Page 1

T.W. Paterson: Colourful pioneer Robert T. Smith died in violent shootout

LIVING, Page 11

Cowichan Valley Capitals shake things up with trio of trades on weekend

SPORTS, Page 21

WEDNESDAY

FRIENDS SAY FAREWELL TO SHOWROOM /15

Serving the Cowichan Valley

www.cowichanvalleycitizen.com

Wednesday, December 4, 2013

CRASH SNARLS DUNCAN TRAFFIC A two-vehicle collision on Chaster Road just metres from where it intersects with the Trans Canada Highway snarled traffic south of Duncan Monday. The 3 p.m. crash, which featured a silver four-door Honda and a grey-green Jeep Wrangler Rubicon, brought northbound traffic to a crawl while first responders investigated and cleaned up the damage. North Cowichan/ Duncan RCMP and paramedics joined volunteers from Duncan’s Fire Hall and a tow truck driver at the scene. RCMP spokesman Cpl Jon Stuart said Tuesday that there were only minor injuries and no charges would be laid in the matter. For more photos, scan this image with the Layar app or go to www.cowichanvalleycitizen. com [SARAH SIMPSON/CITIZEN]

Duncan scrolls honour two of best and brightest KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

Chuck McCandless accepts the Scroll of Honour from Duncan city councillor Martin Barker on Monday night. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN]

When he received the Scroll of Honour — one of the City of Duncan’s most prestigious awards — on Monday night, Chuck McCandless praised the Cowichan Valley’s spirit of generosity and seemingly infinite willingness to volunteer. Appropriately, the other recipient of the Scroll of Honour was Denise McKinlay, who epitomizes the willingness to volunteer, having selflessly given her time to innumerable organizations over 50 years.

McCandless is preparing to retire from his position as the Canadian Mental Health Association’s Homeless Outreach Worker, but his impact has been felt well outside that job. He has made himself available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, providing both advocacy and direct help to those in need. His efforts with the CMHA helped establish temporary homeless shelters in locations such as MLA Doug Routley’s office, the change rooms at McAdam Park and local churches, then led to

H AT T O N I N S U R A N C E A G E N C Y 4 95 TR ANS C AN AD A HWY, DUNCA N, BC L 2 5 0 5 9 7 2 8 9 9

the building of Warmland House, which provides shelter to 60 individuals. The giving nature of the Cowichan Valley has made McCandless’s job an easier one since he and his family relocated to the Island from Manitoba. “It’s a wonderful community we found 15 years ago,” he said. “Everything we try to do here, everybody jumps in. Everybody here wants to help. It’s really easy to get people out.” See Need enormous • page 5


2

Wednesday, December 4, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Why Pay More?

7-0424

Drive a Little, SAVE A LOT!

3 25205-05-4978-760 GREAT ON GAS

2011 NISSAN VERSA SDN M/T With only 13,000 km and now under $10,000 Hurry down- this deal is too good to miss Stk #D15369

Comprehensive Vehicle Inspections

9,999

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

SALE PRICES IN EFFECT UNTIL DEC. 9TH

OPEN: Mon.-Thurs. 9-7; Fri.-Sat. 9-6 & Sun. 10-4

2006 MAZDA 61 SPORT SEDAN Speed 6 AWD Silver Stk #D15501 Mazda 6 Mazda speed for the driver in you. Come test drive this and see for yourself what makes a Mazda speed!

On All Our Vehicles

$

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

$

13,398

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

4.95% AWD

$

2006 NISSAN MURANO

$

12,888

$

159 48 months

$

24,688

Crew cab, 4WD, Diesel 216,112 km. Stk #D14738A

72 months

2005 HONDA CIVIC

$ $

19,388 (*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

4X4

QUAD CAB

RED, SUV D15180B

2011 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD

$

12,798

Harley Davidson Crew Cab 4x4, 138,000 kms STK#D15487

QUAD CAB

31,998

11,898

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

4X4

2011 DODGE DAKOTA

S/SL, Black D15490

$

EXTRA ROOM

12,298

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

72 months

2008 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE blue, van, Stk #P14953A

$

6,888

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

2004 CHRYSLER PACIFICA 112,000 kms Stk #D15446

9,998

$

(+ $499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

2010 CHEV AVEO

LT/ Black P14948A

Better than brand new! Still has warranty. P14881A

$

$

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

95

BI-WEEKLY*

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

1500 SLT Quad ST/SLT Stk #D15097A

$

21,798

2009 NISSAN VERSA

10,888

2003 DODGE RAM

$

XLT S/C SB Blue D15453

$

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

2012 FORD F150

60 months

2007 FORD F150 XL

Stk #D15433

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

BI-WEEKLY*

$

21,888

6,998

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

2005 JEEP TJ SPORT

194

$

$

20,998

GLS Maroon Stk #D15292A1

1500 Quad ST/SLT Grey Stk #D15174A

VP 107,444 km Stk #D15269

$

+ $499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

ONLY 54,272 KMS

BI-WEEKLY*

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

GAS MISER

2007 FORD F350 SD LARIAT

209

2009 HYUNDAI ACCENT

2008 DODGE RAM

Supercab,S/B, Black Truck112,257 kms Stk #15449

BI-WEEKLY*

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

HARLEY DAVIDSON

2011 FORD F150 XLT

SL, AWD Maroon SUV Stk #D15085A

$

20,888

10,888

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

AWD

2007 MERCEDES E3504M Stk #D15395A

24,888

$

(+ $499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

2012 JEEP COMPASS

2005 CHRYSLER 300 TOURING

SE Coupe 2DR Stk #D15409

3.5L, 4 dr, 187,479 km Stk #D14664A

BOOK A TESTDRIVE TODAY

$

6,888

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

2013 CHEV MALIBU

$

22,998

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

1 LT 2.5L L4 Stk #P15202

18,998

$

(*$499 Documentation Fee & Tax)

All payments are based on 4.99% and include the $499 Documentation fee. Subject to approval of credit. STK # D15369 total cost to borrow $1553.44 STK #D15449 total cost to borrow $4435.89 D15174A total cost to borrow $2900.48 STK #D15292A total cost to borrow $2012.73

www.galaxymotors.net 7329 Trans Canada Hwy. Duncan

Open Sundays 11-4

DL#31033


Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, December 4, 2013

3

2nd Annual Santa Claus Brunch December 8 | 15 | 22 Christmas Day Dinner Too! Start a new tradition by bringing the whole family down to relax and spend some time together in our festively decorated restaurant. The wee elves will get their customary children’s buffet as well as an area to watch holiday season movies. All children (and adults) will receive a complimentary photo with Santa which we will email to you that same day! Reservations recommended! 140 Trans Canada Highway | TheOldFork.com | 250.748.4311 | at the Silverbridge Inn

Transplant recipient ‘pops’ in to Cowichan hospital SARAH SIMPSON CITIZEN

Salivating nurses used all forms of self-control Monday when presented with a giant tub of popcorn from a grateful patient. “Thank you!” They said with big grins. Joined by his girlfriend Jan Nelson and daughter Alecsa, heart transplant recipient Mike Bro presented staff in Cowichan District Hospital’s administration offices, intensive care unit, emergency department and operating rooms. Bro is among 107 volunteers — recipients, living donors and donor families — who delivered 97 tins of popcorn to medical staff across B.C. and the Yukon as a thank you for caring for them through what is often the most difficult period of their lives.

Nurses in Cowichan District Hospital’s emergency room break out in grins after heart transplant recipient Mike Bro presented them with a giant tub of popcorn Monday. The gesture is a simple thank you aimed at giving healthcare professionals that often see the tragic side of organ donation a chance to mingle with the patients whose lives were saved through organ donation. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN]

Facebook page: ‘Cowichan Valley Citizen’

CHRISTMAS IDEAS backpacks $ 95 from...

14

from...

630 Second Avenue, Ladysmith

November 30, 10 am to 12:00 Noon

Cowichan Lake Arena 311 South Shore Road, Lake Cowichan

luggage sale off % %

November 30, 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm

30 -50

#6

Join us for a Conversation

Ladysmith Seniors Centre

19

He had been on the transplant list for one month and three days. So far this year, 304 life-saving transplants have been performed in British Columbia. Visit transplant.bc.ca to learn more about what it takes to register to become an organ donor.

The Cowichan Valley Regional Hospital District recently issued a Request for Proposals seeking real estate expertise to identify properties that would fit into long term plans for the planned replacement of Cowichan District Hospital. Members of the public are invited to provide feedback on the site selection criteria that will be used in determining a location for a potential new hospital.

Where:

shaving kits $ 00 assorted purses from... $ 95

25

The initiative, dubbed Operation Popcorn, has been running for 22 years. “Operation Popcorn pays tribute to the work done in hospitals across British Columbia,” said Dr. Moira Stilwell, MLA for Vancouver-Langara. “A simple thank you from a recipient whose life has been saved through organ donation has a huge impact for the health professionals who work hard to honour the wishes of patients and families during these times of tragedy.” Stilwell is among the group honouring medical staff at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver — the facility that gave Bro a new lease on life. Now a Cowichan resident, Bro received his new heart at St. Paul’s Hospital in November 2010.

x Learn about the role of the Cowichan Valley Regional Hospital District

x The site selection process x The site selection criteria x Provide your input

Kerry Park Arena 1035 Shawnigan Mill Bay Road, Mill Bay

December 7, 10 am to 12:00 noon

computer case $ 95 from...

39

sports bags $ 95 from...

19

Serving Duncan For 18 Years!

2011 University Way, Duncan

December 7, 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm Light refreshments will be provided

Duncan Mall

250-748-8009

VIU Cowichan Campus

Shop in style for quality handbags, luggage, backpacks, wallets, travel accessories etc.

For more information contact Cindy Lise 250-709-5062 Email cindylisecchn@shaw.ca or www.cchn.ca


4

News

Wednesday, December 4, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Mendenhall, Skenes get arts, sports nods

Cops stuffing a cruiser this Christmas

KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

SARAH SIMPSON CITIZEN

Among the individuals honoured by the City of Duncan at its annual awards presentation on Monday were a piano teacher and a pair of rugby coaches who have combined to spend more than 50 years enriching the lives of young people in the Cowichan Valley. The Perpetual Arts Trophy went to Ann Mendenhall, a piano teacher and valuable member of the Cowichan music scene for more than three decades. Mendenhall, who admitted she was “shocked, surprised and blown away” to receive the award, was immensely appreciative of the honour. “It means a lot, because, in the first place, I like the idea of the arts being recognized,” she said. “The arts are underfunded in schools and in the community in general, but it’s such a positive when students study music and art.” Born in Kansas, Mendenhall started studying piano at the age of three, and continued doing so after her family moved to Costa Rica five years later. Although she left briefly to study at Oberlin College and the Oberlin Conservatory of Music in Ohio, and later at the Victoria Conservatory, Costa Rica remained her home until 1981, when she and her husband Phillip moved permanently to the Cowichan Valley. Since then, Mendenhall has become increasingly involved in the Valley’s music community, completing her Masters in Piano Performance at UVic and teaching the instrument to countless students, many of whom have gone on to teach and perform professionally as well. Mendenhall expressed her gratitude to her colleagues in the Cowichan Valley Music Teachers

The North Cowichan/ Duncan RCMP’s third annual Stuff-aCruiser event runs from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 7 at the Cowichan Commons Walmart. The goal is to collect gifts and toys for youth and children who may not otherwise receive anything this Christmas. Mounties have joined forces with the folks at the Cowichan Valley Basket Society to make a fantastic Christmas for some very special young people in the Cowichan Valley. This year they hope to collect even more than they did last year. “Last year’s event filled two police cars and a police truck with toys, which were given out to families in need for Christmas,” detachment spokesman Cpl. Jon Stuart said. The focus is on toys, clothes, and other items for children and youth, however food items are gladly accepted as well. “All items will find a good home for Christmas,” Stuart said. Those who can’t make it out to Walmart on Dec. 7 can stop by the North Cowichan/ Duncan RCMP detachment to drop off their donations up until that day.

Howard Meakin accepts the Commercial Development Award of Excellence from Mayor Phil Kent. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN]

Ann Mendenhall Association, and to the students and parents that have made it possible for her to teach over the decades. “It’s a very inspiring job,” she said. “It’s so rewarding intrinsically to see how they can progress, not just in learning the instrument, but in life itself. It helps them learn how to learn; it makes a difference in their lives.” The Perpetual Trophy for Excellence and Sportsmanship went to Cowichan Secondary School and Cowichan Rugby Football Club coaches Brad and Alanna Skene. Both graduates of Cow High, the Skenes met at UVic and were married in 2005. Brad started coaching in 1995 and Alanna joined him on the sidelines in 2003. They have coached girls teams at Cow High and the CRFC to success at the provincial and regional levels, and this past spring guided Cow High to five championships: the Joe McGeachy Tournament, Island Sevens, B.C. High School Sevens, Island XV and B.C. High School XV. “It’s pretty remarkable when people in the community recognize what you do,” said Alanna. “You worry about the results with the kids on the field, not in the community.” (See Friday’s sports section for more about the Skenes and their award.)

Will Duggan receives the Residential Award of Excellence from Mayor Phil Kent. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN]

Development awards honour old and new KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

Commitment to sustainability was celebrated as the City of Duncan recognized two building projects at its annual awards night on Monday. The Commercial Development Award of Excellence was presented to Howard Meakin for his work on the Cowichan Health and Wealth Centre at 435 Trunk Rd. Meakin and architect Peter Jan de Hoog upgraded the old Western Forest Products building, improving and preserving the 1960s glass-and-steel façade and adding higher-efficiency water and heating systems. “This commercial award is presented to recognize the care and

attention to detail in the revitalization of this iconic style of building,” Mayor Phil Kent said as he presented the award. The Residential Award of Excellence was presented to Will Duggan for the four-unit townhouse at 472 Chesterfield Ave. The design worked creatively within the floodplain constraints, retained existing mature cedar trees, and was completed to the Built Green Gold Standard, well above the Silver certification it required. “This residential award is presented to recognize the creative design decisions that enable the development to fit well into its location and the energy efficiency of these new homes,” Kent said.

Friday vigil marks National Day of Action The Cowichan Women Against Violence Society is asking Valley residents to remember, honour and take action on Friday, Dec. 6. The date marks National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women, and CWAV is holding a community gathering with speakers, a procession of roses and a candlelight vigil at noon at the Cowichan Campus of Vancouver Island University in downtown Duncan. Dec. 6 is a significant date, as it marks the day a man walked into an engineering class in 1989 at L’École Polytechnique de Montréal and killed 14 women, injuring another nine women and four men.

Bachelor of Education at VIU

NOTICE ROAD CLOSURE

Impeccable Painting

BAMFIELD 26 KM PARSONS BRIDGE CLOSED: FRIDAY DECEMBER 6TH 2013, 6:00PM

“No job too small”

OPEN: MONDAY DECEMBER 9TH 2013, 6:00AM QUESTIONS: CALL COASTAL BRIDGE CHRIS DODS - 250 720-9488

250.507.7367 87-11-5000

WESTERN FOREST PRODUCTS JUSTIN KUMAGAI - 250 720-4220

Dave Coughlin

www.impeccablepainting.com dave@impeccablepainting.com


News

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, December 4, 2013

5

Need enormous, McCandless says From page 1

Fireworks explode above Duncan’s City Hall during festivities last Friday. For more from Duncan’s Christmas Kick-Off, see the Friday edition of the Citizen. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN]

Kick-Off rappers spark complaints, apology from DBIA SARAH SIMPSON CITIZEN

The intent was to breathe new life into the standard Duncan Christmas Kick-Off with a more youthful vibe, but the result was less than desirable for some. While many who attended the Nov. 29 festivities in downtown Duncan didn’t even notice what was happening onstage during local hip-hop band Subterranean’s set, others most certainly did. Between half a dozen and a dozen offended citizens later called the event’s organizers at the Duncan Business Improvement Area Society to complain about what they said was inappropriate content from the rappers. “It was just people wanting to have their say on what they, themselves noticed and experienced,” said Jen Coyle, the DBIA’s manager. “It was all very civilized and diplomatic. We thanked them for their input.” Wi r e s g o t c r o s s e d , C oy l e explained, when it came to what the band and event organizers thought they’d agreed to for a set list. “When we had hired them we had discussed how we needed it to be Christmas oriented and they were going to write the original songs themselves, which they had done but, unfortunately they had some hardships within their own band and sort of had to go to Plan B and they thought they had specified what their plan was but they really hadn’t.” Had the band better communicated, Coyle said, in all likelihood, the night’s other entertainers, the Smiley Band, would have been asked to carry the evening instead.

The band has since issued a public apology for its set. “Subterranean apologizes for any confusion, miscommunication or offence that has been taken to our set Friday night, Nov. 29. It was not our intention to deceive any of the affected parties,” said the apology. “It should also be noted we frequently organize and play all-ages shows. We attempted to change the words to be as family friendly as possible. Being rap music it is not easy to fully edit lyrics and have them still rhyme but obviously they needed further scrutiny under such circumstances.” Coyle chalked it up to “a series of unfortunate events.” “There were people that were offended and rightly so. It was a family event. But at the same time we have received a lot of accolades as well and people really did enjoy their evening,” she said. Coyle expressed thanks to the Smiley band, which got up onstage to play again after Subterranean’s set was cut short. “It was a bit of a hard lesson to learn but at the same time, we’ll have a better idea on how to go about it next year.”

McCandless’s motivation is no harder to find than volunteers are, and because of that, even in retirement, he won’t be completely stepping aside. “The need is enormous,” he said. “We should all be doing it. Every day, you go out and see it.” McKinlay, who also noted the generosity of the Cowichan Valley, has a history as a volunteer going back to the 1960s, when she helped to form the Cowichan Bay Fire Department. In the 1980s, she was involved with the Duncan Curling Club and Cowichan Golf & Country Club. The 1990s saw her serve as a board member with Duncan Dabber Bingo. She was Chair of Protocol for the 1990 BC Winter Games, and a board member again for the BC Seniors Games in 2000, and then was Duncan’s representative for the 2010 Olympics. Closest to McKinlay’s heart is her involvement with the Cowichan District Hospital. She was a member of the Hospital Board from 1991 to 1996, and has been a member of the Hospital Foundation for 22 years. “The Hospital Foundation means the world to me,” she said. “I think it’s because everybody uses the hospital.” Although that has been her most cherished volunteer opportunity, from one commitment come the others. “All the other little things just come by,” she said. “If you are willing to do that kind of work, there is always somebody tacking you for it. Volunteering is one of those things you fall into. You either enjoy it, or it becomes a job. I love it.”

TM

Your Way Home

Steve Drane Harley-Davidson

®

Vancouver Island's only authorized Harley-Davidson retailer ®

2940 Ed Nixon Terrace Victoria, BC V9B 0B2 250-475-1345 SteveDraneHarley.com sales • service • parts • collectibles • accessories

NOTICE OF INTENT TO AMEND ZONING BYLAW ZONING AMENDMENT BYLAW No. 3735 Applicable to Electoral Area D – Cowichan Bay As per Section 890(4) of the Local Government Act, the Cowichan Valley Regional District Board of Directors has reviewed the above noted bylaw and found it to be consistent with the policies of the Electoral Area D – Cowichan Bay Official Community Plan No. 3605, therefore, the Public Hearing has been waived and the Board has directed that this Public Notice occur in its place. Bylaw No. 3735 received first and second reading at the September 11, 2013, CVRD Board meeting. NOTICE is hereby given that the CVRD Board of Directors will consider reading a third time and adopting the above noted Amendment Bylaw at the regular Board meeting of December 11, 2013. Zoning Amendment Bylaw No. 3735 proposes to amend Electoral Area D – Cowichan Bay Zoning Bylaw No. 1015 by rezoning Lot A (DD A26121), Section 6, Range 4, Cowichan District, Plan 12744, as shown outlined on the map below, from R3-B (Urban Residential – Limited Height) to R3-A (Urban Residential – Duplex).

Great Rates One application to over 40 lenders Terms suited to your needs Pre-approvals Personal Service Offices in Duncan and Victoria

Unit F – 951 Canada Ave. Duncan, BC

Ph: 250.748.9742

Weekend and evening appointments available TM

#5

Coun. Sharon Jackson presents Denise McKinlay with the Scroll of Honour award on Monday. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN]

CANADA’S TRUSTED MORTGAGE EXPERTS

LighthouseMortgage.ca

The purpose of Zoning Amendment Bylaw No. 3735 is to allow the subject property to be developed for a duplex. A condition of the zoning change is that a covenant be registered on the subject property to limit the height of structures to 7.5 metres. A copy of the Amendment Bylaw and relevant support material may be inspected at the Regional District Planning & Development Department office, 175 Ingram Street, Duncan, B.C., from Friday, November 29, 2013, to Wednesday, December 11, 2013, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. For further information, or if you have any questions, please call Rob Conway, Manager, Planning & Development Department at 250-7462620, or toll-free at 1-800-665-3955. A copy of the Bylaw and supporting material may also be viewed on the CVRD website at the following address: http://www.cvrd.bc.ca/ index.aspx?NID=1282


6

Wednesday December 4, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

OUR VIEW

Organ donor numbers not good enough ancouver Island residents are the most likely in all of B.C. to be registered as organ donors. But that number is still only 21 per cent. In all of B.C. there are less than one million organ donors registered. Not enough. In the last year alone the Cowichan Valley Citizen has done at least three stories about folks either getting or needing transplants. In this edition, on page 3, we have a story about a transplant recipient from the area who headed to Cowichan District Hos-

V

pital Monday to thank the health care professionals there. His case is pretty incredible. He was only on the transplant list for one month and three days. Others wait and suffer for far longer, even if they could receive a transplant from a living donor. Such is the case of Shawnigan Lake’s Audrey Schroeder, who is waiting for a kidney transplant, along with 409 other B.C. residents. Her wait could be up to 10 years. When we met Schroeder she had just finished a dialysis appointment, and we could see

ABOUT US

OTHER VIEWS

the toll that her illness, which she has battled since age 13, has taken on her. Nobody should have to live like that. And there is something that we can do. It’s actually pretty simple. Sign up as an organ donor. We all hope to live a long and healthy life. But the fact is that some of us will die prematurely, whether it is due to a car accident or illness or other unforseen event. If that happens, we have the opportunity to give back to someone else who is in desperate

need. What a wonderful thing to be our final act on this Earth. We don’t want to minimize how difficult it can be for families who are grieving to make decisions about organ donation. That’s exactly why we urge people to make the organ donation decision themselves, now, while they’re in good health. Let your family know that these are your wishes. It is a gift to them as well, taking a burden off their shoulders. Your body can help someone else to live. You’re not using it anymore. It’s the greatest possible gift.

Publisher Shirley Skolos Editor Andrea Rondeau Customer service manager Dawn Heggie Production supervisor Alice Brownbridge Newsroom 250-748-2666, extension 235 news@cowichanvalleycitizen.com Advertising 250-748-2666, extensions 223, 227, 228, 229, 230 Classified ads 250-748-2666, extensions 221, 222

Complaint resolution If speaking to the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about a story we publish, contact the B.C. Press Council, which examines complaints from the public about the conduct of the press in gathering and presenting the news. Send your written concern and documentation within 45 days to: B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C., V9R 2R2. Website: www.bcpresscouncil.org.

Submitting a letter to the editor is now easier than ever — you can do it online by going to the Cowichan Valley Citizen website, www.cowichanvalleycitizen.com, and clicking on the Opinion tab. Then click Send us a letter. Write 300 words or less on the topic of your choice, include your full name (first and last), and a town you hail from. Please include a phone number where you can be reached (which is not printed) so that we can verify your authorship.

Objections don’t pass scientific muster

Cowichan Valley Citizen is a division of VI Newspaper Group Limited Partnership., 251 Jubilee St., Duncan, B.C., V9L 1W8 Phone: 250-748-2666 Fax: 250-748-1552

Copyright information This newspaper’s contents are protected by copyright and may be used only for personal, non-commercial purposes. All other rights are reserved. Commercial use is prohibited. Opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the newspaper.

Submit your letter to the editor online

Global warming alarmists out in full force Gee, the global warming alarmists are out in force writing letters to the editor. Unfortunately it’s the same old misinformation, worse storms, more rain, less rain, too much sun, not enough sun, blah, blah, blah. No credible facts though. Martin Best cites the fraudulent survey conducted by John Cook (an Australian cartoonist/ blogger) as evidence that 97 per cent of scientists, agree with catastrophic global warming. John Cook’s website exists entirely to promote global warming, and he is known for frequently publishing unreliable and misleading information, much like Peter Nix

and now Martin Best. Perhaps it would be of more value to read the recent survey conducted by the American Meteorological Society, which has an entirely different result. Bruce Wilkinson outdoes himself and explains the entire function of the earth and atmosphere with a cup of tea. No I’m not kidding! People actually write this tripe, and somehow expect to convince us of catastrophic global warming. I like tea, and it shouldn’t be wasted on Grade 4 science experiments that don’t explain anything! Bruce Wilkinson eventually states “ Sure there have always been hurricanes, tornadoes and typhoons, but the consistent evidence is that they are getting stronger

over time.” This statement is blatantly false, there is no such evidence and he provides none. A new report published Nov. 27 by the Global Warming Policy Foundation concludes there has been no increase in extreme weather events in recent decades. The strongest hurricane in U.S. history called the Florida Keys Labor Day Hurricane occurred in 1935. The most extreme tornado in U.S. history called the Tri-State Tornado occurred in 1925. The worst droughts in U.S. history occurred from 1930-1936, 1944-1950, 1953-1957 Mark Williams Duncan

Re: GM food threatens our health I noticed that two objections to GM foods in the letter from P. Foot don’t pass scientific muster. If the letter writer got either of those points from Dr. T. Vrain in that lecture at VIU, then the good doctor just lost a ton of credibility with me. A single gene from a “pathogen” is not going to leap out of the food and form a full, diseasecausing pathogen. Genetics does not work that way. A gene is not the whole organism; anyone who thinks so either never took basic biology, or forgot all they learned in biology. You are not inherently ingesting whole dangerous bacteria, or even potentially disease-causing viruses, in GM-altered food as opposed to non-GM, be it alfalfa, or apples. Speaking of unwanted and even deadly pathogens in food, what about all the times organic produce has been contaminated with E. Coli? The comment about nitrogen indicates another failure to grasp science. Nitrogen being taken up by plants is the reason vegans can survive without eating meat. Plants make protein with it! Trying to stop GM foods on the basis of unscientific claims that a fifth grader could see through isn’t exactly raising my confidence in the movement to make our food “safer”. April J. Gibson Duncan

Send us your letter Write 300 words or less on the topic of your choice and email news@cowichanvalleycitizen.com


Opinion

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, December 4, 2013

contact us

privacy policy

Publisher, Shirley Skolos

Sports, Kevin Rothbauer

Local News, Sarah Simpson

sskolos@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

sports@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

Editor, Andrea Rondeau

Arts, Lexi Bainas

news@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

arts@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

ssimpson@cowichanvalleycitizen.com Distribution, Audette LePage audettelepage@shaw.ca

Crosswalk not a shield

◆ LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Use of GM plants not black and white As a retired professor who has had a long career researching disease resistance in plants, I am disconcerted by the scientific misinformation in the letter that P. Foot sent to Hon. Gerry Ritz. In genetically modified (GM) crops, it is small pieces of DNA carrying wanted characteristics, NOT whole viruses or bacteria, that are transferred to the plant, so we are not “ingesting unwanted pathogens” from meat and dairy products just because cows eat GM alfalfa. GM crop plants have NO relation to antibiotic resistance in human bacterial pathogens as these bacteria attack people, not plants, and such resistance is caused by antibiotic overuse to treat human and animal infections. Also, herbicides are widely used to kill weeds in Western agriculture, regardless of whether the crop is GM or not, and it is resistance to herbicides, NOT the herbicide itself, that is engineered into some crop species. Since the beginning of agriculture, Man has used selective breeding to genetically modify plants to increase yield, nutrition and/or reduce levels of the natural toxic chemicals that plants use to defend themselves against plant pests and pathogens. Modern agriculture encourages epidemics of these organisms, and microbial pathogens evolve

7

rapidly to overcome breeders’ attempts to make each plant more disease resistant. Transferring a “disease resistance gene” from a wild relative of the crop plant can take 10 years or more by conventional breeding, while doing so by genetic engineering can take less than a year, saving thousands of dollars in manpower, the use of pesticides, and devastating losses in food yield. The use of GM plants is not a black and white issue and labelling food as GM is not informative by itself. Each case is unique depending on whether we eat the GM plant directly or only highly purified products such as sugar that should not contain any plant residue. Whether eating a GM plant that needs less pesticide is more harmful that eating one with pesticide residues also depends on the plant, the gene, and the pesticide. There is an urgent need in our education system to teach high school students the “how, what and why” of genetic engineering so that we have a generation that can understand the science and can make informed decisions rather than succumb to propaganda on either side.

The two recent fatalities in the downtown core of Duncan have prompted me to write about what I see as a generation of younger people who have come to think of a crosswalk as some sort of magic zone in which they are immune to injury or death. I have lost count of the number of times I have seen pedestrians, especially younger pedestrians, simply walk out into a crosswalk without even looking to see if there is approaching traffic that might have a difficult time stopping. There are many mitigating factors affecting the ability of a vehicle to stop, size, road conditions, visibility, driver distraction etc. I agree that crosswalks are needed for safety, in fact they should be

M.C. Heath Cowichan Bay

#3 Helping Men, Families & Community to Create Full, Healthier Lives!

MEN AND THE HOLIDAYS I am sure that many if not most of you are familiar with the holidays being the season for connection with family and friends. My question is: what happens when someone does not have any family and friends in their lives? What happens if someone’s association with the holidays is negative? Then what? My response to this is self care, and here are some ideas around this: 1. Take care of yourself – holiday traditions often include food and drink. My invitation to you is for moderation. Why overdo it and cause your body to become unwell? Better to enjoy the beauty of winter rather than being in bed sick. 2. Watch your dollars – there is a lot of pressure during the holiday season to spend your hard earned money. My question is: Is it not better to spend quality time with those you care about, rather than being in debt for the next 6 to 12 months? What about making gifts for loved ones? 3. Connect with familiar faces – I would invite you to reach out to people you may consider “acquaintances” – this is a great time of year to say: “I care and want to get to know you more;” It is about connection and reaching out. 3. Connect with your children – whether your kids are 5 or 35, the holiday season is a great time to spend quality time with your children. Maybe try to build something with a younger child or go see a movie with an older child. I would invite you to bring creativity into the discussion: what can we do differently this year compared to what we usually do? Maybe you both enjoy certain sports or music, so enjoy it together. What inexpensive ways can we enjoy one another’s company? I have connected with far too many men who spend holiday time alone. I truly hope that this holiday season will be different, that you will find ways to reach out and enjoy some connection. The best of the season to all! May 2014 be filled with much joy, health, and prosperity for all! Grant M. Waldman, Executive Director/Wellness Coach WEST COAST MEN’S SUPPORT SOCIETY (250) 597-2801 | Toll Free (855) MEN WORK (636-9675) 213-80 Station Street, Duncan | www.westcoastmen.com |

The Cowichan Valley Citizen is a division of VI Newspaper Group Limited Partnership. A copy of our privacy policy is available at www.van.net or by contacting 604-439-2603.

better signaled with flashing lights as in many other jurisdictions, but I am afraid that we are raising a generation of people that have lost sight of the fact that in a contest between a car/

truck and a pedestrian, the pedestrian may be in the right but will usually lose the fight. Gerald Walker Shawnigan Lake


8

News

Wednesday, December 4, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Visions art group oers opportunity to get original, one-of-a-kind gifts LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

The annual pre-Christmas show and sale by the Visions group of artists opened Dec. 3 and con-

tinues daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., except Sundays, until Dec. 21 at the Portals gallery in the Island Savings Centre. Michele Heath, Visions Art Tour

Need Financing? Credit Problems? Been Turned Down?

NO WORRIES!! I’ll get you driving TODAY!!

CALL NOW - JOHN BARGER C: 250-710-6441 O: 250-597-0424 Email: barger14@telus.net

GALAXY MOTORS Duncan

Trans Canada Highway

WEEKLY WINNER Dish

a few jewelers. A lot of artists are getting into jewelry now,� she said. “We’ve also obviously got a lot of painters, we have a photographer, a woodturner, a printmaker and

HOCKEY POOL

HONEST JOHN The Car Salesman

Society secretary, said Nov. 30 that works at the show come from 14 of the artists who were in the Visions Tour this year. “We’ve got two potters and quite

&

1 2 T3 T3 T5 T5 T5 T5 T5 T10 T10 T12 T12 T12 T15 T15 T17 T17 T19 T19 T19 T19 T19 T19 T19 T26 T26 28 T29 T29 T31 T31 T33 T33

ShaunParmar chico Friendly Ghost Carson Lesiuk Cole Thomson browny57 Bvs Bhopari Rainmakers Chocolate Island logger leslie57 Green Monster wolves Robert woodsie HABSFAN NParmar Canucks1 TPeters Western Higbie REDNECKROSE Kanadian Bacon Rossco’s Snipers milkman Cj FTC AusAid Giants Bruins1 team Paul Aaron McKenzie Duecks Duds Emma Kasper Grizzly Bears

485 484 476 476 468 468 468 468 468 467 467 465 465 465 464 464 463 463 462 462 462 462 462 462 462 461 461 460 459 459 458 458 457 457

T35 T35 T35 T35 39 40 T41 T41 T41 T44 T44 T46 T46 T46 T49 T49 T49 T49 T49 T54 T54 T54 T54 T54 59 T60 T60 T62 T62 T64 T64 T66 T66 T66

Brad Lesiuk Geoff Dunn dirty animals Ruth Kasper Mike Wadsworth Emma Wadsworth sahtlam swag Sarah Wadsworth Oilers2014 Zinkiew Bruce Nicholson bytorsbest CAPILANOCLUB Rajin Parmar the kesslers colts spOILERS Boston simplythebest asian persuasion 3D_DAN Islandbowler Matt Kerr tims Tony Jensen Redneck Chaz Abigail Wadsworth RUCKY big save Morris does it recknballz malahat man Stonehands2 Biekska

456 456 456 456 455 454 453 453 453 452 452 451 451 451 450 450 450 450 450 449 449 449 449 449 448 447 447 446 446 445 445 443 443 443

T69 T69 T69 T69 T69 T74 T74 T74 T74 T78 T78 T78 T81 T81 T81 T81 T81 T81 T81 T88 T88 T88 T91 T91 T91 T91 T91 T96 T96 T96 T96 T96 T96

The Golden Seals Carl Jensen Gopens6687 Kareena Dale tron J Squad VANCOUVER Team Awesome Dimmer cara Team Canuck budsbest Sharpkillers Stonehands Rebekah Mary farmers team Gina Jung Peter Dale team zach girl power Chemainiac wellington wombats 044 Potsi Dale1 Googas devils Dale2 Jojan CG Unit Tjl lepps Dish

442 442 442 442 442 441 441 441 441 440 440 440 439 439 439 439 439 439 439 438 438 438 437 437 437 437 437 436 436 436 436 436 436

Grand Prize

60’ FLAT SCREEN TV

Bob Carfra

Barristers

• ICBC CLAIMS

Solicitors

• PERSONAL INJURY • DISABILITY CLAIMS

Notaries Public

• Over 36 years experience • 1st office visit is free

Mediation Services

151 Fourth Street Duncan, BC V9L 5J8

www.jsg.bc.ca

Call 250-746-8779 Toll Free 888-442-4042

As of December 3rd 2013

WEEK 4 STANDINGS • TOP 99

TO VIEW STANDINGS – www.ofďŹ cepools.com 2013-14 Pool Name: citizenhockeypool SEASON Password: cowichan JOHNS SOUTHWARD GLAZIER WALTON MARGETTS

an artist who paints glass.� It’s timed perfectly for Christmas gift shopping. “Everything is original and oneof-a-kind,� she said.

2 nd

TRAEGER LIL TEX

3 rd

BEAUTIFUL

ELITE BARBECUE MERIT FURNITURE

LA-Z-BOY RECLINER

4 th

Weekend Pass for two

weekly

$25 River Rock Bucks

TO 2014 SUNFEST

For Canucks Game Days Only

.*--#":1)"3."4"7& .*--#":$&/53&

.PO'SJBNQN4BUBNQN4VOBNQN


News

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, December 4, 2013

◆ HEALTH

New group gives support for stroke survivors SARAH SIMPSON CITIZEN

A new support group for stroke survivors and their caregivers is coming to Duncan this week. Beginning on Dec. 5, the group will meet each Thursday from 24 p.m. at the Cowichan Regional Library on James Street. According to the Stroke Recovery Association of B.C., stroke recovery groups provide a welcoming place where stroke survivors and caregivers find mutual understanding, acceptance and support. “Local stroke recovery groups help people with strokes to have a better quality of life,” said SRABC Executive Director Tim Readman. “We see the benefits everyday. Members not only have access to our programs but they also develop friendships and find strength and support from other stroke survivors.” T he associa tion also said research shows those affected by strokes who are able to get back out into the community and connect with their peers are better able to realize improved health outcomes including: reduced isolation, depression and an improved overall quality of life for both stroke survivors and their caregivers. For more information or to attend a group meeting, please contact Chris Rafuse at 778-4552095 by email at vancouverislandsrabc@gmail.com

9

Christmas goes Celtic with over 100 dancers LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

Celtic Rhythm Dancers are all ready to hit the stage at the Cowichan Theatre for an evening of Highland and Celtic dancing to traditional Christmas music Friday, Dec. 6 starting at 7 p.m. More than 100 dancers, from wee ones to adults, will take part in this show, which will also include some lighthearted and contemporary holiday songs. This will be the group’s third annual Christmas show and, accor ding to Celtic Rhythms’ director Judy Hogg, “the dancers are really excited; last year was such a hit and so much fun for both the dancers and the audience.” Usually, Santa Claus makes an appearance at the end of the show, delighting the audience.

“If we are lucky, he will dance a few steps again on his way to the big chair...” JUDY HOGG, Celtic Rhythms director

“If we are lucky, he will dance a few steps again on his way to the big chair on stage where he will greet and hand out treats to the children from the show as well as the audience,” said Hogg. Tickets for the show are $17 for adults and $13 for seniors, students, children and members of the Cowichan Folk Guild. Book your seats by calling the Cowichan Ticket Centre at 250-748-7529.

Brightly costumed for the holiday season, these young Celtic Rhythms dancers charm the big crowd at last year’s show. This year’s show promises lots of fun this Friday, Dec. 6. [LEXI BAINAS/CITIZEN FILE]

Beautiful Home For Sale in Cobble Hill

250-748-2666

Tel: 250·746·8123 Email: ken@kenneal.com Website: KenNeal.com Facebook.com/kennealduncan

Service you will Happily Recommend

www.CobbleHillHome4Sale.com Open House Every Saturday & Sunday 11:00 am - 3:00 pm

#4 We treat our customers like ROYALTY and we’re bringing you the KING to prove it!

Join us on Thursday Dec 5 TO LAUNCH OUR 12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS!

“VIRTUAL ELVIS” - performing 8pm 5-8pm “Dine & Play” Spend $10 Receive $20 * HOT SEAT DRAWS TO WIN CASH AND PRIZES * 10am - 10pm Sun-Thurs | 10am - 12 Midnight Fri & Sat | Our Slot floor is now Fully Licensed

www.chancescowichan.ca

CONCESSION OPENED DAILY

436 Cowichan Way, Duncan 250-746-6300

■ PAPER BINGO ■ ELECTRONIC BINGO ■ SLOT MACHINE ■ HOURS: Sun - Thurs 10 am - Midnight • Fri - Sat 10 am - 1 am


10

Wednesday, December 4, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

0

% FINANCING FOR UP TO 96 MONTHS

1,000

$

5

HOLIDAY PRICE ADJUSTMENTSΩ

UP TO

YEAR COMPREHENSIVE WARRANTY

ON SELECT MODELS

2013

ELANTRA L

AWARDED THE HIGHEST GOVERNMENT CRASH SAFETY RATINGʆ U.S. NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION

HWY: 5.2L/100 KM CITY: 7.1L/100 KMʈ

STANDARD FEATURES INCLUDE: 6 AIRBAGS • IPOD®/USB/AUXILIARY INPUT JACKS • POWER WINDOWS & DOOR LOCKS • ABS WITH TRACTION CONTROL SYSTEM • DUAL HEATED POWER EXTERIOR MIRRORS OWN IT FOR

WITH

AND

1,000

$ BI-WEEKLY

FINANCING FOR 96 MONTHS

SELLING PRICE:

INCLUDES

DOWN

HOLIDAY PRICE ADJUSTMENTSΩ

Limited model shown Inventory is limited. Dealer order may be required.

ELANTRA L 6-SPEED MANUAL. $1,000 IN PRICE ADJUSTMENTSΩ, DELIVERY & DESTINATION INCLUDED.

2013

2013

ACCENT 5 DR L

ELANTRA GT HWY: 5.3L/100 KM CITY: 7.8L/100 KMʈ

HWY: 5.3L/100 KM CITY: 7.1L/100 KMʈ

Inventory is limited.

OWN IT FOR

WITH

GLS model shown

AND

$ BI-WEEKLY

FINANCING FOR 96 MONTHS

DOWN

SELLING PRICE:

INCLUDES

500

Inventory is limited. Dealer order may be required.

SE with Tech. shown

GET

500

$

HOLIDAY PRICE ADJUSTMENTSΩ

ACCENT 5 DR L 6-SPEED MANUAL. $500 IN PRICE ADJUSTMENTSΩ, DELIVERY & DESTINATION INCLUDED.

FINANCING FOR UP TO 72 MONTHS

STANDARD FEATURES INCLUDE:

HOLIDAY PRICE ADJUSTMENTSΩ

2013 BEST NEW SMALL CAR (OVER $21K)

STANDARD FEATURES INCLUDE:

1.6L GDI ENGINE • FRONT ACTIVE HEADRESTS • FRONT, SIDE & CURTAIN AIRBAGS • POWER DOOR LOCKS • AM/FM/ CD/MP3/USB/iPOD® AUDIO SYSTEM

HWY: 5.6L/100 KM CITY: 8.7L/100 KMʈ

DRIVER SELECTABLE STEERING (DSS) • AIR CONDITIONING • 7 AIRBAGS • AM/FM/CD/MP3/USB/ IPOD® AUDIO SYSTEM • COOLED GLOVE BOX

2013

SONATA

AVAILABLE FEATURES INCLUDE:

GET UP TO

5,250

$

AWARDED THE HIGHEST GOVERNMENT CRASH SAFETY RATINGʆ U.S. NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION

HOLIDAY PRICE ADJUSTMENTSΩ

GDI ENGINE • HEATED FRONT/REAR SEATS • BACKUP CAMERA • INFINITY® AM/FM/XM/CD/MP3 STEREO WITH 9 SPEAKERS & EXTERNAL AMPLIFIER • PANORAMIC SUNROOF

Inventory is limited. Limited model shown

5-year/100,000 km Comprehensive Limited Warranty†† 5-year/100,000 km Powertrain Warranty 5-year/100,000 km Emission Warranty

HyundaiCanada.com

TM

The Hyundai names, logos, product names, feature names, images and slogans are trademarks owned by Hyundai Auto Canada Corp. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. †Finance offers available O.A.C. from Hyundai Financial Services based on a new 2013 Elantra L 6-Speed Manual/Accent 5 Door L 6-Speed Manual/Elantra GT L 6-Speed Manual with an annual finance rate of 0% for 96/96/72 months. Bi-weekly payments are $79/$71/$123. $0 down payment required. Cost of Borrowing is $0. Finance offers include Delivery and Destination of $1,550. Registration, insurance, PPSA, fees, levies, charges, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. Delivery and Destination charge includes freight, P.D.E., dealer admin fees and a full tank of gas. Financing example: 2013 Elantra L 6-Speed Manual for $16,499 (includes $1,000 in price adjustments) at 0% per annum equals $79 bi-weekly for 96 months for a total obligation of $16,499. Cash price is $16,499. Cost of Borrowing is $0. Example price includes Delivery and Destination of $1,550. Registration, insurance, PPSA, fees, levies, charges, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. Delivery and Destination charge includes freight, P.D.E., dealer admin fees and a full tank of gas. ʈFuel consumption for 2013 Elantra L 6-Speed Manual (HWY 5.2L/100KM; City 7.1L/100KM)/Accent 5 Door L 6-Speed Manual (HWY 5.3L/100KM; City 7.1L/100KM)/Elantra GT L6-Speed Manual (HWY 5.3L/100KM; City 7.8L/100KM)/Sonata GL Auto (HWY 5.6L/100KM; City 8.7L/100KM) are based on Energuide. Actual fuel efficiency may vary based on driving conditions and the addition of certain vehicle accessories. Fuel economy figures are used for comparison purposes only. ʕPrice of models shown: 2013 Elantra Limited/Accent 5 Door GLS 6-Speed Manual/Elantra GT SE Tech Auto/Sonata Limited are $24,849/$19,249/$27,899/$30,649. Prices include Delivery and Destination charges of $1,550/$1,550/ $1,550/$1,650. Registration, insurance, PPSA, fees, levies, charges, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. Delivery and Destination charge includes freight, P.D.E., dealer admin fees and a full tank of gas. ΩPrice adjustments are calculated against the vehicle’s starting price. Price adjustments of up to $1,000/$500/$5,250/$500 available on 2013 Elantra L 6-Speed Manual/Accent 5 Door L 6-Speed Manual/Sonata SE Auto (on cash purchases only)/Elantra GT L 6-Speed Manual. Price adjustments applied before taxes. Offer cannot be combined or used in conjunction with any other available offers. Offer is non-transferable and cannot be assigned. No vehicle trade-in required. ʆGovernment 5-Star Safety Ratings are part of the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA’s) New Car Assessment Program (www.SaferCar.gov). †ΩʕOffers available for a limited time, and subject to change or cancellation without notice. See dealer for complete details. Dealer may sell for less. Inventory is limited, dealer order may be required. ††Hyundai’s Comprehensive Limited Warranty coverage covers most vehicle components against defects in workmanship under normal use and maintenance conditions.

DUNCAN HYUNDAI

2801 ROBERTS ROAD , Duncan HOURS: • MON. - THUR. 8:00-7:00 pm • FRI. & SAT. 8:00-5:30 pm • SUN. 11-4 pm

250-746-0335

1-800-461-0161

Browse our inventory online @ www.duncanhyundai.ca


Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, December 4, 2013

Smith died violently, conclusion Crashing backward came and went as to the floor, Smith we pleased, and the struggled with his captain did not again remaining breath to molest us, nor did he raise his gun. thank Smith for his s we’ve seen, life or speak to us at Robert T. Smith, all until we reached the hero of this San Francisco. The Chronicles mini-series, incident with the CHRONICLES didn’t always use his sailor had humbled T.W. Paterson walking stick when in him somewhat, and he a confrontation. While treated the passengers sailing to San Francisco aboard with some consideration; but the decrepit Continental, he and he was as hard as ever on the fellow passenger David W. Higcrew...” gins had witnessed the captain, Upon the Continental’s docking who was known for his brutality, in the Bay City, Smith and Higbegin beating a seaman only to gins went their own ways. When retreat in terror when the man next the Victoria journalist pulled a knife. hard of him, Smith was in Utah None of the crew would help and, according to reports, doing him and he was saved from sure extremely well. Not only was he death by the burly Smith who a financial success at last but he disarmed the would-be assassin was courting the territorial lieuwith little more than a flick of tenant-governor’s daughter. the wrist. Alas, it was too good to be When the enraged sailor then true — or too good to last — as turned his attention to Smith, Smith’s bad luck of old — that he was quickly wrestled to the bad luck that had dogged him deck where he lay exhausted during his years in British Colfrom having chased the captain umbia — again caught up with several times around the ship. him. Although he’d become rich, At this, the master regained his the object of his affection rejectcourage and, ignoring Smith’s ed his proposal of marriage. In and Higgins’s protests, kicked fact, the young lady who, until the man’s face into an unrecogthat time, had given him every nizable pulp before having him encouragement, dismissed him placed in irons in the forecastle. from her life rather abruptly. Shamefully, neither Smith nor When the bewildered suitor Higgins did anything to stop asked why the sudden change of him, merely, as Higgins wrote heart, she simply referred him to half a century after, turning his rival, a Dr. Snedecker. “away sick at heart at the cowSmith, his famous temper to ardice and brutality of the capthe fore, called upon that gentletain and the time-serving crew, man. Just what Snedecker had to who as soon as the sailor had say isn’t known although it was fallen into the clutches of the a matter of public record that, captain, assisted in carrying him when R.T. Smith left him, he was to the forecastle and imprisonlivid and loudly informed the ing him. While the chase was on, doctor that, “Utah was not big they had wished him success. enough to hold them both”. “We remained on deck and Just two days after, the rivals

11

CROWDS ENJOY MELLOR MAGIC

A

D.W. Higgins recounted that memorable voyage with R.T. Smith on the decrepit Continental. —TWP chanced to board the same train at the same time. According to the record, they “glared at each other, hot words were exchanged, and both drew their pistols”. Although older, Dr. Snedecker seems to have been the more agile as he was first to draw and fire, his pistol ball striking Smith in the chest and puncturing a lung. Crashing backward to the floor, Smith struggled with his remaining breath to raise his gun and, with superhuman effort, managed to aim and fire. A second later, he was dead — unaware that his single shot had caught Snedecker in the heart. “The enemies,” it was reported, “breath[ed] their last sighs at the same moment”. With that, Robert T. Smith belonged to the ages, his wealth passing to needy relations in Scotland. One can only hope that his heirs enjoyed happier circumstances than did the bluff but good-hearted pioneer whose death in a Wild West shootout ended what had been a remarkable and colourful career.

Both vendors and buyers are delighted at the first-ever Deck the Hall Christmas craft fair at Mellor Hall last weekend. For more photos and video of the event scan this image with the Layar app on your smart phone or go to www.cowichanvalleycitizen. com [LEXI BAINAS/CITIZEN]

#1

www.twpaterson.com

Saturday December 7th | 9am - 3pm

Hometown Store

Watch for our

FLYER in the

THIS FRIDAY ł 3URIHVVLRQDO6DQWD3KRWRVVWDUWDWDP

Fresh Cut Local Christmas Trees for Sale 1843 Tzouhalem Rd. | 250-746-4204 | www.providence.bc.ca

December 6, 2013 2724 Beverly Street, DUNCAN 250-746-7111 (Old Canadian Tire building next to Liquidation World)


12

Wednesday, December 4, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Join us for your

HOLIDAY SHOPPING Our friendly merchants are here to make your shopping an Outstanding Experience! Help support your local food bank.

FRESH

The Ultimate Gift for Every Age

Add a $5, $10 or $20 coupon to

I t ’s easy to give H

FRESH

for

FRES

for

$20 $10 $5 I FRES

your grocery order. Funds raised

Puzzles

today help food banks meet the

from 20 piece to 9000 piece

growing need for fresh, nutritious food 12 months of the year.

A Great Holiday Gift!

Thank you for giving

H

Present ier this cashan deyour $10 coupon to the to the ad cashie dona coupon n will be m to the loc tion will be ma r t this tio al food Presen $20 dona od bank. de bank. ur fo and yo to the local

for

to give t ’s easy to give I t ’s easy I t ’s e asy to give Pres and ent this you r $5 coupo to th donat n to th e io e lo cal fo n will cashie od b be m r ank. ade

Wrapping FREE Gift with any purchase!

Mill Bay Centre 250-743-4221

• Monday - Saturday 9:30 - 5:30 • Sunday 11 - 4 • Sunday Dec. 22 10-5 • Tuesday Dec. 24 9:30-3:30

Brilliance

Warm up with one of our many Festive Drinks!

Bru-Go's

Available ORGANIC HOLIDAY BLEND COFFEE from Salt Spring Coffee

Gift Certificates available! Check out our wonderful selection of GIFT BASKETS, Mugs, Ornaments and much more!

Drop by and relax with a hot bowl of soup, panini or a BLT bagel!

Stop by while shopping... at Mill Bay Centre Our friendly Staff is always happy to serve you!

Friday Dec 6 Saturday Dec 7 Sunday Dec 8 1:00 - 5:00 pm

Breakfast with Santa

Murray's Whiskey Point Grill - Sun. Dec. 15 Reservations 743-7277

8BMQFSU8PPE/VUDSBDLFS 5BCMF%FDPSBUJPO Âł

1299

0SOBUF(MBTT5BCMF %FDPSBUJPO Âł

1199

299

(MBTT#JSE0SOBNFOU ÂłYÂłYÂł 4JMWFS

399

1SJDFTJOFGGFDUVOUJM%FDFNCFS 

Visit Santa

1-5pm

Âł

"OHFM#FMMT  ÂłYÂł 4FUPG

%JNFOTJPOBM .FUBM0SOBNFOU XJUI+FXFMT 4JMWFS

Make sure to BRING YOUR OWN CAMERA

"OUJRVF4JMWFS0XM 

999 549

Friday Dec 13 Saturday Dec 14 1:00 - 5:00 pm Friday Dec 20 Saturday Dec 21 Sunday Dec 22 1:00 - 5:00 pm

499

Create an elegant setting by combining shimmery silver with the warmth of gold

4IPPUJOH4UBS

Visiting Hours with Santa at Mill Bay Centre

$IBNQBHOF7PUJWF)PMEFS ÂłPSÂł DBOEMFTOPUJODMVEFE

250-743-9011 Mill Bay Centre Mill Bay BC

DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE

(MJUUFSFE 0SOBNFOU

ÂłYÂł  (PMEPS4JMWFS

1

(MBTT 0SOBNFOU  Âł 8JUI4JMWFS %FUBJM

29

449

Mon-Fri 9am-7pm Sat 9am-6pm Sun 11am-5pm

$-04&%$)3*45."4%": #09* /(%":/&8:&"34%":


Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, December 4, 2013

duncan 1A - 180 central road, duncan (next to safeway)

The

Magic

13

#1

of Christmas ~ CONTEST ~

163 Kenneth St., Duncan 250-748-7467

#2

#3 UNIQUE GIFTS FOR CHRISTMAS Whippletree Antique Mall

(beside Kal Tire)

Instructions Visit us Online:

panago.com

#101 - 2700 Beverly Street

DUNCAN 250-746-4851 FINANCING OPTIONS AVAILABLE

Since 1979

duncanfloors.com

DUNCAN AUTO PARTS

DUNCAN 5829 Duncan Street,

250-746-5431

#4

• Cut out this tree template and each Publication find a photo of one of the eight movie pictures through out our newspaper. Attach it to the correct bulb until you have all eight.

#5

• The completed Christmas Tree is valid for a CHANCE TO WIN 2 Tickets to Chemainus Dinner Theatre “It’s a Wonder Life” including a bottle of local wine.

#6

• All Christmas ornaments must be originals and all ornaments must be in place for a chance to win. Bring us this complete template to Cowichan Valley Citizen office 251 Jubilee Street, Duncan Contest closes Dec. 5, 2013 5:00 pm

#7 #8

Old Friend Slippers • Birkenstocks

Duncan Cobbler 291 Trunk Road, Duncan 250-746-1820

Remember our Great Rear Parking Monday - Friday 9-5pm Saturday 9-3pm

REPAIRS for all

your leather & footwear

WALLETS

20% OFF

Dayton Boots - Work & Casual

Name:______________________________________________ 250-748-7200 1-800-976-5566 472 Trans Canada Highway, Duncan

Telephone: _______________________


14

Wednesday, December 4, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Spend $250 and receive a

FREE

uu

PC® butter basted turkey up to 7 kg $28.80 value 470612

uu

Spend $250 or more before applicable taxes at any Real Canadian Superstore location and receive a free PC® butter basted turkey. Excludes purchase of tobacco, alcohol products, prescriptions, gift cards, phone cards, lottery tickets, all third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners, etc.) and any other products which are provincially regulated. The retail value of up to $28.80 will be deducted from the total amount of your purchase before sales taxes are applied. Limit one coupon per family and/or customer account. No cash value. No copies. Coupon must be presented to the cashier at time of purchase. Valid from Friday, November 29th until closing Thursday, December 5th, 2013. Cannot be combined with any other coupons or promotional offers. No substitutions, refunds or exchanges on free item. 104797

baked fresh

in-store

2

no name club pack® hams selected varieties

302755 210909

78

1

Goldfish crackers selected varieties, 180-227 g

811646 1410008133

9

/lb 6.13 /kg

product of Western provinces, Canada no. 1 grade 794604 64664

99

1

fresh tomatoes on the vine

2

selected varieties, 410-650 mL

ea

AFTER LIMIT

2.97

897642 5700033000

8

Royale Tiger towels

2.15 kg

12 rolls

ea

LIMIT 4

AFTER LIMIT

14.97

885377 6343572022

white or 100% whole wheat, sliced or unsliced, 450 g

97

2

ea

203448 46038382948

Smart Ones Signature or Gourmet entrees ea

AFTER LIMIT

3.77

selected varieties, frozen, 126-328 g 240496 5700003641

00

12

Sunlight liquid laundry detergent ea

lemon, 5.08 L, 110 washloads

LIMIT 6

AFTER LIMIT

13.97

5

Bakeshop fresh bread

LIMIT 2

96

3

Boursin soft spreadable cheese assorted varieties, 125-150 g

899008 4175703135

00

Carnation hot chocolate

199370 6500077175

3.24 /kg

Classico pasta sauce

LIMIT 4

98

47

/lb

769114 7261317008

97

2

OR

1.47 EACH

Tenderflake products

LIMIT 5

3.97

4/

selected varieties, frozen, 255-397 g

ea

AFTER LIMIT

00

842079 6310019941

50

ea

LIMIT 6

AFTER LIMIT

20.49

775031 3700086245

AFTER LIMIT

119695 1379295

1.07

ea

selected varieties

LIMIT 4

AFTER LIMIT

3.57

34

17

ea

3

Danone Activia yogurt, 8 X 100 g or Danino, 8 X 93 mL

Pampers club size plus diapers size 1-6, 92-186’s

.57

Campbell’s condensed soup tomato, cream of mushroom, chicken noodle or vegetable, 284 mL LIMIT 6

ea

LIMIT 4

AFTER LIMIT

44.99

87

ea

LIMIT 2

AFTER LIMIT

954775 / 558107 5680015318 / 5680012513

4.99

19

Pampers 12X or Huggies 13X wipes selected varieties, 744-960’s 446414 3600034066

43

ea

LIMIT 4

AFTER LIMIT

24.83

Prices are in effect until Thursday, December mber 5 5,, 2 2013 or while stock lasts. Quantities and/or selection of items may be limited and may not be available in all stores. No rainchecks. No substitutions on clearance items or where quantities are advertised as limited. Advertised pricing and product selection (flavour, colour, patterns, style) may vary by store location. We reserve the right to limit quantities to reasonable family requirements. We are not obligated to sell items based on errors or misprints in typography or photography. Coupons must be presented and redeemed at time of purchase. Applicable taxes, deposits, or environmental surcharges are extra. No sales to retail outlets. Some items may have “plus deposit and environmental charge” where applicable. ®/™ The trademarks, service marks and logos displayed in this flyer are trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. All rights reserved. © 2013 Loblaws Inc. * we match prices! Applies only to our major supermarket competitors’ flyer items. Major supermarket competitors are determined solely by us based on a number of factors which can vary by store location. We will match the competitor’s advertised price only during the effective date of the competitor’s flyer advertisement. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES (note that our major supermarket competitors may not). Due to the fact that product is ordered prior to the time of our Ad Match checks, quantities may be limited. We match identical items (defined as same brand, size, and attributes) and in the case of fresh produce, meat, seafood and bakery, we match a comparable item (as determined solely by us). We will not match competitors’ “multi-buys” (eg. 2 for $4), “spend x get x”, “Free”, “clearance”, discounts obtained through loyalty programs, or offers related to our third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners etc.). We reserve the right to cancel or change the terms of this program at any time. Customer Relations: 1-866-999-9890.

superstore.ca


A&E

250-748-2666 ext. 225 arts@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, December 4, 2013

15

Friends say final farewell to Garage Showroom Tickling the ivories in his own unique way is a specialty with Erskine Phillips. He joined a host of friends of the Duncan Garage Showroom to bid farewell to the venue with style last week. For video and photos from the event, scan this image with the Layar app on your smart phone or go to www.cowichanvalleycitizen.com

LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

[LEXI BAINAS/CITIZEN]

Longevity John Falkner talks about his future plans. [LEXI BAINAS/CITIZEN] for the Orca Showroom [banquet room] all genres presented. Yahoo. I so look forward to this next chapter in my life. Namaste,” he said in his valedictory address before reminding everyone that his new ventures will be under the name Duncan Showroom Productions. In his last week at the Showroom, Falkner emceed several special events including a young performers’ night, a celebration of female performers, and a final variety show. Among the many who came out to share the day with him were Martyn Jones and Glaucia Ayers Desrochers, Corey and Shakey Reay Suter, Doug Koyama and Erksine Phillips and then a windup session of Bill Levity’s For the Love of Words Tuesday, Nov. 26.

#2 The Showroom first opened in 2003

Royal City Youth Ballet Company Society proudly presents, for the 25th season, the full length ballet, the Nutcracker.

The longest running Nutcracker ballet performance in Canada!

Don’t miss your opportunity to see this unique show that delights audiences of all ages.

RCYB An

n i 25 s a ver

Artistic Director Dolores Kirkwood, OBC

Cowichan Theatre, Duncan Friday, December 20 7:00 pm Saturday, December 21 1:00 pm Box Office: 250-748-7529 www.cowichantheatre.bc.ca

For more information, and a full list of performances, please visit our website:

www.royalcityyouthballet.org

th

ry

He kept everyone in the loop, right up to the end. Longevity John Falkner posted on Facebook Sunday, Dec. 1 the arrival of his final hurrah at the Duncan Garage Showroom. He had to move his club out of its 10-year home in the historic building by the end of November. That was no small task as the space was filled with thousands of pieces of fascinating memorabilia from his huge collection. “Well here it is, day one and the Showroom is no longer. We finished just after midnight last night cleaning it out. Wow, empty and just another room that has sound problems to solve....guess we had done that....but as it stands, the Duncan Garage Showroom is no more. “There will be variations on themes later on possibly but right now I have a job.” Everyone will by now have heard that Falkner is moving to the Silver Bridge Travelodge with the aim of making it “the hippest musical joint on the Island if not B.C.” He’s looking at lining up music in the Anglers Tavern five nights a week, music in the Old Fork three to four nights a week “and as many concerts/dances that I can muster


16

A&E

Wednesday, December 4, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

YOUNG MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK Nyah Miranda, 13, is in Grade 8 at Frances Kelsey. Nyah excels in music, learning flute in band, and piano Grade 4, as well as voice Grade 6-7 with Iris Cooke-Chislett. She received first class honours in her exams. She has won awards at the Cowichan Music Festival, and studies advanced rudiments theory with Trisha Daniell. Nyah shines in all that she does.

COURTESY COWICHANMUSICTEACHERS.COM

20TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

Winter Harp Sunday December 15, 2pm

Sunfest adds up-and-comer LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

Canadian country songbird Kira Isabella is joining the star-studded lineup for Sunfest 2014. Making the announcement Saturday afternoon, Nov. 30, Sunfest executive assistant Charlotte Fisher said she was delighted to see the songstress on board. “She’s a great Canadian talent, an up-and-comer for sure. She is going to be performing Friday night. She’ll be on just before George Canyon takes the stage so our Friday’s pretty loaded up there now with Kira Isabella, George Canyon and Jake Owens. It’s going to be a good one,” she said. Kira Isabella is “an artist who’s been on our radar for a while now. We heard about her last year and then with her winning the female vocalist of the year at the Canadian Country Music Awards this year we wanted her even more,” Fisher said. Quality birds of a feather flock together. “She’s hitting stages all over the place. She opened for Carrie Underwood last year when she was in Vancouver and she’s opened for Terri Clark as well. We’re looking forward to bringing her in. It’s great to be adding more female talent to Sunfest, too.” This concludes the announcements of big names for the country music festival, but there is more to come “I don’t think there are any more big ones but we will be announcing all of our local talent. We start calling for submissions in January. People can check out the website and get packages and probably in April the lineup will be announced. We’ve had lots of enquiries already,” Fisher said. Kira Isabella’s latest song, A Country Boy For Christmas,

After she won top female country vocalist of 2013, Sunfest really wanted Kira Isabella. To see video of her singing, scan this image with the Layar app on your smart phone or go to www.cowichanvalleycitizen.com [SUBMITTED] just debuted in America Nov. 26, according to a release from HitShop Records President Skip Bishop, who said he’s happy to welcome the 20-year-old. This exciting young singer first dreamed of stardom at age seven and with influences like Shania Twain and Faith Hill, she had plenty to work with. In 2012 she won the Rising Star award at the Canadian Country Music Awards, and went on to earn the coveted Female Artist of The Year award this year. “We have watched Kira’s meteoric rise to Canadian superstardom.

Her numerous top-ranked awards and consistent radio smashes speak for her tremendous talent,” Bishop said. “She is a lovely and a remarkably gifted young vocalist and performer. The stage is set for Kira to begin her U.S. country radio journey and we are so honoured that she chose HitShop as her Nashville home.” A Country Boy For Christmas was written by the artist herself along with Jason Phelps and has just been shipped to country radio last week and is now available on iTunes.

Sherwood House

Pr One Bedermium oom Available Suite

Independent Retirement Living with Services

Probus Singers I Monday, December 9th at 2:30 pm Everyone is welcome Refreshments will be served!

Enjoying the Good Life! Tickets $36 / CowichanTheatre.ca 2687 James Street Duncan (250) 748-7529 Gift cards available at the Ticket Centre

Living at Sherwood House means enjoying the good life…delicious, chef prepared meals, a variety of activities and outings with new friends, while services are delivered with a smile from the professional and caring staff. We are always having fun at Sherwood House! What are you waiting for?! Join us for your complimentary lunch & tour! Call today to book your reservation 250-715-0116

280 Government Street | Duncan, BC V9L 0B5 | 250-715-0116

www.sherwood-house.com


A&E

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, December 4, 2013

Palm Court turns to ‘Pops’ legend Fiedler

www.cowichanvalleycitizen.com

CAPRICE THEATRE www.capricecinemas.com

LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

The Palm Court Light Orchestra, famous for its presentations of “pops” music, turns to the King of Pops for its next concert, Sunday, Dec. 8 at the Cowichan Theatre, starting at 2:30 p.m. Yes, they are celebrating the world of Arthur Fiedler. According to the Palm Court’s founder and conductor, Charles Job, when the Boston Symphony decided — decades ago — to present concerts of light music they turned to Arthur Fiedler, then a violinist in the orchestra, to create the Boston Pops. “These concerts became so popular that they were broadcast on radio and television across North America. Their success was based upon a repertoire of light classics, combined with popular music and compositions specially written for the orchestra by Leroy Anderson,” Job said. This composer’s work has been featured before by the Palm Court Orchestra. “In the 1950s and 60s Leroy Anderson wrote many compositions, including Sleigh Ride, Blue Tango and Bell of the Ball, that became instant hits and orchestras worldwide played them with great success,” Job said in talking about his group’s upcoming concert. It’s surprising, said Job, what people don’t remember. “Once Leroy Anderson was a staple of symphony pops but you just don’t hear him much any more. And that’s not that far back. That’s the 1950s. That music is disappearing really quickly,” he said. In other words, if you want to hear this sort of music, better do it now while you still can. When Fiedler retired, his “light sabre” was taken over by film composer John Williams who continued the tradition incorporating his own film scores such as Star Wars, Indiana Jones, and Harry Potter. The Boston Pops continues today under the direction of Kei-

404 Duncan Street, Duncan 24 HR Showline

250-748-0678

NOW PLAYING

PG

HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE Nightly: 6:45 & 9:30 pm Matinee: Saturday & Sunday - 1:00 pm

G

FROZEN Nightly: 7:00 & 9:00 pm Matinee: Saturday & Sunday - 1:10 pm

ADMISSION PRICES Adults $9.75 - Juniors $8.50 - Child & Seniors $6.50 TUESDAY AND MATINEES... ALL SEATS $6.50

Genial conductor Charles Job has devoted many years to keeping alive the tradition of light pop concerts and on Dec. 8 he’ll pay tribute to another enthusiast: Arthur Fiedler. [CITIZEN FILE] th Lockhart who is also the conductor of the BBC Concert Orchestra in London, England. For its tribute to the Boston Pops, Job and the musicians will play a selection of Leroy Anderson’s music including The Syncopated Clock, The Typewriter and The Sandpaper Ballet. The orchestra will also present light music by Canadian icon Robert Farnon, who led the Canadian Armed Forces Band during the Second World War, and then remained in the UK, and became famous for his original and novel compositions, radio and television shows, numerous recordings, and arrangements for big band

singers Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett and George Shearing. In order to present an authentic tribute to the Boston Pops the Palm Court is including Henry Mancini’s Moon River, Emil Waldteufel’s Skaters Waltz and Francis Lai’s theme from Love Story (Where do I Begin?). Soloists from the orchestra will also perform Ennio Morricone’s Gabriel’s Oboe from the film The Mission and concertmaster Pablo Diemecke will perform John Williams’s moving violin solo from Schindler’s List. Tickets are available from the Cowichan Ticket Centre by calling 250-748-7529.

Did you know?

Dear George:Remember NO man is a failure who has friends. Thanks for the wings!

Love Clarence

#8 2013 - 2014 SEASON

)*W[\WV8WX[<ZQJ]\M KƵƌĐĞůĞďƌĂƟŽŶŽĨƌƚŚƵƌ &ŝĞĚůĞƌĂŶĚƚŚĞŽƐƚŽŶWŽƉƐ ŝŶĐůƵĚĞƐƚŚĞŵƵƐŝĐŽĨ>ĞƌŽLJ ŶĚĞƌƐŽŶ͕,ĞŶƌLJDĂŶĐŝŶŝ͕ :ŽŚŶtŝůůŝĂŵƐĂŶĚĂŶĂĚŝĂŶ ZŽďĞƌƚ&ĂƌŶŽŶ͘

ŽǁŝĐŚĂŶdŚĞĂƚƌĞ ϮϱϬϳϰϴϳϱϮϵ

17

^ƵŶĚĂLJĞĐϴ Ϯ͗ϯϬƉŵ

Composer Leroy Anderson came up with the concept for Sleigh Ride during a heat wave in August of 1946!


18

Wednesday, December 4, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Your Community

Or call to place your ad:

MARKETPLACE Book your ad ONLINE:

classiďŹ eds.cowichanvalleycitizen.com

250-737-2527 Monday - Friday 8:30am - 5:00pm Email: classiďŹ eds@cowichanvalleycitizen.com Fax: 250-748-1552 469 Whistler St., Duncan, BC V9L 4X5

DEADLINES:

Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Paper - Monday at 4:30pm Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Paper - Wednesday at 4:30pm Circulation: 250-748-2666 or 250-715-7783

REMEMBRANCES

    

 



                           

                      

                

   

         

              

           

       !   

        

           "                         #                      

 



 

                        

               

 $    %  &            



                        '(  )            

*+    , $    #            "   

  

        

COMMUNITY

OBITUARIES

Dr. Herbert Boggs

It is with great sadness and profound grief we say goodbye to Dr. Herbert (Herb) Boggs. Born in Northern Ireland, immigrating to Canada in 1953. Herb is predeceased by his parents Douglas (1978), Minnie (1949), brothers Hans (2011) and Gawin (2012). Left to mourn is his brother Frank, sisters Margaret and Sadie (Morris) and sisterâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;inâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;law Agnes. Herb was a wonderful Husband to Jacqueline, loving Father to Shaughna (Ray), Gillian (Mike) and Glynis (Mike), adored Grandfather to Reece, Ryan, Nicole, Keith and Hailey, gifted Chiropractor of over 35 years and a Great Horseman. Herbâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s greatest joy was watching his race horses win and proudest moments when they brought home the trophy. As his daughters were growing up Herb helped with the 4H Club and QMS Pony Club and was also a proud Mason (Lodge 33). Herb led a full life and we will all miss him terribly. At his request there will be no service and in lieu of flowers, donations may be made at the local Cowichan SPCA in his name. 1933 â&#x2C6;&#x2019; 2013

Of Victoria, BC passed away suddenly on November 25, 2013 in the Cowichan District Hospital. He is predeceased by his parents and brother Jim. Larry will be sadly missed by his sister Sheila (Tom) and his 5 children, Brenda, Tanya (Don), Cynthia, Sonja (Andrew) and Roy. Larryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s family were his world. He was a proud Grandpa to his 9 grandchildren and 1 great grandchild, Brett, Karissa, Savannah, Breanne (Bella), Amber, Tyler, Nathan, Ryan and Isabella. Larry will be laid to rest privately by his family at Royal Oak Burial Park in Victoria. In lieu of flowers please consider a donation to the Canadian Diabetes Association. Online condolences may be offered at www.hwwallacecbc.com

ANNOUNCEMENTS CRIMINAL RECORD? Canadian Record Suspension (Criminal pardon) seals record. American waiver allows legal entry. Why risk employment, business, travel, licensing, deportation, peace of mind? Free consultation: 1-800-347-2540

Ruth (Margaret) Burke October 20, 1942 to November 24, 2013 .

FOUND FOUND childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s jacket at Transfer Beach in Ladysmith. 250â&#x2C6;&#x2019;246â&#x2C6;&#x2019;1951.

FOUND PET RABBIT Thurs Nov 28th, friendly, just behind the Mill Bay Tim Hortons, Pls ID. Call 250-743-3684

LOST $200 REWARD, LOST black cat. Gold eyes, Answers to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Paddyâ&#x20AC;?. 250-929-4213

PSYCHICS TRUE PSYCHICS For Answers call now 24/7 Toll free 1-877-342-3032 Mobile: #4486 www.truepsychics.ca

VOLUNTEERS The Cowichan Valley Capitals are looking for more VOLUNTEERS on game nights! If you are interested in volunteering with the Capitals or would like to join the booster club please call Bria Chipman at 1-250-710-1273 or email: bria.chipman@cowichancapitals.com. GO CAPS GO!

OLSEN, Sharon Linda February 4, 1944 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; November 24, 2013

MOSURE, William Larry .

VAUGHAN, MARGERY MAE, M. Litt., Ed.D. DECEMBER 27, 1927 â&#x2C6;&#x2019; NOVEMBER 22, 2013

Marge died peacefully in Cowichan District Hospital after many years of heart trouble. Predeceased by her niece, Heather, she is gratefully remembered and mourned by her brother Bob (Joyce), nephews Steve (Peg) and Greg (Ingrid), grandâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; nieces Candace (Matt), Chelsea, Beth (Jay), Kelsey, grandnephew Brandon, great grandâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; nephew Caleb, godchildren Hilary and Ann, fellow residents in Lionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cove Mill Bay, faculty colleagues in Music Education at U Vic, choir members in churches and community, music students, volunteers in Knoll Retreat Society, and many dear friends. Her family specially thanks the staff on 2 South CDH for their tender care, Dr. J. Malherbe for years of sensitive attention, and homecare workers Jill and Teresa for faithful and generous support. A memorial gathering will be held Sunday, December 8, at 2:00 PM at the Shawnigan Alliance Church, 1603 Wilmot Ave,. Shawnigan Lake, BC. Private family graveside according to Margeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wishes. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the Cowichan District Hospital Foundation, #4 â&#x2C6;&#x2019; 466 Trans Canada Hwy, Duncan, BC, V9L 3R6.

     

     

        

                   

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Ruth Burke; mother, nanny, sister, aunt, cousin and great friend. Just after supper on Sunday November 24th she suffered a brain hemorrhage and was taken to Victoria General where she passed away soon after. Her daughter Kelly, grandson Justin and nephew Dave were by her side to see her on her way. Ruth was predeceased by her first husband Larry Allen Wright in 1986. She is greatly mourned and remembered by two daughters Sheri and Kelly; a son Roger; a sister Sharon; two brothers Richard, Jim; grandkids Justin, Miranda, Ian; special ex-husband and friend Ron; many special nephews, nieces, cousins and especially her faithful dog companion Gibson. Ruth loved to help in the community whether it was with the Chemainus Theatre, South Cowichan Community Policing, Speedwatch, or just having fun with YSAG functions. She loved to laugh, she loved to dance like no one was watching and she had a heart filled full of love. Her favorite place to be was in Tofino where she could listen to the roar of the waves and walk along the beach. She was our anchor, our safety line that we could rely on when the water got rough. In our darkest times she was the beacon of light so we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t crash amongst the rocks. She will be greatly missed but lovingly remembered. There is a new bright shining star gazing down from the heavens, guiding us with her light. Rest in Peace Ruth. We love you to infinity. A Celebration of Life for Ruth will be held on Dec 12th from 1pm â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3pm at the Oceanfront Suites in Cowichan Bay. In lieu of flowers, please consider donating to the 744 Royal Canadian Air Cadets squadron Sponsor Committee, The Canadian Cancer Society, or the BC Arthritis Society. Online condolences may be offered at www.sandsduncan.ca

.

Our family mourns the passing of Sharon Linda Olsen (nee Kernaghan) on November 24th 2013. Loving wife of 50 years to Garry, devoted mother to Wes (Tanis) and Kelly (Ken) and adoring grandmother to Ryan, Kaitlynn, Eric Scott and Taylor. Sharon is survived by her siblings: brother; Gerry and sisters: Joan; Jackie; Norma and Linda and 31 nieces and nephews. She is pre-deceased by her parents David and Nettie, brothers Mel and Bob and sisters Audrey and Donna. Born on February 4th 1944 in Calgary Alberta Sharon was the second youngest of 10 children. Growing up she was very active in sports and held a school record for high jump at Chestermire Lake High. On November 16th 1963 she married the love of her life and had two children. Garry and Sharon moved extensively over the years in British Columbia due to Garryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s job as an ironworker. In 1979 they decided to set their roots on Vancouver Island and started a successful construction company, Geo-Tech Industries in the early 80â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s which is still active to date. Sharon was passionate about hunting and fishing and spent weeks on end in the Chilcotin with Garry on their recreation property. It was not uncommon for her to go out and get a Grouse or two for dinner as living off the land is what she loved. With that kind of spirit and passion Sharon would end up facing the battle of her life. In 2008 she was diagnosed with Lymphoma in which she started treatment, and in 2010 was told she had pancreatic cancer and given 3 to 6 months to live. That diagnosis was not an option for her and come hell or high water was going to show everyone what she was made of and show this disease that it had picked the wrong woman. With that said she astounded Doctors and family and lived a productive life for 3 more years, a true fighter to the end. Sharon was a long time member of the Ladies Auxiliary Branch 191 and the Eagles. No formal service will be held but a celebration of life will take place in the summer of 2014 at the Olsen Duck Lake Ranch. The date will be published when determined. In lieu of flowers donations can be made to the Cowichan District Hospital Foundation. Online condolences may be offered at www.sandsduncan.ca

        

             


Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, December 4, 2013

REMEMBRANCES

EMPLOYMENT

THANK YOU

IN MEMORIAM .

DONALD CLIFTON BLOM

Thank you

October 15, 1930 - December 8, 2004

for considering donations to: COWICHAN DISTRICT HOSPITAL FOUNDATION #4-466 Trans Canada Hwy Duncan, BC V9L 3R6 Phone: 250-701-0399 Website: www.cdhfoundation.org Donations may be made via mail, over the phone or on our website. Donations are tax deductible & finance hospital equipment & patient care. Memorial donations are acknowledged with a letter to the family and loved ones are commemorated on our Memorial Board or Book in the hospital lobby.

Till we meet again Love you forever AlyceJoy



   

         

CELEBRATIONS

BIRTHDAYS

GENERAL EMPLOYMENT Experienced SALAL pickers (Long Salal) wanted currently paying $1.50 for 1.5lb bunches. 1-604-483-9263 or 1-604-483-9550 Tbird Evergreens

DUNCAN TAXI Ltd. hiring p/t night dispatcher. Please fax resume to 250-746-4987. NO DROP INS PLEASE

MEDICAL/ DENTAL HELP EXPERIENCED MOA - required F/T for 4 physician family practice in Shawnigan Lake. Looking for an enthusiastic, personable, reliable team player. Computer knowledge and ability to multi-task will be necessary. Please fax resume to: 250-743-0754. FULL TIME REGISTERED DENTAL HYGIENIST Full time position available for Registered Dental Hygienist at friendly, family oriented dental office. Strong clinical and personal skills needed. larathetoothraider@hotmail.com

TRADES HELP NEC - NORTHERN ENERGY CONSTRUCTORS is continuing to grow and has openings for: Fabricators Full Benefit Package along with competitive wages. Please submit your resume via fax 250-562-8101 or email hrmanager@nec-bc.ca

     

     

     

        

          !"

 

   

LEGAL

LEGAL/PUBLIC NOTICES INVITATION TO TENDER COWICHAN VALLEY REGIONAL DISTRICT (CVRD) SITE UTILITIES and PARKING UPGRADES - BRIGHT ANGEL PARK BAP-01-2013 The Project consists of works associated with upgrading Bright Angel Park to accommodate new site utilities and parking facilities. Civil site works include the following items: â&#x20AC;˘ New gravel parking lot and upgrading existing gravel parking lot â&#x20AC;˘ New water and electrical service piping â&#x20AC;˘ New ditching, culverts, and re-grading existing ditch Complete sets of Tender Documents may be obtained as of 9:00 a.m., Friday, November 29, 2013, from the office of Herold Engineering Limited, 3701 Shenton Road, Nanaimo, BC, (Attention: Paul Perejma, P.Eng., PPerejma@Heroldengineering.com or telephone 250-751-8558) or the CVRD office, 175 Ingram Street, Duncan, BC, upon receipt of a non-refundable deposit of one hundred Dollars ($100.00) per set in the form of cash or certified cheque in favour of the Cowichan Valley Regional District. Tender Documents may also be viewed on BC Bid. Sealed Tenders (in response to the detailed Tender package) must be received by mail or delivery, no later than Friday, December 13, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. to: CVRD 175 Ingram Street, Duncan, BC V9L 1N8, Attention: Joe Barry, Corporate Secretary Each Tender Form received from a Bidder must be accompanied by a Bid Bond in the amount equal to ten percent (10%) of the total amount of Tender. A non-mandatory site visit for Contractors is scheduled for Tuesday, December 3, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. The meeting place for the site visit will be at Bright Angel Park. Direct all queries to: Michael Miller, Capital Projects Specialist, Parks & Trails Division, CVRD Office at 175 Ingram Street Duncan, BC, V9L 1N8 or by email mmiller@cvrd.bc.ca, telephone 250-746-2638 or fax 250-746-2621. Bids submitted will be deemed irrevocable and will remain unchanged for a period of 30 days after closing date. The owner reserves the right to waive informalities in, or reject any or all Tenders, or accept the Tender deemed most favourable in the interest of the CVRD. The lowest price may not necessarily be accepted.

                           

                   

             

                  

               !!                "            #                                  $   % &          

MARKETPLACE

BUILDING SUPPLIES STEEL BUILDINGS/METAL BUILDINGS UP TO 60% OFF! 30x40, 40x60, 50x80, 60x100, 80x100 sell for balance owed! Call: 1-800-457-2206 www.crownsteelbuildings.ca

RENTALS

APARTMENTS/ CONDOS FOR RENT DUNCAN 3Bdrm, ground floor condo, corner suite. 5 appl, storage, parking, exercise rm avail. immed. 250â&#x2C6;&#x2019;746â&#x2C6;&#x2019;5049. DUNCAN Bach, 1 & 2 Bdrms. H.W., heat (gas/elec), F/S, balcony, pet poss., parking. $550â&#x2C6;&#x2019;$875/mo. 250.748.7764

FIREWOOD AAA Quality dry firewood guaranteed. Call 250-7460105 or 250- 732-6163 DRY arbutus $375. Not dry $250. Not dry maple $175. Dry fir $235. Not dry $185. Big dry mix $215. 250â&#x2C6;&#x2019;709â&#x2C6;&#x2019;5579.

´M & M FIREWOOD´ Delivery Nanaimo to Victoria. Ready to burn now. Call 250710-1976 or 250-710-1640

FOR SALE - MISC BUTCHER SUPPLIES, Leather + Craft Supplies and Animal Control Products. Get your Halfords 136 page Free Catalog 1-800-3537864 or Email: order@halfordhide.com Visit our Web Store: www.halfordsmailorder.com HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best Price, Best Quality. All Shapes & Colors Available. Call 1-866-652-6837, www. thecoverguy.com/newspaper

BUSINESS SERVICES

MAPLE GROVE APARTMENT 3271 Cowichan Lake Rd

2 and 3 bdrm units. Heat and hot water included. Family orientated. Clean and quiet. Renoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d units. Indoor pet welcome. On site laundry facilities. To view 250-710-7515 or 250-748-3412 www.meicorproperty.com RETIREMENT Apartments, All Inclusive. Meals, transportation, activities daily. Short Leases. Monthly Specials! Call 877-210-4130

SHAUGHNESSY GARDENS 3251 Cowichan Lake Rd Clean 1 & 2 bdrm unit. Full size fridge, stove & dishwasher. Carpet & linoleum, window coverings, fireplace. Quite, well maintained building with elevator & sauna. Close to schools & hospital. Pet friendly. To view 250-710-7515 or 250-748-3412. www.meicorproperty.com

DUPLEXES FOR RENT 3 BR, 1 1/2 bath, Duncan, 5 appls, $1100/mth, Dec 1st. Info (250)746-7392 JAN. 1 â&#x2C6;&#x2019; 1BR Cobble Hill duplex. $855/mo. Renoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d in/out. Patio, fenced yard, parking. Suit mature couple. 250â&#x2C6;&#x2019;884â&#x2C6;&#x2019;4124.

HOUSES FOR RENT 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath, with large detached studio/bdrm, ample prkg, fenced yrd, nr shops, suit seniors. avail Jan. 1st. reduced rent for long term tennants. First & last months must have refâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, ns, np, dog neg, $1250/mth.Option to purchase available. 250-748-0957 MILL BAY waterfront, modern 1 br cottage, all electric, ns np, avail Jan 1. Refs reqd. $850/mth (250)743-4797

SHARED ACCOMMODATION ROOM FOR rent on bus rte, cbl, heat/light incl. $400/mth 250-748-8132* 250-246-0334

VACATION RENTALS PTO VALLARTA, MEXICO Large Studio, 3 wks start Jan. 18. F/S, maid service. $550/ week US. 250â&#x2C6;&#x2019;746â&#x2C6;&#x2019;8953.

FRANCHISES ESTABLISHED Motorcycle Dealership located in the Fraser Valley. Excellent location and facility. Contact via email: valleyyamaha@shawbiz.ca

REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE WANTED

SUITES FOR RENT COBBLE HILL small 1BDRM. Newer, no steps, suit 1 mature person. Laundry, no dogs, N/S, ref req.$550/mo. Heat/elec incl. 250â&#x2C6;&#x2019;743â&#x2C6;&#x2019;4010 250â&#x2C6;&#x2019;743â&#x2C6;&#x2019;4154.

Upper level, 1200 sq ft newly renovated suite, w/d, f/s, nr downtown Duncan, refs, $995 + utils. 250-732-3478

CASH BUYER wants detached home >$350K in semi-rural Duncan, Koksilah, Eagle Hts, Glenora or Cowichan Bay/River. foxtoad@gmail.com

Ask your realtor to list your home in...

RECREATIONAL PROPERTY CANCEL YOUR TIMESHARE. NO RISK program. Stop Mortgage & Maintenance Payments Today. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Free Consultation. Call us Now. We can Help! 1-888-356-5248

EDUCATION

CLASSES & COURSES FOODSAFE COURSES Level-1. Sat, Dec 14, Jan 25 $70/prsn. Location: Island Savings Centre. (250)746-4154 to register. www.saferfood.ca

Real Estate Guide

HOME SERVICES CLEANING For all your cleaning, cooking and laundry needs. Island Domestic has experienced housekeepers. We also do apartment, offices and one-time cleans. Serving Mill Bay to Ladysmith. Bonded, Insured, WCB, registered with DVA. 7100864. www.islanddomestic services.ca

HANDYPERSON .

GARAGE SALES ´ KIWANIS FLEA MARKET ´ Every Saturday, from 9am til 2pm Girl Guide Hall, 321 Cairnsmore St. For info phone: Pat at 250-748-1200 or Dave at 250-746-3616

      

19

      

               

        

   

SARAH & CO. PROPERTY MAINTENANCE Free-Estimates Seniors-Discount Lawn-Care Packages, Landscaping & Design, Powerwashing, Carpentry/Deck-Work, Eavestrough-Cleaning, Moss-Removal, Hauling/Rubbish-Removal, Painting Small-MovingJobs, RECYCLING .

Sarah 250-732-3591

RUBBISH REMOVAL A YARD OR TWO DELIVERY SERVICE All Gravels, Mulch, Garden Soils. JUNK & RUBBISH REMOVAL 250-246-0333 ayardortwo.com

   



 

     

          


20

Wednesday, December 4, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Christmas Corner CRAFT FAIRS/BAZAARS

You are warmly welcome to.... The Third Annual Homelearners Youth Craft Fair

ST. PETER QUAMICHAN

Vimy Hall Friday, December 6th 3968 Gibbin's Road A one of a kind craft fair, featuring crafts made and sold by 2:00pm - 6:00pm Cowichan Valley homelearners! Children can do their shopping This sweet homespun event is and wrap the gifts themselves sure to please for all ages. Offerings include a bake sale, hot without anyone seeing! Proceeds homemade soups, baked goods, from this event will be donated to hot drinks and a craft corner for the Newman family, of Lake small hands to make presents for Cowichan, to assist in their time family and friends. of need. We hope to see you there!

SPECIAL CHRISTMAS LUNCHEON - $10.00 SILENT AUCTION, BAKE SALE, CHRISTMAS SALES & MORE! Saturday, December 7, 11 am - 2 pm St. Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Church Hall 5800 Church Rd. - off Maple Bay Rd.

CAIRNSMORE CRAFT FAIR & SHOPPING SHOW AT 321 CAIRNSMORE ST. IN DUNCAN We are having a Christmas craft fair and shopping show ***Bring the whole family*** and want you to come out and take a look! Have a good time looking around, meeting new people, support loyal vendors and crafters and get some Christmas and holiday shopping done!

TRIAL BY FIRE POTTERY 8th Annual Solo Show Dec 7 & 8, 10am - 5pm Clements Centre (off James Rd)1 blk west of Library Free admission, 2nds avail. www.trialbyfirepottery.ca

Saturday December 8th 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM

  !!

 

  

        !  "! # $ % &' !

()* + !!, 

To advertise your Pre-Christmas Fair

l l a C ! Now

250-748-2666

Sample Size 2â&#x20AC;? x 2â&#x20AC;? Ad

2â&#x20AC;? x 2â&#x20AC;? Ad - $35.00 + tax 2â&#x20AC;? x 3â&#x20AC;? Ad - $50.00 + tax

2 Issues

VALLEY Calendar Miscellaneous â&#x20AC;˘ Youbou Community Church Society craft fair/coffee shop Saturdays, Dec. 7, 14, Youbou Community Church Hall basement, 10648 Youbou Rd., 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Proceeds to replacing exterior siding to qualify church for heritage status. Collecting â&#x20AC;&#x153;originalâ&#x20AC;? recipes to compile into book for publication. Email recipes to acapeling@ Yahoo.com â&#x20AC;˘ St. Peter Quamichan Christmas luncheon, $10, silent auction, bake sale, Saturday, Dec. 7, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., 5800 Church Rd., off Maple Bay Road. â&#x20AC;˘ Documentary night at the library, Duncan, Dec. 9, 5:30 p.m., with film 56 Up, a follow-up to documentary Seven Up. Since 1964 filmmakers have followed group of British 7-year-olds, tracking their ups and downs. Film runs two hours and 20 minutes. â&#x20AC;˘ The First Christmas Story live nativity pageant, Dec. 22 & 23, 6:30 & 7:30 p.m., 1815 Tzouhalem Rd. Put on by the Duncan Ward of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. â&#x20AC;˘ Raffle tickets at South Island Fireplace & Spas for Tansor Elementary

fundraising for earthquake preparedness supplies and emergency shelter. Tickets $20 for chance to win 3 cords of split wood and 7 prizes of 1 cord of split wood. Only 1,500 tickets available. Info: tansorfirewood@shaw.ca â&#x20AC;˘ Friendly Visitors wanted! Volunteer Cowichan program connects an isolated or lonely senior in the community with a Friendly Visitor. Interested? Call 250-748-2133.

Seniors â&#x20AC;˘ Chemainus Seniors Drop-in Centre Christmas Dinner, Dec. 12 and 13, tickets now available. Members $15, guests $20. â&#x20AC;˘ Chemainus Seniors Drop-in Centre muffin mornings Dec. 4, 6, 20, Wednesdays and Fridays, 9:30-11 a.m. Dec. 20 includes sing-along. â&#x20AC;˘ Chemainus Seniors Drop-in Centre dance with Happy Hans Dec. 31, bar opens at 8 p.m., dance begins 9 p.m. Tickets $20, includes light lunch. â&#x20AC;˘ Chemainus Seniors Drop-in Centre choirs. Mens Choir Mondays, 9-10:30 a.m.; Ladies Choir Mondays, 11 a.m.12:30 p.m.; Mixed Choirs Fridays 1011:30 a.m.

Recreation â&#x20AC;˘ Bingo for over 19s, Seniors Activity Centre (198 Government St., Duncan), Tuesday, 12 p.m. a.m. Early Bird Draw, Loonie Pot, Odd and Even, Number Seven and Bonanza. Info: 250-746-4433. â&#x20AC;˘ New chess club at Duncan Library, Monday evenings 6-8 p.m. All ages and skill levels welcome. â&#x20AC;˘ Cowichan Valley Scottish Country Dancing Thursday evenings 6:30-8 p.m., singles, couples, beginners welcome, Chemainus Seniors Centre. Info: 250-748-9604.

Meetings â&#x20AC;˘ Feeling stuck in your life? Same old problems popping up? Practice using tools based on A Course in Miracles to create a new and joyful life experience. Meet Tuesday, 7-9 p.m., Nitinat Room, Island Savings Centre, Duncan. Cost $20 or by donation. Info: Dawn Green 250-619-5529. â&#x20AC;˘ Cowichan Valley Prostate Cancer Group monthly meetings the last Thursday of every month. Canadian Cancer Society board room in Duncan,

7 p.m. Meet and talk with survivors and others. Info: Gord 250-743-6960. â&#x20AC;˘ Cobble Hill Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Institute meets in the small room of the Cobble Hill hall, noon pot luck lunch, second Wednesday of the month. New members welcome. Info: Jessie Anderson 250-743-9040. â&#x20AC;˘ Dads Make a Difference weekly support group for Dads Tuesday, 6-8 p.m., West Coast Men office, 80 Station St., Ste 213. Info: 250-597-2801 or www. westcoastmen.org â&#x20AC;˘ Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Circle (West Coast Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Support Society) Wednesdays, 7-9:30 p.m., Cowichan Station Hub, East Annex. Directions: www.cowichanstation. org. Info: 250-597-2801 or www.westcoastmen.org â&#x20AC;˘ Multicultural Leadership Group. Drop in and volunteer on Thursdays after school until 5:30 p.m. Come when you can and leave when you have to. Heritage Hall, Duncan United Church. Info: Lori Austein lori@cis-iwc.org

Arts â&#x20AC;˘ Fine Art Show, Jennifer Lawson Gallery, Saturday, Dec. 14, Sunday, Dec. 15, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., 1516 Khenipsen

Rd., Duncan. Smaller works, art cards, recent painting of Bermuda and Whidbey Island. Info: jenniferlawsonart. com or jlart@telus.net â&#x20AC;˘ Cowichan Valley Artisans year round studio tour: 14 professional studios. www.cowichanvalleyartisans. com for details. Admission free.

Music â&#x20AC;˘ Get in the spirit of the season with carols sung by Probus Singers Tuesday, Dec. 10, 3-3:30 p.m., Cowichan Library, Duncan. â&#x20AC;˘ Feel â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Little Christmasâ&#x20AC;? with Encore! Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Choir, Saturday, Dec. 14, 7:30 p.m., Sunday, Dec. 15, 2:30 p.m., Duncan United Church, tickets at the door or in advance by calling 250-746-0847. â&#x20AC;˘ Shawnigan Lakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Laurel Singers Annual Christmas Concert with casual choir music for all ages, some Christmas selections. Sunday, Dec. 15, 3:30 p.m., The Art House, 1756 Wilmot Ave., Shawnigan Lake. â&#x20AC;˘ Cowichan Consort Orchestra rehearsal Mondays, 7:30 p.m. Sylvan United Church. Come play with us. All strings welcome. Info: 748-8982.


Sports

250-748-2666 ext. 236 sports@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, December 4, 2013

21

Capitals shake things up with trio of trades KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

A hometown favourite and a high-scoring defenceman are among four players on their way out of town after the Cowichan Valley Capitals shook things up with a series of three trades over the weekend. Centre Steen Cooper, a Duncan native and product of Cowichan Valley Minor Hockey, was traded to the Penticton Vees. Meanwhile, defenceman Taki Pantziris was shipped to the West Kelowna Warriors, and brothers Mitch and Rylan Ball were dealt to the Trail Smoke Eaters. Coming back are blueliners Matthew Berry-Lamontagna and Clint Filbrandt from Penticton, forward Ambrose Firkus from West Kelowna, and defenceman Valik Chichkin from Trail. “There were different goals to each of the three deals,” Capitals head coach and general manager Bob Beatty said. “Overall, we feel we’ve strengthened our back end, and we were trying to add some scoring.” The moves were made just inside the BCHL’s December roster freeze. Even though the Caps won 6-0 against the Alberni Valley Bulldogs last Friday (see game story on page 23), the preceding ninegame losing streak made it clear that the team needed changes. “We knew, especially with a ninegame losing streak that we had to do something to shake things up,” Beatty said. Including three goals and 15 assists in 27 games this year, Cooper, who turned 18 on Nov. 25, had compiled 18 goals and 50 assists for 68 points in 129 games

Local star Steen Cooper, left, and rookie defenceman Rylan Ball were traded away by the Caps, along with blueliner Taki Pantziris and forward Mitch Ball in three deals last weekend. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN]

“Overall, we feel we’ve strengthened our back end, and we were trying to add some scoring.” BOB BEATTY, Caps head coach and GM

over three seasons with the Caps. Cooper recently won bronze with Team Canada West at the World Junior A Challenge in Nova Scotia, and will head to Div. 1 Minnesota State-Mankato next fall. “We are all sorry to see him go,” Beatty said. “It wasn’t a deal I envisioned making, and not one I wanted to make. There was some outside pressure from his advisors

who wanted to get him somewhere there would be less pressure. He was a well-liked player on our team, by the coaching staff and the players. That makes it very difficult, but he felt too much pressure here and the numbers that he was putting up were not what people had expected.” Pantziris, 20, came to the Caps earlier this season after a roundabout career that had stops on the Ontario junior A circuit, the NCAA, and the Ontario major junior league. In his 30 games with Cowichan, Pantziris totalled 10 goals and 10 assists. “We felt we were a little loose in our back end, and we had to give up something to get something,”

Beatty said. Forward Mitch Ball, 19, was in his second season with the Caps, and had four goals and 12 assists for 16 points in 29 games so far this year. His brother, 18-year-old defenceman Rylan, was in his rookie season, and compiled three assists in 30 games. “Rylan certainly played his best game for us on Friday night,” Beatty noted. “He has lots of potential, but he wasn’t as efficient as he could have been on the back end. Mitch had a big goal for us on Friday night, but we have to be a bit tougher to play against.” Penticton flipped Berry-Lamontagna’s rights to Cowichan after acquiring them from the Coquit-

Call to place your ad:

Business at a

250-748-2666

GLANCE

Purely Optometry BESIDE DIAMOND EYECARE

EYE EXAMS Family Eye & Vision Care Call for most reasonable rates

250-597-1011 159 Trunk Road, Duncan Coronation Market A Great Convenient Store to pick-up your TV Scene, fresh produce and groceries. Hours : Weekdays 7:30 am - 8:00 pm Saturdays 8:30 am - 8:00 pm • Sunday 9:00 am- 8:00 pm 607 Coronation Ave, Duncan - Just down from M&M meats 250-748-6655

lam Express earlier the same day. So far this year, he has seven points in 26 games. The 18-yearold Filbrandt has just nine games under his belt, and has registered one assist. He has also played 40 games in the Western Hockey League. “Berry is a solid two-way defenceman, a good defender,” Beatty said. “He’s a really good team player. He’s excited to be here. Filbrandt is a young defenceman with a year of major junior and a lot of potential.” Firkus, who turns 19 later this month, has 41 points in 54 career games with West Kelowna, including 21 points in 23 appearances this year. “The idea there is to add some scoring, and we hope he’ll be a topend player for us,” Beatty said. Chichkin, 19, is both the most experienced player coming to the team, with 125 BCHL games between Langley and Trail, and the largest, at 6-foot-3 and 206 pounds. He has seven points in 25 games this year “Valik is a big, physical defenceman,” Beatty said. “He’s got a good shot. We’re hoping he’ll add some physicality and strength to our lineup.” It seems clear the Caps have added more toughness in the trio of trades: the four new players have a combined 113 penalty minutes in 83 games this season, while the departing foursome had just 57 minutes in 116 games. “That was something we had to add,” Beatty said. “When you’re playing against Nanaimo and Powell River and Victoria who have beefed up, in that division, you have to match horses.”

Monday - Friday 8:30am - 5:00pm Email: classifieds@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

JAC KO ’ S Concrete Finishing Form Work • Prep • & More

FREE ESTIMATES Phone: (250)

733-0884

Cowichan Marine Services Specializing in: • Yamaha • Mercury • Mercruiser All Makes & Models 10 years Experience

www.davidgaleconstruction.ca

ALL CERTIFIED TRADES

David Gale

CONSTRUCTION Additions • Renovations

250.746.9956 Leave message

Trained Architectural Technologist

• Decks • Doors • Basement Suites • Foundations • Windows 20 YEARS • Kitchen • Bathroom IN THE VALLEY • Drywall • Plumbing • Electrical Estimates, Plans

50% off ALL FRAMES

Sacha Lepage

DIAMOND EYECARE

cowichanmarineservices@shaw.ca

159 Trunk Road at Brae, Duncan 250-597-1011 EYE EXAMS

5175 Koksilah Rd. Duncan, BC Cell: 250-710-3001 • EMERG: 250-732-4408

FREE


22

Sports

Wednesday, December 4, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Stingrays exceed all expectations KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

The Duncan Stingrays contingent at last month’s Island Pacific Cup swim meet in Saanich did much better than head coach Leanne Sirup expected. “Being as this was a mid season racing opportunity, the swimmers were not ‘fresh’ going into this, and were striving for their best despite their training fatigue,” Sirup said. “With this level of swimmers, it is extremely unusual to see such great PBs average during their heavy training phase. As such, they relied on their discipline they earned from training and attacked their races, and to great results.” The Prystupa sisters, Malia and Montana, both achieved personal bests in 100 per cent of their races. Five others — Olivia Campbell, Oliver Castle, Megan Lewis, Desirae Ridenour and Robyn Zinkan — set PBs in all but one of their events. Castle broke his second and third club records of the fall. In the 50m backstroke, his time of 34.66 seconds beat Kip McDaniel’s 1994 record of 35.51, and in the 400m individual medley, Castle’s new record of 5:36.80 toppled Greg Bate’s 21-year-old mark of 5:40.20.

Senior T-Birds set for tipoff The senior boys basketball season will get underway at Cowichan Secondary School this Thursday, Friday and Saturday as the Thunderbirds host the annual Welcome Back Tournament. The T-Birds will be joined by Gulf Islands, Belmont, North Surrey, Brookswood, Wellington, West Vancouver and Dover Bay for

After five points Saturday, Uomoleale commits to Isles KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

Jasmin Marston led the rest of the returning Stingrays with personal bests in 78 per cent of her races, followed by Savanah Van Nieuwkerk (67 per cent), Haakon Koyote (57 per cent), Cecilia Johnson, (50 per cent), Rosie Lee (50 per cent), and Laura Kissack (28.5 per cent). Three swimmers made their competitive debuts for the Stingrays, all joining the team from out of province: Eleanore Fisher from California, Cailine Kierstead from Alberta, and Gavin Morrison from Quebec. Kierstead promptly earned her first provincial AAA qualifying time, her mark of 32.01 seconds easily beating the standard of 33.30.

the tournament. It tips off at 2:15 p.m. on Thursday as the host team battles the Gulf Islands Scorpions. Cowichan’s junior team will face Gulf Islands prior to the tournament at 11:15 a.m. Games continue on Thursday at 4, 5:45 and 7:15 p.m. Friday matches are at 2, 3:45, 5:30 and 7:15 p.m., and on Saturday, games are at 9:30 and 11 a.m., and at 12:45 and 2:30 p.m.

Armand Uomoleale continued to cement himself as a cornerstone of the Kerry Park Islanders last Saturday when he scored five points as his team downed the Oceanside Generals 6-2. Uomoleale had two goals and three assists, bringing his total to 20 points in 12 games with the Isles, even as he has shuttled back and forth between junior B and junior A hockey. “I can’t say enough about him,” said Islanders owner Mark Osmond, who confirmed on Monday that Uomoleale has committed to staying with the Isles, barring a chance to return to junior A with the Caps, who will have to sign him permanently if they use him again. “He could be a superstar in our league,” Osmond said. “We’re happy to keep him.” Uomoleale had powerplay and shorthanded markers on Saturday, and set up two goals by Cody Short and one by Francis Slicer to have a hand in more than 80 per cent of the team’s offensive production. Braedan Cross’s was the only goal the Isles scored that the Connecticut-born forward didn’t have a hand in. The Isles scored four times to take a strong lead in the first period. Despite losing Alex Milligan and Tylor Branzsen to misconducts late in the second, they managed to hold on to the lead, swapping two goals for two with the Generals. Leighton Williams had another strong outing in goal, stopping 39 of 41 shots. The win on Saturday followed a loss to the Victoria Cougars on Thursday despite yet another impressive performance against the Vancouver Island Junior Hockey League’s top team.

An Oceanside player tries to tie up recent Kerry Park addition Hobin Zinck. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN]

Uomoleale opened the scoring less than a minute in, and the teams were tied at two apiece after 20 minutes. Slicer staked his team to a 3-2 lead 49 seconds into the third, but the Cougars were relentless and led 4-3 after two periods before scoring the only goal of the third. “They’re a good team,” said Osmond. “They just don’t stop.” The Isles will face the Cougars this Sunday, to wrap up a busy weekend. They head to Campbell River on Friday, then host Peninsula at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday before Victoria visits Mill Bay at 3 p.m. Anyone who brings a non-perishable food item or unwrapped toy to Saturday’s game receives half-price admission.

2013 - 2014 SEASON

He Shoots!

He Scores! GO

o t e om

H r u Yo

GO VS

Saturday, December 7th Game Sponsors

m a e wn T

VS

Vernon Vipers

7:00 pm www.cowichancapitals.com

Peninsula Panthers

Saturday, December 7 7:30 pm Kerry Park Arena

www.kerryparkislanders.ca


Sports

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, December 4, 2013

23

Losing streak ends in style as Caps clobber Bulldogs KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

After nine games of being stymied on the scoreboard, the Cowichan Valley Capitals finally got back in the win column last Friday. For two scoreless periods, the result appeared in doubt, but once the Caps finally got on the board at 3:33 of the third period, the floodgates opened, and Cowichan stormed to a 6-0 victory over the very team that shut them out 3-0 six days earlier. “It was a relief to see some goals go in,

finally,” head coach Bob Beatty said. “It was just a matter of breaking it open and playing with a bit more confidence. Dane Gibson opened the scoring, and was followed in the rapid-fire third period by the soon-to-be-traded Mitch Ball, Brayden Gelsinger, Mason Malkowich, Jordan Topping and Myles Powell. Gelsinger and Gibson both added assists to their tallies, and Daniel Wanner recorded a pair of helpers. Not to be forgotten was goalie Robin Gusse, who made 30 saves for his second shutout of the season.

Captain inspires Chargers to go out with provincial victories KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

Destined, on the final day of the provincial girls single-A volleyball tournament, to end up in the bottom four of the standings, the host Duncan Christian School Chargers found a reason to go out strong. Heading into their penultimate match against Vernon Christian, the Chargers rallied around captain Becky Bazinet. “She’s our one Grade 12, so we wanted to win those two matches for her, since they were her last two games as a high school student,” head coach Dave Vanderschaaf explained. Duncan Christian jumped out to an excellent start against Vernon Christian last Saturday, winning the first set 25-15. After dropping the second game 25-20, they bounced back to a 15-12 victory in the deciding game. Facing Enderby’s A.L. Fortune in the battle for 13th and 14th place, the Chargers again started strong, winning 25-14. They again dropped a close second set, 25-23 this time, then won a nail-biter 16-14 to take the match. Duncan Christian went 1-2 in pool play, falling to Carver Christian and eventual champions Kelowna Christian before beating Chetwynd. They opened the playoffs with a 25-22, 25-9, 25-18 loss to Langley Christian, who would go on to finish fourth, then lost 21-25, 25-19, 15-13 to Bulkley Valley. In all of their matches, the Chargers had at least one game that was decided by six points or fewer, proving that they weren’t out of place at the provincial tournament. Knowing how close his team came to winning the Island tournament, however, Vanderschaaf thought his team would have been closer in the standings to the Island champs. “For the most part, I was happy with the performance of the girls,” he said. “We had some close matches at Islands against Campbell River Christian, and they finished ninth, so for us to finish four spots behind them was a little disappointing.” Danielle Groenendijk, the Chargers’ lone Grade 9 player, earned an honourable mention when the tournament all-star teams were named. “She definitely kept us in a few of the matches,” Vanderschaaf said. “She’s young, and she’s got a really good future ahead of her. She was very strong throughout the tournament.” Already known for their positive attitudes, the Chargers carried that through at provincials. “The girls had fun,” Vanderschaaf said. “Which is a win in my books.”

While Beatty knew the losing streak was bound to come to an end eventually, he didn’t foresee it ending with a 6-0 crushing of a divisional opponent. “I would have been happy with a win of any kind,” he admitted. “But that was a good way to end it, that’s for sure. It was a long time coming. It was hard for everybody.” In the two days following the win, the Caps made three trades, shipping Mitch and Rylan Ball, Steen Cooper and Taki Pantziris out for Valik Chichkin, Matthew

Berry-Lamontagna, Clint Filbrandt and Ambrose Firkus (more on page 21). The new-look team will try to build on last Friday’s win this weekend when Cowichan visits the Bulldogs on Friday, then plays host to the Vernon Vipers at 7 p.m. on Saturday. “Obviously, it’s another four-pointer against Port Alberni,” Beatty said. “We need a good weekend to make up some ground. You don’t go on a nine-game losing streak without dropping in the standings; we have to fight back.”

LIMITED EDITION BOOK

100th Anniversary of Canadian Scottish Regiment

Great Gift Idea for Christmas DCS Chargers captain Becky Bazinet prepares to send the ball back at A.L. Fortune during the provincial tournament. For more photos, visit www.cowichanvalleycitizen.com or scan this image with the Layar app on your smartphone. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN]

This book is a pictorial celebration of The Canadian Scottish Regiment’s first 100 years. It stands as a tribute to the men and women who have defended the nation, serving with dignity and honour. “They know, as their father’s did, the Regimental motto ‘Deas Gu Cath’ (Ready for the Fray) will always be upheld.” - The Honourable Peter McKay, Minister of National Defence

$

35 plus TAX

Available at Nanaimo Daily News 2572 McCullough Road Phone: 250-729-4200 Toll Free: 1-888-311-7713

#7


24

Wednesday, December 4, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

PUBLIC NOTICE d e k c o t S r e v O N EW NOW

PUSH, PULL OR DRAG

SALE

NOW

$

$

11,345

2013 CHEVROLET SPARK $ 81 WAS $13,345

2013 CHEVROLET SONIC LS $ 89 WAS $15,560

B/W

NOW

12,297

B/W

$

21,902

$2,000 Trade Guaranteed

NOW

$

ON NOW!

25,328

d e k c o ver St

O

d e n w Pre- O

NOW

NOW

$

$

5,997

5,997

CAMERA SHY 2006 PONTIAC WAVE #15678A $ 57 WAS $8,995

2006 CHEVROLET UPLANDER #25604A $69 WAS $7,997

B/W

B/W

NOW

NOW

$

$

11,997

13,995

FREE

2013 BUICK VERANO CX WAS $24,740

$

153

2013 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LS $177 WAS $28,828

B/W

NOW

B/W

NOW

$

$

27,997

IPad or 51 Flat Screen with purchase

NO PAYMENTS

30,997

2012 TOYOTA MATRIX

2011 CHEVROLET CRUZE #40549A $ 93 WAS $13,995

WAS $17,995

B/W

NOW

$

93

B/W

NOW

$

$

23,995

33,495

until Summer 2013 CHEVROLET SILVERADO CHEYENNE $195 WAS $40,425

B/W

2013 BUICK REGAL WAS $38,495

$

215

NO DOWN PAYMENT

B/W

needed!

2010 HONDA RIDGELINE WAS $26,995

$

182 B/W

2013 TOYOTA TACOMA $ 199 WAS $37,995

B/W

*499 administration fee included in payment, and is over and above vehicle pricing, payments based on 4.99% financing OAC. Cost of borrowing based on financing $13,999 over 96 months @ 4.99% is $3,510. All payments are plus gst and pst.

Over d e k c o t S Due to...

recent overwhelming success with New 2014 Model Sales, Peter Baljet GM is over stocked with clearance 2013’s and overstocked in Pre-owned due to all the trade ins!

THEY MUST ALL GO!

www.peterbaljetgm.com LIKE US ON

AND FOLLOW US ON

250 746 7131

6300 Trans Canada Highway, Duncan | Bodyshop 250 748 4370 | Parts 250 746 4466


Cowichan Valley Citizen Wrap | Wednesday, December 4, 2013

Vintage Financial

A-ONE SAFETY

149 First Street, Duncan

& INDUSTRIAL SUPPLIES LTD.

1

Your Local Mortage Experts

250.701.0521

Maria Kyle

AMP

Paul Gala

AMP

www.dlcvintagefinancial.ca

CHRISTMAS GIFT IDEAS GALORE!! ENTER OUR GIFT DRAW Come see us at our

Unit 7 - 180 Central Road, Duncan

NEW LOCATION!

(old Sears store between Staples & Safeway)

Phone: 250-748-4232

CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE... a-onesafety.com

Tidal Blinds Special Prices For SENIORS Everyday!

where you receive

“Good Old Fashioned Service”

SAVE up to

Locally Owned and Operated

Happy Holidays Featuring Blinds “MADE IN B.C.” BY

FREE CORDLESS OPTION ON ALL CELLULARS

250-416-0097 250-715-7733

S PECIALIZING IN R ESIDENTIAL & C OMMERCIAL W INDOW C OVERINGS

60

% off

ALL BLIN DS & SHUTTER S!

www.tidalblinds.ca


2

Wednesday, December 4, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen Wrap

UP TO

9,250

$

IN MANUFACTURER REBATES ON VIRTUALLY ALL OF OUR MOST POPULAR MODELS (2013 F-150 SUPERCREW AMOUNT SHOWN)

ENDS DECEMBER 15TH FOR 2014 MODELS

. T F I G E R T ’ N O W U O TH E G I F T Y FLAGSHIPFORD.COM

6456 Norcross Road, Duncan 250-748-5555 888-794-0559


Cowichan Valley Citizen Wrap | Wednesday, December 4, 2013

December to

Remember FLAGSHIP FORD is building a Leading the way...

2012 Hyundai Sonata

Hope

Tree of

#13401A

$17,990 2011 Ford Ranger #13347A

SANTA KNOWS WHERE WE ARE!

$13,200

When you purchase a vehicle in December 2013, you will get to choose a local charity and Flagship Ford will DONATE $100 TO THE CHARITY, IN YOUR NAME.

2010 Nissan Frontier #13548C

$17,200 2008 Chevy Cobalt

Santaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pick

#13192A

As well you will be able to choose a Gift for yourself off our Gift Table!

$6,700 2012 Subaru Legacy #13526B

$25,300

FLAGSHIP Leading the way DL# 5964

Bernadette Scudder General Sales Manager

Chris Yu Team Leader

Stu Philips Sales Manager

Bryan Flynn Sales Manager

Edie Lange

Dave Faithfull

Business Manager

Sales and Leasing Consultant

Ian Smith Sales and Leasing Consultant

John Travis Anins

Trevor Waldron

Sales & Leasing Consultant

Sales & Leasing Consultant

Sandra Jurcic Sales & Leasing Consultant

Dawood Francis Sales & Leasing Consultant

Mark Yacoboski

Chris Tarala

Sales & Leasing Consultant

Sales & Leasing Consultant

FLAGSHIPFORD.COM 6456 Norcross Road, Duncan

250-748-5555 888-794-0559

3


4

Wednesday, December 4, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen Wrap

S â&#x20AC;&#x2122; L L O R E H T ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S END OF

% 0 7 E V A S up to

E C N A R A E L C E SIV S A M R U O G DURIN ING! TORE â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;TIL SPR - WEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;LL S S N A L P T S E R NO INTE NO PAYMENT,

/+!+*"Ć?,,/&+$Ç˝,4-/& "0Ç˝)460&+01, (Ç˝

ENDOFTHEROLL.COM

Duncan | 5880 York Rd | 250.701.9191 No payment, no interest plans available OAC - *See store for details

*

December 4, 2013  

The December 4, 2013 edition of the Cowichan Valley Citizen.

Advertisement