to bring Tyler back.” “The positive thing is we can move on from here now. We can get on with our lives....And Brandon will have to live with it for the next five years.” Macaulay imposed a lifetime weapons prohibition. Huth has been ordered to give a sample of his DNA and to perform 240 hours of community work service in the first 18 months of his probation.


News

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, March 7, 2014

5

Public concern has led to committee to investigate salaries SALARIES, From Page 1 of that list, 22 of them were paid more than $100K per year. The salary total for all 43 people was $4.56 million with an extra $119K for expenses. CVRD directors struck a committee in January, with Duncan Mayor Phil Kent as chair, to look specifically at the subject of these salaries. Finding frames of reference for such an investigation is challenging, Kent said. “Normally they’ve made comparisons with municipalities and regional bodies of similar size and service areas and employees. Not all the private sector shares their information. I think we also need to look at how we can connect these things to the general condition of the economy.” The committee was formed because municipal governments across Canada have been dealing with the challenge of “reflecting the expectation of society,” Kent said. He pointed out that the board must appear to be acting fairly. “We need a clear policy from the board perspective on how these things are measured, benchmarked and adjusted over time.” The CVRD board has made such adjustments, according to the Duncan mayor. “At one time there was a great deal of competition for the kind of skill sets and the professionals that were available to do the work. There actually was a policy that the board would try to achieve the 75th percentile of the average

PAGE 6: editorial summation of what’s to

come in the Beggar’s Checklist series and its purpose NEXT WEEK: The Citizen delves into the

idea of contracting out district services to the private sector

Phil Kent, Duncan mayor

Bruce Fraser, area director

Rob Hutchins, board chair

of remuneration [for comparable positions]. “The board adjusted that later on as that market demand eased off. We were able to go back to the 50th percentile to be right at the median,” Kent said. “It’s important to be able to attract and keep quality, qualified staff. But it can’t be at any cost and it can’t be disconnected from the community and the society that you’re living in.” His group is going to complete a comprehensive look by the summer and bring back recommendations to the board before the next budget cycle begins. CVRD board chair Rob Hutchins agreed that one of the drivers for forming Kent’s committee was a push from the public in general.

“I think its a growing awareness and concern about public sector wage or compensation packages and we made a commit to take a look at that,” he said. Bringing staff salaries into line with the private sector is “quite

a complex topic,” according to Bruce Fraser, regional area director for Shawnigan Lake, who has been vocal on the subject at the board table. Fraser said that part of the problem is meeting concerns from tax-

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payers about the eventual bill for all these jobs. “One of the ironies, of course, is that the regional district is probably the lowest tax bite of all the various tax bites. What we’re trying to do is put senior salaries in a reasonable relationship to the economy of their own community.” So, what is comparable in the private sector? Fraser said he saw challenges there because the skill requirements can be so different. “Would they like us to compare the regional district to Walmart? Which corporation represents a comparable level of responsibility, effort and academic and experience preparation for the job? If we had a neat comparison, it would be a lot easier,” he said.

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6

Friday, March 7, 2014 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

OUR VIEW

Several options for a net-zero tax increase A

s budget deliberations continue, it’s time to speak up about what our local governments should or should not have in their forecasts for fiscal 2014. It is entirely possible that every municipal and regional district could start with a “net zero” tax increase each year. Penticton did so, twice, under former mayor, now MLA Dan Ashton. There is no reason why that couldn’t be the case here. It would be the job of the mayor and council to mandate staff to come up with net zero budgets. Otherwise, staff will predictably bring in increased residential

taxes and suggest that there’s no way they could do net zero. Regional districts have somehow slipped below the radar. Don’t forget to check your tax notice, and even those within a municipality will notice that they are paying taxes for the regional district. One needs to keep a watchful eye on regional districts, as civic leaders who are reluctant to hit taxpayers at the front door for city taxes may be using the back door to ram projects through via regional district levies. The Canadian Taxpayers Federation has come up with some suggestions in what they call “The Beggar’s Checklist”. Over

ABOUT US

OTHER VIEWS

the next weeks, this newspaper will dig into each of the 10 aspects of the plan, which are chock full of ideas and opportunities to keep civic taxes low: Bring salaries and benefits inline with the private sector. With union contracts, this will be a tough place to make headway, but in 2008, the Canadian Federation of Independent Business noted municipalities had an 11.2 per cent wage and salary advantage over private sector workers - 35.9 per cent once benefits and pension plans are included. Contract out services. What services does the city/regional district offer that compete with the private sector?

Utilizing public private partnerships for capital projects. What 3P projects have been, or could be, undertaken to ease the burden on taxpayers? Selling surplus land and assets. Why not? There could be some extra income from unused civic property that could help fund the next infrastructure project — instead of raising taxes. Converting services to user fees. Instead of blanket tax hikes, let those who want to use a particular service pay directly. Seeking volunteers for the delivery of city services. What are we paying staff to do that volunteers could do? Refocus activities on core servi-

Publisher Shirley Skolos Editor Andrea Rondeau Customer service manager Dawn Heggie Production supervisor Alice Brownbridge Newsroom 250-748-2666, extension 235 news@cowichanvalleycitizen.com Advertising 250-748-2666, extensions 223, 227, 228, 229, 230 Classified ads 1-866-415-9169

Complaint resolution If speaking to the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about a story we publish, contact the B.C. Press Council, which examines complaints from the public about the conduct of the press in gathering and presenting the news. Send your written concern and documentation within 45 days to: B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C., V9R 2R2. Website: www.bcpresscouncil.org.

Vancouver Island News Group

Land should be included in marsh

Cowichan Valley Citizen is a division of VI Newspaper Group Limited Partnership., 251 Jubilee St., Duncan, B.C., V9L 1W8 Phone: 250-748-2666 Fax: 250-748-1552

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ces? Cities/regional districts continue to creep away from what their core responsibilities should be. Is it time to re-focus? Sponsorship activities. Companies may be willing to pay premiums to have their names on public facilities to take advantage of the extra exposure. Partnering with other governments for service delivery. Duplication of services is a real problem at the local/regional level. Utilizing new technology to reduce costs. Plenty of good ideas here, and any combination should make net zero tax increases realistic.

EDC helped keep our business alive I am writing to let this community, particularly the business community, know of the treasure we have in Economic Development Cowichan. In the last three years I have had only support, encouragement and practical advice from the team at EDC. Kathy Lachman has been exceptionally helpful to me and our business in general. I wasn’t aware of this invaluable resource when I first launched my business eight years ago. When I did learn about EDC a few years ago, I was too distracted and not adequately organized to take advantage of

all that was on offer. Three years ago, I decided to examine EDC in greater detail and to figure out how I might seek help. I have to say, doing so has been one of the best business decisions I made. With the recession, our business was faltering and the urge to pack it all in often crept into my mind. Kathy, Geoff and Judy (EDC team) however, encouraged and explored with me ways of keeping the business alive. Kathy Lachman was exceptional in attempts to put our products in front of various accounts. Trade show opportunities, conversations with various buyers were made available to us as well. Kathy always reminded me

of their desire to keep businesses in this community healthy, and the importance of creating job opportunities here, particularly for our young people. I am proud to say that with the help of EDC, we have secured BC Ferries retail as one of our accounts. This is helping us turn the corner with much optimism. We also know that there is much more to come because of the assistance and support that Kathy and her team continue to give us. Sending a huge thank you to Geoff, Kathy and Judy for the wonderful work you do to help small businesses such as ours. Gifty Serbeh-Dunn Shea Butter Market founder

Re: Coun. Siebring says: sell the marsh site The land that North Cowichan owns in the Somenos Marsh should not be sold. A new owner will likely sue the taxpayers for misrepresentation when they discover the complexities and spiraling costs involved in attempting to build the foundation for a building in a wet marshland. They’ll discover that the land is flood-prone and that the cost of insurance is prohibitive, if available at all. The legal costs to the taxpaying public could far exceed any paltry sum North Cowichan Municipality could realize for selling marshland. And why aren’t we supportive of marshland for what it is, a place of refuge, its real value being its wildness? Perhaps Coun. All Siebring could share with us his record of preserving wild places for the community to enjoy. From a municipality’s standpoint, sometimes cutting your present losses is preferable to incurring more. I wish all marshland north of Beverly Street could be included in the Somenos Marsh (the exception being the school, which could live out its usefulness, then be put in). Does anyone else out there share my views? If so, let North Cowichan know. They want your opinion. I believe the public consultation process is still in effect. Julie Foster Duncan Submit your letter to the editor online at www.cowichanvalleycitizen.com


Opinion

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, March 7, 2014

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Council should preserve property for farmland Re: opposition to the proposed development of Ford Road property as police facility It would be very short-sighted to use the Ford Road property for the police facility. It is an old farm, unused for many years and ready for re-development as an agricultural property. David Ford gave this property to his step-daughter, my grandmother, Florence Yates, in the early 1920s, so my family has kept track of it ever since. It is fine farmland, which ought not to be developed for any other purpose. Surely, even now, there are councillors who know the importance of saving remaining farmland to feed the growing population and as insurance against crop failure elsewhere. Too much good agricultural land in Somenos has been sacrificed to commercial development in recent years. The Cowichan Commons is located on what was once excellent farmland, including the farm of my other grandparents, Elizabeth and Alwyn Thompson, owned by them 1917 to 1944, and the farm of our friends Frederick and Nina Holmes (who owned an adjacent farm for an even longer time; that farm is also now under the Cowichan Commons). The three farms were the location of mixed farming, which supported whole families. Had they produced cash crops, they could have provided fruit and vegetables for a significant proportion of the population of Cowichan. It has been fashionable to regard commercial development as somehow more important than the preservation of farmland. WHY must the fine agricultural property at the corner of Ford and Drinkwater Roads be sacrificed? The council must be aware of the complications of developing this property for the proposed purpose, including the need to remake the road system in that area. Surely there is another more appropriate

location on the main highway, perhaps one already developed as a failed or faltering commercial property, which may now be available for other purposes. Has this angle been thoroughly explored? It is distressing that my arguments are likely to be disregarded and good farmland once again placed under blacktop and building, and permanently removed from its earlier, productive use. I hope another location for the police facility may be found. Gillian Thompson former North Cowichan resident

Taxes should not be based on last year-plus I heard North Cowichan Mayor Lefebure quoted on the radio Feb. 19 as saying they were targeting “stable increases of around three per cent” in the

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budgeting process. The five-year plan North Cowichan has put out confirms this. It seems wrong for the mayor, or any elected politician, to have a prescribed notion of stable year over year increases in taxes. Taxes should be based on budgets, which in turn should be based on sober assessments of what the taxpayers need. Taxes should not be based on “let’s do the same as last year plus a set amount”. It is always true that a government will spend at least 100 per cent of the budget it has, so allowing them to add increases automatically will escalate the overspending problems. Based on figures from North Cowichan annual reports and the latest five-year plan, the tax take, all in, of North Cowichan has increased from just under $16 million in 2004 to a projected $34 million by 2017.

Simple arithmetic suggests that is an increase of 113 per cent over 13 years or roughly 8.5 per cent per year. Maybe some would quibble and say that some of that is water or sewage fees, but regardless, those are still taxes, i.e., money the government levies from citizens to carry out the work of government. Population, on the other hand, has increased from roughly about 27,000 to about 30,000 over the last 10 years. The rate of population increase, again using simple arithmetic, is about one per cent per year. Taxes are increasing eight times faster than population growth would suggest is necessary. I think there is something wrong with North Cowichan governance. Nick Caumanns North Cowichan

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8

News

Friday, March 7, 2014 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

www.cowichanvalleycitizen.com

www.valleycarpetoneduncan.com 230 Kenneth Street, Duncan

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LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

Two Cowichan Valley teens — Lynnea Bruce and Parker Schmidt — are both contestants in YTV’s The Next Star: SuperGroup program, which starts Tuesday, March 11 at 7 p.m. TV audiences across Canada will vote for the next super group in the same way One Direction or Fifth Harmony rose to fame. Schmidt, 14, was part of season four of The Next Star, in 2011. “It was kind of nice going into this show having The Next Star under my belt. And my friend, Shania, who was also on my season, is on the show as well so we had a really nice reunion when we saw each other,” he said. Asked what he’s hoping people will really enjoy about this new program, Schmidt said, “I think it’s going to be having people see me perform in a group instead of solo. I have performed with my brothers before but that was a little different. This will be more just singing and I think it will be cool for people to see me in a group rather than a solo artist.” SuperGroup will appeal to a slightly older audience than The Next Star. “This is steered towards more my age. There are some kids on there that are 17 or 18 now. It will include some more drama,

that kind of thing. The Next Star it was all happy. But this is tougher, more challenging, more real,” he said. Bruce, 16, is well known from appearances at Sunfest, Duncan’s Got Talent and other stages on Vancouver Island. “I’ve been dreaming of being on a show like this since I can remember. I love watching American Idol, I haven’t missed an episode since season six. I’ve auditioned for The Next Star multiple times. I can’t believe how lucky I am to be part of SuperGroup,” she said. Working with the crew of experts that YTV has assembled to coach the teens is exciting in itself. “We were all sort of star struck when we first met them because they’ve worked and done some amazing things,” she said. Family and friends have been supportive, even though Bruce had to keep some details from them. “I’m lucky that Parker was there with me because he’s one of my closest friends and we’ve gotten to share the experience. And that way we didn’t have any secrets,” she said. The six-episode series, produced by Tricon Films & Television, will take viewers through an intense, top-level talent showdown in order to crown a new mega boy or girl group.


News

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, March 7, 2014

◆ SCOTIABANK MS WALK PROFILE

Visit us online at www.cowichanvalleycitizen.com

MS Walk Citizen of the Week

Valleyview Treatment Centre

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Dr. Harris is accepting new patients. In partnership with: www.mswalks.ca

Name: Pam Smith Team: Coastal Community Crew I lace up to: “prevent my children and grandchildren from going through what I am going through.”

Fight against MS personal for Pam

P

am Smith was suffering from the symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis for years until she was diagnosed in 2001. Her family doctor couldn’t figure out what was wrong, so Pam decided to change doctors. That’s when she was referred to a specialist and diagnosed with MS. Pam admits the hardest part was accepting help from others. She felt embarrassed that she wasn’t able to do certain things the way she used to and didn’t want to ask friends or family for help. She learned over time that accepting help is not a sign

of weakness. Her Husband Dick, daughters Jackelyn and Michelle have provided support both physically and emotionally. Pam says, “They are always aware when I’m having a bad day and give hugs and support, which is sometimes all I need”. She participates every year in the Duncan Scotiabank MS Walk because she doesn’t want her children or g randchildren to go through what she’s going through. Pam says “If we can find a cure to MS we might be able to cure other neurological diseases”. Pam has participated in

the MS Walk since 2003. She was team captain of her own team for several years and presently continues to be an excellent fundraiser for MS Walk as part of her daughter Michelle’s team, Coastal Community Crew. The Duncan MS Walk is an inclusive and family oriented event with face painting, balloons, coffee and continental breakfast, healthy lunch, doggie treats and bandanas, motivational speakers and lots of community spirit. All routes are wheel chair accessible. For more information or to register go to www.mswalks. ca or call the local MS Society office at 250-748-7010.

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The City of Duncan presents ISA Certified Arborist Todd Gesshe, speaking on the economic, environmental, and social benefits of urban trees and other priorities from Duncan’s ‘Urban Forest Strategy’, including tree maintenance. You are encouraged to attend one of these

free workshops: Monday, March 10 - 10:00 am - 12 noon Duncan Guides Hall, 321 Cairnsmore St.

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9


10

News

Friday, March 7, 2014 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Two charged with robbery, B&E KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

Two Duncan men, including a designated “prolific offender” have been charged in a series of crimes in January and February. Colin Daniel Clark and Devin Cory Mulholland are facing a variety of charges after allegedly dousing a man with bear spray and taking several of his belongings. Clark, who has been designated under the B.C. Attorney General’s Prolific Offender Management program, was charged with two counts of robbery, break and enter, and failure to comply with a probation order, and was taken into custody. Mulholland was charged with robbery and break and enter, and was scheduled to appear in court on Thursday. The incident took place on Jan. 7. North Cowichan/ Duncan RCMP were called to Cliffs Road after a young man was reported to have been hit with bear spray. “RCMP officers attended to the area and found a young local man had been sprayed with bear spray by two men,” Cpl. Jon Stu-

art said. “The young man advised that he was assaulted, and they had taken his jacket, cell phone and personal belongings.” Three days later, the same man went to the RCMP detachment to say that his bicycle had been stolen by two men, one of whom had also been involved in the bear spray incident. He said he had been riding his bike when he was approached and chased by the two men, then was thrown to the ground. The men then fled with his bike. On Feb. 17, police investigated a daytime break and enter, which resulted in the execution of a search warrant in a residence at Gilana Place in Duncan, the home of the two men involved in the bear spray incident. “Items stolen from the break and enter were located in the Gilana Place residence,” Stuart said. The Prolific Offender Management program, under which Clark has been identified, was implemented by the local RCMP in November 2010.

‘Drunk Albertans’ crash into strata gate KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

Residents of a gated strata complex on Sherman Road received a rude awakening late on Tuesday night. Around midnight, a truck with Alberta plates came tearing down Truesdale Street and crashed through the closed entryway to Brookside Gates, then collided with a parked vehicle inside. “A bunch of drunk Albertans came rip-

ping down Truesdale and didn’t see the gate,” Brookside resident Jason Adair said. “They smashed it to hell and took off.” South End volunteer firefighters responded, as did the North Cowichan/ Duncan RCMP. “The investigation is still ongoing, and the police are looking to speak to any witnesses, and the owner of the truck,” spokesperson Cpl. Jon Stuart said. Anyone with more information should contact the RCMP at 250-748-5522.

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Friday, March 7, 2014 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

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Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, March 7, 2014

13

Poster going province-wide LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

Graphic artist Gillian Berry, who teaches at Cowichan Secondary School’s Quamichan Campus, has designed a poster that will be used province-wide to combat eating disorders. The Provincial Eating Disorders Awareness campaign announced that Berry’s poster is expected to find its way to libraries, mental health centres, and other high profile locations to help boost awareness. It’s been an exciting challenge,

according to the artist, who also owns Wild Blossom Studios. “The design process was an interesting one,” she said, “because I was not working from a blank canvas. I was given a few parameters such as ‘Your weight is not your worth’ and asked to create some sort of graphic to enhance its meaning. “Initially, I played around with words and simple graphics, like hearts, to explore a design for the poster. For a number of days, I was trying to find deeper symbols and meaningful ways to repre-

sent weight and worth. I thought of things like fishing and how a fish’s weight determines its worth, to other sayings like ‘You’re worth your weight in gold’. I was thinking too much and needed to let go of the thoughts, and just draw something.” Berry’s mission through Wild Blossom is all about sharing inspiration through stationery, other art forms, and inspirational posts to help others “be you, express yourself”. Gillian Berry is a local artist and teacher whose ideas have led to a special poster against eating disorders. [SUBMITTED]

See BERRY, Page 15

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14

Living

Friday, March 7, 2014 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Monsters of the deep: Ed Boddaert’s ‘memorable night at sea’ “Cor, hell!” exclaimed Archie and Dick, Percy as he reeled back with crewman Percy from the rail, throwing Hunkin, all of whom his hands in front of substituted for his his face. “What is it?” father who was away oday, we have a in the war... guest columnist, “It was a pleasant Ed Boddaert, calm autumn evening for whom my recent as the Ibis sailed out CHRONICLES columns on sea serof Mevagissey HarT.W. Paterson pents “brought back bour, with the other childhood memories members of the fishof fishing off the Cornish coast” ing fleet, bound for the pilchard in 1944. I’ve edited his great grounds off Fowey Point. The story only because of space bay was glassy smooth with a limitations. slight swell, I was at my usual Almost 70 years later, he wonposition at the helm and Eddie ders “if it was an oarfish. The Lakeman was outside the wheelfishermen of the village did not house door, leaning against the believe the crew and ridiculed jamb. them. Things have changed a bit “Mevagissey was a busy fishsince then, when if anything was ing port in those days, located said to exist that was thought midway along the south cost of to be extinct or could not be Cornwall, England. With one because it was not commonplace, hand on a spoke of the wheel and then anyone purporting to have my body leaning on the wheelencountered it was not in his or house window, my eyes scanned her right mind or, as the Cornish the waters with an occasional say, ‘gone Bodmin.’ glance at the compass to check “Bodmin being the town where the course. About a quarter of the asylum was. There have been a mile off the starboard bow, I several sightings recorded in the spotted a plume of water like a papers since 1944.” fountain’s jet, my first encounter “Ed was 13 at the time and with a whale. spent his weekends and school “Some time after 10 o’clock we holidays helping aboard the fishstarted hauling in the nets; there boat Ibis, owned and operated was hardly anything there. After by the Lakeman brothers, Eddie, some discussion it was decided

T

An oarfish that washed ashore on a Bermuda beach in 1860. The animal was 16 ft long and was originally described as a sea serpent. The image was originally published in Harper’s Weekly March 3, 1860. that we would look for schools of pilchard. Percy started one of the engines, put it slow ahead, came up from the engine room and knelt on the deck with his arms on the rail, peering into the black water off the starboard bow. The Lakemans were aft by the wheelhouse. I walked to the rail, braced my knee against it and also peered down into the black water [watching for the telltale silver fluorescence of a school of pilchard]. “Suddenly the Ibis heaved in the water, causing me to almost lose my balance. A massive

silvery shape passed amidships from port to starboard. I knew what it was, but a scared 13-year-old needs some reassurance. ‘That’s a whale, come up to scratch its back on our keel,’ said Percy. I retreated from the rail to the foremast, amidships. If that whale was coming back, I wanted to be as far away from the side as possible and near something solid that I could grab hold of. “All was quiet after that, Percy leaning over the rail, looking for pilchard, Eddie, Archie and Dick on the starboard side by the wheelhouse, I by the foremast,

the black night illuminated only by the one shielded netroom light, the only light that we could have at sea during the war. “Suddenly the black sea parted some 10 to 12 feet in front of Percy’s face, off the starboard side. A three to four-foot diameter object with a black ball-like head came straight out of the water and rose to a height of some 12 feet above the water’s surface. The deck that I was standing on was four feet off the water. I was about five-and-a-half See SAILORS, Page 15

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Living

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, March 7, 2014

15

Sailors stared as ‘thing’ disappeared into the depths MONSTERS, From Page 14

The poster shows that weight is actually irrelevant to self-esteem. Look for her work in a variety of places. [SUBMITTED]

Berry hopes to inspire students POSTER, From Page 13 And that follows naturally from her daily life. “It parallels my work at school, hoping to inspire students both to be and express themselves, in little and big steps,” Berry said. “So often we hold ourselves back from who we really are, especially in the teen years when we want to fit in for fear of ridicule and being different,” she said. “When students open up and start projects that they love, there is so much growth and passion that comes alive in them. It’s not an easy road, but this is where I want to support, and encourage them, to carry on.” Berry’s design for the PEDAW poster features a scale as the central image with a twist: instead of pointing to a number, it points to and highlights the word “irrelevant,” complementing the theme of the poster.

feet [tall] and was looking slightly up at it. “’Cor, hell!’ exclaimed Percy as he reeled back from the rail, throwing his hands in front of his face. ‘What is it?’ “I looked back at the others by the wheelhouse; they were staring at it with their mouths open. That vision still remains with me: three seasoned seamen staring at this thing with their mouths open! I turned to look at this ‘thing,’ momentarily poised on the sea. It gave a breathing sound, ‘Aaagggh, Haaggh,’ before slipping vertically down the way it had come. “A stunned silence for a few seconds before excited conversation broke out as the four fishermen compared sightings: a tubular form with globular

“That vision still remains with me: three seasoned seamen staring at this thing with their mouths open!” ED BODDAERT, guest columnist

head seen from the bow and the stern. Not a whale nor a submarine periscope or snorkel. Whatever it was, they had never seen or read about anything like this. I remained holding onto the foremast, feeling cold, clammy and decidedly scared. I do not remember what we did after that; I think the idea of looking for more pilchard was abandoned and we returned to harbour. “It was 12 years later, 1956, when I returned to Mevagissey on holiday with my wife. Ibis

The message is apt. “Students are inspired when teachers/counsellors model what they’re passionate about. I want to be someone who expresses creatively and encourages students to do the same, as the arts are very important to me,” she said. PEDAW is a province-wide effort to raise awareness around prevention of and early intervention for eating disorders as well as media literacy, resiliency, building healthy body image and self-esteem. The initiative is led by Jessie’s Legacy Eating Disorders Prevention Program at Family Services of the North Shore in collaboration with Kelty Mental Health Resource Centre, Looking Glass Foundation, St. Paul ’s Specialized Adult Eating Disorder Program, BC Children’s Hospital Eating Disorders Program, Healthy Minds, Healthy Campuses and Project True.

was tied up to the west arm of the inner harbour, the crew was busy mending gear. I climbed down the piling to the deck to renew acquaintances, my wife remained on the quay with the three or four other fishermen who were passing the time of day. “After introducing my wife and chatting about this and that, I turned to Eddie and said, ‘By the way, did you ever see anything [more] of that thing we saw off Fowey Point in 1944?’ “Eddie turned excitedly to the fishermen on the quay and said, ‘There you are! He remembers it after all this time and you didn’t believe us!’ “No, they had never seen it again, but it had been a memorable night at sea.” www.twpaterson.com

SCHOOL BOARD OFFICE HOURS SPRING BREAK/DISTRICT CLOSURE DAYS The School Board Office will be CLOSED to the public Monday, March 10th, 2014 to Friday, March 21st, 2014 inclusive

Cowichan Gardens Contest OUR CONTEST gives our readers recognition for dedication to their gardens. Send us or bring in a good quality photo of your garden or flowers that we can publish in a Special Newspaper Feature. Limit of 2 photos

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16

250-748-2666 ext. 236 sports@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

Friday, March 7, 2014 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Piggies play to a pair of draws KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

Ties are unusual enough in rugby, where there are so many different ways to collect points and where scores range from miniscule to massive depending on the day and the teams involved. So it was especially unexpected when both of Cowichan’s senior men’s teams played to draws last Saturday. The First Division Piggies tied the Velox Valhallians 17-17, while the Third Division team ended up even at 22-22 with the University of Victoria Saxons. The Firsts entered the game four points back of league-leading Velox in the standings and hoping to gain ground. Although Cowichan dominated the game in terms of both territory and possession, they weren’t able to secure a win. “I was pleased with how we played, but a little disappointed with the result,” head coach Gord McGeachy said. “We did more than enough to come away with the victory.” The Piggies left five tries on the field, McGeachy estimated. “We took probably too many penalties in the red zone and made too many mistakes, and it cost us,” he said. Velox did all the damage on the scoreboard in the first half and carried a 7-0 lead. Five minutes after halftime, Louis Gudmundseth went in for a try, making it 7-5. With about 15 minutes left in the game, Peter Budina scored, and a conversion by Owen Wood made it 12-7 for Cowichan. With less than 10 minutes to play, a couple of defensive errors by the Piggies allowed Velox to score an unconverted try, and that was it for scoring. “We had a couple of opportunities late to put it away, but we

CAPS REMEMBER CALEB KROFFAT

“I was pleased with how we played but a little disappointed with the result. We did more than enough to come away with the victory.” GORD MCGEACHY, Cowichan Piggies head coach

didn’t capitalize,” McGeachy said. Just giving Velox a challenge, let alone having a chance to win, shows how much Cowichan has improved this year. “For the first time in a couple of years, I thought we surprised Velox,” McGeachy said. “They’ve been the best team in the league for about three years, but we totally outplayed them.” Beyond the players who scored points, the Piggies also got strong efforts from Pat Fraser and Ian Manly, who put pressure on Velox from the flanker position, and Andrew Gudmundseth, who had a good two-way game in the centres. The Thirds didn’t know what to expect from the UVic team they tied with. “We weren’t really sure what we were going to get,” McGeachy said. “We knew they were going to be fast and fit. We had a decent team, but not our best, but it was good to get a game in.” The Firsts will be in action at home this Saturday against a winless Comox squad, kicking off at 1 p.m. The Thirds will host Castaway Wanderers at 1 p.m. on Sunday. Cowichan’s women’s team had their game against Meralomas cancelled last weekend because of the weather. They will play host to Delta’s Brit Lions at 11:30 a.m. this Saturday.

Sassy Lion

Caleb Kroffat’s mother Renee, twin brother Ethan, and father Jason were joined at centre ice prior to the Cowichan Valley Capitals season finale by Caps captain Kyle Horsman, Island Savings Centre manager John Elzinga, Capitals team president Cory Wanner and Victoria Grizzlies captain Mark McLellan. The Caps and the Island Savings Centre honoured Caleb, who collapsed suddenly outside a Caps game last November and later died in hospital, by hanging his minor hockey jersey in the arena. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN]

Teams set for Jackson Cup quarterfinals KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

With home games this weekend, both of Cowichan’s senior men’s soccer teams have a chance to advance to the Jackson Cup tournament semifinals. Cowichan FC, the Valley’s Div. 1 entry and tournament champions in 2011 and 2012, will get the first opportunity when they play their quarterfinal match against Div. 2 Saanich Fusion on Saturday night at the Ladysmith turf, kicking off at 7 p.m. Cowichan United will take on their Div. 2 rivals from Nanaimo at Evans Park on Sunday at 2 p.m. This will be Cowichan FC’s third

game of the tournament, as they have already gotten past Div. 2 teams from Gorge and Gordon Head. “We’re climbing the Div. 2 ladder,” FC head coach Glen Martin noted. “We’ve gone from the bottom to the middle to the top.” Having not played since Feb. 22, and with few chances to train because of snowy fields, Cowichan is a bit rusty, Martin admitted. The team was forced to practice in Victoria earlier this week, a first in FC history. Cowichan United, who are playing their first Jackson Cup game after a bye through the first round, struggled down the stretch in league play, having just eight

players available for their last game, but numbers are looking better for the cup run. Robbie Martin, Matt Fitzgibbon, Nick Crichton and Daryl Kobe are all expected back in the lineup this weekend. United finished two spots ahead of Nanaimo in the Div. 2 standings and the teams split their two regular-season meetings. “I am very optimistic of our chances,” coach Neall Rowlings said. Cowichan’s senior women’s team will make another attempt to play their first Doug Day Cup game this weekend. They are scheduled to visit Castaways FC on Sunday.

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Sports

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, March 7, 2014

17

Frances Kelsey hockey academy set to expand, spots open for next year KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

After a successful inaugural session, Frances Kelsey Secondary School’s hockey academy will be expanding for 2014/15. In partnership with the school, Pacific Rim Hockey Academy ran a midget program for Grade 10-12 students this year, and will return to conduct that program along with a bantam class for Grade 8 and 9 students next year. Contrary to rumours he has heard, Pacific Rim owner Craig Millin assures interested students and their parents that there is still room in both age groups. “Everybody is under the impression that the academy is filled,” Millin said. “They feel like they missed the opportunity to get involved.” Pacific Rim runs 14 academies throughout the province, and the program at

Kelsey was a particular success. “It ran very well for a couple of reasons,” Millin said. “One is that [Kelsey vice principal] Lori Hryniuk has been really good. The other is that we’ve been bringing academies on for 10 years already, so we’ve got a lot of the bugs worked out. It’s pretty seamless now.” Kelsey and Pacific Rim have worked hard to make the academy inclusive, affordable and available to anyone interested. The response from participants, parents and staff at the school and school district has been overwhelmingly positive. “For a lot of these kids, they can’t think of a better way to spend the day than with a little bit of hockey mixed in with the academics,” Millin said. For more information, contact Lori Hryniuk through the school or email craig@rpmhockey.com

Showing how badly they want to play, Cowichan Secondary rugby players clear snow from the school’s field prior to last Friday’s games. [SARA LOWE/FACEBOOK]

Determined T-Birds find a way to play KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

DCS grad Groenendijk helps VIU to national tournament Former Duncan Christian School volleyball standout Megan Groenendijk is playing for a national championship this week. Groenendijk and the Vancouver Island University Mariners are seeded second in the eight-team field battling for the Canadian Collegiate Athletic Association banner in Toronto. The tournament kicked off on Thursday as VIU played Mount Saint Vincent University in the opener.

New CWFL entry seeking players for March 16 kickoff The Cowichan Women’s Football League is set to kick off its 31st season later this month, and a new entry to the league is still hoping to add more players. The Storm doesn’t have enough players to begin the season on March 16, and is put-

VIU Mariner Megan Groenendijk Groenendijk, who graduated from DCS in 2012, was named a tournament all-star as VIU won the PACWEST provincial title on Feb. 23.

Usually the big kickoff for the high school girls rugby season, last weekend’s Joe McGeachy Memorial Rugby Tournament was cancelled due to the weather, but that didn’t prevent the Cowichan Secondary School Thunderbirds from getting in a pair of games against Alberni District. Both A and B games ended in lopsided victories for the T-Birds. In the A game, the defending provincial champions from Cowichan crushed Alberni 56-0. Sara Lowes finished the game with five tries, Darien Hobday had two, Adrienne Saari, Shania Pronk and Gillian Torok-Both had one each, and

ting the call out for new additions. “We are looking for help of any kind,” said Chris Mann, a league founder and coach of the Storm. “Ladies must be between 16 and over and have cleats. No experience needed they just have to be able to breathe.” Anyone interested in playing should call Chris at 250-748-9385 or email westiemanor@hotmail.com

Alison Franks kicked three conversions. Cowichan won the B game 21-0 on a try and two conversions by Emily Lindsay, two more tries by Denise Roy, and a conversion by Maddie Pirie. “I was impressed with the seniors’ knowledge of the game plan and ability to transfer concepts that we have practiced into a real game,” Cowichan coach Brad Skene said. “The juniors were a lot of fun to watch. They are very athletic but it is always interesting to watch how the new kids do with contact and they looked very confident at tackle points. We have a lot of work to do but this was a great start for the program.”

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Sports

Friday, March 7, 2014 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Coach Beatty already building Caps for next year

Goalie Gusse is Capitals’ MVP AWARDS NIGHT: Gusse and

Moody honoured twice

KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

After missing the B.C. Hockey League playoffs for a second straight season, the Cowichan Valley Capitals will immediately begin building for next season, and head coach Bob Beatty, a two-time winner of the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League championship at the helm of the La Ronge Ice Wolves, remains optimistic. “We have to keep in mind it is a process, and it takes time to develop a winning culture and a team that consistently and perennially competes for a championship, and we certainly haven’t given up on that task,” he said. “We have to get going and work extremely hard and make sure that we’re not having our exit interviews and banquet in March next year.” The Caps have six graduating 20-yearolds in Robin Gusse, Mason Malkowich, Reilly O’Connor, Matthew Berry-Lamontagna, Adam Moody and Blake Butzow. Moody, who will head to Utica College, is one of three players with commitments for next season, along with 19-year-olds Myles Powell (Rochester Institute of Technology) and Jarrett Brown (Alaska Anchorage). The current roster includes 10 players who are eligible to return, including captain Kyle Horsman and second-leading scorer Dane Gibson. “We certainly like the core group coming back,” Beatty said. “Even though we do have a lot of recruiting to do.”

After a season as a consistent bright spot on an inconsistent team, it came as little surprise on Tuesday night when Cowichan Valley Capitals goaltender Robin Gusse was named the team’s MVP for 2013/14. In his only season with the Caps, the 20year-old native of Bayonne, France, led all B.C. Hockey League netminders in games played (53), minutes played (3,080), shots against (1,712) and saves (1,554). He also finished sixth in the league with 21 wins, posting a 3.08 goals-against average and .908 save percentage. Gusse also walked away with the Three Star Award for the player with the most three-star selections over the year. Another 20-year-old, centre Adam Moody, was the other multiple honoree of the night, collecting the Academic Achievement Award and sharing the Peter Lawson Memorial Unsung Hero Award. Moody missed almost half the season after breaking his jaw in a preseason exhibition game, but finished the year with 11 points in 32 games and nabbed a scholarship to Utica College. Captain Kyle Horsman was the other winner of the Lawson Award for his leadership efforts while adding 22 points in 56 games. Defenceman Reilly O’Connor, who picked up just 12 penalty minutes over 55 games as a 20-year-old rookie, was named the Most Sportsmanlike Player.

Richard Service Manager

Mark

Debbie

Robin Gusse led all BCHL goalies with 53 games played. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN] The Most Popular Player Award went to big blueliner Blake Butzow, another 20year-old, who made an impression despite playing just 16 games with the Caps after coming over in a trade deadline deal with

Mark

Bob

Tyson

the Penticton Vees. Jordan Topping, a 16-year-old rookie from Saltspring Island who compiled 10 goals and five assists in 15 games and was the only Capital to register a hat trick in 2013/14, was named the Most Improved Player. Mason Malkowich missed 18 games due to injuries, but in his 40 appearances still managed to record 14 goals and 19 assists while serving as an assistant captain, and was recognized with the Ron McLaren Memorial Award for Most Inspirational Player. Colton Kehler was named Rookie of the Year after scoring 14 goals and 21 points in 43 games, becoming a reliable scorer down the stretch. Jarrett Brown received the Top Gun Defenceman award. Despite starting the season with an injury, Brown led all Capitals blueliners in goals (six), assists (15) and points (21) in 47 games. Defence partners Rylan Bechtel and Matthew Berry-LaMontagna shared the Top Defensive Defenceman award. Bechtel was a rock on defence all season for the Caps, missing just one game, while Berry-LaMontagna played 26 games after coming over in November and played strong two-way hockey. Myles Powell received the Leading Scorer award with team-high numbers of 21 goals, 38 assists and 59 points as the only player to appear in all 58 games. The Jeff Young Coaches’ Award went to Jesse Neher, who had career highs with 16 assists and 23 points in 55 games, playing every shift with heart.

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Friday, March 7, 2014 | Cowichan Valley Citizen


Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, March 7, 2014

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Friday, March 7, 2014 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

VALLEY Calendar Miscellaneous • Swing Dance Lessons Tuesdays, 7:30 p.m., Island Oak High School, 5814 Banks Rd. Duncan, $10 per class, $12 drop-in fee, private lessons available. No partner necessary. Info: Josef 250709-8583, jgraf5@yahoo.ca • World Day of Prayer 2014 Ecumenical Service Friday, March 7, 1:30 p.m., St. Edward’s Catholic Church, 2085 Maple Bay Rd. Theme: Streams in the desert, written by the women of Egypt. Refreshments follow.

• Cowichan Fish and Game Association hosts Canadian Firearm Safety course, (PAL and RPAL) in Glenora, Friday, March 7. Info and to register: Mike 250-748-0319. • Documentary Night at the Library: Salmon Confidential, Monday, March 17, 6-7:30 p.m., Duncan. Biologist Alexandra Morton’s struggle to overcome government and industry roadblocks and bring info to the public to save B.C.’s wild salmon. Shawna Green to introduce film and lead discussion after. Info: 250-761-7661.

Seniors • Chemainus Seniors Drop-in Centre show “Way out West” a story about Mary and Jethro in Dry Gulch, March 14, 15, 7 p.m., March 16, 2-4 p.m. Tickets $15. Assigned seating. Info: 250-246-2111. • Chemainus Seniors Drop-in Centre soup and sandwich, March 19, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Cost $5. • Chemainus Seniors Drop-in Centre blood pressure clinic, March 19, 9:30-11 a.m.

• Chemainus Seniors Drop-in Centre dance with Dan Hughes and the Seniors March 22, 7 p.m. Cost $9 (includes lunch).

Meetings • Cowichan Therapeutic Riding Association annual general meeting, Wednesday, March 5, 7 p.m., CTRA facility at Providence Farm, Duncan. Info: 250-746-1028 or info@ctra.ca • Aglow meeting March 8, 10 a.m., Providence Farm chapel. Info: Karen

250-748-3576. • Monthly meeting Cowichan Valley Chapter of the Council of Canadians, Tuesday, March 11, 7 p.m., Volunteer Cowichan Centre, basement of Duncan City Hall. Discussion: water issues, trade agreements etc. Info: 250-748-2444. • Feeling stuck in your life? Same old problems? Practice using tools based on A Course in Miracles. Meet Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m., at location in Duncan. Cost $20 or by donation. Info: Dawn Green 250-619-5529.

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Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, March 7, 2014

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Friday, March 7, 2014 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

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Michael O’Callahan Sales & Leasing

Shawn Kent Sales & Leasing

March 7, 2014  

The March 7, 2014 edition of the Cowichan Valley Citizen