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Friday, August 16, 2013

“If my friend didn’t show up they could have killed me.”

Wine bar looks to expand

ASSAULT VICTIM

Second victim speaking out

FINGERS CROSSED: Plan still

SARAH SIMPSON CITIZEN

requires council approval KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

The space is open, so Jeff Downie wants to take it over. The operator of the Old Firehouse Wine Bar on Ingram Street in downtown Duncan is hoping to get an amendment to his liquor licence that will allow him to expand into the space vacated by Dolce Bakery earlier this year. “It’s a move up in occupancy class,” explained Downie, who owns the strata rights to the space and says his business is ready to expand to “assembly use” occupancy class. “It fits the style of the place better,” he said. The space has been sitting vacant since the bakery left in January, and Downie is eager to get into it. “One of the biggest things is that we need to expand; we need more capacity,” he said. “We’d like to do more special events. A higher-occupancy licence will allow us to spread our wings.” Among the special events that the Old Firehouse currently holds and that Downie would like to do more of are live music performances, book launches and lectures. “There are all sorts of things we do,” he said. “The whole gamut of small-scale events.” A bigger storefront will also increase the bar’s visibility, although both local support

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More space could open up a world of possibilities for Jeff Downie and the Old Firehouse Wine Bar on Ingram Street in downtown Duncan. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN] and tourist visits are already excellent. Downie used to run Gallowglass Books out of the same space, but it has moved around the corner onto Canada Avenue, and while he still owns it, he has taken a step back from day-to-day operations to focus on the Old Firehouse. His new project has been going since March 2012, and has captured its own niche. “This business isn’t just Duncan-unique, but in a way, it’s Island-unique,” he said. “The events we do are pretty unique with all the parts we put together.” With expansion, Downie could add more wine and food options to his menu, along

with other bar features. The Old Firehouse doesn’t focus strictly on local offerings, but does feature a variety of local wines, along with selections from other parts of the province and around the world, and makes use of some local food as well. Downie is optimistic that the city will allow him to expand the bar. “We have a pretty good reputation as far as being something different,” he said, noting that between the bookstore and the bar, he has been working in the same area for nearly 15 years. “We’ve been downtown for a long time.”

Another victim has come forward to tell his story of theft and violence on the Cowichan Tribes reserve south of Duncan and to urge the band’s management to do something to help. In late July, the man who declined to be named publicly in fear of a repeat attack, said three young men staged a late-night invasion into his home, stealing two television sets, clothing, running shoes, jewelry and even traditional native artifacts from the walls. “Then they came back five hours later. I think they thought I’d be still sleeping or something,” said the man, who lives alone. “They just walked right into my house and beat me up.” The damage: two black eyes, a swollen and sore nose and two cracked teeth, could have been a lot worse had the victim’s friend not arrived while the beating was taking place. “He chased them and they ran out the door,” said the victim. “If my friend didn’t show up they could have killed me. He said I was knocked out for about 30 seconds.” The terrified resident did call the police. “I was really scared. I was staying awake all night. Any little noise I would hear outside I would wake up,” he said. See Tribes • page 3

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Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, August 16, 2013

School reconfiguration work means summer not a vacation for SD79 staff LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

“It’s been a whirlwind summer. It’s going to be an interesting time in September, as we get into that new normal,” Monroe Grobe, operations director for the Cowichan Valley School District, said. He was talking about all the work needed to reconfigure the district’s schools, following the announcement late last spring of a host of changes. The biggest jobs have been converting Mt. Prevost and George Bonner middle schools so they are ready for elementary school kids in September. Part of that is the look of the buildings, Grobe said. “In certain portions of the schools, we removed the lockers and replaced them with panels of cubbies and coat-hooks. It looks really sharp and it takes away that middle school atmosphere,” he said. Another big task was making the right kind of space for the district’s youngest students. “Because of the requirement for kindergarten classrooms to have washrooms...we converted bookrooms and storage rooms into a washroom off each of these classrooms. We didn’t take it away from the classrooms themselves. There are three in Mt. Prevost and two in Bonner,” he said. Playgrounds have been on the move, too. The jungle gym from École Mill Bay was moved to George Bonner, the one from Somenos went to Tansor and a small primary playground from Koksilah went to Alexander. New playgrounds are being installed at Discovery, Palsson, École Mt. Prevost and Lake Cowichan School. There’s a sports court going in at Lake Cowichan, too. It’s been a busy summer, Grobe said. “It’s been a blur,” he laughed, “but we’ve made really good progress. I’m quite appreciative of the efforts of our crews. The bulk of the work started as soon as school was let out in June. “We did a lot of prior planning that has

3

Tribes needs to help stop the violence, member says From page 1

Quamichan Middle School is no longer. It is now known as Cowichan Secondary’s Quamichan campus — just one of the changes made my SD79 heading into September. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN] really helped to keep things on task and that’s worked out well for us, too.” Grobe said his team’s mandate is to ensure teachers and students will find classrooms and, if needed, playgrounds ready in their schools, wherever they are. Cowichan Secondary and Quamichan Middle School have joined into one operation with two campuses but there has not been a lot of renovation involved in that besides moving furniture and teachers’ resources. “Quamichan is almost doubling in capacity. We’re looking at roughly 600 students there so every classroom needs furniture but we did have a fair amount of furniture [coming from Mt. Prevost].” It’s been a similar job moving the Grade 8s from George Bonner to Frances Kelsey and up at Lake Cowichan, changes were also relatively simple, Grobe said. “At Palsson, we’re adding in two portables,

because of the decision to offer Grade 4 at either Palsson or Lake Cowichan School, we have to be prepared for them,” Grobe said. “Those portables are slated to move up there Friday and then it’s just buttoning them up and getting the services. We’re also adding a portable at Bench for the music program. Bench is pretty chock-a-block.” “With George Bonner moving to an elementary school, it will take time for the parents and students to see where they want to go. We’re hoping the additional space at George Bonner and the elementary program will lighten the load on Bench as well,” he added. Once everything is up and running, over the next couple of months, “our plan is to respond to some more specific needs and the creature comforts make learning better for the kids, modifying and doing the little bit of extra we can do in that regard,” Grobe said.

“I’ve got little things to protect myself hiding all over the place at my house now. I shouldn’t be living like that. I was really afraid they’d come back and burn my house down or beat me up again.” When the victim learned three young men had been arrested in relation to a different case, he relaxed a little, though he’s not certain one way or the other that the assailants are the ones that attacked him. “I heard three guys were in custody and I assumed they were the same people because it’s a small community and the news flies around here pretty fast on the reserve,” he said. He’s hoping that tight-knit community and fast-flowing information can work for the good and that the residents of the reserve will work together to stop the violence. “It’s just ongoing. Violence all over the place. Alcoholism and violence has taken control of this reserve,” he said. By telling his story, he hopes Cowichan Tribes management will take notice and admit there’s a problem. “I’m afraid for myself. I’m afraid for the community. There’s a lot of people on this reserve that area probably scared,” he said. “Nobody says anything because they don’t want to get beaten up either. It’s like living in the ’hood. It feels like we’re living in a third world country here. Cowichan Tribes need to at least protect their members. Otherwise somebody’s going to get killed.” Cowichan Tribes administrators are on their summer holidays and have not yet been able to respond to requests for a comment on the matter.

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News

Friday, August 16, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Duck Pond death not suspicious LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

A Lake Cowichan resident living near the Duck Pond Park made a surprising discovery early Tuesday morning. Lake Cowichan RCMP detachment commander Sgt. Wes Olsen said his office received a report at about 8:45 a.m. of an unresponsive elderly male in the park.

“A nearby resident observed the male on the ground and called emergency services,” Olsen said. Lake Cowichan Emergency Health Services, the fire department and the Mounties all responded to the park where they discovered the 78-year-old man was dead. The BC Coroner’s Service also attended and is investigating.

How Do I Become a Catholic? St. Francis Xavier/Our Lady Queen of the World Catholic Faith Community will be having sessions of “Inquiry” throughout September on how to become a Roman Catholic. There is no charge or commitment to these sessions. The sessions will take place at the new ‘Welcome Centre’ on St. Francis Xavier Church grounds, 790 Kilmalu Rd. 2 pm to 3 pm every Saturday. Please call 250-743-1688 or email: AveMaria@telus.net to register. Fr. Sean will facilitate. Questions are welcome.

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Community policing office closed Friday The volunteers who normally work out of the Cowichan community policing offices in downtown Duncan have been reassigned for one day only. They have been tasked with helping out with the RCMP Musical Ride at Avalon Acres on Herd Road for the day. Community policing manager CarolAnn Rolls said should the public need to speak to a police officer or make a complaint, they can call the North Cowichan/ Duncan RCMP at 250-748-5522.

“Foul play is not suspected in this matter,” Olsen said. The name of the deceased, a Lake Cowichan resident, is being withheld pending the notification of next-of-kin. Located on Park Road off North Shore Road, the Kinsmen Duck Pond has become a popular swimming hole and picnic spot in Lake Cowichan.

Suspect sketched following second attempt to steal ATM SARAH SIMPSON CITIZEN

Shawnigan Lake RCMP believe the man responsible for a Wednesday morning break and enter at Country Grocer in Cobble Hill is the same as the one suspected of the ATM theft at Cobble Hill Market on Aug. 6. Police have released a sketch of the suspect in the hopes that the public may recognize him. Wednesday’s incident occurred at 3 a.m. though staff discovered it four hours later. “Video footage shows an older model pick-up truck driving by the front door twice. Shortly after, a male suspect forced entry by smashing the glass door. The suspect can be seen on video attempting to unsuccessfully remove the ATM machine,” said Shawnigan Lake RCMP detachment commander Sgt. Rob Webb in a press release. “The suspect then walks to the cus-

tomer service area of the store, where he grabs a small garbage bin and fills it with cigarettes. Video footage clearly shows the suspect wearing white gloves.” At 12:35 a.m. on Aug. 6, a lone male rammed his vehicle into the front doors of the Cobble Hill Market twice before turning his vehicle around to back in. “He was able to dislodge the ATM machine located inside and take off east bound on Fisher Road,” Webb said. The Caucasian suspect is described as slim and approximately six feet tall. He was wearing a ball cap and dark clothing at the time of the first breakand-enter. His vehicle is possibly blue in color and either a pickup with a canopy or an SUV. Anyone with information regarding this or any other crime is asked to contact the Shawnigan Lake RCMP at 250-743-5514 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800665-TIPS (8477).

A police sketch of the man police are looking for in connection to two commercial break and enters in Cobble Hill within the last week. [RCMP HANDOUT]

Firefighters raising funds for MD Join Cowichan Valley firefighters on Aug. 17 at Duncan Safeway as they kick off Canada Safeway’s Make Muscles Move Awareness Weekend for Muscu-

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Malahat highway upgrades nearly finished

Construction delays on the Malahat are coming to an end — at least until the fall — with crews finishing the majority of a highway upgrade project on Monday. B.C.’s Transportation Ministry said the bulk of the work was completed Monday with a crash attenuator, used to cushion collisions, installed at barriers near the upgraded Shawnigan Lake Road turnoff. The $8-million highway safety upgrade project is several weeks late and has caused lengthy backups and traffic delays. There is still some painting to be completed by the end of this week, the ministry said. The province also intends to add additional median barriers at the south end of Goldstream Park, and construct a northbound acceleration lane at Finlayson Arm Road, but the work has yet to be contracted and a start date is unknown, the ministry said. The work is expected to be done in the fall. Times Colonist


News

The old Island Savings Credit Union on Canada Avenue has been reduced to rubble and green space —albeit temporary — has been approved to replace it. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN]

Hydra, the orphaned baby harbour seal that was rescued from a Cowichan Bay beach in July, has adapted well to her surroundings at the Vancouver Aquarium’s Marine Mammal Rescue Centre. Staff there hope she can be released this fall. [SUBMITTED PHOTO]

Green space slated for former Island Savings property

Hydra’s recovery going swimmingly SARAH SIMPSON CITIZEN

Hydra, the tiny orphaned baby harbour seal the Cowichan Bay community has adopted as their own, is getting better by the day says staff at the Vancouver Aquarium’s Marine Mammal Rescue Centre. “Hydra is doing very well. She has been weaned from formula and is now eating fish and gaining weight steadily,” reported Lindsaye Akhurst who manages the downtown Vancouver facility. Hydra was rescued from the beach outside the Oceanfront Suites in Cowichan Bay after days of concern from afar on the part of hotel staff. Deena Skinner, the hotel’s director of sales, took to Facebook to solicit advice about a tiny seal she’d been seeing on the beach. It just so happened that Sion Cahoon, who grew up in Duncan, had been tagged by a mutual friend in one of the messages. Cahoon now lives in Vancouver and is a veterinary technician with the Vancouver Aquarium’s Marine Mammal Rescue Centre. She replied to the Facebook plea

5

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, August 16, 2013

and Hydra’s rescue and recovery took off from there. “Hydra graduated to the pool [Monday] and has adjusted well.” The youngster now has more space to play after being moved from her individual tub to a special pool with four other rescued seal pups. “If she continues to improve and gets along with her new pool mates, we expect to release her back into the wild this fall,” Akhurst said. When Hydra arrived at the Marine Mammal Rescue Centre on July 24, she was one of 17 injured and/or orphaned harbour seals being cared for. Since then that number has jumped up to no fewer than 43 slippery charges — all of which were brought to the centre mainly as a result of maternal separation. Visit www.vanaqua.org/act/direct-action/ marine-mammal-rescue to learn more about what the centre does and how you can donate to the cause. If you see a marine mammal that you believe is in distress, contact us at 604-258SEAL (7325).

PRIME PLOT: Downtown land to ultimately be developed LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

The Canada Avenue building that housed the main branch of Island Savings Credit union was reduced to rubble last week. For the time being, the area will provide extra green space in the downtown area. “The credit union has applied for a demolition permit and a development permit for the temporary holding of the property to grass out the area where the existing branch building was and retain the trees and create a small sort of green space while they work towards finalizing plans for redevelopment of the site,” Duncan Mayor Phil Kent said. Redevelopment is still in the future, though. “I’m not certain what that time line they have,” Kent said. “That permit for that ‘parked-out’ area has been approved and

as they come forward with other plans, they will comment on that directly.” Saturday, Nov. 17, 2012 marked a milestone for Island Savings Credit Union as the Duncan business icon officially opened its new state-of-the-art branch at the Duncan Centre mall. With great fanfare, representatives of all Cowichan’s communities were involved in an impressive opening ceremony that celebrated both the history and the future of the corporation. Even at that time, though, there was a lot of curiosity among many people attending the event about what would happen to the old building in downtown Duncan. Island Savings spokesperson Kathi Springer said then when all permits were approved, the company would be looking for qualified parties to conduct the demolition of the Canada Avenue location.

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Friday, August 16, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

OUR VIEW

Let’s keep looking for the good news out there his paper was a real doozy to put together because it just seemed so... negative. It has just a little bit of everything bad: from the doom and gloom of home invasions and violence on the Cowichan Tribes reserve to a dead body in the park at Lake Cowichan, from massive upheaval and reconfiguration challenges with the school district to a handful of police briefs looking for suspects still at large and reporting that prolific offenders are headed to jail. Sometimes it’s hard to imagine that life can be, you know, GOOD. But it is.

T

It is part of our job as a newspaper to report on the ups and downs of a community and that’s why many of our stories so often contain conflict. It gets us down sometimes, that’s for sure, and we bet there are times when you feel the same. But, sprinkled in amongst the harder, sadder, more negative news stories are glimmers of hope — small positives we can cling to while wading through the all of the rest. Stories of people like longtime local merchant Jeff Downie, whose Old Firehouse Wine Bar has been so successful that he is

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OTHER VIEWS

looking to expand in order to offer his niche services to even more willing customers. Stories like the update on Hydra, the orphaned baby harbour seal, too. Her saga is one of community members rallying to ensure the young animal got the care she needed and by all accounts she taught her rescuers a thing or two about spirit and resilience along the way, as well. From Special Woodstock to the Great Lake Walk, to firefighters bagging groceries to raise money for Muscular Dystrophy, if you look closely enough in the newspaper — and all around town

— there are stories of goodness and happiness and service to the community out there. We want to tell more of those stories. We hope you’ll help us do that by letting us know about the good, the humorous, the silly, the weird, the wild and the curious. We’d sure like to find more positive stories about people to tell. We loved writing about Jora Dale’s banana tree story last week, and about the potential for new jobs in Lake Cowichan when the new Fields store opens up. We got a real kick out of Team Super Mommas tackling their own fears and hesitations to raise

Just say it like it is, please

Cowichan Valley Citizen is a division of VI Newspaper Group Limited Partnership., 469 Whistler St., Duncan, B.C., V9L 4X5 Phone: 250-748-2666 Fax: 250-748-1552

Re: Michael Openshaw’s letter, “Obituaries: folks don’t ever seem to just die”. At 65, I too, read the obituaries, and know that we all hesitate to use the word “die”. When I was eight years old, my father died of a heart attack. Without explanation, I was scooped to a neighbour’s house, and waited for news of my father’s condition. My mother sat me down, and told be that my father “passed away”. I was so happy — in fact, overjoyed — as I thought she meant he passed his medical tests and was going to recover. Years later, the neighbour still talked about my strange reaction of laughter. I felt so terrible when it was mentioned and no one else knew it was just a misunderstanding of the terminology. I ask all parents to PLEASE, use words that your children will understand.

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Copyright information This newspaper’s contents are protected by copyright and may be used only for personal, non-commercial purposes. All other rights are reserved. Commercial use is prohibited. Opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the newspaper. Complaint resolution If speaking to the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about a story we publish, contact the B.C. Press Council, which examines complaints from the public about the conduct of the press in gathering and presenting the news. Send your written concern and documentation within 45 days to: B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C., V9R 2R2. Website: www.bcpresscouncil.org.

money for charity. We were so pleased to report about the Duncan Junior Baseball duo that was picked up to play in the Western Canadian Pee Wee Baseball Championships and about the new project that will see much needed repairs being made to local First Nations homes. We want to tell these stories. No doubt we’ll have to keep telling you about the doom and gloom. But nobody said we can’t try to tell you more about your friends and neighbours and try to find as many silver linings as we can. Send your story ideas to: news@ cowichanvalleycitizen.com

Where’s the for sale sign on the Eco Depot land? It is now more than three years since the CVRD board decided in secret to purchase a 22-acre piece of land on Cameron Taggart Road for the failed four-acre South Cowichan Eco Depot. The board wasted more than $1.5 million to purchase the property, hire many consultants, promote it using high paid spin doctors, tried to defend themselves in court and plan for a Cadillac style of industrial development waste dump and recycling centre in a rural residential and agriculture area. And they continue to spend more tax money on this unwanted project! In November 2011 the CVRD’s

proposal was soundly rejected by taxpayers in a poll during local elections. The CVRD board finally voted to abandon their discredited Eco Depot in January 2012. Let’s not forget the BC Supreme Court subsequently also ruled against the CVRD’s attempt to ignore its own zoning bylaws and foist an illegal development on the public. The cavalier attitude of the CVRD staff and board to taxpayers’ money is well reflected by the fact that 18 months after the CVRD decision to abandon the Eco Depot there is still no For Sale sign on the property and money continues to be wasted on this debacle by inaction and make-work projects in the CVRD.

How difficult is it to put up a For Sale sign? A year after abandoning the project the CVRD chair and his $200,000 per year administrator “consulted” with local residents in February 2013 about what to do with the property at a community meeting in Shawnigan Lake. They were told very clearly the community wanted the Eco Depot property sold “as is where is” pronto without subdivision or any more bureaucratic attempts to delay the process or continue bleeding tax money on this project. It is now August and nothing has been done to sell this property as the taxpayers wanted! The CVRD purchased the Eco Depot property after 15 minutes

of secret discussion in 2010 and it’s taken almost two years to get the for sale signs up again and try to and recover some of our wasted tax money! This huge CVRD bureaucracy appears incapable of respecting public interests or our money. W.E. (Bill) Dumont Cobble Hill

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Opinion

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, August 16, 2013

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Islanders ‘clearly want’ passenger rail service T

he final piece of funding to repair the E&N railways tracks fell into place with an announcement by the federal government in April 2012 that they would provide $7.5 million to help with upgrades. Now we are waiting to hear from VIA Rail if it will agree to a new train service agreement that will allow the project to proceed. No passenger trains have travelled those tracks since March 2011 when engineers identified problems with the rail bed. A safe, reliable transit service will provide the many people who travel around the Island with an alternative to the car that should help us all with reduced traffic, reduced pollution and reduced wear and tear on our infrastructure. I contacted the federal Minister of Transport this week and asked her to do all that she can to see that a train service agreement is signed soon. Although VIA Rail is a crown corporation, the government provides funding to VIA to provide rural services. And VIA funding was cut in the most recent Conservative budget, making it harder for the corporation to respond to the transportation needs of Canadians. According to their own corporate report, ridership on the E&N line increased by six percent a year for the last six years it was operating.

The Island Corridor Foundation is encouraging residents to write directly to federal and provincial politicians as well as the head of VIA rail. You can see more at COMMUNITY their website: www. REPORT islandrail.ca Jean Crowder Considering that the recent construction of the McTavish highway interchange in Victoria cost $24 million, the cost of repairing this rail line is a bargain compared to the cost of building more roads. But our passenger rail service is only one piece of the transportation puzzle here on the Island. Rail freight costs are a growing concern for many Island businesses. I raised the issue of increased freight costs for agricultural suppliers on the Island and how it increased reliance on truck traffic for deliveries just at the time our communities were working to reduce large vehicles on our roads. Rail customers in Canada have suffered losses for years due to unreliable freight services. New Democrats introduced the Rail Customer Protection Act to create a more

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‘A safe, reliable transit service will provide the many people who travel around the Island with an alternative to the car that should help us all with reduced traffic, reduced pollution and reduced wear and tear on our infrastructure,’ says MP Jean Crowder. [CITIZEN FILE] balanced playing field for shippers across industries. One troubling statistic spurred this legislation: more than 80 per cent of all service commitments for agricultural rail customers are not met by the rail companies. The NDP private member’s bill will grant all rail customers the right to negotiate service level agreements with rail companies. Instead of starting with a blank piece of paper, every negotiation will begin with core components aimed to protect rail customers.

This would include performance standards and penalties for non-performance, which will go a long way to addressing the concerns of shippers. Better enforcement of safety standards and more regulation, particularly of hazardous goods, is also top-of-mind for many Canadians after the rail disaster in Lac-Mégantic. But that shouldn’t prevent us from improving passenger service when so many Islanders clearly want this option. Jean Crowder is the Member of Parlaiment for the Nanaimo-Cowichan riding.

Community Extension & Contract Services Fall 2013-Winter 2014 brochure is available! Watch for your copy on August 21st in the

www.cowichanvalleycitizen.com Look for the results of this week’s poll in next Friday’s edition of the Cowichan Valley Citizen.

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Friday, August 16, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Thief spends hours in Barton office

Prolific offender sent to jail for B&E spree SARAH SIMPSON CITIZEN

One of Duncan’s prolific offenders has been given two years less a day in jail and two years probation after that for his involvement in multiple crimes. Police had been investigating Micah Jair McClure for three months before recommending no fewer than 13 charges against him. McClure pleaded guilty to two counts of break and enter and two of wearing a disguise. “On Feb. 18, McClure broke into the Chuckwagon general store in Cedar, and during the offence was wearing a disguise,” said North Cowichan/ Duncan RCMP

spokesman Spl. Jon Stuart. “On Feb. 27, McClure broke into and was caught inside the Save On gas on Highway 1 and Bench Road. When he was arrested he was wearing gloves, and a mask over his face.” McClure had been identified as a prolific offender by the RCMP and its community partners. “These persons are identified when they have come to the attention of the police, usually once they have been the subject of numerous files in a short period of time,” Stuart said. Once released, McClure is not to be within 40 kilometres of Duncan.

SARAH SIMPSON CITIZEN

A grainy surveillance camera image shows the man suspected of a July 12 break and enter at Barton Insurance. [RCMP HANDOUT]

North Cowichan/ Duncan RCMP are asking for the public’s help in identifying a man who ransacked the Barton Insurance offices in the middle of July. According to detachment spokesman Cpl. Jon Stuart, the suspect broke into the space at 102-109 Trans Canada Hwy on July 12. “The suspect gained entry to the building by breaking into a vacant neighboring unit at 3:04 a.m. and then used tools to break through an interior wall into the business,” Stuart explained. The officer added that the suspect spent four hours inside the unit and left the building just after 7 a.m. “Some cash was stolen from the business and building repairs are

estimated to exceed $4,000,” Stuart said. Surveillance cameras in the area captured a grainy image of the suspect. The man is described as a Caucasian male with a slim build and brown medium length hair. It is believed was wearing a black leather jacket, a black hooded sweatshirt, a black hat, and white shoes. Those with information about this or any other crime are encouraged to contact the North Cowichan/ Duncan RCMP at 250-7485522, or Crime Stoppers anonymously at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477). If you provide information to Crime Stoppers that leads authorities to an arrest or to the recovery of stolen property or the seizure of illicit drugs, you could be eligible for a cash award.

CDH Foundation gets big boost LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

Checking out a fountain at Cowichan District Hospital are, from left, Ed Rasmussen, Vera Renshaw, CDH Foundation chair Brian Payne, Leah La Riviere and Gord La Riviere and, in front, Mary Rasmussen. [LEXI BAINAS/CITIZEN]

A shy man has given the Cowichan District Hospital more than a quarter of a million dollars. It comes from the estate of the late Arthur Renshaw. Family members visited the hospital Thursday, Aug. 15 to make the presentation of a cheque for $229,775, as part of a donation which will likely amount to $234,000 once the estate is wound up. Renshaw’s name will be put on a plaque on one of the fountains outside the hospital’s main

NOTICE OF INTENTION TO PROVIDE ASSISTANCE UNDER A PARTNERING AGREEMENT IN ELECTORAL AREA I – YOUBOU/MEADE CREEK Pursuant to Section 185 of the Local Government Act, the CVRD is providing notice that the Regional District intends to provide assistance to TimberWest Forest Corp. under the terms of a partnering agreement having a term of five years. The CVRD supports the construction of a truck wash to reduce the amount of dust, dirt and mud emitted from logging trucks entering onto Youbou Road from the unpaved portion of North Shore Road and proposes to provide a contribution to TimberWest in the amount of Five Thousand ($5,000) dollars from the Electoral Area I Nature and Habitat Fund. TimberWest will be responsible for, and will provide, all remaining funds needed to construct the truck wash and for the ongoing operational costs of the truck wash. Any comments regarding the proposed assistance should be sent by 4:30 pm on Tuesday September 2, 2013 to Joe Barry, Corporate Secretary, at jbarry@cvrd.bc.ca or forwarded to the address below. Comments received will be placed on the September 11, 2013 public Board agenda for consideration by the Board of Directors.

entrance to commemorate the huge donation. His sister, Vera, told the CDH Foundation board that their facility was lucky two ways. “Forty years ago when he was living in Burnaby he said if he died the money should go to Burnaby Hospital. So you should be glad he moved to Duncan,” she said, before signing the cheque in the board room. “We’ll be spending it carefully on equipment and services to improve patient care rather than on one big project,” CDH board

chair Brian Payne said after the presentation. State-of-the-ar t equipment attracts state-of-the-art doctors to the Valley so anything the Foundation can do to help with projects helps everyone. Renshaw’s niece Leah La Riviere said the family was particularly pleased to see the money go to a foundation where 90 per cent of the money goes directly to the hospital, rather than to fancy offices. “I know it’s hard to get donor dollars, and that is really important to me,” she said.

Jenn George new chair of Social Planning Cowichan LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

Valley activist Jenn George is the new chair of Social Planning Cowichan. George is active in the community, serving as Land Code Coordinator for Cowichan Tribes as well as working on numerous initiatives and supporting many organizations, including her role as co-chair of the highly-successful Walk of the Nations for the last five years. George served during the last year as co-chair with five-year Board Chair Valerie Nicol. The departing chair said she is happy to see George in the role. “I know Jenn will be a valuable asset as chair of Social Planning Cowichan,” Nicol said. Meanwhile, George herself is excited. “Let’s get this party started!” exclaimed George. “I couldn’t be more thankful for the opportunity to work with such an amazing community organization. Social Planning Cowichan represents what this community means to me: partnerships, cultural connections, addressing the concerns and needs of community and providing opportunities to educate and outreach. I also raise my hands to Val and her five years of leadership with the board and I look for-

Jenn George

ward to having her participate as past chair on our board’s executive committee.” The executive committee now includes George, Candace Spilsbury (vice-chair), Nicol (past chair), Gina Talbot (treasurer) and John Scull (secretary). Social Planning Cowichan was founded in 2004 and is currently working on initiatives around affordable housing, cross-cultural relations, the status of the community 12 determinants of health, youth initiatives, and coordinating with organizations on community issues.


Valley Calendar Miscellaneous • Chemainus Literary Festival Fridays, 5-9 p.m., in August. Part of ArtBeat on Willow Street. Meet local authors and/or bring your own published books. Free. Info: Eliza Hemingway, days 250-324-2212, evenings 250-4160363, email elizahemingway@shaw.ca • Friendly Visitors wanted! Volunteer Cowichan prog ram connects an isolated or lonely senior in the community with a Friendly Visitor. Interested? Call 250-748-2133. • ShoDai Peace Chant new location Nichiren Peace Centre, Johnny Bear and Cambrai Road. Meditation Thursdays, 7 p.m., Discovery Sunrise Sundays, 10 a.m. Website: www.viretreats.com. Info: 250-710-7594. Email: peace@viretreats.com • The Duncan Family History Centre (Genealogy) is open, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and Wednesday night 7-9 p.m. Free access to Ancestry.com available, 1815 Tzouhalem Rd, LDS Church. Info: 250-746-4122.

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, August 16, 2013

THE MORE WE GET TOGETHER...

cing Thursday evenings 6:30-8 p.m., singles, couples, beginners welcome, Chemainus Seniors Centre. Info: 250-748-9604. • Calling all chess players, every Wednesday, 1-4 p.m. All levels welcome. Info: 250-743-8740. • Interested in rocks? The Cowichan Valley Rockhounds meet the third Monday of each month, 7 p.m., Duncan Airport. Info: 250-743-3769. • Drop in table tennis, Monday and Thursday, 7-9 p.m., Queen of Angels School. All ages welcome, coaching available. Drop in fee $3. Info: Frank 250-748-0566 or email fe0540@telus.net

Meetings

Seniors

Many hands make light work as Const. Bert Calvo, Elspeth Spencer, Duncan Mayor Phil Kent and Anita Fraser help top Chantal McGeachy’s burger during the Cairnsmore community barbecue held on the grounds of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church last Thursday. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN]

• Chemainus 55+ drop in centre muffin mornings Wednesday and Friday, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Come and meet new friends. • Are you 55 or older and bored? Why not join the Valley Seniors Organization in Duncan? Located at 198 Government St., open 6 days a week, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Bus trips, carpet bowling, whist, bridge, cribbage, 3 bands, a choir. Info: 250-746-4433.

• Weekly bingo, Tuesdays, 12 p.m., Valley Seniors Centre, Duncan. Info: 250-746-4433. Chemainus 55+ drop in centre bridge for beginners Thursdays, 1 p.m. Info: Al Taylor 250-246-4134. • Chemainus Seniors Centre bridge classes: Monday 1-4 p.m., Tuesday pairs 7:30-9:30 p.m., Friday pairs 1-4 p.m. Duplicate bridge

ISLAND Round-up ◆ VANCOUVER ISLAND

Multi-jurisdictional business licenses may be on the way Nanaimo city council is moving forward on a business-friendly, inter-municipal business licence program with other local governments in the central Vancouver Island area. Council voted unanimously Monday to direct city staff to prepare a special business license bylaw to enable the city to participate in the scheme, which could come into effect by Jan. 1, 2014. The idea was promoted at council in February by Greater Nanaimo Chamber of Commerce president and CEO Susan Allen, who said the move would result in less paperwork and red tape for businesses that operate across the region. If implemented, the program would see the Nanaimo and 12 other municipalities adopt a common transferable business licence geared towards businesses that tend to be mobile, rather than operate at a fixed location, according to a city staff report. Examples include tradespeople, architects and catering companies.

◆ CAMPBELL RIVER

Retired logger and son land 61.5-pound chinook salmon Campbell River is reverberating with the news that someone caught a 61.5-pound chinook salmon in the Tyee Club of British Columbia’s annual tournament Sunday night. It was the first salmon of that size to be recorded in the Tyee Club in more than 30 years. The angler? Mike Gage, a retired logger who has devoted his golden years trying to repair some of the mistakes of his industry and other industries in the past. The rower? Mike’s son Richard, who has obviously learned a thing or two from his dad, who is a longtime rower and guide in the annual tournament.

9

Mike was instrumental in starting the Campbell River Salmon Foundation and in using funds from that to bettering the spawning and rearing conditions in the Campbell River.

◆ NANAIMO

Naked swimmer chased by search and rescue, police A naked man in was apprehended Monday morning on Newcastle Island after displaying erratic behaviour in the water between Stone’s Marina and Newcastle Island. The manager from the Gas & Go at Departure Bay Marina called 911 just after 8 a.m. to report a man in distress in the water between Stone’s Marina and Newcastle Island. Nanaimo Search and Rescue was contacted and responded, though the man was unco-operative with rescuers. The man ended up swimming to the shore of Newcastle Island that was approximately 15 feet away and then proceeded to run away into the forest, said Robinson.

Wednesday, 1-4 p.m. Crib Classes 2nd and 4th Saturday of each month.

Recreation • New chess club at Duncan Library, Monday evenings 6-8 p.m. All ages and skill levels welcome. • Cowichan Valley Scottish Country Dan-

• Cobble Hill Women’s Institute meets in the small room of the Cobble Hill hall, noon pot luck lunch, second Wednesday of the month. New members welcome. Info: Jessie Anderson 250-743-9040. • B.C. Schizophrenia Society-Cowichan Branch support group meetings the third Monday of each month, 3-4 p.m., 71 Government St., Duncan. Family, close friends of those afflicted with any serious mental illness invited. Info: 250-748-1985 or 250-597-1718. • Spanish Club — El Circulo Espanol meets every Wednesday night, 7-9 p.m. in private homes. Come and practice speaking Spanish and learning with games and other fun activities. Free. All levels welcome. Info: Carolyn at 250-743-5974.

Now, reading the Cowichan Valley Citizen News is a multi-layared experience.

◆ PORT ALBERNI

Western Forest Products reports big second-quarter earnings Western Forest Products recently reported one of the company’s most successful quarters ever, with earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization of $44.9 million in the second quarter. WFP runs two sawmills in Port Alberni: Alberni Pacific Division, which cuts hemlock, and Somass, which specifically cuts cedar. “The company has gone through some trying times in recent years, so we have to be cautious,” said WFP spokeswoman Makenzie Leine. “But we do believe that WFP has a very bright future and the province’s forests are not going anywhere.” Vancouver Island News Group

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10 Friday, August 16, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

History caught up recently with a man who’s been living quietly on Bell McKinnon Road. Johnny Coupland, who served in Europe with the 29th Field Company of the Royal Canadian Engineers in World War II, was contacted recently by Bruno Maquet, the owner of a chateau in Dompierre-sur-Authie, near Abbe-

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News

Friday, August 16, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Memories hit and miss from time spent abroad From page 10 Interestingly, Coupland no longer remembers how he came to end up at this particular castle. “Don’t ask me!” he laughed. However, his nephew, George Duncan said, “as soon as he looked at the picture they sent, he recognized his printing.” Apparently, such carvings were not unusual. There are no other Canadian names at Dompierresur-Authie but some members of the German air force guys carved their names there, too. Coupland chuckled. “Oh, yeah. Among us, there was a common practice to draw a cartoon with a guy peering over a fence and underneath it would say: Kilroy was here! That was the standard. You saw that all over the place.” Maquet wrote to him in French, but a translated copy by a Northern Irish researcher was included. The researcher had actually found Coupland in the Duncan phone book but he had trouble

getting hold of Johnny because he was in the hospital at the time. The researcher went on Google and found a neighbour and made the contact through them. The letter reads: “Dear John, My Northern Irish friend Simon has, through the power of the Internet, been able to follow your traces back to Canada where, praise be, you are alive and well. “I would so enjoy the chance to meet you personally to thank you and your courageous comrades in arms who, putting the German occupiers to flight, harried them across northern Europe. “I am especially moved by the fact that your fleeting stay in the chateau of Dompierre, of which I am the fortunate owner, occurred on the exact day of my birth in the city of Lille, some hundred kilometres to the northeast. Lille was liberated on Sept. 5, 1944 and I was nicknamed The Wee Liberator.” Maquet’s repairs also included other excavations. “In carrying out work in the gar-

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Johnny Coupland remembers lots of wartime experiences from his days in northern France, Belgium, Holland and Germany but can’t recall decorating this chateau in Dompierre-sur-Authie. [LEXI BAINAS/CITIZEN AND SUBMITTED PHOTO] den, I have discovered a number of empty bottles and jars left behind by your company as testimony to their passage...” “Bet they didn’t find any full ones,” Coupland quipped. The 29th was in England before traveling to France in an old Liberty ship. “We were anchored off the beach of Normandy after the first wave of the assault went in and they had a battleship of the Royal Navy there, too. I don’t know which one it was, a big one with 15-inch guns. Every time they fired a broadside, the old Liberty ship would move sideways. “They had targets way inland. I can tell you a funny story about that. After things kind of died down around there, we used to go snooping around to see what we

could see,” Coupland related. “There was a cowshed of some type in the corner of this field and they had fired a broadside from the battleship and when the shell came down, it came down about the same angle as the roof, glanced off the roof and landed in the field where it ploughed a furrow about a hundred yards long before it stopped. It was still sitting there. The nose had to hit something for it to explode. But it skied down the roof and just made a furrow.” By January 1945, he was in Brussels and he moved through Holland to Germany. “I was over there from midJuly to when the war was over. I was in Oldenburg, Germany, when they finally caught up with the Germans and that was the surrender.”

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Food rations for the troops were okay, but a change was always welcome, he said. “We were in this German town that had been battered in a raid and the Regina Rifle Regiment, Third Division, had been occupying the town. They were moving out and one of the riflemen said, ‘You’ll find a quarter of beef up in the attic. It’s perfectly good. We just killed it yesterday. Help yourselves. So a bunch of us got into the kitchen and made steaks out of it. We had a steak dinner. Gee, it was good,” Coupland said. In the town of Emden, they were detailed to sweep a road for antitank mines. “I think we got about six of them and then the sergeant said, take ’em out in the river there and dump ’em. We did. Then we had nothing else to do and some guys found some German hand grenades, they had a long wooden handle and you pulled the cord in the handle and then got rid of it quick. Anyway, they decided to go try for some in the river. The first guy that threw one in the river, it exploded all these mines we’d just dumped.” While overseas, Coupland occasionally met a friend from home, Jack Bullcock, and also other pals he had trained with. Some of them he’s kept in touch with even to this day. “It was quite an experience. There were a lot of times I wished I was somewhere else, but now I’m back here, I’m glad I went,” he said.

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Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, August 16, 2013

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14

Living

Friday, August 16, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Special Woodstock will no doubt inspire FESTIVAL: Performers, a drum draw and a musical instrument workshop to highlight 14th annual event at Providence Farm LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

They call it “empowerment through music” but you’ll call it an inspiration. It’s Special Woodstock, that remarkable event, now in its 14th year, aimed at giving adults with special needs a chance to shine at Providence Farm in their own music festival. This year the event runs on Sunday, Aug. 18. Shelley Smiley, whose name describes her demeanour when she talks about this event, has been an energetic booster of Special Woodstock since the beginning. Special Olympics is known for its focus on athletics, but Special Woodstock shines its loving light on music and the arts. Professional musicians like Smiley and many others have been stepping up for years, using their talents to bring the music alive on stage. Special Woodstock features more than 60 performers on three stages. There are a few new wrinkles at this year’s festival according to Smiley. “We’ve had a set of drums donated to us and we’re going to have that as a draw prize. We’re going to have a passport that you can take around and get stamped so you can see all the different things that are happening around the grounds and don’t

The Raggedy Band, seen here making its way through the garden from the main stage area to the orchard, will be back, bigger and better than ever for 2013. [LEXI BAINAS/CITIZEN] miss anything. And once you’ve finished filling out your book, you’re entered in the drum draw.” Last year, organizers tried a new idea called The Raggedy Band, and this year they plan to expand it, she said. “We hope it will grow bigger and bigger every year because of the musical instrument workshop. This gives everyone a chance to showcase the instruments they made,” Smiley said.

Special Woodstock also features three stages: the karaoke stage, the rose garden stage and of course the main stage. In the rose garden, you can have a cup of tea and sit in the orchard and watch the show in the gazebo. On the main stage, there’s all the usual excitement — including Rick Scott. “He’s so great. We also have a band called Montgomery County coming up from Victoria. It’s a country band and the guy is

really cool. He’s got one of those head-set mics and he goes out into the audience and gets everybody singing,” Smiley said. “I’m always really surprised at how much dedication I get from people. The atmosphere is so special.” Her own family life has been enriched over the years by the event as well. “My kids have grown up with this; they were about four or five years old when Special Woodstock started. It’s been their favourite festival. I’ve taken them to a lot of cultural events but they always have to make it to Special Woodstock. I think that’s got to help with the way they see the world, how they see themselves and respect people. There’s nothing but good comes from it.” She finds Special Woodstock is a special inspiration herself. “When I first started working with people with special needs, I asked myself, ‘Why am I the lucky one that gets to see this?’ If only everyone could see how talented these people are, how they find a way to make music. It amazed me so much that I wanted to share it. Now, everyone else who’s been there tells their friends about it, too. The joy is infectious.” The gates open at 10:30 a.m. with the music starting at 10:45 and going until 6 p.m. Donations at the entrance are welcomed.

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Living

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, August 16, 2013

15

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It can take less than five hours or more than 14 hours but completing the 56-kilometre Great Lake Walk around Cowichan Lake is an amazing achievement. While it originally started as a walk, the idea of an ultramarathon quickly gained popularity with the running crowd, who are always looking for new challenges. This year’s event will be held on Saturday, Sept. 21 and organizers urge everyone to “Experience the Walk, walk the Experience” when they take part. Because it’s an autumn event, the mass start at 5 a.m. takes place in the dark, although with the full moon being only two days old, clear weather could mean some magical times on the road west towards the lakehead. Of course, if the idea of covering 56 km scares you, there is an option. The Great Lake Walk Society is offering the opportunity to enter a team this year and do a relay or tag team approach to the event. Great Lake Walk Society chair Joan Hieta said so far signups for the walk are on par with last year. “It’s so hard to judge because there are so many last-minute registrations. But we’re doing the new team option this year and we’re starting to get a few teams. It’ll do far better next year once people see how it works and the idea gets out there,” she said. In past years, many participants have used the walk to raise money for various causes and agencies and a team could do the same, even challenging other teams in trying to raise the most money for the char-

“There’s still time to get a team in for this year.” JOAN HIETA, Great Lake Walk Society chair

ity of your choice. The base price for a team includes each person’s entry fee, food, prizes, race-day medical care and use of facilities. The minimum number of members for a team is three and the maximum members is equal to the number of seat belts in the team vehicle, which organizers are urging participants to decorate in a showy way, adding colour and fun to the overall event. Teams will monitor themselves, keeping track of the distance each person walks or runs. “We’re really encouraging them to dress up their vehicles and dress themselves up and really push who they are raising money for, really make a statement and have a lot of fun doing it,” Hieta said. “There’s still time to get a team in for this year.” The Great Lake Walk could use more volunteers, too. “We always need them and it gets harder to find them every year,” Hieta said. “They could get hold of me and I could transfer them on to our volunteer coordinator.” If you are interested in helping out, contact Joan Hieta at 250-749-3707. Check out the registration page on the Great Lake Walk website for more details and lots of other interesting information about the walk. Registration is open until Sunday, Sept. 1 and can be accomplished online as well at www.greatlakewalk.com

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Friday, August 16, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

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PLEASE READ THE FINE PRINT: Offers valid until September 3, 2013. See toyota.ca for complete details on all cash back offers. In the event of any discrepancy or inconsistency between Toyota prices, rates and/or other information contained on toyotabc.ca and that contained on toyota.ca, the latter shall prevail. Errors and omissions excepted. 2013 Corolla CE Automatic BU42EP-B MSRP is $19,635 and includes $1,645 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, battery levy and air conditioning federal excise tax. *Finance example: 0% finance for 84 months, upon credit approval, available on 2013 Corolla. Bi-Weekly payment is $99 with $1850 down payment. Applicable taxes are extra. **Lease example: 0% Lease APR for 60 months on approved credit. Monthly payment is $169 with $2,300 down payment. Total Lease obligation is $12,440. Lease 60 mos. based on 100,000 km, excess km charge is $.07. Applicable taxes are extra. Down payment, first monthly payment and security deposit plus GST and PST on first payment and full down payment are due at lease inception. A security deposit is not required on approval of credit. ***Up to $2,500 Non-stackable Cash Back available on select 2013 Corolla models. Cash back on Corolla CE is $2,000. 2013 RAV4 FWD LE Automatic ZFREVT-B MSRP is $26,605 and includes $1,815 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, battery levy and air conditioning federal excise tax. ‡Finance example: 4.3% finance for 72 months, upon credit approval, available on 2013 RAV4. Bi-Weekly payment is $179 with $2300 down payment. Applicable taxes are extra. ‡‡Lease example: 4.5% Lease APR for 60 months on approved credit. Monthly payment is $288 with $1,800 down payment. Total Lease obligation is $19,080. Lease 60 mos. based on 100,000 km, excess km charge is $.10. Applicable taxes are extra. Down payment, first monthly payment and security deposit plus GST and PST on first payment and full down payment are due at lease inception. A security deposit is not required on approval of credit. 2013 Tacoma Access Cab 4x4 V6 Automatic UU4ENA-B MSRP is $32,440 and includes $1,815 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, battery levy and air conditioning federal excise tax. ‡Finance example: 2.9% finance for 72 months, upon credit approval, available on 2013 Tacoma. Bi-Weekly payment is $199 with $4500 down payment. Applicable taxes are extra. ‡‡Lease example: 4.9% Lease APR for 60 months on approved credit. Monthly payment is $329 with $4,350 down payment. Total Lease obligation is $24,090. Lease 60 mos. based on 100,000 km, excess km charge is $.10. Applicable taxes are extra. Down payment, first monthly payment and security deposit plus GST and PST on first payment and full down payment are due at lease inception. A security deposit is not required on approval of credit. ‡‡‡Up to $1,000 Non-stackable Cash Back available on select 2013 Tacoma models. Cash back on Tacoma 4x4 Access Cab is $1,000. Non-stackable Cash Back offers may not be combined with Toyota Financial Services (TFS) lease or finance rates. If you would like to lease or finance at standard TFS rates (not the above special rates), then you may be able to take advantage of Cash Customer Incentives. Vehicle must be purchased, registered and delivered by September 3, 2013. Cash incentives include taxes and are applied after taxes have been charged on the full amount of the negotiated price.See toyota.ca for complete details on all cash back offers. Visit your Toyota BC Dealer or www.toyotabc.ca for more details. Some conditions apply; offers are time limited and may change without notice. Dealer may lease/sell for less.

Living Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, August 16, 2013

Sixteen-year-old Lynnea Bruce from Duncan saw stars as she delighted the crowd during a Beachfest performance in the Parksville Community Park Saturday night, Aug. 10. Some 400 people enjoyed her smooth country voice as she crooned out her own tunes, opening for Big Twang Theory. “She’s amazing,” said event organizer Sharon Franzen. “And what a thrill for her to play with such professionals as Big Twang’s Dave Marco, Kevin Varey, Pete Wallace and Ron Stewart.” “I think we just saw a star in the making,” said Marco, Big Twang’s singer and guitar player.

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Oceanside Star Duncan’s Lynnea Bruce delighted 400 listeners in Parksville on Aug. 10. [LAURA HESSE PHOTO]

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18

Living

Friday, August 16, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Visit us: www.cowichanvalleycitizen.com

COWICHAN ADULT LEARNING CENTRE

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Local duo Amy and Tafadzwa Matamba were willing drivers for a big name African performer and he paid them back by offering them the chance to open for him. [SUBMITTED]

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Tafadzwa and Amy Matamba, who call themselves Mbira Spirit, are opening for the Zimbabwe group Oliver Mtukudzi and the Black Spirits in Vancouver on Friday, Aug. 16. Called “Zimbabwe’s pride, most successful artist and national treasure,” Mtukudzi is a special singer/songwriter, whose work reflects the daily struggles of his people. The Matambas are from the Cowichan Valley but their music makes them part of a tightly knit world and that led to their gig at the Vogue Theatre Friday. “We’re very honoured to be going over to open for him. He was here for the Comox music festival,” Amy Matamba explained. “We are called Mbira Spirit, after the instrument we play. It’s a traditional Zim-

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babwean thumb piano. We think we were asked to play because it will be a more cultural influence.” They did not get picked out of the blue; they are known as members of the Zimbabwe music community. Recently married, the Matambas had originally met through their love of the music of Zimbabwe. “Oliver needed a driver when he was going to Comox gig, so we got a phone call for that. In that process, they said maybe they could get us to open for them in Vancouver. We didn’t expect it but then they called,” Amy added. Anyone who attended the opening ceremonies of the Aboriginal Film Festival will remember Tafadzwa from his lively performance there, particularly his duo with Joe Thorne of Cowichan Tribes.

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Living

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, August 16, 2013

19

Chronicles: Fences make good neighbours – or enemies S

ometimes — often, in fact — when researching Cowichan Valley history I get lucky and come upon a great story from the past that has long since slipped between the cracks of time. Until I resurrect it with additional facts. Sometimes, too, as in today’s rendering which was originally published 80 years ago, it’s tempting to tell the tale in the author’s own words. Unfortunately, in this particular case, there’s a matter of meeting current journalistic standards so I’ve had to edit, not just to meet space limitations, but to massage some of the more sensitive details. As it happens, no byline was given for the article and as the author chose to identify the leading character only as Mr. X, I’ve extended that courtesy to the other principals involved.

So, here we go with a tale of one pioneer’s struggle to build a homestead in the wilderness at the cost of inciting a feud with his nearest neighbours. It’s hardly of the CHRONICLES Hatfields and the T.W. Paterson McCoys calibre but it’s quite out of the ordinary so far as Valley history goes... Mr. X, who at the time the article was published was within a year of celebrating half a century here, “began the flight of his life from the land of the heather, taking off from there and coming to New York State, where he was schooled. “The district got him like it did other

Easterners, perhaps, for he came West as one of a family lured by appealing pamphlets sent to their neighbourhood by population-seeking administrators. “A country where the snow lasted no longer than 24 hours was certainly one to welcome a family desiring the ideal temperate climate. The missive read was too good to be true, and [Cowichan] proved that it was not true. The first winter brought snow that the family thought was going to be perpetual. “[Their homestead] was an inviting place in the summertime, with its verdant valley and the river close at hand, but it kept the snow longer than any other place in the district.” Mr. X and his father, after a dry first summer, weren’t expecting a harsh winter. By then they had to feed a horse and

12 head of cattle — with the single ton of hay they’d been able to cut and store. Come winter, Mr. X had to hike to town to buy 150 pounds of meal to supplement the animals’ feed. This meant his having to make several trips, packing it on his back through the snow. Sound difficult? You haven’t heard the worst of it. As our chronicler tells us, “He wore snowshoes for the job, as they afforded the easiest means of travel in five feet of snow, but at that they were not the best kind of shoe, being made simply from cedar shakes[! –TW] “Lichen was the other food given the cattle, and the nutrition it contained gave the animals excellent health. See From threats • page 20

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Living

Friday, August 16, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

From threats of late night attacks... to the best of friends From page 19

“The only difficulty was in securing it from the fir trees on which it grew. Chopping the trees down proved the only way to obtain the fodder. “This was done, and throughout the winter two trees were hacked to the ground every morning for the cattle [until] the struggles of the winter were relieved by the coming of spring. From then on progress was made on the farm, and the hardships of the first cold season were not duplicated.” To keep his livestock from wandering, Mr. X built a fence down one side of his riverfront property, the side that butted up to neighbours who’d been living there for generations. The head of the family, convinced that the fence encroached on their land, took matters into his own hands. Without, it seems, discussing the matter with Mr. X, he went at the barricade with an axe. Twice. Both times, Mr. X could only suspect the culprit’s identity. But, on the third occasion, he caught his neighbour in the act. To again quote our storyteller: “One day he discovered the man at work with an axe bringing the boundary-marker to the ground. “Needless to say, Mr. X became angry at this, in fact so angry that he took up his own axe and chased the [man]; ran after him until the man took refuge in his own hut. Fleetness of foot was the only thing that saved [him] from a little forceful handling...” There was no turning back, it was a state of war. For a time there was little more than a show of sullenness by Mr. X’s neighbours. But, as he recounted years later, they weren’t just brooding but plotting. Our chronicler picks up the story: “One dark night the climax came. Mr. X and his father had retired. A soft calling from the direction of the trail in front of their cabin attracted their attention. The noise was a quiet, ‘Cooee.’ Mr. X, hearing it,

“That this was the plan he had little doubt and, reaching for their guns, father and son waited for any sign of an attack. Shouting that he knew well what they were intending to do, Mr. X warned them that if they did not go away they would be filled with lead.” took it to be a traveller who...had become lost and was seeking aid. “He was just on the point of putting his foot on the veranda when he heard whispers... [He] instantly surmised that the calling was simply a ruse to bring him and his father from the cabin, when they would be shot down in cold blood. “That this was the plan he had little doubt and, reaching for their guns, father and son waited for any sign of an attack. Shouting that he knew well what they were intending to do, Mr. X warned them that if they did not go away they would be filled with lead. “That his speech produced an effect he was sure, for no attack came that night and the morning broke... However, the movements of the previous night assured Mr. X that all was not well as it might be, and that another and more serious brush might follow.” Arming himself, and against the urging of his father who was convinced “he would be riddled,” Mr. X strode into his neighbours’ yard and made it plain that if there was any further trouble he’d inform the authorities. And, should anything happen to him or his father, “every one of them would get his neck stretched”. Mr. X did, in fact, report the matter in Duncan and his neighbours received official warning to behave themselves. This not only ended their feuding without further confrontation but, eventually, both parties “became the best of friends”. How’s that for a Hollywood ending? www.twpaterson.com

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Every morning through the first winter Mr. X had to fall two trees to strip off their lichen for his cattle feed. Okay, not trees as big as this. — TWP

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Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, August 16, 2013

21

The Cowichan Valley Athletic Club contingent at the Canadian Youth Legion Track & Field Championships: Nicole Lindsay, Tia Baker, Jordyn Piercy, Natalie McFall, Casey Heyd, Ben Williams, Liam Lindsay and female athlete of the meet Chicago Bains. Missing are Lauren D’Agnolo and Taryn Smiley. The group included Team BC athletes from the Cowichan club, local athletes competing for the club, and a trio of UVic athletes wearing Cowichan colours to round out relay teams. [SUBMITTED PHOTO]

Bains leads stellar CVACs at Legions NATIONAL RECORDS:

Cowichan contingent shines for B.C. and home club

“That was definitely one of my goals, but I had no clue what was going to happen that day. There was really strong competition.” CHICAGO BAINS, triple gold medallist at Legions

KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

Coming home with three gold medals and two Canadian records, Duncan speedster Chicago Bains admitted she was hoping for big returns from the Canadian Youth Legion Track & Field Championships in Langley last weekend, but had no idea she would achieve what she did. “That was definitely one of my goals, but I had no clue what was going to happen that day,” she said. “There was really strong competition. Lots of girls gave me a run for my money.” Bains came away with solo gold medals in the U16 girls 80m and 200m hurdles, and as part of the B.C. team that won the 4x100m relay. Bains’s time of 11.48 seconds in the 80m hurdles broke the Canadian U16 record that stood since 1982, while the relay team shaved a second off old Canadian mark, as well. Bains, who was ranked first in Canada in both hurdles distances, was pleased to take home relay gold as well. “Our group of girls was really strong,” she said of the team that also included Ladysmith’s Rachel Jerome. “We were hoping just to have a clean race. We’re all good

friends. We’ve been through all the ups and downs together.” Bains might have collected another medal, but was stung by a bee on the bottom of her foot after qualifying for the final in the 200m dash. After finishing fourth in the preliminary round, she dropped to eighth in the final despite the sore foot. At the end of the meet, Bains was named the top female athlete for both Team BC and the entire national meet, which might seem like a no-brainer, although Bains didn’t see it that way. “I was very shocked and surprised,” said the humble track star. Bains was far from the only Cowichan Valley Athletic Club member to have a phenomenal showing at Legions, as she was joined by six other CVAC Jaguars representing either Team BC or their home club. Taryn Smiley collected bronze medals in the U18 girls 4x100m and 4x400m relays, and thoroughly enjoyed the experience of being on a provincial team. “It was amazing,” she said. “We made so many friends, and we were all so close by the end of it.”

Smiley also made finals in the 100m and 200m sprints. Timer issues required her 100m heat to be run a second time, and the final was held almost immediately afterward, but she still managed to place seventh. She felt better about her sixth-place finish in the 200m. “The competition was huge, but I was happy with it,” she said. “I was fifth in B.C. last year, and this year I’m sixth in Canada and first in B.C.” Also competing for Team BC, Liam Lindsay finished 10th in the U18 boys long jump, admitting he “didn’t feel like he was in it mentally.” He prepared better for the triple jump, and leaped to a fourth-place finish. “The difference between me and the podium wasn’t very much,” he said. “But that’s what it comes down to in triple jump.” After his first trip to Legions and first time representing B.C., he’s hoping for another shot next year. “I didn’t really know what to expect, but it added a certain amount of pressure,” he said. “Overall it was a great experience and I’d love to do it again if I could.” Lindsay’s sister, Nicole, was part of the CVAC relay team that finished third in the U18 girls club 4x100m even though three of the runners, herself and Heyd included, are just 15, and two of them — Natalie McFall and Jordyn Piercy — typically compete for the University of Victoria Track Club.

CVAC Jaguar and Team BC athlete Taryn Smiley. [CITIZEN FILE] That didn’t matter to the athletes, who were already somewhat familiar with each other. “I had seen those girls and met them at provincials, but at nationals, we clicked,” said Lindsay. “It was fun representing the CVACs and showing what we’ve got.” Racing solo, Lindsay also finished 14th in the country in the U16 girls 300m dash. “It was amazing; It was a good feeling,” she said, noting that she’d like to join Liam on Team BC next year. Also on the 4x100m relay team was CVAC Casey Heyd, who also placed a remarkable fifth in the U16 100m dash and 20th in the 200m preliminaries. “I wanted top eight,” she said of the 100m. “I was ranked eighth in the country, so I was pretty sure

I’d get it, but you never know. So when I got fifth, that was great. I moved up three places.” Ben Williams, who was told he made Team BC, then was cut before Legions due to a wind-aided qualifying jump, made good on his promise to make Team BC regret their decision. Representing his club, Williams finished fourth in the U16 boys triple jump and high jump, and was seventh in long jump. The CVAC team that finished fourth in the U18 girls club 4x400m included CVAC Tia Baker as well as UVic Club imports Piercy, McFall and Lauren D’Agnolo. Baker also placed 20th in the U18 girls 400m dash, although she probably would have finished much higher if not for a knee injury she suffered in early July. While not usually CVAC athletes, the UVic girls still did the Jaguars banner proud. D’Agnolo placed fifth in the U16 girls 800m, and 10th in the 300m, McFall was 13th in the U16 girls 300m and 19th in the 200m, and Piercy was 15th in the U18 girls 300m hurdles. The CVAC athletes understood the magnitude of the national championships, and expressed their gratitude to the Legion for presenting it. “I’d like to thank all the people, the veterans and Legion members that put it on,” said Heyd. “It was a great learning experience for everyone. They put their hearts into it. They really are in it for the kids. They want to see us be happy.”


22

Sports

Friday, August 16, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Cowichan Valley powers B.C. at rugby nationals KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

A host of athletes with Cowichan Valley ties helped B.C. win two gold and two silver medals at the Rugby Canada National Championships Festival in Vancouver last weekend. B.C. won gold in both U16 divisions, and silver medals in both U18 divisions, and every team the province fielded included players from the Cowichan Valley. BC 1 finished atop the U16 men’s pool with a perfect 6-0 record. George Barton, a product of both the Cowichan Rugby Football Club and Shawnigan Lake School, was among the tournament’s scoring leaders, finishing second on his team and fourth overall with 30 points, and second overall with six tries. Aaron Hersant of Brentwood College School finished with 17 points on one try and six conversions. Also on the team were Cole Milne of the CRFC and Shawnigan, and Shawnigan players Simon Gray and Callahan McMaster. BC 2 went 3-3 in the U16 men’s tournament. Kyle Joe of Cowichan Secondary School finished with one try, while the team also included Keaton Armstrong of Brentwood and Carl Smit of Shawnigan. This was the inaugural year for the U16 women’s tournament at nationals, and BC 1 made history as the first champions.

Ciel Arbour-Boehme was among the team leaders with three tries, and was joined on the squad by Brentwood teammates McKenna Haz and Avi Sharabi. McKenzie Saysell of the CRFC and Ladysmith Secondary scored one try for BC 1. BC 2 included Hanna Morten of the CRFC and Cowichan Secondary. In the U18 men’s tournament, BC 1 finished second, falling 29-21 to Ontario in the Cup Final. Shawnigan’s Guiseppe Du Toit was first on the team and second in overall scoring with 43 points on five penalty kicks and 14 conversions. Also on the team were fellow Shawnigan players Nik Hildebrand, Chris Miles and Jenner Teufel, Hildebrand and Teufel also hailing from the CRFC. BC 2, all U17 players, finished 10th in the U18 tournament, losing 26-7 to Ontario in the Plate Final, and included three players from both Shawnigan and the CRFC. Captain Wesley Wong kicked three conversions for the team, while Tyler Beselt and Michael Henderson each scored one try. B.C.’s U18 women also finished second, falling 25-5 to Ontario in their Cup Final. Allie White of Cowichan Secondary scored three tries to tie for ninth in scoring, and was joined on the roster by her T-Bird teammates Sam Jory, Hannah Lauridsen, Adrienne Saari and Leah Theobald, and by Shawnigan’s Nicole Crowley.

Ice beckons as Caps open camp Sunday

Left, Lindsay Hodgins takes some practice pitches on her backyard horseshoe court. Right, Hodgins shows off the massive trophy she claimed at the World Horseshoe Tournament in St. George, Utah, earlier this summer. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN]

Duncan teen wins at horseshoe worlds KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

After a busy summer of recruiting and making deals, the Cowichan Valley Capitals are ready to start skating this weekend when training camp starts on Sunday. “We’re excited,” said head coach and general manager Bob Beatty, who is about to begin his first season in the B.C. Hockey League. “This is the time of year our blood starts flowing. The kids are starting to arrive in town. There will be real competition in camp.” About 60 players will be vying for roster spots this time around. Registration starts Saturday and the players will be on the ice Sunday. The public is welcome to check out on-ice sessions from 9:30-11:30 a.m. on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, and

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scrimmages from 7:15-10:15 p.m. An intrasquad game will take place on Thursday at 7:30 p.m. “We’ve got strong competition at all positions, to be quite honest,” said Beatty. “I’m looking forward to getting back into the swing of hockey.” Beatty himself hasn’t seen all the players that will be in camp, and can’t wait to check them out. “Some of the players we signed sightunseen,” he noted. “They came with good references and resumes, but we want to see what they bring to the table. It will be interesting to see them on the ice.” The Caps will play their first pre-season game at Fuller Lake Arena on Aug. 23, against the Alberni Valley Bulldogs, followed by a rookie game against Nanaimo at Lake Cowichan on Aug. 24.

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Duncan’s 16-year-old horseshoe star has become the first pitcher from B.C. ever to claim a world championship. Lindsay Hodgins won the girls championship at the World Horseshoe Tournament, hosted by the National Horseshoe Pitchers Association of America in St. George, Utah in late July and early August. In addition to being the first pitcher from B.C. to win a title, Hodgins also became just the third Canadian girl to win in the last 50 years, and the first since 1993. “We went down hoping she would qualify for the final round,” said Wayne Hodgins, Lindsay’s grandfather, who made the trip to Utah with her. “When she got into the final six, we thought it would be good to get into the top three. And by God, she beat them all!” Some 1,040 participants attended the world tournament, including about 40 in the junior division. Girls and boys played 40-shoe games together in the first round, with the top players advancing based on wins. Hodgins finished second with a record of 7-2 in the first round, boasting a ringer percentage of 51.5. In the second round, the girls and boys split up and played 40-point games, with the top six girls and top eight boys advancing based on ringer percentage. Hodgins was down from the first round, but still topped the field at 47.5 per cent. Advancing to the final boys group was Matthew Macdonald of Cobble Hill, who placed seventh with a 47.78 percentage. “It was exciting,” said Lindsay. The venue at St. George consisted of 42 indoor horseshoe pits, with competitors playing five shifts a day for two weeks. The Hodginses stuck around for the entirety of the tournament to find out how things played out in the other divisions.

“When she got into the final six, we thought it would be good to get into the top three. And by God, she beat them all!” WAYNE HODGINS, Lindsay’s grandfather

“We had already decided that, regardless of what she did, we would stay to see who won the championships,” said Wayne Hodgins. The final six in the girls tournament played a round robin on the final day to determine the world champion, and Lindsay went undefeated, winning five lopsided games. “The closest was 40-25,” she recalled. In the other games, she beat her competition — all Americans — 41-4, 42-4, 41-16 and 41-17. Her ringer percentage of 56.91 was also tops in the final round, nearly 12 percentage points ahead of her closest rival. Macdonald, meanwhile, played some close games, but finished 0-7 in the final round, still placing eighth among junior boys in the world. Hodgins’s triumph came despite changing her throwing style just six weeks before the tournament, and playing in clayfilled raised boxes on the floor, as opposed to the sand pits she’s used to. Hodgins and Macdonald both won Canadian junior titles in 2012, but didn’t attend the national championships this year because they conflicted with worlds. Hodgins will be in contention at the B.C. championships in Penticton in two weeks. Hodgins has one year left as a junior, and while the family wasn’t planning on heading to next year’s worlds in Buffalo, New York, they might have to defend the title. “Our goal was to go just one year,” said Wayne. “But after winning it, I guess we’ve got to go back.”


Sports

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, August 16, 2013

23

Cowichan kids among winners at Biondo KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

Some of the best young tennis players in B.C. gathered at the South Cowichan Lawn Tennis Club earlier this month for the 25th annual Biondo Junior Grass Court Championships, and despite some foul weather on the first day, the event was a spectacular one once again. “I think it was successful, although it rained all day Friday,” said organizer Sheila Biondo. The name of the event honours both Sheila and her late husband, Franco, who was a longtime tennis and coach at the club before he passed away in 2009. Numbers at the junior championships were up this year, with 67 entries from B.C., Washington and Oregon. “We ended up going into Monday, partly because of the rain and partly because we had lots of entries,” said Biondo. “When kids are good, they end up in three finals.” Participants from the Cowichan Valley included Nyles and Chanelle Moisson, Eric Hartford, Johannah Hixson and Jessa Michieli. Nyles Moisson won the U16 and U18 boys titles, beating John Paul Yun of Richmond in both finals. While the results were identical, Biondo confirmed that there were indeed two tournaments played. “It just happened that we had the same boys in the final,” she said. “I guess they were the best two.” Nyles Moisson also entered the U18 boys doubles, where he and his partner Adam Hobbs placed second to the duo of Yun and Christopher Chan.

Nyles Moisson stretches out to get his racquet on the ball during the Biondo Junior Grass Court Championship. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN] Hixson finished second in the U16 girls singles event, falling to Jayden Nielsen in the final. She also stepped up a level to enter the U18 singles event, where she tied for third place behind winner Mateya Radisavljevic and runner-up Anastassia Krasnova. Also cracking the top three in a bracket was Chanelle Moisson, who teamed up with Mady Star of Victoria to place third in U14

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girls doubles behind Alexandra and Jayden Nielsen and Jenny Jia and Franzene Tsui. Other winners included Alexander Asenov in U12 boys singles, Franzene Tsui in U12 girls singles, Jared MacLean in U14 boys singles, Gregory Dee and Dickson Zhuang in U14 boys doubles, Jayden Nielsen in U14 girls singles, and Sybella Garvin and Mina Inaz in U18 girls doubles. All participants received bags honouring

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the 25th annual tournament donated by Pharmasave, and filled with a variety of items donated by the club and other sponsors. Sheila Biondo donated grip wraps in memory of Franco. Other treats couldn’t be contained, however. “Thrifty’s donated ice cream,” Biondo said, laughing. “We just put a note on the bag about that; we didn’t put the ice cream in the bags.”

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Friday, August 16, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen


Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, August 16, 2013

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Friday, August 16, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

PARENTS CONNECTING WITH SOCIAL MEDIA There is a power outage, and your child’s school is dismissing students early, requiring you to arrive quickly for pickup. Your kid will not be left waiting for you because you got this information immediately after a quick log-in to the social media site you use to connect with other parents. Some other parents may be delayed in receiving this important information because they rely on phone alerts. Social media has changed the way people communicate. Whether through tweets or status updates, information shared through social media avenues is often instantaneous and can reach a large number of people, which is why many parents have turned to social media to learn about events at school. According to a study by Nielsen McKinsey Company, parents are more likely than adults without children to play games, engage in creative pursuits, and look for entertainment on Facebook, blogs and other social sites. The data collected from 2,000 adults (both parents and nonparents) who frequently use social media found 88 percent of users rely on social networking sites

for communicating with family and friends. The next most popular activity is connecting with new friends, followed by accessing product reviews and online entertainment. Reports show that adults devote a quarter of their time spent online to social media sites. Parents, in particular, are finding new ways to put these sites to use. Social media is helping parents in a variety of ways, even enabling them to keep an eye on their children when they go online. According to a survey from Laptop magazine, 55 percent of parents are using social media to watch their kids’ online activities. Of that 55 percent, one-fifth indicated they only use social media to monitor their child’s online activity. However, social media has other handy purposes. Many parents use it as they would a bulletin board -- posting all types of information. Some parents use social media to stay abreast of school happenings, asking questions about when fundraiser money is due or if anyone got the spelling words for the week. Others find it is a good way to meet parents or speak with the parents of their child’s classmates. Some moms and dads use it to set up parents’ nights out, advertise

Parents are increasingly relying on social media sites to communicate with others and learn about school happenings.

things for sale or ask for recommendations on contractors.

Parents also use social media to invite people to special events, including birthday parties. Others can see who was invited and decide if they’re going to come, too. More parents are turning to social media sites for advice and information, to stay in touch or simply to share a good laugh. BS127259


Cowichan Valley Citizen | Friday, August 16, 2013

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National Bank Financial is an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of National Bank of Canada which is a public company listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (NA:TSX).

David Cherry, CTech, 250-748-1918

ALL Chainsaws and Blowers on SPECIAL right now.

National Bank Financial, 206-2763 Beverly Street, Duncan, BC

COASTAL OUTBOARDS Offers:

that have your dreams in mind with permit ready drawings

$

RRSPs, stocks/bonds, insurance

“Now Open”!!!!!

CUSTOM DESIGNS

240 Chainsaw 38cc Chainsaw with 16” bar

roger.bruce@nbc.ca

Purely Optometry

ALL CERTIFIED TRADES

David Gale

Trained Architectural Technologist

CONSTRUCTION Additions • Renovations

250.746.9956 Leave message

• Decks • Doors • Basement Suites • Foundations • Windows 20 YEARS • Kitchen • Bathroom IN THE VALLEY • Drywall • Plumbing • Electrical Estimates, Plans

FREE

ISLAND DOMESTIC SERVICES • COMPLETE HOUSE CLEANING • OFFICE CLEANING • MOVE INS/OUTS • LAUNDRY • BONDED & INSURED

Ph: (250) 710-0864 Office 1-866-749-0213 “Quality Service at Affordable Rates” SERVING THE COWICHAN VALLEY

www.islanddomesticser v ices.ca

BESIDE DIAMOND EYECARE

EYE EXAMS Family Eye & Vision Care Call for most reasonable rates

250-597-1011 159 Trunk Road, Duncan

Friendly Earth Building Products 250-746-9380 mlite@telus.net ■ Superior Quality Vinyl Decking ■ Custom Aluminum Railings ■ Vinyl Fencing ■ Composite Decking ■ Deck Renovations & Installations ■ Long term warranties provided ■ We Provide Complete Design & Installions Services Specializing in MAINTENANCE FREE fencing and decking!

JAC KO ’ S Concrete Finishing Form Work • Prep • & More

CUSTOM RENOVATIONS AND ADDITIONS

FREE ESTIMATES Phone: (250)

733-0884

250-709-4035

Reach over 48,000 homes a week CREATIVE ADVERTISING at a reasonable rate!

Call 748-2666 Dave, Darin, Heather, Katherine & Vi will be at your service

27


28

Friday, August 16, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

mid-

Spectacular! 2000 FORD MUSTANG CONV

sold

Auto, A/C, P/W, P/L, P/M, #13-246B

$

8,000

2007 MIATA MXS CONVERTIBLE

2007 HYUNDAI TUCSON GL FWD

2009 TOYOTA TACOMA 4X4

2009 HYUNDAI SANTA FE GL AWD

AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L, P/M,

5 SPD, A/C/, P/W, P/L, P/M,

5 SPD, A/C, P/W, P/L, P/M,

AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L, P/M,

#13-U03A

#13-285A

#13-387A

#13-392A

$

16,913

$

11,913

$

20,913

$

18,913

2002 ACCORD COUPE Auto, A/C, P/W, P/L, P/M, PSRF #13-87A

$

6,000

2005 DAKOTA CW RWD Auto, P/W, P/L, P/M, PSRF #13-242A

$

7,000

2005 VIBE GT FWD 2009 FORD RANGER SPORT

2009 HYUNDAI TUSCON LTD AWD

2010 OUTLANDER AWD

2010 HYUNDAI ELANTRA L

AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L, P/M,

AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L, P/M,PSRF

AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L. P/M

5 SPD

#13-291C

#13-353A

#13-335A

#13-291A

$

16,913

$

16,913

$

19,913

5 SPD, P/W, P/L, P/M, PSRF #13-276A

$

8,000

$

10,000

2005 PT CRUISER TOURING AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L, P/M, #13-305A

$

7,000

2005 TAURUS WAGON 2010 ACCENT SPORT 3DR

2011 CRV EX

2012 HYNUDAI ACCENT GL 5DR

2012 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS

5 SPEED, A/C, P/W P/L, P/M

AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L, P/M,PSRF

AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L. P/M

AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L. P/M, PSRF

#12U38

#13-192A

#13-298A

#13U15

$

10,500

$

27,913

$

15,913

Auto, A/C, P/W, P/L, P/M

AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L,

AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L P/M,

#13-289C

#10U38

2009 ACCENT 3 DR L 5 SPEED

AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L, P/M, PSRF

#13-321A

#13U08

#13-165A

34,913

ALL CREDIT APPLICATIONS ACCEPTED (GOOD CREDIT, BAD CREDIT, NO CREDIT)

$

10,000 OAC

7,500

Down Payment maybe required

(1 mile south of Duncan on Island Highway)

250-746-0335

HOURS: • MON. - THUR. 8:00-7:00 pm • FRI. & SAT. 8:00-5:30 pm • SUN. 11-4 pm

1-800-461-0161

AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L, P/M,PSRF #13-383A

$

6,000

9,500

2007 G5 2009 ACCENT 4DR GL AUTO, A/C #13-359A

$

8,000

$

10,000

LOW, LOW PAYMENTS

2801 ROBERTS ROAD DL 9988

2007 CALIBER SXT

$

AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L, P/M #13-275A

$

5,500

#11-13A

$

2013 ESCAPE TITANIUM

$

20,913

2009 SONATA GL

7,000

$

$

2008 SONATA GL

AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L, P/M

18,913

#13-188A

2007 MONTANA EXT

2012 HYUNDAI ELANTRA TOURING

$

AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L, P/M,

Browse our inventory online @ www.duncanhyundai.ca

LOW RATES Tony Chauchan

Brent Popovich Sales Manager

Sean Reid Sales & Leasing

Sales & Leasing

Terry McKay

Eamonn Carter

Business Manager

Sales & Leasing


Cowichan Valley Citizen Wrap | Friday, August 16, 2013

Register for a

DEMO DRIVE & Receive a

$

25

Gas Card

Chance to Win

$5,000

CASH!

hurry... ends soon! $ E 5,000 GIVE-AW H T F O E M O H E AY TH

OWME L B

461 Trans Canada Hwy. Duncan

250-748-8144

1-800-461-5337

1


2

Friday, August 16, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen Wrap

Cowichan Valley Citizen Wrap | Friday August 16, 2013

$

Stop in and ask about the

12,999

$

15,888

2010 Dodge Journey #13283A

$

$

2010 Honda Pilot Touring #13182A

16,348

$

13,681

$

19,871

8,681

500

GAS CARD

$

31,548

$

23,876

2011 Ram 1500 SXT #13392A

EcoBoost

$

2011 F150 Super Crew FX4 #13376A

$

12,681

2008 Chevy Uplander #13245A

2010 Ford Transit Connect XLT #6064A

$

4X4

2010 GMC Acadia SLE #13261A

2008 Ford Taurus X LTD #13246A

2012 Ford Focus SEL #6043

... plus

21,488

2013 Dodge Dart #13216A

27,931

$

$

$

6,931

6,388

2009 Pontiac G5 #12290A

$

12,488

2010 Chev Cobalt #13052A

2012 Chevy Cruze LS #13276A

80.000 kms!

36,988

$

2012 Toyota Tundra Ltd

10,888

$

2005 Mustang Convertible #13044B

plus..

Chance to Win

Trip for Two

$5,000

to Vegas!

$

2012 Expedition Max Ltd #6060

2010 Kia Soul #6010A

$

38,988

25,488

2012 Chrysler 300 Ltd

CASH!

Sale Ends August Dealer #8385. Bow Mel Chrysler will beat any dealers written offer on your trade in. Must have signed and accepted bill of sale by customer and dealer including VIN numbers. If we cannot beat trade in value in contract, Bow Mel Chrysler will give the customer $500 cheque. Bow Mel Chrysler will beat any dealers written offer on exact new vehicle in stock. Must have signed and accepted bill of sale by customer and dealer including VIN numbers. If we cannot beat offer in contract, Bow Mel Chrysler will give the customer $500 cheque. Payments are bi-weekly 96mo, 4.49% including taxes and documentation of $399. $5000 giveaway no purchase necessary. For Vegas card offer no two offers can be combined. We trust this satisfies concerned auto dealers in our area.

bowmel.com

461 Trans Canada Hwy. Duncan

250-748-8144 |1-800-461-5337

$5,000 Monthly Giveaway

bowmel.com

461 Trans Canada Hwy. Duncan

250-748-8144 |1-800-461-5337

21, 2013

$5,000 Monthly Giveaway

3


Friday, August 16, 2013 | Cowichan Valley Citizen Wrap

$

16,980 98 OR

... plus

PAYMENTS

$

$

500

GAS CARD

$

$

25,498 149

2013 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN

OR

... plus

2013 RAM 1500 SXT 4X4

2013 DODGE DART

PAYMENTS

4

$

500

GAS CARD

2013 DODGE CHARGER

MSRP

... plus

$

500

$

GAS CARD

OR

$

236

... plus

$

19,990 112 39,876 bowmel.com OR

PAYMENTS

$

PAYMENTS

$49,350 $

500

GAS CARD

461 Trans Canada Hwy. Duncan

250-748-8144 |1-800-461-5337

$5,000 Monthly Giveaway


August 16, 2013