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Friday, December 27, 2013

Help lift St. Peter’s from its foundation LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

Advent is a season of new beginnings for Christians and the parish of St. Peter’s Quamichan announced Sunday, Dec. 22 — the final Sunday of Advent — that they are looking at the future of their historic building. “This is really exciting for the parish,” said Rev. Deborah Rivet. “It’s a celebration of the past, the present and the future and that’s what all the readings have said during all of the Advent season: moving forward while keeping an eye on the past. This is absolutely an Advent for this project.” And, they’re hoping the wider community will help them preserve the structure, which played an important role in Valley history. The truth is that St. Peter’s needs fixing. Many old buildings, such as the B.C. Legislature in Victoria, that date back to the 1800s now require extensive upgrades. There has been a church at St. Peter’s since 1866, before Confederation, and the current building was built only 11 years later. An extensive review of the situation in 2012, led by Alan Gurzinski, discovered that feeding the existing oil furnace is not an affordable option and worse, that the church’s sandstone foundation is crumbling and can’t bear its load. An engineer’s report said, “A new foundation will provide enhanced vertical and lateral load carrying capacity and can be designed to meet current Building Code requirements. It should

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Health team, part-time doctor fill Lake care gap LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

We’ve already raised more than half of it, say Mark Oldnall, people’s warden, left, and Rev. Deborah Rivet, rector of St. Peter’s. The parish is hoping interested community members will help out, too. [LEXI BAINAS/CITIZEN] be noted that the seismic load at which the foundation may fail is considerably lower than that which would cause the wood frame structure to fail.” Another state-of-the-building checkup in early 2013 found that “the bouncy floor” could also use an upgrade and by April the buildings and grounds committee urged the parish to consider a capital campaign to raise funds

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for the overall project. After unanimous consent, a low-key in-parish campaign was launched, headed by Dianne McNair, to raise a minimum of $275,000. This push was later expanded to include families buried in the historic churchyard, which dates back to 1866. Now, it’s time to broaden the campaign still further, according to Rivet and People’s Warden

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Mark Oldnall. “This building was built in 1877. There was an addition in 1892 and a small upgrade done since then. The last major upgrade was the roof done about six years ago. A lot of the fabric of the building is original. It’s time to renovate it. It’s getting a complete update,” Oldnall said Dec. 22. See Important piece • page 4

Cowichan Lake’s search for a doctor closer than Duncan got a boost on several fronts just before Christmas. Island Health announced Dec. 20 that a new Primary Health Care Team for Cowichan Lake is to begin service delivery in early 2014. What that means is that residents of the Cowichan Lake area will soon have local access to a team of professionals from a dietician to a primary health care nurse. Earlier this year the Cowichan Lake working group, consisting of representatives from the Cowichan Communities Health Network, Choose Cowichan Lake, the Cowichan Valley Division of Family Practice and Island Health, was formed to develop a model for an integrated health care team. They’ve been busy ever since. Following consultations with community residents to determine their long-term needs in the area of health services, the working group agreed on a primary health care team consisting of a dietitian, primary health care nurse, social worker/counsellor and a clinical office assistant. “This collaborative team was selected based on input from local residents about their long-term See Nurse practitioner • page 4

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Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, December 27, 2013

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Two Cowichan businesses make provincial award finals SARAH SIMPSON CITIZEN

John Close and Lush Eco Laws have been named semi-finalists in the category of Best Green Business at the Small Business BC Awards. A record 417 nominations were made this year and Lush was among the tops of its category after all 37,650 votes were cast. “It’s awesome. It’s a massive honour for sure, and a huge thanks to everybody who voted,” Close said. But the process is far from over. “The next step is a long process where we go through a big application process and sit before some dragon-esque judges and they pick the top five.” While he knows there’s a way to go yet, Close already feels like a winner. “Getting a top 10 is like them saying ‘Hey, you’re going in the right direction. We’ve noticed. Good job.’” Established in 2009 and now with three employees, Lush Eco Lawns uses all-natural products in its property care. The company has also recently expanded to Victoria

“It’s awesome. It’s a massive honour for sure, and a huge thanks to everybody who voted.... Getting a Top 10 is like them saying ‘Hey, you’re going in the right direction.’”” JOHN CLOSE, Lush Eco Lawns

“This award feels like recognition for the choices I’ve made to really include and invest in my community...” CHRISTINA PLATT, Bamboletta Dolls

and Nanaimo and offers Christmas light design and installation among its services. The lawn and garden care company wasn’t the only Cowichan business given a nod, however. Founder Christina Platt and the folks at Bamboletta Dolls in Cowichan Bay were also short-listed for a Small Business BC award in the Best Community Impact

category. “I am very excited to be a finalist,” Platt said. “This award feels like recognition for the choices I’ve made to really include and invest in my community rather than take the traditional manufacturing route of overseas production. I love my team and I love my community and I know all of that translates directly into our dolls.” Bamboletta Dolls has been around since 2003 and now boasts more than two dozen employees — all local women — to handcraft each unique doll with natural wool sourced from B.C. and Alberta. “I never thought that this business I started over 10 years ago in my living room would now give income to over 30 local women and this has been one of the most fulfilling aspects of running my business,” Pratt said. Each year the company donates hundreds of dolls to both local agencies and provincial ones such as Canuck Place and Ronald McDonald House. Winners will be announced in Vancouver at a special event on Feb. 27.

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News

Friday, December 27, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Council meeting times change

Nurse practitioner starting in 2014

SARAH SIMPSON CITIZEN

From page 1 After several years of gathering at 3 p.m. on the first and third Wednesday of the month, North Cowichan council is going back to the days of old, come January, and pushing their meeting times up to 1:30 p.m. Council passed a bylaw to that effect on Dec. 18. “All our meetings start at 1:30 p.m. unless council directs otherwise,” Chief Administrative Officer Dave Devana confirmed. The goal of holding the meetings later in the afternoon was to encourage more public participation but with attendance levels not increasing significantly and marathon meetings taking council well into the night, something had to give. Now, with the installation of a

Meeting times will change back to 1:30 p.m. [CITIZEN FILE] video camera that allows curious members of the public to watch the council meetings online live, or after the fact, exactly when council meets is less important.

Holiday Hours Dec. 24 8:00 am - 9:00 pm Dec. 25 Closed - Merry Christmas! Dec. 26 9:00 am - 9:00 pm Dec. 31 8:00 am - 9:00 pm Jan. 1 10:00 am - 8:00 pm We’re all hoping you and yours have a Safe and Happy Holiday Season Jim and the Staff at Mason’s Store

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health services needs, which include local access to care,” said Dr. Bob Burns, executive medical director, population and community health for Island Health. “This team will work closely together to support the needs of residents of the Cowichan Lake communities.” The recruitment process for team members is expected to be completed by the end of December, he said. Once in place, the team will work out of the existing Kaatza Health Centre, at 58 Cowichan Ave. West in Lake Cowichan. The team will begin delivering services early in the new year. A nurse practitioner has also been hired for the Cowichan Lake

“This team will work closely together to support the needs of residents of the Cowichan Lake communities.” DR. BOB BURNS, Island Health

area and will begin practising at the Brookside Medical Clinic in the new year. The Brookside Medical Clinic used to house Lake Cowichan’s only family physicians Dr. Peter Postuk and Dr. Philip Kerswell, who have now left Lake Cowichan, but there is action on that front as well. Dr. Gary Toth, who used to practise out of that facility, has returned to the Brookside Medical Clinic on a part-time basis and is

accepting new patients, according to Island Health. Bob Day, a Lake Cowichan town councillor and member of Choose Cowichan, said, “the goal of the working group was to develop a primary health care team that would meet the needs of residents based on what they considered as their most important health care issues and the make-up of this team definitely meets this goal.” Community information sessions will be held in the new year where residents can meet the primary health care team and get information on the health services that will be provided and how to access these services. Dates and locations for the information sessions will be announced in the coming weeks, according to Island Health.

Important piece of Valley heritage From page 1 “It’s close to our hearts as a parish and also the diocese thinks it’s important,” Oldnall said. “The church is going to be lifted for a period of three to four months and at that time they’re going to remove the foundation and excavate. There will be a new heating system going in, all new electrical wiring, the organ is going to be all rewired. It’s a major upgrade. Then the church will be sat back down on its new foundation.” On top of the idea of renovating their church, Oldnall and Rivet and their parish feel strongly that the wider community will be as excited as they are about preserving such an important piece of the Valley’s heritage. A church can exist perfectly well without a building; that is not the focus of the parish in this case, Rivet pointed out. “Because of the historic value of this piece of property, too — the untouched quality, its ties to the

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“The church is going to be lifted for a period of three to four months... at that time they’re going to remove the foundation and excavate.” MARK OLDNALL, people’s warden, St. Peter’s Quamichan

past — it’s important to everyone. We need to stress its history,” she said. “And the children of the parish are doing things, too, because this is for them in the future. We’re doing a spaghetti dinner. The kids are hosting it. We’re going to have lots of fundraiser events and we hope the community will come out for them.” While Sunday’s announcement is the kickoff for the wider fundraising effort, everyone will keep working until there’s enough money to get the job done. “The parish members themselves have already raised $175,000 and we’re hoping for community support. We’re also going to look

at various organizations that give money to support this kind of venture, whether it’s the Anglican Foundation or others. Some of the service clubs might get on board because of the historic value,” Rivet said. The project’s proposed timeline calls for presentation of a complete budget by February so St. Peter’s can approach the Diocesan council for a construction loan. Preparing the site would begin in April, with the church lifted by May at the latest, and new foundation footings and walls built in June so as to allow several weeks for curing the concrete. Electrical upgrades would be done in July and August and then the church would be lowered, followed by construction of a roof over the north door and finishing the interior of the building. Paths with handrails and lighting plus some landscaping should finish the job in time for a Thanksgiving celebration for St. Peter’s, its members, and supporters.


News

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, December 27, 2013

5

U.S.-born man faces battle to remain on Penelakut CINDY E. HARNETT TIMES COLONIST

Muddied and covered in cow dung, grandfather Richard Jerman was building a fence on a farm on Penelakut Island, where he has lived for 37 years, when border officials came for him. They gave him just enough time to change his clothes before whisking him away. “I just stood there, I couldn’t believe it,” Jerman said last week. Jerman, 60, who has four children and 14 grandchildren, was removed from his First Nations reserve on Penelakut Island, about five kilometres from Chemainus, on Dec. 11. Two days later, he was released on a $500 bond and issued with an exclusion order — the lowest level removal order. “They picked me up and said I was considered an illegal alien in this country,” said Jerman, who was born in the U.S. “I just kept thinking this is a bad dream.” Jerman, who has never been in jail, was shackled at Victoria’s jail and as he was taken to a holding centre at Vancouver International airport before appearing before immigration officials. His wife, Maria George, a former student in the Island’s notorious residential school, travelled to Vancouver with her two daughters, not knowing if her husband would ever return home. The apprehension of her husband churned up memories of when she was taken from her family. “It was very traumatic,” Jerman said. “I still get the jitteries in my stomach. When it comes to my fate, it’s in the hands of immigration officials. I hope the outcome is that I can stay.” If deported, “it would be totally devastating to me and my family and my grandkids,” he said. The proud grandfather is expecting his 15th grandchild in the new year. Jerman was born to a Miwok Indian father from California. His mother’s background is not confirmed but she was likely part First Nations, he said. She died when he was young and he was raised by white fos-

ter parents. “I didn’t know I was native,” Jerman said. He only learned about his heritage in his teens. In school, he said, he was bullied by kids who thought he was Japanese. At 23, Jerman met his wife, Maria George, in Seattle. The couple returned to her home on the Penelakut First Nation reserve, formerly called Kuper Island. Jerman does not have official Indian status and did not apply for Canadian citizenship. Jerman does, however, have a social insurance number, a driver’s licence, a health card and has travelled back and forth across the United States without issue. “I’ve never been in trouble or had a conflict with crossing the border,” he said. He assumed that under the Constitution Act and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, First Nations have rights to travel and trade freely across the Canada-U.S. border. Victoria immigration lawyer Peter Golden said last week’s abrupt apprehension is an example of recent more aggressive removals of foreign nationals by border officials. Jerman could have applied for permanent residency in Canada, based on his spouse’s residency, had he known he was in Canada illegally, his lawyer said. “He’s had the same phone number for 37 years and travelled, including to the United States and back,” Golden said. “It’s not as if he’s been hiding. He figured he was here legitimately and why would he flee.” A pre-removal risk assessment, which allows the applicant to remain in Canada another 30 days while it’s completed and reviewed by immigration officials, is being done. “As soon as that decision is made, he’s

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Richard Jerman has lived on Penelakut Island for 37 years with his family. [FAMILY PHOTO] removable from Canada,” Golden said. Meanwhile, Golden is preparing an application for permanent residency for Jerman based on humanitarian and compassionate grounds under a section of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act.

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Friday, December 27, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

OUR VIEW

Wine sales at farm markets: let’s make it work he idea of allowing the sales of locally made beer, wine and spirits at farmers markets is a great one that could be particularly good for the Cowichan region. Right now, our farmers markets offer some of the best of what our local farmers and craftspeople have to offer. They are wonderful places for people to go and buy everything from snow peas to strawberries, cookies to cheese, soap to jewelry. With so many things to taste and try it seems almost odd that one can’t find wine, or other spe-

T

cialty alcoholic beverages. In the Cowichan Valley the wine industry is a huge part of the agriculture community. We’re not known as the Provence of Canada for nothing! Dozens of wineries dot our landscape and offer products that are second to none. It seems a natural extension of what is already for sale at our farmers markets to make these artisan products available there as well. There certainly are still things to be taken into consideration before it would be a go, as Linda Holford of Rocky Creek Winery

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pointed out in the Citizen’s Wednesday front page article on the subject. We wouldn’t want all of the Valley’s wineries to descend upon the market every weekend, all at once. There are so many of them that it would be overkill, and would flood out the existing vendors rather than providing a complement. Some, we imagine would not be interested in setting up at the market, content with their own tasting rooms, and in some cases, restaurants. But those who are interested

could set up some kind of rotation through several booths. Also an important consideration is that to make it worth a winery’s time, farmers market sales would have to fall under the same exemptions that currently govern sales by wineries from their own tasting rooms. They won’t do it if the government is going to take 60 per cent of the profit, as they do on sales through government liquor stores. We think that these are hurdles that can, and should be overcome. Let’s make it work.

Tom Masters Chemainus

The B.C. government has lied to us again. They have just hiked the B.C. Health premiums by 4.15 per cent, in spite of the promise last election not to raise taxes for five years. They say it’s not a tax, but it’s not income tax deductible and is included in most provinces’ provincial tax. It’s a very regressive tax. Couples making more than $30,000 pay the maximum premium of $125.50 per month. That’s a huge percentage and the rich pay no more. We’re now facing a BC Hydro rate increase in excess of 25 per cent over the next five years, a more than 50 per cent increase in postal rates in March and seniors now pay for B.C. ferry service. The Cowichan Valley endured a massive property tax hike with the shift away from the Crofton mill, food prices are on the increase and our own strata fees jumped by over 10 per cent. In contrast, over the past 12 months Old Age Pension increased by 1.09 per cent, C.P.P. by 1.79 per cent and our MB. Gov. Pension by 0.85 per cent. It doesn’t take a genius to see where this is going. Dining out and donations are the first to go and the restaurants and charities are already feeling the pinch. Jobs that should be available to young people are being taken by seniors to make ends meet. It’s unfair that you work all your life, pay taxes, raise your children and then have to work until either you die or no longer can. Seniors are the fastest growing segment in Canada and represent a lot of votes. It’s time we were heard. Anyone else agree?

Find the Cowichan Valley Citizen online at www.cowichanvalleycitizen.com

Jim Jorgensen Duncan

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We want to hear from you! Submitting a letter to the editor is now easier than ever — you can do it online by going to the Cowichan Valley Citizen website, www.cowichanvalleycitizen.com, and clicking on the Opinion tab. Then click Send us a letter. Write 300 words or less on the topic of your choice, include your full name (first and last), and a town you hail from. Include a phone number (which is not printed) so that we can verify your authorship.

Massive hikes evidence of government deceit

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Becoming trash mecca could be profitable The concern about trash dumped on public land in North Cowichan is not new. But until council comes up with a comprehensive plan to deal with refuse in all its forms, it will continue to be a serious problem. First of all, what is needed is a service that deals with everything, not just what is convenient or easy to deal with. Obviously there has to be provision for commercial and industrial waste as well as residential. Shipping off-Island is foolish in the extreme, though we have done it for years. Let’s explore an option that

takes the problem seriously and might yield real benefit to the community. The Cowichan Valley lies at about the centre of Vancouver Island’s population distribution. I suggest North Cowichan look at the possibilities inherent in designing a system and creating an industrial scale, environmentally sustainable facility to service the whole of Vancouver Island. We could provide a valuable service to everyone as well as ourselves and do it at a profit. As a model we have to look no farther than the City of Edmonton that has for years operated a world class facility for its population of one million. (Vancouver Island’s population

is approaching 800,000.) The Edmonton Composting Facility is the largest of its type in the world. And it’s not just kitchen scraps that go there. This year the city anticipates it will divert more than 90 per cent of the city’s household waste from landfill. A facility like that would be a cutting edge solution to the problem of human pollution of the environment — where we live. And as for transporting all that trash from the south and north Island, how about rail?


Opinion

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, December 27, 2013

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Have your say, Cowichan! Be part of our online poll

This week’s question: How many days should we get for holiday over Christmas? A) 5 days (one week) B) 3 days (Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, Boxing Day) C) none (Bah, humbug!) Tell us what you think! To be part of our poll visit: www.cowichanvalleycitizen.com Look for the results of this week’s poll question in next Friday’s edition of the Cowichan Valley Citizen.

Last week’s question: On December 20 we asked you: Should you be able to buy wines and spirits at farmers’ markets? A) Yes 34% B) No 16% C) Only if they are locally made 50%

Send us your letter Write 300 words or less on the topic of your choice and email us news@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

New money? What has happened to the old money? It was with a certain amount of skeptical interest that I read the article announcing that the federal health minister, Rona Ambrose, came to Cowichan to “announce” an $11.5 million national project aimed at “stamping out youth substance abuse.” As one of the many local non-profit organizations that seek out grant funding opportunities to deliver community programming, I was intrigued, but a nagging skepticism arose almost immediately as well. Cowichan Green Community responded to a call for proposals by Health Canada through their similarsounding “Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund” (DSCIF) that was due on April 8, 2013. This DSCIF program is part of an original funding allocation made in 2004 with an annual budget of $9.6 million to support community-led initiatives to reduce illicit drug use among youth ages 10-24. Since 2004, the feds have announced the distribution of two calls for proposals and have signed 103 contribution agreements for a total of $40 million. Even if you are not a math whiz, you should be able to figure out that with a budget of $9.6 million a year for the past 10 years that would equate to $96 million not $40 million that the feds should have spent to date on this initiative. So unless they allocated $56 million to the 2013 call, which is highly unlikely in my opinion, it seems that the feds are going to be a little bit short on delivery as announced. And by the way, that DSCIF proposal that was due on April 8 took us at CGC two months to complete and included eight letters of support, a six-page logic model, detailed three-year budget projections, and a 17-page application form. This project, which has the buy-in of the

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I hope you will join Hon. Elizabeth May in raising the serious questions of practice, natural justice and human rights that the unconscionable detention and jailing of Richard Jerman on Penelakut Island should raise. It is frightening to think that if this had happened to the vast majority of First Nations people on any reserve in Canada, they would have likely found themselves in a U.S. jail with no recourse. In fact, others arrested at the same time as Mr. Jerman and held in the same detention centre at which he ended up in Vancouver, were ALL deported. Some dumped across the U.S. border in Blaine, Washington, with absolutely nothing. Because Mr. Jerman has friends and colleagues that he has made over decades of service to the community — both native and non-native — his case did not have that result. But it must raise, in our minds and those of our parliamentarians, the question of how an arm of the Canadian government can be allowed to act in just about any way it pleases. That behaviour is characteristic of a much different form of government than we believe we have.

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local high schools, the health authority, and many other local organizations who want to support the youth in our community, would see an “out-of-school” drop-in centre developed at Kinsmen Park as an extension of the KinPark Youth Urban Farm. Youth will have the opportunity to learn skills related to food production, develop a food-related social enterprise, and participate in growing, harvesting, cooking, and marketing food that they have grown through a youth-led mentorship and skill-building program. We did the research, we created the model, we have all the pieces of the puzzle in place yet here we are waiting almost nine months in a standstill watching as now all this supposed “new” money is announced. So our federal government can host meetings and talk a big story about big money coming as yet another “new” program called, “A Health Promotion and Drug Prevention Strategy for Canada’s Youth” is launched but the way I see it that does not look like new money to me. In fact, I think they have some explaining to do about where the old money has gone. And I’d like to know when they are, in fact, going to deliver on the DSCIF money that’s been sitting in the bank. Money that could have already been in this community. Money that could have already been helping serve the youth here that need it the most. Money that could have prevented some tragedies that have already happened. For those youth we’ve lost, no amount of money at any time will help — it’s too late. But it’s not too late to help others. So I challenge our federal government to quit announcing supposed “new” money to help our kids and just spend the money that you already promised.

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Friday, December 27, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

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Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, December 27, 2013

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Friday, December 27, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

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Quantities and/or selection of items may be limited and may not be available in all stores. No rainchecks. No substitutions on clearance items or where quantities are advertised as limited. Advertised pricing and product selection (flavour, colour, patterns, style) may vary by store location. We reserve the right to limit quantities to reasonable family requirements. We are not obligated to sell items based on errors or misprints in typography or photography. Coupons must be presented and redeemed at time of purchase. Applicable taxes, deposits, or environmental surcharges are extra. No sales to retail outlets. Some items may have “plus deposit and environmental charge” where applicable. ®/™ The trademarks, service marks and logos displayed in this flyer are trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. All rights reserved. © 2013 Loblaws Inc. * we match prices! Applies only to our major supermarket competitors’ flyer items. Major supermarket competitors are determined solely by us based on a number of factors which can vary by store location. We will match the competitor’s advertised price only during the effective date of the competitor’s flyer advertisement. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES (note that our major supermarket competitors may not). Due to the fact that product is ordered prior to the time of our Ad Match checks, quantities may be limited. We match identical items (defined as same brand, size, and attributes) and in the case of fresh produce, meat, seafood and bakery, we match a comparable item (as determined solely by us). We will not match competitors’ “multi-buys” (eg. 2 for $4), “spend x get x”, “Free”, “clearance”, discounts obtained through loyalty programs, or offers related to our third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners etc.).We reserve the right to cancel or change the terms of this program at any time.

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Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, December 27, 2013

11

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1914 was (supposed to be) Good Year

T

here was a Directors of the noticeable sense Cowichan Creamof optimism in ery Association the Cowichan Valley announced to a packed in December 1913, 100 audience of shareholdyears ago. ers that all was well So much positive was financially despite happening that few adverse market condishort of the skeptic tions for egg layers CHRONICLES could refrain from and there was further T.W. Paterson looking to the New talk of establishing a Year with high hopes local jam factory. The and expectations... Board of Trade met to discuss Maple Lodge No. 15, the how to stimulate and encourage Knights of Pythias, had celebrat- home consumption of B.C. proded their birthday in the Valley ucts in preference to imported with a large public gala of music goods. and dance (with the help of the The Cowichan Agricultural Dawber orchestra) and whist. Society was dickering with With a healthy, growing member- Ottawa for a lease of the land ship and $25,000 in the bank, they surrounding the Cowichan had reason to celebrate! Mound for a new hall (which A municipal election was would become the Valley’s upcoming in March and the City social hub for decades). Cowiof Duncan launched its own fund chan Merchants Ltd. marked drive with a $10,000 sale of MuniChristmas (and its new store, cipal Street and $5,000 worth built to replace the first which of School debentures, selling was lost to fire only a year after out within a week at wholesale construction) with a full-page rates to a Toledo, Ohio brokerad, proclaiming itself to be “The age firm. Just as Premier Sir Christmas Store,” with sales on Richard McBride stoutly denied men’s neckties, pleasing and during the election campaign practical glassware, grass furnithat his government intended to ture and luggage “for the man subsidize railway construction, who travels.” including that of the Canadian For the true gentleman, the Northern Pacific underway in Merchants advertised tuxedo the Cowichan Valley, with a large suits “at a price that perhaps bond issue. you do not dream possible for the

highest type of tailoring,” and “fine undressed English worsteds full or partly silk lined.” The Bazett, Bell Co. Ltd. offered its own Ye Good Old Xmas Time and Greetings with “a most complete line of Xmas bon bons or crackers” and children’s goods, having offered “To every purchaser of goods in any Dept... from Dec. 1st to Dec. 24th for every cash purchase of $1.00, one ticket in our drawing for a very large Xmas Stocking filled with all sorts of good things...” Even the King’s Daughters, the good ladies responsible for Duncan’s hospital, held a bazaar sale (immediately followed by a well-attended ball) and the Cowichan Valley Cadets staged a grand concert and display of Indian Club drill, dumbells and signalling in the K. of P. Hall. Another success was the Navy League’s Concert which was highlighted with a “splendid address” by hyper-patriot Clive Phillipps-Wolley. But, all said, it had been a difficult year for many and in its first editorial of 1914, the Cowichan Leader addressed the spirit of the times: See Optimism • page 19

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12

Friday, December 27, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

t e L t ’ Don n e p p a This H ! u o Y o T

This Holiday Season, and all year long, please remember that it’s never been cool to drive under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Enjoy your time with family and friends, celebrate responsibly and make it home safe.

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Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, December 27, 2013

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14

Friday, December 27, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Your Community

MARKETPLACE Book your ad ONLINE:

classiďŹ eds.cowichanvalleycitizen.com

Or call to place your ad:

250-737-2527 Monday - Friday 8:30am - 5:00pm Email: classiďŹ eds@cowichanvalleycitizen.com Fax: 250-748-1552 469 Whistler St., Duncan, BC V9L 4X5

DEADLINES:

Wednesday’s Paper - Monday at 4:30pm Friday’s Paper - Wednesday at 4:30pm Circulation: 250-748-2666 or 250-715-7783

REMEMBRANCES IN MEMORIAM

COMMUNITY

OBITUARIES

OBITUARIES THOMPSON, William (Bill) Henry

Grace Conway December 28, 1919 - December 25, 2002

HOEK, Harmen Cornelis March 3, 1922 - December 20, 2013 .

Always in our hearts Love Dave, Cathy & Mac

Lockhart, Marie Laura Ethel May 8, 1923 - December 24, 2005 .

She always leaned to watch for us, anxious if we were late, in winter by the window, in summer by the gate. .

And though we mocked her tenderly who had such foolish care, the long way home would seem more safe, because she waited there. .

Her thoughts were all so full of us, she never could forget, and so I think that where she is, she must be watching yet. .

Waiting until we come home to her, anxious if we are late, watching from heaven’s window, leaning from heaven’s gate.

Forever missed, never forgotten Love the family

OBITUARIES

YATES - Peter Douglas April 6, 1954 - December 10, 2013 The final adventure of Peter Yates ended at his home in Cobble Hill, BC on December 10, 2013. Peter was the son of Doug and Bibsy Yates. He was born in Chemainus and raised in Penticton, BC. He is survived by his wife Joanne, his daughters Aly and Lizzie, brothers Norman and Michael, sister Janine, a large extended family and innumerable friends, colleagues and teammates. The untimely loss of Peter is difficult because of what he represented. For almost all of his life he was the model for strength, health, vigor, capability and integrity. He was an educator and mentor to thousands, particularly in pursuits that had anything to do with the outdoors. In his relatively short life, as a teacher at Shawnigan Lake School and in his other work, he made lasting contributions and left indelible impressions in so many areas including outdoor adventure, the sport of rowing and the leadership of youth, particularly through exposure to hands on projects in developing nations. Nothing better exemplified Peter than the intelligence and dignity that he maintained in the final stages of his life and the comfort these qualities brought to others. A celebration of Peter’s life will take place at the chapel of Shawnigan Lake School on January 25, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. First Memorial Funeral Services 250-748-2134 Online Condolences may be made online at www.mem.com

Born in De Rijp, Netherlands and raised in Castricum, Herman was a police officer with the Dutch Police. He married the lovely Sophia Walet in February, 1947 and lived in Utrecht until they immigrated to Duncan, B.C. in 1953. Herman leaves behind his sister Bep (in the Netherlands) and his wife Sophia (in Duncan), along with three daughters: Margaretha (Roger Schiffer, deceased) in Vancouver, Sonja (Art) Milbury in Duncan, and Shirley Anne (Colin) Weber in Denver, CO. He will also be greatly missed by his grandchildren Wanda, Johanna , Janet, Mark, Cadi, Julia, and Jaime; great-grandchildren Merzedese, Logan, Luke, Nicholas, Kalena, Madeline, Liam, Nevaeh; and great-great-grandchild Kiera, expected by Spring 2014. Early on, Herman worked at the Youbou mill in the Cowichan Valley and then at Home Bakery for many years before moving on to the Crofton Pulp And Paper mill. He was the Lead Hand in the ‘wood room’ where he was a very conscious and well liked employee. Herman’s career at Crofton ended in his retirement in 1987. Herman then went on to be a landscaper for Woodgrove Estates, as he was not ready to put up his feet yet... He gardened at home year-round and walked tirelessly. In his daily trips to the Superstore, Herman always met shoppers with a smile and a greeting. Every winter, he would travel with Sophia to Mexico and visited family annually in the Netherlands and across Canada. Herman enjoyed playing cards, listening to music, watching the stock market, and offering a helping hand to family and friends whenever he was needed. He was a proud and devoted family man, and always baked delicious treats to be enjoyed by their many guests.. He had a great sense of humor. Though it could be a little dry at times, we always appreciated his hardy laugh and the mischievous glint in his eye! Herman continued to care for his garden until he moved into Biscay Manor where he was well looked after and given wonderful care. Later, at Sunridge, Herman was fortunate to have an excellent nursing staff around him (especially Katrina). With his loved ones close by, Herman passed away, strong and proud until the end. Amazing Grace played in the background as he smiled and then was at peace. A Mass for Christian burial will be celebrated at St. Edwards Church 2085 Maple Bay Duncan BC on Monday December 30, 2013 at 11:00 am. Followed by interment at Mountain View Cemetery. Online condolences may be offered at www.hwwallacecbc.com.

Born Sept 28, 1930. Died peacefully December 14, 2013 at his Nanaimo Travellers Lodge home, with family by his side. Born and raised in Cranbrook, B.C. He worked as a machinist for Cominco in Kimberly and Trail before moving to Vancouver in 1954, where he worked at Vivian Diesel and also did a stint with CP Steamlines Shipping as a Steam Engineer. In 1955 he met and married his sweetheart and the love of his life, Lena. They had 2 boys Bill and Ron. He started Thompson Ready Mix in 1959, working hard at that until 1971. His search for gravel to supply his concrete business led him to Vancouver Island, where he and Lena moved to Cobble Hill to run a gravel pit, now the site of Arbutus Ridge. He got the Gold Rush bug in 1978, and with Lena in tow, went up to the Cariboo in search of the elusive Pot of Gold. They returned in 1982, and later settled in Nanaimo and operated a small oneman sawmill in Cassidy. Bill and Lena spent the ‘80s laughing with their 5 Grandchildren, playing checkers, building chesterfield forts, and giving out the (dreaded) Birthday Bumps. After Lena passed in 2002, Bill spent some time in Parksville, golfing and playing hockey. Bill played hockey most of his life and was quite good at it. He played for the Kimberly Dynamiters Senior A team, where the fans would chant his name if the opposing team needed a lesson in body checking. He did stop playing for a short time while building his business, but coached his boys in Burnaby during this time. The family would also go camping for the summer while dad was at work, where he would return after work and on the weekends. He started playing hockey again in the late 60’s with Ocean Cement at North Van Rec Centre, where he made many life-long friends. Upon moving to Cobble Hill, he played many games for the Duncan Cowboys, and then moved to the Mill Bay Rec League. While in Mill Bay he was able to play on a team with both his sons, which provided many funny stories and a few beers afterwards in the dressing room. After he retired in Nanaimo, Bill and Lena traveled to Scotland, and also the Snoopy Hockey Tournament’s in Santa Rosa, CA. He continued to play hockey in Nanaimo and Parksville, usually 3 times per week, plus tournaments right up until age 77. Dad relocated to Nanaimo as his mobility slowly deteriorated, landing him eventually at Nanaimo Travellers Lodge. Bill was predeceased by his, loving wife Lena in 2002, and only brother, Ernie in 2011. He is survived by 2 sons: Bill (Betty), parents of Kristine and Trevor, and Ron (Dianne), parents of Lee (Tanya), Bruce, Eric (Emily). He met Great Grandchildren: Hayden and Stanley. Also many Cranbrook nieces and nephews, and sister-in-law Ray. A service of Remembrance is planned at Sands Funeral Home, 1 Newcastle Avenue in Nanaimo, on Saturday, January 4 at 1 pm, with a tea upstairs to follow. Flowers gratefully declined, instead a donation to Nanaimo Travellers Lodge in Dad’s name would be appreciated.

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LEGAL/PUBLIC NOTICES Sale under Warehouse Lien Act 2000 Chrysler Cirrus 4 door Sedan VIN# 1C3EJ46X0YN279290 Debtor: D Gamble Auto Sales Amount: $2000.00 Will be sold on Jan 13, 2014 @ noon at 10668 Cedar Dr, Youbou, B.C. 604-800-2970

EDUCATION FOODSAFE COURSES Level-1. Sat, Jan 25, Feb 22 $70/prsn. Location: Island Savings Centre. (250)746-4154 to register. www.saferfood.ca

CLASSES & COURSES TRAIN TO be an Apartment/ Condominium Manager ONLINE! Graduates get access to all jobs posted with us. 33 years of success! Government certified. www.RMTI.ca or 1-800-665-8339,604-681-5456

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Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, December 27, 2013 EMPLOYMENT





ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYST/TECHNICIAN Environmental Initiatives Division Regional Services Department (Temporary, Part-Time - up to One Year) .

An Environmental Analyst/Technician opportunity is available at the CVRD to develop and maintain an environmental GIS framework including base maps, tools and reports to support the Regional Sustainability Strategy. The maps and tools will be developed to describe the region’s environmental, social and economic realms. Predictive modeling to support scenario development for sustainability and climate projections will also be components of the work anticipated. Technical tasks include: developing maps, research, reports, field studies, communications materials, and geostatistical database work to support analysis.

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QUEEN OF ANGELS EARLY LEARNING CENTRE requires a support worker for Tuesdays and Thursdays to work one on one with a child in our care. The successful candidate will have ECE or ECE assistant status, current first aid, and criminal record check. This job would be perfect for a practicing Catholic. Please send resume’s to: Art Therrien 2085 Maple Bay Rd, Duncan B.C. V9L 5L9 or fax to 250-746-8689. Closing date Jan 6, 2014. Lic #1381622

JOURNEYMAN Automotive Service Technician(s) in Hanna Alberta. Hanna Chrysler Ltd. offers competitive wages, relocation allowance, negotiable depending on experience. Bright, modern shop. Full-time permanent with benefits. Friendly town just 2 hours from major urban centres. More info at: hannachrylser.ca. Fax 403854-2845; Email: chrysler@telusplanet.net.

  

         

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Recreation Summer Camps Lifeguarding Parks Outdoor Work Crew GIS Engineering Services Legislative Services (Records Mgmt.)

If you are a student attending high school, community college or university and plan to return to school next fall, visit our website to view the opportunities, including qualification and application requirements.

www.cvrd.bc.ca

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Queen Margaret’s School in Duncan is currently accepting applications for the following positions. RECEPTIONIST – TEMPORARY PT SYSTEMS ANALYST – TEMPORARY FT For full details on these positions and how you can apply, visit us at www.qms.bc.ca and click on “Employment�

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GENERAL MANAGER The BC Forest Discovery Centre requires a General Manager who is accountable for the day-to-day management (operational, financial, administrative & marketing) of the facility. The general manager works effectively with stakeholder groups including industry partners, union staff, volunteers, the local Visitor Information Centre and the community. Some mechanical knowledge would be an asset. A complete job description is available at www.bcforestdiscoverycentre.com. Only applicants of interest will be notified. E-mail resumes to info.bcfdc@shawlink.ca Applications will be accepted no later than January 15, 2014, 4:30 pm.

 

         

 

       

     

 

             

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Summer 2014 is right around the corner! Be a proactive student and consider working with the CVRD next summer in one of these areas:

     

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2014 SUMMER STUDENT OPPORTUNITIES COWICHAN VALLEY REGIONAL DISTRICT

APT SIZE CHEST freezer $125. Mid size upright freezer $150. White 17 cu.ft fridge $175. White 30’’ range $150. Almond 30’’ range $100. Kenmore washer/dryer $300. Apt size stackable W/D $350. GE washer $150. GE dryer $150. Inglis dryer $100. GE built-in dishwasher $125. & more! 6-mth warranty on all appliances. Greg: 250-246-9859.

FIREWOOD

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Friday, December 27, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Call to place your ad:

Business at a

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Monday - Friday 8:30am - 5:00pm Email: classifieds@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

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JAC KO ’ S Concrete Finishing

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HOME OFFICE: (250) 597-1488 CELL: (250) 216-7724 Investors Group Financial Services Inc., L.G. Insurance Services Inc.

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Call John Portelance ... 250.749.3174

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Sports

250-748-2666 ext. 236 sports@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, December 27, 2013

17

Morris leads CVWC to War on the Floor

Milligan, Isles earn their wings KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

Just like Clarence in It’s a Wonderful Life, the Kerry Park Islanders earned their wings in time for Christmas. They didn’t have to save Jimmy Stewart from icy peril, but the task assigned to Mill Bay’s junior B hockey team still wasn’t an easy one: beating the Nanaimo Buccaneers last Saturday night. Islanders owner Mark Osmond, who also operates the Black Swan Pub in Shawnigan Lake, promised his team chicken wings if they beat the Bucs, one of the strongest teams in the Vancouver Island Junior Hockey League. After watching two-goal leads disappear three times, the Isles finally earned their wings with a 6-5 win in double overtime. Despite the positive results, Osmond won’t be using food as an incentive regularly. “That’s not going to be happening every game,” he laughed. Alex Milligan scored four goals in the win, tying him for the league lead with 27 on the season, and linemate Braedan Cross had four assists to go along with the overtime winner. Kerry Park held 2-0 and 3-1 leads in the first period, and a 5-3 edge with less than three minutes left in the game. Once the Bucs got to 5-4, they pulled their goalie. The Isles were too slow to capitalize on

Andrea Morris led a contingent of eight athletes from the Cowichan Valley Wrestling Club into battle at Simon Fraser University’s War on the Floor last week. Morris won four matches to claim gold in the juvenile women’s 47kg division at the elite meet that attracts some of the best wrestlers from across B.C. Nolan Mitchell fought his way through a stacked 52kg division, and reached the final, where he finished second. “In most of Nolan’s matches, he used smart wrestling and took apart his opponents with good technical wrestling,” coach Travis Carey commented. “The finals [opponent] for Nolan was a tough kid from St. Thomas Aquinas wrestling.” Also performing well for the Cowichan club were Ayden Claus, Owen Pite, Kayden Dorma and Olive Kiruiro. Ryan Kuruvita also made the trip, but managed only one match before being injured. “Some of the matches from the wrestlers could have gone either way, and it was very nice to see the work ethic and no-quit attitude coming from CVWC wrestlers,” Carey said. “This competition was a great eyeopener for all of the wrestlers to see who exactly is the best in B.C. at this current time.”

Alex Milligan carries the puck against the Buccaneers last Saturday. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER] the empty cage. “Some of our guys who had the puck at the time were just going for the glory,” Osmond lamented. When the Isles finally fired on the net, the puck was intercepted and the Bucs turned it into the tying goal, which set the stage for Cross’s overtime heroics. “It was all good in the end, against a good team,” Osmond said. Tylor Branzsen rounded out the scoring and added two helpers, with Jordan Coyne

Richard Service Manager

Mark

Debbie

and David Bittner also registering assists. Jackson Jane was kept busy in net, stopping 51 of 56 shots in nearly 68 minutes of action. With a third of the season left, the Isles are still aiming for second place in the South Division, where they currently sit fourth, eight points behind Peninsula. The season resumes after Christmas break with three consecutive road games on Jan. 2, 3 and 4, at Nanaimo, Saanich and Oceanside, respectively.

Mark

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* up to 5L Quaker State Convential/Syntheitc oil (Assorted grades) Some vehicles may require more. MotoMaster filter (up to $5 value) may not fit some vehicles. Additional fees and charges may apply to vehicles that require more oil or a different filter. Eco fees, where applicable, are extra. Most vehicles.

Did You Know... Coolant system failure is a leading cause of mechanical breakdown. It is also one of the most neglected systems on the vehicle, despite being one of the most simple to maintain. Rust, scale, sludge and air reduce its effectiveness and can cause premature failure of components. This is why Coolant system flush and fill is very important!

CANADA’S AUTO SERVICE STORE DUNCAN - 2929 Green Road

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18

Sports

Friday, December 27, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Stingrays of all ages make a splash at Whales’ Classic KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

Twenty-five Duncan Stingrays travelled north in early December for the Campbell River Whales Winter Classic. With some of the younger competitive swimmers in tow, it was a chance for the less-experienced swimmers to show what they can do. “It is encouraging to see so many of our young ones having the support of their families to allow them to achieve such successes,” Stingrays head coach Leanne Sirup commented. “What is even better is our young swimmers are taking advantage of these opportunities and each are enjoying a great amount of personal growth. The future of the Stingrays is exciting.” Eight swimmers — nearly a third of the group — achieved 100 per cent personal bests in Campbell River: Allie Bell, Jamie Bell, Oliver Castle, Olin Dahlstrom, Ty Dahlstrom, Jeremy Kissack, Dylan Kruger, and Cody Shewchuk. Another eight were just one race shy of 100 per cent personal bests: Mathias Bell, Jotei Browne, Jessica Castle, Heather Mackay, Mary Paridaen Van Veen, Sophie Paridaen Van Veen, Ava Smith, and Tess Van Nieuwkerk. Cate Cochrane, Laura Kissack, Megan Kruger, Malia Prystupa, Montana Prystupa, Randi Robertson, Mya Smith and Connor Wardrop had personal bests in

Colton Kehler stretches out to collar a loose puck against Nanaimo. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN]

Fortune doesn’t favour Caps against Clips all but two of their events, and James Ogihara-Kertz rounded out the group with one PB. Several of the Stingrays challenged themselves to new races, led by Shewchuk, who tried three, the 100m freestyle, 100m backstroke and 100m breaststroke. Browne, Robertson, Jessica Castle and Dylan Kruger entered two new events each, and Mackay, Smith, Van Nieuwkerk, Wardrop, Allie Bell, Jamie Bell, Megan Kruger and Sophie Paridaen Van Veen tried out one apiece. Two swimmers also recorded regional AA qualifying times. Ten-year-old Dylan Kruger did so in the 50m freestyle and 100m backstroke, while Olin Dahlstrom achieved his marks in the 50m and 400 free.

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KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

Once again, the Cowichan Valley Capitals weren’t rewarded for their efforts. The B.C. Hockey League team headed into the Christmas break with a 5-2 loss to the Nanaimo Clippers where the result didn’t match up to the work level. Leading 2-1 after the first period last Saturday night, the Caps gave up a powerplay goal in the second after a questionable call gave the Clippers a 5-on-3 advantage. The third-period marker that gave Nanaimo the lead came on what many felt was a missed offside call. The fourth goal was fired into an empty net.

Dynamics’ Baker reaches new heights KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

Another Duncan Dynamics gymnast has vaulted a new level in the sport. In just her first year of competing on the national level, Hayley Baker earned a spot on the provincial team that will compete in the National Stream Cup in Montreal on Jan. 17-19. The entire club is thrilled with the achievement, which shows how far the Dynamics as a group have come since moving into their new facilities and improving their equipment and coaching. “Hayley making the team proves that all the hard work we have done to renovate this gym, get quality equipment and hire quality coaches makes for a winning formula,” said treasurer Kristin Johnson, who will be joining the rest of the board in seeking community support for the trip. “Hayley had to do a ton of work too to get where she is. And the non-profit has had to do a lot of work too to accomplish this

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“I thought we played a good first half,” head coach Bob Beatty said. “But it was the same old story. We came up short.” Myles Powell opened the scoring at 4:12 of the first period. The Clippers responded at 7:31, but Taylor Allan potted his first BCHL goal 14 seconds later to restore the lead. Goalie Robin Gusse stopped 27 of 31 shots in the loss. The Caps will be off until Jan. 3, when they begin a three-game Mainland trip that sees them visit Surrey, Coquitlam and Langley. “We’ve got to reset and get ready for the final 20 games and make up some ground on Nanaimo,” Beatty said.

Solicitors Notaries Public Mediation Services www.jsg.bc.ca

Dynamics gymnast Hayley Baker is headed to the National Stream Cup. [SUBMITTED] new step. We are so proud of what all of our girls are accomplishing.” Baker was one of two Duncan gymnasts to attend qualifying for the National Stream Cup, making the trip with teammate Micaylla Broadway to North Vancouver on Dec. 14 for the qualification meet. Baker won a silver medal on vault and a bronze on floor as she finished ninth overall. Broadway placed seventh on bars and 11th overall. Dynamics head coach Olga Mataganova will make the trip to Montreal with Baker in January

Patricia Blair • Family Law • Civil Litigation • Estate Litigation • Evening Appointments Available • Family Law Legal Aid Referrals Accepted

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Living

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, December 27, 2013

The

Optimism high in Duncan on cusp of WWI From page 11 “...1913 is passed — and comparatively few of us in this part of the world will be sorry to see the last of it. Most of us are wont to laugh at the superstition that number ‘13’ is unlucky, but be that as it may be, there is no doubt that 1913 was not a lucky year in the Dominion of Canada. “There is another curious circumstance about the year which is passed. Someone has said that this country advances by periods of seven years’ duration. That is to say that there are seven lean years followed by seven fat years. 1906 was without doubt the leanest year of the past decade. Last year was the seventh in order from that year and ended another seven-year period. But despite the complaint which has been general in most parts of the world of the scarcity of money and hard times, we in Cowichan have very much useful progress to look back upon. Locally, there have been great and notable developments in some lines of work. “Never in the history of Duncan has there been successfully carried out such an extensive programme of building operations as during 1913. First of all the new public school was built at a cost of $30,000. The work was done by a local firm which is another noteworthy sign of development. The new post office building which will also be ready for occupation within a few weeks is another substantial investment which shows that, in the opinion of those at the head of this important institution, Duncan is destined to develop far beyond its present proportions. The Oddfellows’ block was a notable addition to the buildings of the city — the work again entirely done by a local contractor. “The Duncan Garage had sufficient faith in the prosperity of this district to erect one of the most modern garages on

19

Much-lauded was the very ‘modern’ Duncan Garage, built in 1913. [CITIZEN FILE] this coast at a cost of over $10,000. Over $12,000 has been spent on improvements to the Hotel Duncan. These few buildings we have mentioned mean an expenditure of well over $100,000 on new buildings within the year. “Did we say 1913 had not been lucky for Duncan? Having recounted such a list of developments in this one direction, we are reminded to withdraw such a statement. We have much to be thankful for, and have every cause to look forward to a year of still further progress in 1914.” Just nine months later the world would go to war — the Great War — and Duncan’s sons, many of them of British birth, would answer the call. Duncan, B.C. would have the highest enlistment per capita in Canada.

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www.KenNeal.com I’m Ken Neal I have been privileged to live, work and raise my family in the stunning Cowichan Valley. People ask me why do I advertise experience on your side? Selling real estate since 1991, negotiating over 1700 successful sales and receiving some of the highest honours in the industry, this has given me a privileged understanding of the people, schools, organizations, trades, business people, properties and the communities in this incredible place to live. Checking one off my bucket list between 2008 and 2013, I took a 5 year sabbatical for health, family and to pursue a lifelong dream. During this time I personally built 4 homes giving me a great understanding of what is behind the walls of the homes I sell. People ask me what you do. I listen carefully to people, help them overcome obstacles, make it easy for them to buy or sell, treat them as I would my family and the rest just happens. I believe in earning trust through a straight forward approach, fair and honest with no pressure. What makes me different? If I say I will do it, it will be done, constant communication with my clients and I never give up. Now that’s experience on your side.

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Wise customers read the fine print: ★, •, ‡, § The Be S’elfish Sales Event offers are limited time offers which apply to retail deliveries of selected new and unused models purchased from participating dealers on or after December 3, 2013. Offers subject to change and may be extended without notice. All pricing includes freight ($1,695) and excludes licence, insurance, registration, any dealer administration fees, other dealer charges and other applicable fees and taxes. Dealer order/trade may be necessary. Dealer may sell for less. ★The Make No Payments for 90 Days offer applies to retail customers who finance a new 2014 Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge or Ram vehicle (except 2014 Dodge Avenger CVP and Dodge Viper) or eligible 2013 Dodge Dart, Ram Heavy Duty or Fiat model at a special fixed rate on approved credit through Royal Bank of Canada, TD Auto Finance or Scotiabank between December 10, 2013 and January 2, 2014. Monthly payments will be deferred for 60 days and contracts will be extended accordingly. Interest charges will not accrue during the first 60 days of the contract. Customers will be responsible for any required down payment, licence, registration and insurance costs at time of contract. Some conditions apply. See your dealer for complete details. •$23,888 Purchase Price applies to the 2014 Jeep Cherokee Sport. ‡3.49% purchase financing for up to 96 months available on the new 2014 Jeep Cherokee Sport FWD model to qualified customers on approved credit through Royal Bank of Canada, Scotiabank and TD Auto Finance. See your dealer for complete details. Example: 2014 Jeep Cherokee Sport FWD with a Purchase Price of $23,888 financed at 3.49% over 96 months with $0 down payment equals 208 bi-weekly payments of $132 with a cost of borrowing of $3,506 and a total obligation of $27,394. §2014 Jeep Cherokee Limited shown. ¤Based on 2013 EnerGuide Fuel Consumption Guide ratings published by Natural Resources Canada. Government of Canada test methods used. Your actual fuel economy will vary based on powertrain, driving habits and other factors. 2014 Jeep Cherokee Sport - Hwy: 6.4 L/100 km (44 MPG) and City: 9.6 L/ 100 km (29 MPG). ❖Real Deals. Real Time. Use your mobile device to build and price any model. TMThe SiriusXM logo is a registered trademark of SiriusXM Satellite Radio Inc. ®Jeep is a registered trademark of Chrysler Group LLC


20

Friday, December 27, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

SANTA KNOWS WHERE WE ARE! .

Leading the way..

6456

Norcross Road

DECEMBER TO REMEMBER

$500 9 , 250 09,250 $$%

FLAGSHIP FORD is building a

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$26697

Bi-Weekly

72 mos @4.49% | OAC Net of all discount payments incudes all fees and taxes

* Not exactly as shown

FLAGSHIPFORD.COM 6456 Norcross Road, Duncan

250-748-5555 888-794-0559

FLAGSHIP Leading the way DL# 5964

Bernadette Scudder General Sales Manager

Chris Yu Team Leader

Stu Philips Sales Manager

Bryan Flynn Sales Manager

Edie Lange Business Manager

Dave Faithfull Sales and Leasing Consultant

Ian Smith Sales and Leasing Consultant

John Travis Anins

Trevor Waldron

Sales & Leasing Consultant

Sales & Leasing Consultant

Sandra Jurcic Sales & Leasing Consultant

Dawood Francis Sales & Leasing Consultant

Mark Yacoboski

Chris Tarala

Sales & Leasing Consultant

Sales & Leasing Consultant

Will Banga Sales & Leasing Consultant


Cowichan Valley Citizen Wrap | Friday, December 27, 2013

biggest Merit Furniture’s

boxing week sale ever ENTIRE INVENTORY ON SALE NOW!

FIRST 10 CUSTOMERS will Receive a Kitchen Aid

POTS & PANS SET

*minimum purchase $799

PRIZES ALL WEEK!

MERIT FURNITURE 250-746-5527

107 Ingram Street, Downtown Duncan Mon. - Sat. 9:30am - 5:30pm Sunday - Holidays Noon - 4pm

No Down Payment • No Interest NO PAYMENTS TILL JANUARY 2015 O.A.C. www.meritduncan.ca

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Friday, December 27, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen Wrap


HUGE

Cowichan Valley Citizen Wrap | Friday, December 27, 2013

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YEAR END CLEARANCE

RANGES

REFRIGERATORS

GE 24” Electric Self-Clean Oven Range • White • Coil elements 1 only $ 5 9 9 Moffat 30” Range $429 • White • Coil elements GE Deluxe 30” Self-Clean Oven Range $599 • White • Coil elements GE 30” Smooth Top Self-Cleaning Oven Range • White $649 GE 30” Smooth Top Self-Clean Oven Range • Two 2 in 1 elements • Warming zone $849 • Self-clean over racks GE 30” Black Smooth Top Self-Clean oven Range • Two 2 in 1 elements • Warming zone • Self-clean over racks • Warming drawer $849

GE 3.1 cu.ft. two door • White Moffat 17 cu.ft. • White GE 20 cu. ft. Bottom Pull Out Freezer • Black GE Profile 22.1 cu. ft. • French Door • Ice & water 1 only

$149 $499 $999 $1399

DISHWASHERS Moffat Built-in Dishwasher $329 GE Built-In Dishwasher • Delay start • Steam • Stainless Interior Door White $ 5 4 9 Stainless Steel $ 6 4 9 GE Profile Built-In Dishwasher • Hidden controls • Stainless interior • Nylon coated racks White or Black $ 6 9 9 Stainless Steel $ 7 9 9

Where GE Appliances Come to Life!

R.A.M.

• SALES • SERVICE • PARTS APPLIANCE SPECIALIST for the Cowichan Valley since 1978

Monday - Saturday 9:00 am - 5:00 pm •

IN HOME SERVICE

PARTS

&

SERVICE FOR ALL BRANDS DELIVERY AND INSTALLATION

250-748-4368 460 Whistler St, Duncan


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Friday, December 27, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen Wrap

BONUS..

Bedding Accessory Bundle * Value $300.00

BOXING WEEK BLOWOUT!

45% OFF REGULAR PRICE

EXTRA...

Featuring Silk & Wool Fibre, Luxurious Latex and Soy Based Foams

Exact image not available

MERIT FURNITURE 250-746-5527 107 Ingram Street, Downtown Duncan Mon. - Sat. 9:30am - 5:30pm Sunday - Holidays Noon - 4pm

No Down Payment • No Interest NO PAYMENTS TILL JANUARY 2015 O.A.C. www.meritduncan.ca

December 27, 2013  

The December 27, 2013 edition of the Cowichan Valley Citizen

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